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Arts and Sciences

Recommendations are intended to help students make the most of their education by providing examples of experiences that can enrich educational experience and illustrate how within and beyond the classroom experiences relate to one another. These are examples and options, not requirements. 

African-American Studies

To learn more about making the most of your educational experiences within and beyond the classroom contact:
Todd Shaw, Faculty Program Coordinator, shawtc@mailbox.sc.edu
Val Littlefield, Director, African-American Studies, littlevw@mailbox.sc.edu

PARTICIPATE: Community Service

Related Course(s)
AFAM 476 — Black Activism
AFAM 335 — Survey of the Civil Rights Movement
AFAM 397 and AFAM 398 — Special topics courses that could potentially have a community service component.

Recommended Sites/Experiences
AFAM 476 regularly has a practicum component in which students are required to briefly volunteer with and study a community-based organization that is an example of contemporary grassroots activism among African Americans. Examples of such organizations include:

  • the South Carolina HIV/AIDS Council
  • Palmetto AIDS Life Support Services
  • Appleseed Foundation
  • Transitions Homeless Recovery Center
  • Alston Wilkes Society
  • Community Schools in the Midlands
  • South Carolina Victim Assistance Network
  • Central Carolina Habitat for Humanity.

Students are expected to engage in 4 hours of volunteer work (one Saturday) or an equivalent assignment while interviewing key leaders and stakeholders to understand their perceptions of activism. AFAM 335 provides students with experiences to understand the historic 1950s-1970s Civil Rights Movement among African Americans, as well as opportunities to get involved in groups continuing to advocate around various civil rights issues. A few examples of such organizations/sites include the Columbia Urban League and Columbia Chapter of the NAACP.

Why this is important
African American Studies as a discipline was founded with the concern of “praxis” or making connections between theory and practice with regards to the African American experience. Community service as part of the learning experience is an invaluable way to make this connection.

 

PARTICIPATE: Global Learning

Related Course(s)
AFAM 580 — Culture and Identity in the African American Diaspora

Timing for “study abroad”
Maymester

Destinations

  • Brazil (especially the Bahia region)
  • Venezuela
  • Costa Rica
  • The Dominican Republic
  • Mexico (especially Costa Chica region of Oaxaca, Guerro, Veracruz)
  • Puerto Rico
  • Jamaica
  • Virgin Islands
  • Bermuda
  • Trinidad and Tobago
  • Africa — West Africa especially Ghana, Senegal, Nigeria as well as South Africa
  • Europe — especially England, France, and Amsterdam.

Opportunities

  • International House at Maxcy
  • Walker Institute
  • Columbia World Affairs Council

Why this is important
African American Studies is a discipline that concerns itself with not only with the experiences of persons of African descent in the United States, but also with the experiences of persons of African descent around the globe.

 

PARTICIPATE: Peer Leadership

Student Organization(s)

  • Association of African American Students
  • Campus Chapter of the NAACP
  • Brothers of Nubian Descent (BOND)
  • Pan-African Student Association (PANASA)

Opportunities
There are a wide range of leadership opportunities at USC relevant to African American Studies majors such as leadership and/or membership in the above or related organizations. Additional opportunities are available within the AFAM program where we call upon students and collaborate with students groups to assist in the planning of programs including the AFAM Open House, the Black History Month Program, and the End of the Year Celebration.

Why this is important
The discipline of African American Studies concerns itself with how leadership has mattered in shaping American citizenship and the full citizenship rights of African Americans. Campus leadership is a practical means through which students can develop the skills necessary to become citizens of a multicultural world. Students are encouraged to work with or volunteer with a range of other programs with the Office of Multicultural Student Affairs.

 

PARTICIPATE: Internships

Related Course(s)
AFAM 399— Independent Study (in lieu of a internship course; although presently the AFAM Associate Director is developing a proposal for a internship course.)

Recommended Sites/Work Experiences 
There are any number of sites/work experiences relevant to an AFAM major. A few examples include the equivalent of AFAM internship-related opportunities with:

  • the Mojeska Monetieth Simkins House
  • South Carolina Archives and History Center
  • South Carolina African American Heritage Commission
  • Renaissance Cultural Arts Center at Historic Bethel
  • Historic Waverly Neighborhood Community Center
  • and work with Randolph Cemetery. 

Professional Organizations
South Carolina Council for African American Studies

Why this is important
African American Studies majors must understand how their major concretely connects them to professional and career opportunities in a range of fields, but most especially those fields that deal with experiences and issues of historical preservation of African American communities. 

 

PARTICIPATE: Research

Related Course(s)
AFAM 498 or AFAM 499 — Seminars in African-American Studies. These are research methods courses; with 498 being taught by AFAM core faculty members whose disciplines are related to social and historical foundations and 499 being taught by AFAM core faculty members whose disciplines are related to arts and cultural foundations. 

Sample Research Projects or Topics
Among the research projects and topics of these courses are:

  • Work with the South Carolina Library preparing a display of student research on the history of the Booker T. Washington high school and community
  • interviews with local black South Carolina poets, writers, and painters
  • a research project involving the Historic Waverly Neighborhood and effective Diabetes Prevention efforts
  • an investigation of grave markers with the historic Randolph Cemetery
  • and research on the history of the Saxon Homes Housing Development.

Why this is important
Research is at the core of African American Studies as an academic discipline and thus it is fundamentally important, conceivably most important, for students to learn how to be good researchers and thus scholars.

 

INTEGRATE

How to integrate
There are a range of integrative learning opportunities that have and will be provided to AFAM majors such as: class presentations on what they have learned from volunteering and participating with a local homeless agency; a blog about their experiences in attending a theatrical production (especially with the local

Apply what you have learned
Students may demonstrate applied knowledge from there USC Connect-related experiences in new contexts by making presentations to various community groups in collaboration with these groups. This was the case with Dr. Bobby Donaldson’s AFAM 498 Research Seminar, where students presented their findings -- original documents and other materials, interviews, photographs -- to families connected to the Booker T. Washington High School neighborhood.

Why this is important
It is very important for students to understand the practical applications of what they are learning.

 

LEAD

Initial career opportunities
Applied knowledge as presented to various communities is of vital interests to African American Studies because it connects our scholarly purpose with our responsibility to be of service to communities. A list of careers AFAM graduates with bachelor’s degrees have pursued include: business/service industry, journalism, community development, community services, student services, academic affairs, travel and tourism especially posts related to heritage tourism, social services and youth programs, education (elementary and secondary such as a teacher or program coordinator/school administrator) and legal services.

Related graduate programs
Some of the masters, doctorates, or other degrees of advanced study that African American Studies graduates have pursued are a master or doctorate in: African American Studies, Sociology, Anthropology, Political Science, History, English and Literature, Public Health as well as degrees in Medicine.

Future career opportunities
African American Studies (especially at USC) is an entrée to various disciplines of graduate study and various career opportunities including: History, Anthropology (physical and cultural), English and Literature, Political Science, Sociology, and Music. The advanced level careers in these fields include: college professor (assistant, associate, full professor), chair of an academic department, chair/director of an African American Studies program or department, director or fellow of a research institute related to African American/African/or Disapora Studies, director of a African American culture center or Black Student/Multicultural Student center.

Download this information as a PDF.

Anthropology

To learn more about making the most of your educational experiences within and beyond the classroom contact: 
Dr. David Simmons, Undergraduate Director, dsimmons@mailbox.sc.ed 

 

PARTICIPATE: Community Service

Related Course(s)
ANTH 322 – Field School in Archaeology
ANTH 551 – Medical Anthropology Fieldwork

Recommended Sites/Experiences

Why this is Important
These field related courses offer students opportunities to serve the community by preserving local heritage or taking part in community based participatory research.

How Students Can Get Started
Talk with your advisor regarding these course offerings or the Historic Columbia Foundation.

 

PARTICIPATE: Diversity & Social Advocacy

Related Course(s)
ANTH 102 – Understanding Other Cultures
ANTH 161 – Human Origins: An Introduction to Biological Anthropology
ANTH 204 – Plagues Past and Present
ANTH 207 – Gender and Culture
ANTH 238 – Anthropology of Middle Eastern Cultures
ANTH 291 – Sex and Gender
ANTH 317 – American Indiana Nations
ANTH 353 – The Anthropology of Law and Conflict
ANTH 355 – Language, Culture, and Society
ANTH 442 – African-American English

Recommended Sites/Experiences

  • Local Homeless Shelters
  • Oliver Gospel Mission
  • Halfway houses
  • Good Samaritan Clinic
  • The Free Medical Clinic
  • Waverly Women’s Health Center
  • Sexual Health (SHARE)
  • Healthy Carolina – Food Share Columbia/ Gamecock Pantry
  • Diversity and Inclusion Committee
  • Dive-in luncheons
  • Race and Reconciliation Tables
  • Provost Forums on Diversity and Inclusion
  • LGBT Caucus 

Sample Research or Advocacy Project Topics
Gender and Globalization
Gender in Ethnoarchaeology
Racial and Ethnic Formations
Economic Justice
Cultural and Visual Anthropology

Why this is Important
“The purpose of anthropology is to make the world safe for human differences.” – Margaret Mead. Anthropology as a discipline in committed to helping students understand the importance of human differences. This field has a long standing history of social advocacy for different groups and cultures.

How Students Can Get Started 
Contact the Undergraduate Director or speak with your faculty advisor. 

 

PARTICIPATE: Global Learning

Related Course(s)
Any ANTH courses touch on a breadth of knowledge regarding culture and globalization. A couple of courses include:

ANTH 102 – Understanding Other Cultures
ANTH 208 – Globalization and Development
ANTH 234 – Caribbean Cultures
ANTH 238 – Middle Eastern Cultures
ANTH 322 – Field School in Archaeology
ANTH 355 – Language, Culture, and Society
ANTH 580 – Culture & Identity in the African Diaspora
ANTH 581 – Globalization and Cultural Questions
ANTH 552 – Medical Anthropology

Timing for Study Abroad
Students are encouraged to travel at any point, but summers are a good option.  

Destinations

  • Brazil - ANTH 580 [Maymester]
  • Colombia

Through the Study Abroad and Magellan programs our students have gone to:

  • Ireland
  • China
  • Australia
  • New Zealand
  • Africa
  • Latin America

Campus or Local Opportunities
See the ANTH 322: Field School in Archaeology above, which offers opportunities to do archaeology in various parts of the Southeastern U.S. Many professors offer lab opportunities, such as Dr. Terrance Weik, who has worked with undergraduates (no experience necessary) on identifying artifacts from a Chickasaw Indian and African settlement in Mississippi.

Why this is Important
Whether it is studying historical Columbia’s historical and archaeological sites (e.g. in ANTH 322), or learning how to do professional interviews and ethnographic analysis (e.g. in ANTH 551), students gain from prospective employees and students.

How Students Can Get Started 
Contact the Anthropology Undergraduate Director or check the course offerings for each semester. Some Anthropology courses are offered through the South Carolina Honors College, and others are cross listed with Southern Studies, Latin American Studies, African American Studies, Public Health, Religious Studies, Women’s Studies, Linguistics, History, and Geography.

 

PARTICIPATE: Peer Leadership

Student Organization(s)
Anthropology Student Association
South Carolina Anthropology Student Conference

Why this is Important
Students learn about careers and find opportunities to participate in experiences that increase their understanding of social diversity, cross-cultural literacy, and international relations.

How Students Can Get Started
Contact the ASA at 803-777-0993 or online at soanthro@email.sc.edu or via twitter @AnthroSA13

 

PARTICIPATE: Internships/Professional Practice

Related Course(s)
ANTH 207 – Gender and Culture
ANTH 355 – Language, Culture, and Society
ANTH 442 – African-American English
ANTH 552 – Medical Anthropology 

Recommended sites/Work experiences
Although there are no requirements, the department has facilitated internships with the Historic Columbia foundation and South Carolina Institute of Archaeology and Anthropology, as well as through the University of South Carolina Medical School. The department is willing to coordinate with students who have a general interest in obtaining professional experience within anthropology.

Professional Organizations

Why this is Important
These experiences foster a greater sense of understanding regarding how anthropologists apply their skills and ideas to the world.

How Students Can Get Started 
Contact the Anthropology Undergraduate Director or check the course offerings for each semester. 

 

PARTICIPATE: Research

Related Course(s)
Any intermediate or upper level course within anthropology 300-500 level has some type of research component within our courses.
ANTH 322 - Field School in Archaeology
ANTH 323 - Field School in Ethnography
ANTH 550 - Archaeological Laboratory Methods
ANTH 551 - Medical Anthropology: Fieldwork
ANTH 552 - Medical Anthropology

Sample Research Projects or Topics

  • Meso-American Archaeo-Astronomy
  • Ancient iconographic analysis
  • Understanding Racial Health Disparities
  • Syrian Refugee Health

Why this is Important
Hands-on lab or field experience is not only fun, but crucial for helping students understand if a career in anthropology is meant for them.

How Students Can Get Started
Contact the anthropology undergraduate director or check the course offerings for each semester. 

 

INTEGRATE

How to Integrate 
The Distinguished Undergraduate Research Track (DURT) program, which involves hands-on research on primary data sets, helps students integrate various aspects of method, theory, and evidence which are addressed in coursework. 

 

LEAD

Initial Career Opportunities 
Our majors have gone on to medical school or graduate schools. Other graduates have gotten jobs with cultural resource management firms, state agencies (e.g., Dept. Natural Resources), non-profits, and other organizations (e.g., the Peace Corps).

Related Graduate Programs 
The University of South Carolina Anthropology Graduate Program

Future Career Opportunities 
Anthropologists work in corporations, government agencies, international NGOs, the Foreign Service, education (at all levels), museums, and many other career sections.

Art Education

To learn more about making the most of your educational experiences within and beyond the classroom contact:
Olga Ivashkevich, ivashkev@mailbox.sc.edu

PARTICIPATE: Community Service

Related Course(s)
ARTE 560/760, 560P/760P
ARTE 705, ARTE 530
ARTE 525P/725P
ARTE 540/740
ARTE 571/771
ARTE 565/765

Sites/Experiences

  • After school programs
  • Boys and Girls club
  • St. Lawrence Place Shelter
  • Lexington County Juvenile arbitration program
  • big brothers/sisters
  • Killingsworth House
  • Palmetto Home

Why this is important
By teaching and learning in community-based situations, we are making it apparent that there is value to what people create. Classroom learning is enhanced, professional identities are formed, and situated learning becomes a life long skill. 

 

PARTICIPATE: Global Learning

Related Course(s)
ARTE 201
ARTE 399

Timing for “study abroad”
Sophomore or Junior year

Destinations

  • Italy
  • Scotland
  • Ireland
  • Ghana

Why this is important
Teaching and learning about culturally relevant art is a global experience. 

 

PARTICIPATE: Peer Leadership

Student Organization(s)

  • National Art Education Association Student Chapter
  • South Carolina Art Education Association

Opportunities

  • Fundraisers
  • Professional conference trips
  • Leading through professional development

Why this is important
Forming progressive, professional identity 

 

PARTICIPATE: Internships

Related Course(s)
ARTE 571/771 — Student Teaching Practicum

Recommended Sites/Work Experiences 
K-12 schools in South Carolina 

Professional Organizations
National Art Education Association (NAEA)

Why this is important
The student-teaching experience is a capstone semester, when everything that is learned in the undergraduate or graduate program culminates as an experiential semester.

 

PARTICIPATE: Research

Related Course(s)
ARTE 399 

Sample Research Projects or Topics

  • Magellan Scholars
  • Capstone Scholars
  • Honor’s College Scholars

Why this is important
Preparing students for graduate education; forming progressive professional identity 

 

INTEGRATE

How to integrate
Integrating information is the future of teaching and learning. Opportunities include:

  • exhibitions
  • arts presentations
  • creating books and websites
  • conducting community-based art projects
  • presenting at conferences

 

LEAD

Initial career opportunities 
Art Educators in K-12 schools and community based programs

Related graduate programs 
M.A.T.
I.M.A.
M.A.
Ed.S.
Ed.D.
Ph.D.

Future career opportunities 
Arts administrators, professors 

Art History

To learn more about making the most of your educational experiences within and beyond the classroom contact: 
Professor Susan Felleman, Program Coordinator, felleman@mailbox.sc.edu 

 

PARTICIPATE: Community Service

Related Course(s)
ARTH 503 – Internship
ARTH 542 – American Architecture
ARTH 560 – Museology 

Recommended Sites/Experiences
Outreach projects within the community, such as the documentation related to the history and preservation of the historic South Carolina State Hospital; interning with museums and galleries, special collections, and other cultural organizations. 

Why this is Important
The visual and cultural literacy and the skills in writing and speaking about art, history and culture cultivated by an art history education, as part of a broad-based liberal arts education, can be applied to the public and private spheres in ways that enlarge and enhance human experience.

How Students Can Get Started
Contact the Program Coordinator for more information.  

 

PARTICIPATE: Global Learning

Related Course(s)
Numerous courses in the history of art and architecture of Asia and Europe, for instance:
ARTH 345 – History of Asian Art
ARTH 524 – Topics in Renaissance Art
ARTH 549 – Topics in Non-Western Art

Study Abroad
We encourage our students to seek out study abroad opportunities, during the academic year and the summer.

Timing for Study Abroad
Sophomore or Junior year

Opportunities/Destinations
The globe is the limit of possibilities for studying art history and culture at universities, colleges and institutes worldwide.

Why this is Important
Study abroad brings art history to life. Students who study abroad gain exposure to major monuments of world art and architecture, develop their linguistic and cultural literacy, and enlarge their perspective on culture.

How Students Can Get Started
Visit the Study Abroad Office about opportunities related to Art History.

 

PARTICIPATE: Peer Leadership

Student Organization(s)
Art History Club

Other Leadership Opportunities
Leading by office, chairperson on boards. 

Other Recommendations 
Involvement with SECAC (Southeastern College Art Conference) and other educational and professional societies

How Students Can Get Started
Contact the Program Coordinator for more information.   

 

PARTICIPATE: Internships/Professional Practice

Related Course(s)
503 – Internships (including Palmetto Curatorial Exchange)
560 – Museology

Recommended Sites/Work Experiences 

Professional Organizations

  • SECAC (Southeastern College Art Conference) 
  • CAA (College Art Association)
  • SESAH (Southeast Chapter of the Society of Architectural Historians)
  • SEMC (Southeastern Museums Conference)

Why this is Important
Internships give students insight into the great variety of institutions, fields and cultural entities in which art history graduates pursue careers. By participating in internships, students can gain exposure to and prepare for the professional opportunities that await them after graduation. 

How Students Can Get Started
Contact the Program Coordinator for more information.

 

PARTICIPATE: Research

Opportunities

  • Magellan Scholars
  • Capstone Scholars
  • Honors College Scholars
  • Most upper-level Art History courses 

Sample Research Projects or Topics
Our students have conducted original research on University architecture and urban development and on artworks on public view in Columbia and its museums. They have contributed articles on photographers and women artists to Wikipedia and undertaken individual research in a range of courses. 

Other Recommendations

  • Office of Undergraduate Research grants and mini grants
  • Travel grants to present original research at conferences 

Why this is Important
Students can seek funding, support and recognition for research and seek to present it at scholarly and professional meetings. Research projects in art history provide students opportunities to apply their skills in research, formal analysis, critical thinking, writing and presentation, all valuable preparation for graduate school and professional life. 

How Students Can Get Started
Contact a faculty member that has a similar research interest.

 

INTEGRATE

How to Integrate 
Working on the organization of exhibitions, conferences and scholarly panels, publications, websites, etc. gives student the opportunity to apply the knowledge they are learning in the classroom.

 

LEAD

Related Graduate Programs 
M.A. and PhD programs in art and architectural history, visual culture, historic preservation, art conservation, curatorial and other visual and humanistic disciplines
Our M.A. in Art History

Future Career Opportunities 
The major prepares students for advanced study in Art History, Architecture, and Cultural Studies. It also serves as the foundation for careers in arts administration, museums, galleries, historic preservation, art libraries, criticism, publishing, art conservation, art investment, law, and many other fields.

Art Studio

To learn more about making the most of your educational experiences within and beyond the classroom contact: 
Kathleen Robbins, Program Coordinator, robbins@mailbox.sc.edu

PARTICIPATE: Community Service

Related Course(s)
ARTS 399
ARTS 449
ARTS 545
Capstone Classes

Sites/Experiences
Students have many opportunities for outreach projects within the fine arts community, including the Columbia Museum of Art, Tapp’s Art Center, contemporary art galleries, magazines and graphic design firms. Students also mount exhibitions at local galleries and contemporary art spaces.

Why this is important
The Visual Arts enrich our lives. They contribute the forms that shape and guide our daily experience and have a profound effect on our mental state, health, job satisfaction and consumer tendencies.

 

PARTICIPATE: Global Learning

Timing for “study abroad”
Sophomore or Junior year

Destinations

  • Italy
  • Spain
  • England

Opportunities
Summer in Italy program in conjunction with the International School of Painting and Drawing

Why this is important
Study abroad is an enriching experience that not only allows the student to gain a larger world perspective, but allows them to mature as an artist.

 

PARTICIPATE: Peer Leadership

Student Organization(s)

  • USC Photographic Society
  • Ceramics Club
  • Printmaking Club (Ink and Paper)

Opportunities
Officer positions in student art organizations, Garnet and Black, Daily Gamecock, McKissick Museum, McMaster College of Art

Other Recommendations
Demonstrated leadership and community involvement is considered in departmental awards and successful application to graduate school.

 

PARTICIPATE: Internships

Related Course(s)
ARTS 449
ARTS 545
Capstone Classes

Recommended Sites/Work Experiences 

  • The Columbia Museum of Art
  • George Fulton Studios
  • Tapp’s Art Center
  • 701 CCA
  • graphic design firms

Why this is important
Demonstrated leadership and community involvement is considered in departmental awards and successful application to graduate school.

 

PARTICIPATE: Research

Sample Research Projects or Topics

  • BFA thesis portfolios and exhibitions
  • Magellan Scholars
  • Capstone Scholars
  • Honor’s College Scholars

Why this is important
Capstone projects in the arts help students transition from student to artist by creating work without assignment limitations. These projects help facilitate the beginning of a sustainable studio practice. Extensive portfolio and exhibition projects also help prepare students for successful application to MFA programs.

 

INTEGRATE

How to integrate 
Our students CREATE photographs, paintings, prints, sculptures, ceramic pieces, illustrations and more. Throughout the year students implement their creative works by organizing Exhibitions, Portfolios, Books, Magazines, Installations, and Websites all within the context of contemporary art and a sustainable studio practice. Students are allowed the time and freedom to develop their own voice as artists. In order for artists to execute their ideas they must become good problem solvers. Today’s art students should be versatile and prepared to participate in a variety of fine arts fields as practicing artists and industry professionals.

 

LEAD

Initial career opportunities

  • Arts Administrator
  • Art Critic
  • Art Director
  • Arts Intern/Apprentice
  • Assistant Curator
  • Book Designer
  • Ceramicist
  • Commercial Artist
  • Editorial Illustrator
  • Exhibition Designer
  • Freelance/Editorial Photographer
  • Photography Editor
  • Typographical Artist
  • Web Designer

Related graduate programs 
M.F.A. in Studio Art (photography, painting, drawing, etc…)
M.A. in Studio Art
M.A. in Critical and Curatorial Studies
M.A. in Art History
M.A.T. in Art Education 

Future career opportunities 

  • Arts Administrator
  • Art Critic
  • Art Dealer
  • Art Director
  • Art Historian
  • Art Therapist
  • Curator
  • Gallery Director
  • Professor

Download this information as a PDF.

Biological Sciences

The mission of the Department of Biological Sciences is to provide a fundamental, intellectual framework for science in which each student in the major may develop an understanding of the structures, functions, and inter-relationships among diverse biological systems. A Biology degree is relevant to everyone. A solid foundation in biological principles is of relevance to students interested in careers in some aspect of medicine, biologically relevant research, management of natural resources, or teaching. Such a foundation empowers any citizen to confront issues of ever increasing complexity of medical care, environmental deterioration, bioethics, agricultural economics, public health, or biotechnology. A major in Biological Sciences provides students with a broad education in the sciences, and empowers students with knowledge critical to surviving life in the 21st century.

To learn more about making the most of your educational experiences within and beyond the classroom contact: 

Dr. Amanda P. Zeigler
Director of Undergraduate Studies
polsona@mailbox.sc.edu

PARTICIPATE: Community Service

Recommended Sites/Experiences

Why this is Important
Community service fosters awareness of human problems and common goals. Service projects can illustrate in a concrete way some of the concepts and issues examined in the Biological Sciences major (environmental projects), and give students the opportunity to share their knowledge with the community.

How Students can get Started
Contact the student organizations directly by clicking on the links above, or visit the Leadership and Service Center.

 

PARTICIPATE: Diversity & Social Advocacy

Many of our Biological Science majors are interested in social advocacy and increasing diversity in the life sciences.  Our students can volunteer in a number of community outreach events that include march to college day, mentoring, and tutoring.  Many of our students further participate in University wide activities and societies geared towards specific groups (see the Garnet Gate website for more information on specific opportunities).

Related Course(s)
BIOL 399 – Independent Research.  Students develop independent study projects that focus on a number of diversity related and social advocacy projects.

Recommended Sites/Experiences

  • SACNAS USC Chapter – SACNAS is an inclusive organization dedicated to fostering the success of Chicano/Hispanic and Native American scientists, from college students to professionals, in attaining advanced degrees, careers, and positions of leadership in STEM.
  • Student Success Center – Students serve as Peer Leaders, mentors, and tutors via the Student Success Center
  • Cocky’s Reading Express – The Cocky's Reading Express literacy program features the Carolina mascot and USC student volunteers who travel the state visiting elementary schools, and reading to students.
  • PASOs – Statewide organization supports Latino community with health care education, resources, and environmental stewardship.
  • Office of Pre-Professional Advising-Volunteer as a translator for a minority population at a free clinic or hospital 

Sample Research or Advocacy Project Topics
Our students have worked on projects involving all the sites listed above!

Why this is Important
Research has shown that diverse populations (gender, socioeconomic, ethnic, etc.) are critical for science innovation and technology development.  A lack of diversity limits the insight and creativity with which scientists can approach problems.

How Students can get Started

  • Contact specific organizations listed above
  • Contact student organizations through Garnet Gate
  • Inquire with OPPA for shadowing and volunteer opportunities
  • Speak with your advisor about how to get involved in research
  • Contact the Career Center about internship opportunities

 

PARTICIPATE: Global Learning

Related Course(s)
Global Classroom

  • San Ramon, Costa Rica: Topic-Tropical Ecology (includes opportunities to complete multiple Biology courses at all stages of degree progression)
  •  Nicosia, Cyprus (University of Nicosia): Topic: all disciplines across the Biological Sciences (special emphasis in Developmental Biology, Molecular Biology, Biochemistry, and Pre-Medical courses)

BIOL 599 – Topics in Biology

Maymester course: Topic-Conservation of Marine Turtles in Latin America

Timing for Study Abroad
For Biological Sciences majors, it is recommended that a Study Abroad semester be completed during the summer, during the second semester of sophomore year, or before advancement into the upper-level (400-level plus courses) curriculum*.

 *These are recommended semesters, but are not mandatory.  Study Abroad approval is determined on an individual basis, and may vary based on the student’s progression through the major.  Speak with your advisor and the Study Abroad Office to determine is a semester abroad is appropriate for you.

Opportunities/Destinations
Most study abroad programs offer language training and study in the humanities, social sciences, arts, culture, and business. Biological Sciences majors can aim to fulfill some of these general education-based requirements, but with appropriate planning, could also potentially fulfill science related credit or cognate credits as well while on a semester abroad. An increasing number of programs offer opportunities for students with majors within the sciences to study abroad while fulfilling science-based courses.  The University Studies Abroad Consortium (USAC) offers science-based curriculum programs in San Ramon, Costa Rica and Nicosia, Cyprus, which not only combine language study, but also provides optional courses in tropical ecology, conservation biology, tropical plant diversity, and other disciplines across the Biological Sciences.

Why this is Important
Students are provided with the opportunity to be immersed in different cultures all while advancing their Biological Sciences degree. 

How Students can get Started
Speak with an advisor in the Study Abroad Office, as well as contacting your Biological Sciences Academic Advisor.  

 

PARTICIPATE: Peer Leadership

Student Organization(s)

Other Leadership Opportunities
Supplemental Instruction Leader

Why this is Important
Building a network within the academic and professional communities may help contribute to students’ academic and career success.

How Students can get Started

  • Contact the student organizations directly by clicking the link(s) above.
  • Contact the Student Success Center by clicking the link above in order to learn more about becoming a Supplemental Instruction Leader and/or Peer Tutor/Mentor.

 

PARTICIPATE: Internships/Professional Practice

Related Course(s)

  • BIOL 399 - Independent Study (this course allows students to participate in an Undergraduate Research project in a discipline of their choice within a field of Biological Sciences)
  • UNIV 401 - Topic: Transitioning to Medical School
  • UNIV 401 - Topic: Medical School Application Process

 *Although internships are not a requirement of the Biological Sciences major, students are encouraged to speak with the College of Arts and Sciences (CAS) Internship Director if he/she is interested in completing an internship.  Students can also visit the CAS Internships website for additional information.

Recommended Sites/Work Experiences

Professional Organizations
Discipline specific professional organizations for Biological Sciences-Examples include, but are not limited to:

Why this is Important 
Being a member of a Professional Organization could potentially allow students the opportunity to present any undergraduate research at professional meetings of these organizations.  Presentation of data at professional meeting could help expand the student’s understanding of the sciences in addition to propelling their future careers forward.

How students can get started
Contact your advisor or research mentor.

 

PARTICIPATE: Research

Related Course(s)
BIOL 301and 301L - Ecology and Evolution + Lab
BIOL 302 and 302L - Cell and Molecular Biology + Lab
BIOL 399 - Independent Study
BIOL 425 and 425L - Plant Form and Function + Lab
BIOL 460 and 460L - General Physiology + Lab
BIOL 498 - Biological Research: An Introduction
BIOL 535 - Fishery Management
BIOL 536 - Ichthyology
BIOL 538 - Behavior of Marine Organisms
BIOL 541/545 and 541L - Biochemistry + Lab
BIOL 550 - Bacteriology + Lab
BIOL 576 - Marine Fisheries Ecology
BIOL 690 - Electron Microscopy

Sample research projects or topics

  • Applications of Trail Cams in Ecological Research
  • Identification of miR 489 Target Genes in Breast Cancer Cells
  • Peromyscus Developmental Biology
  • DNA Mutations Programming
  • Modeling Blue Crab Predation
  • Molecular Genetics of Natural Selection
  • The Role of ASH1L in Neuronal Development
  • Molecular Techniques to Study Dystoria 16
  • Role of Cox2 in Cellular Senescence
  • Early Gene Expression in Neuronal Differentiation
  • Analysis of p53 response gene IGRFs
  • Role of Cox2 in Cellular Senescence

Other Recommendations

Why this is Important 
A major advantage of education at a large university is the opportunity students have to participate in research projects with faculty members. Faculty members in the Department of Biological Sciences maintain dual lives as educators and researchers, and many of these research labs include undergraduate student researchers. Typically, students become familiar with faculty members through their classes, and through the descriptions of each researchers interest on the departmental website. Students can join laboratories as early as their freshman year. The student’s undergraduate research efforts can allow them to receive academic credit towards the progression of their major coursework.  In many cases, students can also receive financial support for research, especially during the summer, from either research grants or from several competitive fellowship programs offered by the Department and University.

How Students can get Started
Contact faculty members within the Department of Biological Sciences with active research programs in your area of interest, or visit the websites listed above.

Contact the Office of Undergraduate Research

 

INTEGRATE

How to Integrate
All Biology (BIOL) courses in the undergraduate curriculum that have an associated lab are helping integrate practical and theoretical knowledge of the biological sciences. (See Academic Bulletin for a list of courses.)

 

LEAD

Initial Career Opportunities

  • Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC)
  • Department of Natural Resources
  • Technical positions in biomedical research companies
  • Hospital and other analytical labs
  • Medical and Pharmaceutical Sales
  • Fish and Wildlife Organization
  • Environmental Consulting
  • Private School Teaching

Related Graduate Programs 
MS or PhD in Biological Sciences
MD, DVM, DMD, DO, or other professional program
MAT or MT (for secondary science teacher certification)
Master of Earth and Environmental Resource Management
PhD in Marine Science

Additional graduate programs may include medical technology, public health, biotechnology, agriculture, environmental sciences/studies

Future Career Opportunities

  • Physicians
  • Dentists
  • Veterinarians
  • PhD scientists and researchers working for private companies or government organizations
  • College professors (all realms of academia)
  • Secondary Education Teacher
  • Curators (zoos, gardens, museums, etc.)
Cardiovascular Technology

To learn more about making the most of your educational experiences within and beyond the classroom contact:
Cammie C. Steele, Program Coordinator, cammie@sc.edu

PARTICIPATE: Community Service

Recommended Sites/Experiences

Why this is Important
Community Service would be valuable for any and every major because it opens up opportunities for students to give of themselves to others. In the process of being involved in community service, students become aware of those less fortunate than themselves.

How Students Can Get Started
Speak with your faculty advisor about how to get started, or we recommend that you contact the Leadership and Service Center for more information about opportunities to engage in community service activities. 

 

PARTICIPATE: Peer Leadership

Student Organization(s)

How Students Can Get Started
Students should search for the organization they are interested in through Garnet Gate to contact the club president and also attend the student organization fair for more information. 

 

PARTICIPATE: Internships/Professional Practice

Related Course(s)
Student are required to complete an intensive training program in an accredited hospital CVT program.

Recommended sites/work experiences
Providence Hospital, Columbia, SC
University Hospital, Augusta, GA

Professional Organizations
AAHEP (Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs)
ARDMS (American Registry for Diagnostic Medical Sonography)
CCI (Cardiovascular Credentialing International)

Why this is Important
The students enters the intensive training program portion of the major after all of the academic requirements have been met. This provides students with the opportunity to apply their academic knowledge in a practical way in the field.

How Students Can Get Started
Students are required to engage an intensive training program along with the completion of their degree requirements.

LEAD

Initial Career Opportunities
Cardiovascular Technologist

Related Graduate Programs
Master of Health Science Diagnostic Cardiovascular Sonography
Master of Health Science in Diagnostic Medical Ultrasound
Master of Science in Cardiovascular Science

Future Career Opportunities
According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, “employment is expected to grow much faster than the average; technologists with multiple professional credentials, trained to perform a wide range of procedures, will have the best prospects.”

Chemistry and Biochemistry

To learn more about making the most of your educational experiences within and beyond the classroom contact:
Michael Dukes, dukesmd@mailbox.sc.edu
Leslie L. Lovelace, Faculty Program Coordinator, lovelacl@mailbox.sc.edu

PARTICIPATE: Community Service

Sites/Experiences

  • Chemistry Outreach to K-12 Schools
  • American Society of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology Student Chapter
  • USC Science and Engineering Fair
  • Discovery Day
  • Science and Humanity Fair

Why this is important
Participating in these groups promotes the awareness and importance of Chemistry and Biochemistry as they relate to everyday life. 

 

PARTICIPATE: Global Learning

Timing for “study abroad”
Junior or Senior Year (depends on the coursework and timing).

Destinations

  • Brazil (especially the Bahia region)
  • Venezuela
  • Costa Rica
  • The Dominican Republic
  • Mexico (especially Costa Chica region of Oaxaca, Guerro, Veracruz)
  • Puerto Rico
  • Jamaica
  • Virgin Islands
  • Bermuda
  • Trinidad and Tabago
  • Africa — West Africa especially Ghana, Senegal, Nigeria as well as South Africa
  • Europe — especially England, France, and Amsterdam.

Opportunities
USC’s Study Abroad Office

Why this is important
Science is a global language. Communicating and learning about other cultures outside of science will give a better understanding of the cultural differences and similarities that the science community shares.

 

PARTICIPATE: Peer Leadership

Student Organization(s)

  • The American Chemical Society
  • The American Society of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology Student Chapter
  • Any Professional Organization (ie., Pre-Med, etc).

Opportunities
Teaching assistant opportunities in the Department of Chemistry, Supplemental Instruction, one on one tutoring, Honor societies, American Society of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology student chapter.

Why this is important
Students will be faced with post-secondary education opportunities and/or job offers, where leadership is a characteristic that will benefit them greatly. Learning how to interact with and/or manage people is invaluable. 

 

PARTICIPATE: Internships

Related Course(s)
CHEM 399
CHEM 496-499

Recommended Sites/Work Experiences 

  • Any summer internship (or semester internship that does not distract from academics)
  • Hospital shadowing, volunteering
  • Academic study at other institutions via pre-professional internships (ie., MCAT prep, etc)
  • Additional internships are available through:
      • Savannah River Site
      • Zeus Industrial Products
      • Eastman-Kodak
      • Roche Carolina
      • Milliken

Why this is important
Depending on the students interest after graduation (graduate/professional school or career) internships provide the knowledge necessary to make decisions regarding the many choices that await them. 

 

PARTICIPATE: Research

Related Course(s)
CHEM 496-499 

Sample Research Projects or Topics
Non-USC Researach experiences for undergraduates, USC research opportunities: through the departments of Chemistry, Biology, Public Health, Pharmacy

Other Recommendations
Students participating in research are required to attend weekly group meetings and present updates on their research projects. In addition, students will present their research at Discovery Day, and specific undergraduate research conferences both locally and nationally.

Why this is important
Besides the fact that research is required as a major course, it provides problem solving skills that are beneficial in all aspects of life. Research teaches students to think “outside the box” and not to look for the obvious.

 

INTEGRATE

How to integrate 
Hands on research, presentation of research results at local and national meetings. Local: Discovery Day, ACS local sections National: ACS regional meetings, Southeast Undergraduate Research Conference, American Society of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Meeting, PITTCON, etc. Research experiences in chemistry require students to design their own experiments based on observations and literature. Students are presented with a problem in the lab and are required to solve the problem using information gained in previous classes and through literature searches. Most advances in society are related to scientific development and problem solving. 

 

LEAD

Initial career opportunities
Graduate or Professional School matriculation. Most students attend graduate school in Chemistry/Biochemistry, Professional school for Medicine or Dental. Positions other than graduate/professional school: Pharmaceutical Companies like Abbott, Eli Lilly, Roche Carolina; Milliken, Savannah River Site, Zeus Industrial Products, DHEC, Community Environmental Labs.

Related graduate programs 
M.S. Chemistry/Ph.D. Chemistry: specific emphasis is based on individual interests (Biochemistry, Inorganic, Polymer, Physical, Environmental, Organic, etc)

Future career opportunities

  • Faculty Research Positions
  • Physicians
  • Industrial Chemists
  • Pharmaceutical Lab specialists
  • quality control chemist
  • laboratory technician
  • technical sales representative
  • chemical and drug sales representative
  • consumer protection specialist
  • water quality analyst / technician
  • technical writer
  • aerosol development manager
  • quality assurance chemist
  • methods development chemist
  • process development chemist
  • organic mass spectrometrist
  • forensic lab analyst
  • pulp and paper chemist
  • paint formulation chemist
  • paper product developer
  • chemical information specialist
  • occupational health and safety officer
  • medical laboratory technician
  • analytic chemist
  • associate chemist
  • research assistant
  • chemical safety officer
  • clinical technician
  • food and drug analyst
  • pollution controller
  • information analyst
  • soil tester
  • laboratory analyst
  • chemical technologist assayer
  • product tester
  • production chemist
  • lab coordinator
  • chemical analyst
  • pest control technician
  • textile chemist
  • occupational hygienist
  • geologist
  • color development specialist
  • environmental engineer
  • geochemist
  • industrial hygienist
  • teacher
  • crime lab analyst
  • dentist
  • medical technologist

Download this information as a PDF.

Chinese Studies

To learn more about making the most of your educational experiences within and beyond the classroom contact: Krista Van Fleit, Program Director, hangk@mailbox.sc.edu


PARTICIPATE: Diversity & Social Advocacy

Related Course(s)
Any of our Chinese studies courses engage students in understanding another culture.

Recommended Sites/Experiences
Chinese Culture Club
Confucius Institute

Sample Research or Advocacy Project Topics

  • Chinese culture in the United States
  • Religions from East Asia
  • Clinical Applications for Chinese Medicines in the US
  • The History of Chinese Students Studying in the US

Why this is Important
Students will get exposure to diverse cultural activities that demonstrate local customs, Chinese New Year celebration, Dragon Boat festival, Trans-Americans, martial arts.

How Students Can Get Started
Contact the faculty advisor of the Chinese Culture Club, Greg Patterson, or any of the faculty in Chinese Studies.

PARTICIPATE: Global Learning

Related Course(s)
CHIN 240 – Chinese Culture, Tradition, and Modern Societies
CHIN 341 – Modern Chinese Literature
CHIN 335 – Women in China
CHIN 355 – Screening China

Timing for Study Abroad
Timing depends on students’ goals; however intensive opportunities are encouraged. This decision is best made in consultation with your academic advisor and the Study Abroad Office.  There are often scholarships available through the Study Abroad Office to support your trip.  

Recommended Experiences
Contact Study Abroad to further discuss opportunities for learning about different programs abroad.

Destinations
We encourage our students to travel to China for experiences abroad. Some places our students have traveled include:

  • Chengdu CIEE (year-long)
  • Beijing Tsinghua University
  • Peking University
  • Beijing Languages and Cultures University

Why this is Important
Critical Languages such as Chinese require extensive training for students to achieve full fluency. Moreover, the experience of living in a Chinese-speaking environment will provide students with a much deeper level of cultural knowledge.

How students can get started
Contact any member of the Chinese faculty and consult with the Study Abroad Office.

PARTICIPATE: Peer Leadership

Student Organization(s)
The Chinese Culture Club with Dr. Patterson, holds regular meetings for students interested in Chinese language and culture. Students can also participate in language exchanges through the Conversation Partners program operated by USC’s English Program for internationals.

Opportunities
International Accelerator Program organizes events for Chinese International students to mingle during social events as well as partner up as Conversation Partners. There is also a list of students seeking conversation partners, contact your Chinese Language faculty member.

Why this is Important
These student-centered programs offer new ways to practice the Chinese language, learn about Chinese culture, meet international students at the university, and forge valuable connections with other students and members of the local community.

How Students Can Get Started
Contact the Chinese Language Club or English Program for Internationals.

PARTICIPATE: Research

Related Course(s)
All Chinese culture classes 300 level and above could serve as a springboard for an intensive research project, contact your course faculty member regarding opportunities to engage in research.

Sample Research Projects or Topics
Many students in the Chinese program have received support for research from the Magellan Scholars program, the Walker Institute, and other sources. Recent research projects have included topics such as clinical applications for Chinese medicines in the United States, the history of Chinese students studying in the US, and the literature and film of the Chinese revolution.

Why this is Important
In addition to their language training, it is crucial for students to learn how to use English- and Chinese-language sources and research portals. The hands-on training that comes from these research projects helps students to develop valuable skills that will serve them in almost any caree

How Students Can Get Started
Contact faculty member that has your related research interest.

LEAD

Initial Career Opportunities
Students graduating with a B.A. in Chinese Studies have a range of career options, especially in education, international business, and public service.

Related Graduate Programs

  • M.A. and Ph.D. in Comparative Literature
  • M.A. and Ph.D. in East Asian Languages and Cultures
  • M.A. and Ph.D. in Linguistics
  • Graduate training in Education

Future Career Opportunities

  • management in multi-national firms
  • teachers and professors
  • public servants in diplomatic
  • military and intelligence organizations
  • management in social service organizations
  • translators and interpreters
  • journalists and business analysts
Classics

To learn more about making the most of your educational experiences within and beyond the classroom contact:
Hunter Gardner, Program Director, gardnehh@mailbox.sc.edu

PARTICIPATE: Community Service

Recommended Sites/Experiences

  • The classics program hosts an outreach event called Classics Day for area-high schools in which faculty, graduate students, and undergraduate students view presentations on subject areas that relate to courses taught such as CLAS 220: Classical Mythology; CLAS 240: Sport and Combat in the Ancient World; CLAS/HIST 305: Greece and Rome in Film and Popular Culture
  • Alpha Iota Society

Why this is Important
Involvement in community service helps spread the importance of Classical Literature and how majoring in this at the undergraduate level helps to develop skills to understand community.

How Students Can Get Started
Students should look on our webpage for more information about community service opportunities through Alpha Iota Society.  

PARTICIPATE: Diverstity & Social Advocacy

Related Courses  
CLAS 320 – Sex and Gender in Ancient Greece
CLAS 321 – Sex, Gender, and Power in Ancient Rome     

Recommended Sites/Experiences
Always Coming Home Project

Sample Research or Advocacy Project Topics

  • Same sex relationships in Ancient Rome
  • Ancient Women
  • Understanding Race in the Ancient World

Why this is Important
Classicists are working hard to recover historically marginalized perspectives from Greco-Roman antiquity.  By studying Greek and Roman attitudes toward gender and sexuality we can better understand our own attitudes and the factors that have shaped them.

How Students Can Get Started
Students should register for our Classics courses and learn more through social advocacy committees that have been piloted by the Society of Classical Studies.

PARTICIPATE: Global Learning

Related Course(s)
All Classics course have some component of studying literature in different cultures, specifically in the ancient Mediterranean world.

Timing for Study Abroad
Student should considers studying abroad during sophomore or junior year after having some basic training and understanding of Classical Literature and the history of the Ancient Mediterranean.

Opportunities
The Classics and Italian program are currently involved in a USC Study Abroad in Sienna program where students can take Italian, Classics, and Art History courses.

Why this is Important
This will enable our students to obtain firsthand experience at sites of cultural artifacts, while learning Italian and/or Latin.

How Students Can Get Started
Contact the Study Abroad Office or the Classics Program Director.

PARTICIPATE: Peer Leadership

Student Organization(s)
Alpha Iota Society

Why this is Important
This energizes students and gets them together to discuss and study Greek and Latin literary works in their free-time. Peer Leadership gives student opportunities to work with other students and to get involved in community outreach to promote the Classics.

How Students Can Get Started
Contact the faculty liaison for Alpha Iota Society.

PARTICIPATE: Internships/Professional Practice

Recommended Sites/Work Experiences

Professional Organizations
Society for Classical Studies
Classical Association of the Midwest and South (CAMWS)

Why this is Important  
These organizations provide resources for students who wish to teach Latin at the high school level as well as a number of scholarship opportunities, and presentation opportunities at national conferences.

How Students Can Get Started
Search for more information via professional organization websites.

PARTICIPATE: Research

Related Course(s)
Most CLAS, LATN, and GREK courses at the 500 level require research components.

Sample Research Projects or Topics

  • Ancient Coin Iconography
  • Study of Augustan visual iconography
  • Feasting in the Iliad and the Odyssey
  • Commentary for Aesop’s Fables

Why this is Important
Students are continuously encouraged to write research papers with an eye to eventually presenting their work in a public forum (i.e. at SCS and CAMWS conferences).

How Students Can Get Started
Talk with your favorite faculty member who works in your field of interest.

INTEGRATE

How to Integrate
In many of our courses (e.g., CLAS 586, CLAS 321, CLAS 240) we ask students to bring together knowledge from various sub-disciplines within Classics (history, literary criticism, art history, archaeology, philosophy).

Why this is Important
These courses encourage students to identify the intersections between history, literature, and material culture.  These courses also direct students to explore how political, philosophical and religious ideals inform (and are informed by) various cultural artifacts.

LEAD

Initial Career Opportunities
Editing
Teaching Latin at the secondary level


Related graduate programs
Many of our students do pursue graduate degrees to continue their education.
M.A. in Classics
M.A. in Classical Archeology
M.Ed. in Teaching
M.A. in Art History
M.A. in Comparative Literature
Ph.D. in Classics
Ph.D. in Classical Archeology

Future career opportunities
University Professor
Curation of Museum Collections
Editing

Comparative Literature

To learn more about making the most of your educational experiences within and beyond the classroom contact: 
Jie Guo, Program Director, guoji@mailbox.sc.edu

 

PARTICIPATE: Community Service

Related Course(s)
GERM 401P – Practicum in Teaching German to Young Children
SPAN 301 – Service Learning in Spanish
SPAN 305 – Working with Hispanic Clients

Recommended Sites/Experiences
As part of the Comparative Literature major, students acquire proficiency in two languages other than English. Many of the language programs at USC offer fantastic service-learning opportunities to put that language expertise into practice in the community. Students are encouraged to consult with the program of their major language for more information on these opportunities.

Why this is Important
Being able to use a language within the classroom setting is an important skill, and a major accomplishment. But being able to use that language in real life, outside the classroom, offers a real test of those abilities, and puts knowledge to use in the community, whether through helping children in local schools learn German, or in learning to work with Spanish-speaking patients or clients.

How Students Can Get Started
Contact the program in your language of specialization or contact local non-profit or community agencies about opportunities to get involved.

 

PARTICIPATE: Diversity & Social Advocacy

Related Course(s)
CPLT 150 – Values and Ethics in Literature
CPLT 270 – World Literature
CPLT 303 – Great Books of the Eastern World
CPLT 415 – Topics in Comparative Literary Relations

Recommended Sites/Experiences
Many courses offered by the Program in Comparative Literature are ideal places for students to enhance their awareness of issues of diversity and social advocacy. For instance, CPLT 150, which is described in the Bulletin as “Analysis of major works of world literature focusing on values, ethics, and social responsibility,” invites students to examine issues directly linked to social advocacy. Courses such as CPLT 270 “World Literature” and CPLT 303 “Great Books of the Eastern World” are wonderful sites for students to immerse in diverse and often marginalized literary and cultural traditions. CPLT 415 “Topics in Comparative Literary Relations” encourages students to critically apply the comparative method to diverse literary traditions and cultural phenomena and products.

Why this is Important
These courses not only introduce to students diverse traditions across the globe, but also often vigorously examine diversity- and social advocacy-related issues such as race, ethnicity, women, and gender. In this sense, in addition to providing wonderful classroom experiences to help enhance awareness, these courses are also energetic sites for students to directly participate in debates about these issues in a critical fashion. The knowledge and skills (writing, reading, and speaking) students obtain from these classroom experiences will enable them to better engage issues of diversity and social advocacy outside the classroom and in their future careers.

How Students Can Get Started
Contact the Director of Comparative Literature for more information about these courses.

 

PARTICIPATE: Global Learning

Related Course(s)
CPLT 270 – Introduction to World Literature
CPLT 301 – Great Books of the Western World I
CPLT 302 – Great Books of the Western World II
CPLT 303 – Great Books of the Eastern World

Timing for Study Abroad
If you are wanting to travel with the CPLT 270 course, plan to study early in your career. For study abroad opportunities, the summer after sophomore year or one of the semesters of your junior year. 

Destinations
Destinations vary according to your language of specialization.

Why this is Important
CPLT 270 is the ideal classroom experience for students who want to engage in global studies. Themes vary from section to section, but each section of the course deals with major themes and global challenges through the perspective of literature from around the world. It’s an eye-opening experience!

Consisting of CPLT 301, CPLT 302, and CPLT 303, the “Great Books” sequence on the one hand helps students to achieve understanding of canonical works from some of the most impactful literary traditions, and on the other hand encourage them to engage these traditions from the global perspective by reading literary texts comparatively and by considering these texts and their afterlives in the global context.

Study abroad is invaluable for consolidating the language learning that students do in the classroom. Regular interaction with native speakers allows students to take their fluency in a language to the next level, and there is no better way to learn about a culture than by living in it and being part of it!

How Students Can Get Started 
The Comparative Literature major is very supportive of study abroad opportunities in the languages; consult with the program of your major language for more details. Also connect with the Study Abroad Office for more information.

 

PARTICIPATE: Peer Leadership

Student Organization(s)
The Comparative Literature major is small, and does not have its own student organizations, although our students have been actively involved in many other student organizations, from the German and Russian clubs to the Classics and Spanish fraternities.

Other Leadership Opportunities
Maxcy International House

Why this is Important
By connecting with fellow students with shared interests, students learn about opportunities to put their knowledge into practice and about career opportunities.

How Students Can Get Started
Contact the student group(s) in your language of specialization. Connect through Garnet Gate.

 

PARTICIPATE: Internships/Professional Practice

Recommended Sites/Work Experiences 
Many fantastic opportunities exist in the various language programs. Consult with your language program for more details.

Professional Organizations
Students can become involved with the American Comparative Literature Association, the national organization for scholars of comparative literature, based right here on the USC Columbia campus! The national headquarters is located at the University.

University of South Carolina Press to become editors

Why this is Important
Internships can be the “missing link” between the skills you acquire in the classroom, and the job you’re looking for after graduation. An internship is the perfect place to connect the language proficiency and reading/writing/ critical thinking proficiency you’ve acquired as a Comparative Literature major to new and more job-specific skills. Students should also be proactive in searching out internship possibilities in areas of future career interest.

How students Can Get Started 
Consult the program of your language of specialization and talk about internship possibilities with your academic adviser. Sign up for an appointment with the Career Center

 

PARTICIPATE: Research

Related Course(s)
Students complete a senior thesis (CPLT 499), an integrative research and writing experience involving the language(s) they have studied. Students in Comparative Literature have also been very competitive in winning Magellan Grants to conduct research alongside faculty members. The course is optional, but we highly encourage students to engage in a thesis – this thesis could be combined with an honors thesis, GLD, and Magellan Scholars.

Sample Research Projects or Topics
Almost unlimited: topics have ranged from the use of folklore in Ralph Ellison’s The Invisible Man to literature and film about the Nazi occupation of France (senior thesis) to preparing an online student edition of Aesop’s fables in Greek (a recent Magellan Grant).

Why this is Important
The senior thesis is a fantastic integrative project, bringing together the language skills students have acquired in their major languages(s) along with the skills they’ve acquired in reading, thinking, and writing about literature. Those students who are interested in graduate study find the experience invaluable as a stepping-stone towards the master’s thesis or the doctoral dissertation. Students going in other directions gain important skills in project management — it’s a great opportunity to learn how to manage a complex long-term project, which is a skill that is useful in almost any professional career.

How Students Can Get Started 
Get in touch with a faculty member with your research interests or the program director of the department.

 

INTEGRATE

How to Integrate
The senior thesis is a fantastic integrative project, bringing together the language skills students have acquired in their major languages(s) along with the skills they’ve acquired in reading, thinking, and writing about literature.

 

LEAD

Initial Career Opportunities 
Students who graduate with a B.A. in Comparative Literature, have excellent skills in two languages other than English, as well as in critical reading, thinking, and writing in English. That’s a pretty unbeatable combination of abilities, and study after study has shown that these are the kinds of skills that lots of employers are looking for. Rather than being trained for any one career option, Comparative Literature students have a skill set that is highly prized in every business and professional context. Students in Comparative Literature work with their adviser to develop specific career goals, and to acquire the additional preparation (coursework, internships) they need to succeed at those goals.

Related Graduate Programs 
Students are of course well-prepared to enter graduate programs in Comparative Literature itself or in the language of their specialization, at the M.A. or Ph.D. level, and some of our students do just that. But the skills that make you a successful Comparative Literature major also lead to success in all sorts of other graduate or professional programs: Law, Education, and the MBA.

Future Career Opportunities
There are no limits to the career opportunities that are open to Comparative Literature majors. Nationwide, students with a B.A. in Comparative Literature have done everything from run internet start-ups to editing major magazines, to serving as Appellate Court judges. Aside from the obvious possibilities of academia, education and law, students with undergraduate experience in Comparative Literature excel in corporate communications and marketing, consulting, publishing, and even medicine, where their language skills and cross-cultural awareness are a major asset!

Criminology & Criminal Justice

To learn more about making the most of your educational experiences within and beyond the classroom contact:
John Burrow, Program Coordinator, burrowj@mailbox.sc.edu  

 

PARTICIPATE: Community Service

Related Course(s) – these classes have a service-learning component
CRJU 554 - Women and Crime
CRJU 591 - Crime, Violence, Women & Girls
CRJU 591 - Adolescent Mentoring

Recommended Sites/Experiences

Why this is Important
Access to conferences and research newsletters; make contact with CRJU experts, improve resume

How Students Can Get Started
Talk with your faculty advisors for opportunities related to these courses.

 

PARTICIPATE: Diversity & Social Advocacy

Related Course(s)
CRJU 563 - Race and Crime
CRJU 425 - Hate Crimes

Recommended Sites/Experiences

Sample Research or Advocacy Project Topics

  • Racial disparities in the application of the death penalty
  • Policy research related to racial and gender differences among statutory rape offenders

Why this is Important
Getting involved with research beyond the classroom shows students that the world of criminal justice is open to a variety of opportunities past typical criminal justice prospects.

How Students Can Get Started
Talk with your faculty advisors for opportunities related to getting involved with these experiences.

 

PARTICIPATE: Global Learning

Related Course(s)
CRJU 491 - Terrorism and Homeland Security
CRJU 491 - Comparative Criminal Justice Systems and Transnational Crime

Timing for Study Abroad
Spring semester of sophomore year - Spring semester of junior year

Opportunities/Destinations
Choose the places that are beyond expected and out of your comfort zone:

  • France
  • Spain
  • Greece
  • Brazil
  • South American countries
  • African countries (Kenya, South Africa, Tanzania)

Why this is Important
Students need to understand the challenges facing the world outside of the USA. Students should engage in opportunities that are beyond the norm of what you are comfortable with so you gain the best experience that you have while studying abroad.

How Students Can Get Started
Speak with the Undergraduate Director about your interest in studying abroad as well as the Study Abroad Office.

 

PARTICIPATE: Peer Leadership

Student Organization(s)

Why this is Important
Peer Leadership introduces students to various careers and professions in criminology, criminal justice, and law. Students gain confidence in themselves and put their learning experiences into practice.

How Students Can Get Started
Speak with the Undergraduate Director.

 

PARTICIPATE: Internships/Professional Practice

Related Course(s)
CRJU 494 - Internship (not a required course) students can take up to 6 credit hours built around the student’s interest. Local and national opportunities available.

Recommended sites/work experiences

Professional Organizations
Lamba Alpha Epsilon/Criminal Justice Association - national criminal justice association that provides scholarships and opportunities to present on students’ original research.

Why this is Important
Students work in criminal justice agencies/organizations under faculty supervision for a specified number of hours. Internships provide excellent resume material, give students real world experience, and provide a potential employer upon graduation. An excellent opportunity for students to gain leadership experience.

How Students Can Get Started
Contact the Internship Director, Les Wiser. Students should also attend the Internship and Career Fair within the Criminology and Criminal Justice department.


PARTICIPATE: Research

Related Course(s)
CRJU 399 - Independent Study

Sample Research Projects or Topics

  • Statutory rape among teen males in high school
  • Delay in the implementation in the death penalty
  • Bell Decisions

Why this is Important
Getting involved with research beyond the classroom shows students that the world of criminal justice is open to a variety of opportunities past typical criminal justice prospects.

How Students Can Get Started
Contact the faculty member who shares your research interest.

 

INTEGRATE

How to Integrate
There are a number of integrative learning course where we ask students to bring together knowledge from various disciplines: CRJU 426, 430, 554, 563, 591. In these courses, students have immersion experiences in various sites among the community within various prisons, psychiatric facilities, and visits to court rooms.

Why this is Important
Many students have an idea of what criminal justice is, but they do not know how the breadth of the criminal justice system or how criminal justice issues connect to so many other aspects of modern life. It is vital for our students to see the reality of the criminal justice field.

 

LEAD

Initial career opportunities

  • Policing
  • Correctional Administration
  • Military
  • Juvenile Justice
  • Special Investigators
  • Opportunity to work within the court system in some capacity

Related graduate programs
M.A. in Criminology & Criminal Justice
Ph.D. in Criminology & Criminal Justice
J.D. (School of Law)

Future career opportunities

  • General Law Enforcement
  • Forensic Science
  • Office of the Coroner
  • Crime Scene Investigation
  • Homeland Security
  • Diplomatic Security
  • Federal (FBI, CIA, Customs, DEA, Secret Service)
  • Law and Policy opportunities
Dance

To learn more about making the most of your educational experiences within and beyond the classroom contact: 
Susan Anderson, Head of Dance, susanea@mailbox.sc.edu

 

PARTICIPATE: Community Service

Related Course(s)
DANC 150 - Introduction to Dance (restricted to Dance Majors and Minors)
DANC 177 - Dance Company I (restricted to Dance Majors and Minors)
DANC 270 - Dance Education I: Introduction to Dance Education (restricted to Dance Education Majors)
DANC 478 - Integrated Approaches in Dance Education (restricted to Dance Education Majors)

Recommended Sites/Experiences

  • Teaching dance at a community or senior center
  • Volunteering in an educational environment, nonprofit performing arts program, K-12 Dance Education and Performance
  • Supporting local arts organizations by working backstage, ushering, or helping with administrative work
  • Participate in state and national art advocacy days
  • Participate in or organizing a fundraiser for the community (NDEO)

Why this is Important
Community Service enables students to support local arts organizations, gain experience for future careers in a variety of fields, and increase appreciation of dance in the community.

How Students Can Get Started
Talk with your faculty advisor, contact one of the student groups (NDEO student chapter, USC Dance Advisory Council) or a community arts organization directly.

 

PARTICIPATE: Diversity & Social Advocacy

Related Course(s)
All of the Dance Education courses include components of DSA including:
DANC 270 - Dance Education I: Introduction to Dance Education
DANC 281 - Dance History I
DANC 282 - Dance History II
DANC 307 - West African Dance I
DANC 360 - Choreography I
DANC 407 - West African Dance II
DANC 460 - Choreography II
DANC 478 - Integrated Approaches in Dance Education
DANC 479 - Teaching Internship in Dance Education
DANC 490 - Senior Capstone Dance Project

Recommended Sites/Experiences

  • Non-Profit Arts Organizations
  • Dance Companies
  • USC Dance Organization
  • State and National Arts Advocacy Days
  • Volunteering in an organization that works with individuals with disabilities
  • CarolinaLIFE
  • Wideman/Davis Dance

Sample Research or Advocacy Project Topics

  • The relevance of dance in education
  • Inclusive dance
  • Choreography or curricula about a social justice issue
  • Race and gender issues in dance

Why this is Important
Immersion in diverse settings demonstrates how dance can be used as a vehicle for social change and recognizing the discipline as having many opportunities for inclusivity.

How Students Can Get Started
Talk with Faculty to ask how to get involved with different sites and experiences. Attend organization meetings. Do research to learn about what is available.

 

PARTICIPATE: Global Learning

Related Course(s)
DANC 111 - World Dance I
DANC 113 - World Dance II
DANC 281 - Dance History I
DANC 282 - Dance History II
DANC 307 - West African Dance I
DANC 407 - West African Dance II

Timing for Study Abroad

  • Dance Education before Spring of Sophomore Year or any summers
  • Dance Performance fall semester of Sophomore or Junior Year

Opportunities/Destinations

  • National Taiwan University of Arts
  • Arts Institute of Barcelona
  • University of Limerick
  • Movement Exchange

Why this is Important
Studying dance abroad provides students with an opportunity to learn about how various cultural values and traditions inform dance practice and performance across the globe.

How Students Can Get Started
Talk to your Advisor or contact the Study Abroad Office.

 

PARTICIPATE: Peer Leadership

Student Organizations

Why this is Important
Peer Leadership allows students to gain leadership experience relevant to future careers and service in dance.

How Students Can Get Started
Talk with your faculty advisory about these opportunities or contact Stephanie Milling, advisor for NDEO.

 

PARTICIPATE: Internships/Professional Practice

Related Course(s)
DANC 370 - Dance Education II: Creative Dance
DANC 399 - Independent Study
DANC 470 - Dance Education III: Dance Pedagogy for Middle and High School
DANC 478 - Integrated Approaches in Dance Education
DANC 479 - Teaching Internship in Dance Education
DANC 490 - Senior Capstone Dance Project

Recommended sites/Work experiences

Professional Organizations
Students may also be interested the SC Dance Association, Dance and the Child International, World Dance Alliance, Dance USA, and Americans for the Arts, American College Dance Association, NDEO.

Why this is Important
Internships prepare students for careers in dance education, professional performance, and arts administration through mentored, hands-on work experiences in a variety of arts organizations.

How Students Can Get Started
Talk with your Faculty Advisor.

 

PARTICIPATE: Research

Related Course(s)
DANC 281 - Dance History I
DANC 282 - Dance History II
DANC 490 - Senior Capstone Dance Project
DANC 360 - Choreography I
DANC 460 - Choreography II
DANC 399 - Independent Study and Research 

Sample Research Projects or Topics

  • Advocacy and Policy research
  • Standards of Ballet Teaching
  • Best Practices in Dance Pedagogy
  • Historically related topics
  • Creating a Dance work and investigating the creative process (Choreographing a work and critically analyzing the process

Other Opportunities
Magellan Scholars
Summer opportunities within research, training, and/or internships

Why this is Important
Creative/Scholarly research provides students with opportunities to investigate creative processes and apply qualitative methodologies to choreography and writing projects in dance.

How Students Can Get Started
Talk with your faculty advisor to plan a project that will lead to a bigger picture.

 

INTEGRATE

How to Integrate
The curriculum within Dance Education immerses students in beyond the classroom experiences, such as Arts Advocacy Days where students participate in meetings with politicians to discuss funding and policy issues that impact the arts.

Dance Majors mentor public school students with Choreography Projects and apply techniques and teaching practices learned within the classroom. Students also teach at the Children’s Development Center and through Student Teaching in K-12 environments applying pedagogical strategies in real world settings.

Students in the performance program (360 and 460) choreograph work they develop and perform that apply concepts from their learning.

Students in DANC 177 do work within the community and gain exposure working in community settings.

 

LEAD

Initial Career Opportunities

  • Performance
  • Teaching in a variety of settings
  • Arts Administration
  • Community Outreach Programs

Related Graduate Programs
M.A. in Arts Administration
M.A. within the Dance discipline
M.A.T. (can only pursue after graduating for one year)
Ed.D in dance education
M.F.A. in Dance
Ph.D in related art including performance arts
Additional Certifications include (CMA, Pilates, Alexander Technique)

Future Career Opportunities

  • Performance
  • Director of Dance Company or Organizations
  • Arts Administration
  • University Faculty
  • Choreographer
  • Studio Owner
English
To learn more about making the most of your educational experiences within and beyond the classroom contact:
Ed Gieskes, Undergraduate Director, gieskese@sc.edu

 

PARTICIPATE: Community Service

Related Course(s)
ENGL 466 - Internship

Recommended Sites/Experiences

Literacy programs such as:

Why this is Important
Getting engaged within community service connects students with the community. 

How Students Can Get Started
Students should contact the agencies of interest or consult with the Undergraduate Director.

 

PARTICIPATE: Diversity & Social Advocacy

Related Course(s)
ENGL 383 - Romanticism
ENGL 430 - Topics in African American Literature
ENGL 434 - Environmental Literature
ENGL 438B - Scottish Literature
ENGL 438C - Irish Literature
ENGL 438D - African Literature
ENGL 438E - Caribbean Literature
ENGL 441 - Global Contemporary Literature
ENGL 485 - Women's Rhetoric

Recommended sites/experiences

Why this is Important
Engaging in advocacy immerses students in another culture that builds knowledge and awareness to understand the needs of your community and desire to take action.

How Students Can Get Started
Students should register for the course or talk with the Undergraduate Director for more information about getting involved.

 

PARTICIPATE: Global Learning

Related Course(s)
ENGL 393 - Postcolonialism
ENGL 430 - Topics in African American Literature
ENGL 438B - Scottish Literature
ENGL 438C - Irish Literature
ENGL 438D - African Literature
ENGL 438E - Caribbean Literature
ENGL 439 - Selected Topics
ENGL 441 - Global Contemporary Literature
ENGL 485 - Women’s Rhetoric

Timing for Study Abroad
Junior year

Opportunities/Destinations

  • University of London
  • Canterbury
  • Kent
  • Glasgow
  • Ireland
  • Italy

Why this is Important
Study abroad can be an invaluable part of undergraduate education and offers the chance for some unique insights into the literatures and cultures we study in our classes here in the English Department.

How to Get Started
Visit the Study Abroad Office and contact the Undergraduate Director.

 

PARTICIPATE: Peer Leadership

Student Organizations

Why this is Important
Getting involved in peer leadership opportunities gives students the opportunity to lead their peers and develop applicable skills that will benefit their future.

How Students Can Get Started
Students interested in any of these organizations should contact the Undergraduate Director.

 

PARTICIPATE: Internships/Professional Practice

Related Course(s)
ENGL 466 - Internship

Program Requirements 
ENGL 466 + internship contract

Program Internship Requirements

  • Local Publications
  • Editing Firms
  • Online Publications
  • Any of the community service opportunities listed above.

Professional Organizations
Modern Language Association (MLA)

Why this is Important
Involvement with professional organizations helps students to integrate their course experiences with professional opportunities.

How Students Can Get Started 
Students interested in any of these organizations should contact the Undergraduate Director.

 

PARTICIPATE: Research

Related Course(s)
ENGL 399 - Independent Study
ENGL 499 - Thesis
*many upper level courses, 300 and higher

Sample Research Projects or Topics
Thesis; archival research

Why this is Important
Research advances students’ intellectual experience and capacities for independent work.

How Students Can Get Started
Students interested in getting involved with research should talk with their academic advisor or contact the Undergraduate Director.

 

INTEGRATE

How to Integrate 
Students seeking distinction present their work in a public venue as part of the process, connecting to broader audiences. Creative writing courses entail creative work by their very nature and many of our courses have creative assignments as part of the required coursework.

 

LEAD

Initial Career Opportunities
Anything involving writing, critical thought, intelligent analysis, and/or creative planning

Related Graduate Programs 

  • Ph.D. programs in rhetoric or literature
  • M.A. programs in rhetoric or literature
  • M.F.A. programs
  • M.A.T teaching degree programs

Future Career Opportunities 
Graduates pursue a wide range of careers - editing, political science, philosophy, business, education, law. Students are well placed to pursue careers in writing, editing, or other creative fields. The skills developed by an English major have broad applicability and appeal to employers looking for people with innovative, creative, and synthesizing minds.

Environmental Science

To learn more about making the most of your educational experiences within and beyond the classroom contact:
Dr. Gwendelyn Geidel, Undergraduate Director, ugraddir@seoe.sc.edu
Ms. Sheri Foxworth, Undergraduate Coordinator, foxworsd@mailbox.sc.edu

 

PARTICIPATE: Community Service

Related Course(s)
ENVR/POLI 122 - Green Engagements
ENVR 231 - Introduction to Sustainability Management and Leadership
ENVR 331 - Integrating Sustainability
ENVR 399 - Independent Study
ENVR 490 - Special Topics in Sustainability and the Environment
ENVR 500 - Environmental Practicum
ENVR 501 - Special Topics on "Sustainable Projects"
ENVR 531 - Sustainability Management and Leadership Strategies
ENVR/ECON 548 - Environmental Economics
ENVR 590 - Environmental Issues Seminar

Recommended Sites/Experiences

  • Conservation Voters of SC
  • Belser Arboretum
  • UofSC Outdoor Recreation
  • Keep the Midlands Beautiful
  • City Roots
  • UofSC Herbarium
  • Edventure

Why this is Important
Teaching others about environmental issues helps you learn to clearly communicate science to non-specialists, develop public awareness, and increase advocacy and activism.

How Students Can Get Started
Contact any faculty member, faculty affiliate, or faculty advisor in the Environment and Sustainability program of the School of the Earth, Ocean and Environment.

 

PARTICIPATE: Diversity & Social Advocacy

Related Course(s)
ENVR/POLI 121 - Green Explorations
ENVR/POLI 122 - Green Engagements
ENVR 202 - Environmental Science and Policy II
ENVR 231 - Introduction to Sustainability Management and Leadership
ENVR/ENHS 321 - Environmental Pollution and Health
ENVR/PHIL 322 - Environmental Ethics
ENVR/ENHS 323 - Global Environmental Health
ENVR 331 - Integrating Sustainability
ENVR 399 - Independent Study
ENVR 490 - Special Topics in Sustainability and the Environment
ENVR 500 - Environmental Practicum
ENVR 501 - Special Topics in the Environment
ENVR 531 - Sustainability Management and Leadership Strategies
ENVR /ECON 548 - Environmental Economics
ENVR 590 - Environmental Issues Seminar

Recommended Sites/Experiences

  • Conservation Voters of SC
  • Keep the Midlands Beautiful
  • Edventure
  • Gills Creek Watershed Association
  • Rocky Branch Watershed Association
  • Sustainable Carolina
  • SAGE (Students Advocating a Greener Environment)
  • Congaree National Park

Sample Research or Advocacy Project Topics

  • Edventure integration with the Palmetto Trail Greenway
  • Gills Creek Flood impact Assessment

Why this is Important
"Environmental Justice" is a core concept in Environmental Science: externalized negative environmental impacts fall disproportionately on the poor, children, the elderly, and minorities.

How Students Can Get Started
Contact any faculty member, faculty affiliate, or faculty advisor in the Environment and Sustainability program of the School of the Earth, Ocean and Environment.

 

PARTICIPATE: Global Learning

Related Course(s)
ENVR 202 - Environmental Science and Policy II
ENVR 295 - Green Technology in Germany
ENVR/ENHS 323 - Global Environmental Health
ENVR 331 - Integrating Sustainability
ENVR 399 - Independent Study
ENVR 490 - Special Topics in Sustainability and the Environment
ENVR 501 - Special Topics in the Environment
ENVR 531 - Sustainability Management and Leadership Strategies
ENVR /ECON 548 - Environmental Economics
ENVR/BIOL 571 - Conservation Biology
ENVR/BIOL 572 - Freshwater Ecology
ENVR 590 - Environmental Issues Seminar

Timing for Study Abroad
Any summer break or semester following ENVR 201/202 (typically taken during sophomore year).

Opportunities/Destinations

  • U.K.
  • Europe (including Germany, Italy)
  • Costa Rica
  • Chile
  • Indonesia
  • UAE
  • China
  • Taiwan
  • South Africa
  • Madagascar
  • Alaska
  • Iceland
  • Antarctica 
  • No Limits!  Can be supported by various travel grants and awards.

Why this is Important
Students can see sustainable farming, green energy resources, environmental education and outreach, environmental management, practices, and/or participate in environmental science classroom and field studies

How Students Can Get Started
Contact any faculty member, faculty affiliate, or faculty advisor in the Environment and Sustainability program of the School of the Earth, Ocean and Environment.

 

PARTICIPATE: Peer Leadership

Related Course(s)
ENVR/POLI 122 - Green Engagements
ENVR 331 - Integrating Sustainability
ENVR 399 - Independent Study
ENVR 460 - Conagree National Park: Field Investigations in Environmental Science
ENVR 490 - Special Topics in Sustainability and the Environment
ENVR 499 - Research in Environmental Science
ENVR 500 - Environmental Practicum
ENVR 501 - Special Topics in the Environment
ENVR/BIOL 571 - Conservation Biology
ENVR/BIOL 572 - Freshwater Ecology
ENVR 590 - Environmental Issues Seminar

Student Organizations

  • Sustainable Carolina
  • SAGE (Students Advocating a Greener Environment)

Other Leadership Opportunities

  • NOAA
  • National Estuarine Research Reserve
  • National Park Service
  • Baruch Marine Field Lab
  • USC Housing
  • Watershed Associations
  • Clemson Extension
  • City of Columbia

Why this is Important
Demonstrated leadership can be a factor in departmental awards, national scholarships (Hollings, Udall, Goldwater), and successful application to graduate school.

How Students Can Get Started
Contact any faculty member, faculty affiliate, or faculty advisor in the Environment and Sustainability program.

 

PARTICIPATE: Internships/Professional Practice

Related Course(s)
ENVR/POLI 122 - Green Engagements
ENVR 202 - Environmental Science and Policy II
ENVR 231 - Introduction to Sustainability Management and Leadership
ENVR 295 - Green Technology in Germany
ENVR/ENHS 321 - Environmental Pollution and Health
ENVR/ENHS 323 - Global Environmental Health
ENVR 331 - Integrating Sustainability
ENVR 399 - Independent Study
ENVR 460 - Congaree National Park: Field Investigations in Environmental Science
ENVR 490 - Special Topics in Sustainability and the Environment
ENVR 499 - Research in Environmental Science
ENVR 500 - Environmental Practicum
ENVR 531 - Sustainability Management and Leadership Strategies
ENVR/ECON 548 - Environmental Economics
ENVR/BIOL 571 - Conservation Biology
ENVR/BIOL 572 - Freshwater Ecology
ENVR 590 - Environmental Issues Seminar

Recommended Sites/Work Experiences

  • Sustainable Carolina
  • City Roots-Gills Creek Watershed Association
  • Summer Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) opportunities
  • NOAA
  • National Park Internships (Hawaii, Congaree)

Professional Organizations
AASHE

Why this is Important
Professional Experiences can be a factor in departmental awards, national scholarships (Hollings, Udall, Goldwater) and successful application to graduate school.

How Students Can Get Started
Contact any faculty member, faculty affiliate, or faculty advisor in the Environment and Sustainability program.

 

PARTICIPATE: Research

Related Course(s)
ENVR/POLI 122 – Green Engagements
ENVR 399 – Independent Study
ENVR 460 – Congaree National Park: Field Investigations in Environmental Science
ENVR 490 – Special Topics in Sustainability and the Environment
ENVR 499 – Research in Environmental Science
ENVR 500 – Environmental Practicum
ENVR 531 – Sustainability Management and Leadership Strategies
ENVR/BIOL 571 – Conservation Biology
ENVR/BIOL 572 – Freshwater Ecology

Sample research projects or topics

  • renewable energy
  • sustainable farming
  • human impacts on the environment
  • ecology
  • biodiversity
  • hydrology
  • water resources and water quality
  • environmental policy
  • environmental justice
  • culture & environmen

Why this is Important
Research experience, particularly independent research, plays a major role in departmental awards, national scholarships (Hollings, Goldwater, Udall) and successful application to graduate school. It is also instrumental in helping students decide which facet of environmental science to focus on in the future. These projects are often supported by SURF (Honors College) and Magellan grants.

How Students Can Get Started
Contact any faculty member, faculty affiliate, or faculty advisor in the Environment and Sustainability program of the School of the Earth, Ocean and Environment.

 

INTEGRATE

How to Integrate
ENVR/POLI 121 - Green Explorations
ENVR/POLI 122 - Green Engagements
ENVR 200 - Natural History of South Carolina
ENVR 201 - Environmental Science and Policy I
ENVR 202 - Environmental Science and Policy II
ENVR/GERM 295 - Green Technology in Germany
ENVR/PHIL 322 - Environmental Ethics
ENVR 331 - Integrating Sustainability
ENVR 460 - Congaree National Park
ENVR 490 - Special Topics in Sustainability and the Environment
ENVR 499 - Research in Environmental Science
ENVR 500 - Environmental Practicum
ENVR 501 - Special Topics in the Environment
ENVR 531 - Sustainability Management and Leadership Strategies
ENVR/ECON 548 - Environmental Economics
ENVR/BIOL 571 - Conservation Biology
ENVR/BIOL 572 - Freshwater Ecology
ENVR 590 - Environmental Issues Seminar

 

LEAD

Initial career opportunities

  • Water Quality Assessor
  • Conservation Manager
  • Environmental Health Officer
  • Environmental Impact Assessor
  • Climate Change Impact Assessor in Business
  • Non-Governmental, Education, and Governmental Sectors. Examples: Public utilities, manufacturing, environmental consulting, County and State Extension services.

Related graduate programs
There are many options. Some examples: Law School; Master’s in Earth and Environmental Resource Management (MEERM); Master of Environmental Management (MEM); Medical School; M.A., PhD.

Future career opportunities

  • Sustainability Manager
  • Environmental Manager
  • Program Officer in Business
  • Education, Humanitarian Agencies, and Service agencies. Examples: EPA, NOAA, USAID, DHEC, DNR; researcher or research director in academic or R&D settings.


Of special note: As sustainability & environmental issues continue to be of concern, these careers have significant growth potential over the next decade.

Environmental Studies

To learn more about making the most of your educational experiences within and beyond the classroom contact:
Dr. Gwendelyn Geidel, Undergraduate Director, ugraddir@seoe.sc.edu
Ms. Sheri Foxworth, Undergraduate Coordinator, foxworsd@mailbox.sc.edu

 

PARTICIPATE: Community Service

Related Courses
ENVR/POLI 122 - Green Engagements
ENVR 231 - Introduction to Sustainability Management and Leadership
ENVR 331 - Integrating Sustainability
ENVR 399 - Independent Study
ENVR 490 - Special Topics in Sustainability and the Environment
ENVR 500 - Environmental Practicum
ENVR 501- special section on “Sustainable Projects
ENVR 531 - Sustainability Management and Leadership Strategies
ENVR/ECON 548 - Environmental Economics
ENVR 590 - Environmental Issues Seminar

Recommended Sites/Experiences

  • Sustainable Carolina
  • SAGE (Students Advocating a Greener Environment)
  • Congaree National Park
  • Conservation Voters of SC
  • Belser Arboretum
  • UofSC Outdoor Recreation
  • Keep the Midlands Beautiful
  • City Roots
  • UofSC Herbarium
  • Edventure

Why this is Important
Teaching others - particularly children - about environmental issues helps develop public awareness and increases advocacy and activism.
How Students Can Get Started
Contact any faculty member, faculty affiliate, or faculty advisor in the Environment and Sustainability program of the School of the Earth, Ocean and Environment.

 

PARTICIPATE: Diversity and Social Advocacy

Related Courses
ENVR/POLI 121 - Green Explorations
ENVR/POLI 122 - Green Engagements
ENVR 202 - Environmental Science and Policy II
ENVR 231 - Introduction to Sustainability Management and Leadership
ENVR/ENHS 321 - Environmental Pollution and Health
ENVR/PHIL 322 - Environmental Ethics
ENVR/ENHS 323 - Global Environmental Health
ENVR 331 - Integrating Sustainability
ENVR 399 - Independent Study
ENVR 490 - Special Topics in Sustainability and the Environment
ENVR 500 - Environmental Practicum
ENVR 501 - Special Topics in the Environment
ENVR 531 - Sustainability Management and Leadership Strategies
ENVR 548 - Environmental Economics
ENVR 590 - Environmental Issues Seminar

Recommended Sites/Work Experiences

  • Sustainable Carolina
  • SAGE (Students Advocating a Greener Environment)
  • Congaree National Park
  • Conservation Voters of SC
  • Keep the Midlands Beautiful
  • Edventure

Why This is Important
"Environmental Justice" is a core concept in Environmental Studies: externalized negative environmental impacts fall disproportionately on the poor, children, the elderly, and minorities.
Getting Started
Contact any faculty member, faculty affiliate, or faculty advisor in the Environment and Sustainability program of the School of the Earth, Ocean and Environment.

 

PARTICIPATE: Global Learning

Related Courses
ENVR/GERM 295 - Green Technology in Germany
ENVR/ENHS 323 - Global Environmental Health
ENVR 331 - Integrating Sustainability
ENVR 399 - Independent Study
ENVR 490 - Special Topics in Sustainability and the Environment
ENVR 499 - Research in Environmental Science
ENVR 501 - Special Topics in the Environment
ENVR 531 - Sustainability Management and Leadership Strategies
ENVR/ECON 548 - Environmental Economics
ENVR/BIOL 571 - Conservation Biology
ENVR/BIOL 572 - Freshwater Ecology
ENVR 590 - Environmental Issues Seminar

Recommended Timing, Semester, or Destinations
Study abroad: Any summer break or semester following ENVR 201/202 (typically taken during sophomore year).

Study Abroad Destinations
Germany, Costa Rica, South Africa, Peru, South America, Madagascar, Alaska, Iceland, Antarctica - No Limits!  Can be supported by various travel grants and awards.

Why This is Important
Students can see sustainable farming, green energy resources, environmental education and outreach, and environmental management in practice.

Getting Started
Contact any faculty member, faculty affiliate, or faculty advisor in the Environment and Sustainability program of the School of the Earth, Ocean and Environment.

 

PARTICIPATE: Peer Leadership

Related Courses
ENVR/POLI 122 - Green Engagements
ENVR 331 - Integrating Sustainability
ENVR 399 - Independent Study
ENVR 460 - Congaree National Park
ENVR 490 - Special Topics in Sustainability and the Environment
ENVR 499 - Research in Environmental Science
ENVR 500 - Environmental Practicum
ENVR 501 – special topic with “Sustainable Carolina
ENVR 531 - Sustainability Management and Leadership Strategies
ENVR/BIOL 571 - Conservation Biology
ENVR/BIOL 572 - Freshwater Ecology
ENVR 590 - Environmental Issues Seminar

Student Organizations
Sustainable Carolina, SAGE (Students Advocating a Greener Environment), Conservation Voters of South Carolina

Other Leadership Opportunities
Sustainable Midlands, Keep the Midlands Beautiful, Greek Festival Recycling, Congaree National Park class

Why This is Important
Demonstrated leadership can be a factor in departmental awards, national scholarships (Hollings, Udall, Goldwater), and successful application to graduate school.

Getting Started
Contact any faculty member, faculty affiliate, or faculty advisor in the Environment and Sustainability program of the School of the Earth, Ocean and Environment.

 

PARTICIPATE: Internships/Professional Practice

Related Courses
ENVR/POLI 122 - Green Engagements
ENVR 202 - Environmental Science and Policy II
ENVR 231 - Introduction to Sustainability Management and Leadership
ENVR/GERM 295 - Green Technology in Germany
ENVR/ENHS 321 - Environmental Pollution and Health
ENVR/ENHS 323 - Global Environmental Health
ENVR 331 - Integrating Sustainability
ENVR 399 - Independent Study
ENVR 460 - Congaree National Park
ENVR 490 - Special Topics in Sustainability and the Environment
ENVR 499 - Research in Environmental Science
ENVR 500 - Environmental Practicum
ENVR 501 – special topic on “Sustainable Projects in Engineering"
ENVR 531 - Sustainability Management and Leadership Strategies
ENVR 548 - Environmental Economics
ENVR/BIOL 571 - Conservation Biology
ENVR 590 - Environmental Issues Seminar

Recommended Sites/Work Experiences

  • Sustainable Carolina
  • City Roots
  • Gills Creek Watershed Association
  • Summer Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) opportunities
  • NOAA
  • National Park Internships (Hawaii, Congaree)

Professionial Organizations
AASHE

Why This is Important
Professional Experiences can be a factor in departmental awards, national scholarships (Hollings, Udall, Goldwater) and successful application to graduate school.

Getting Started
Contact any faculty member, faculty affiliate, or faculty advisor in the Environment and Sustainability program.

 

PARTICIPATE: Reserach

Related Courses
ENVR/POLI 122 - Green Engagements
ENVR 460 - Congaree National Park
ENVR 490 - Special Topics in Sustainability and the Environment:
ENVR 499 - Research in Environmental Science
ENVR 500 - Environmental Practicum:
ENVR 531 - Sustainability Management and Leadership Strategies
ENVR/BIOL 571 - Conservation Biology
ENVR/BIOL 572 - Freshwater Ecology

Sample Research Projects or Topics
Renewable energy, sustainable farming, human impacts on the environment, water resources and water quality, environmental policy, environmental justice, traditional environmental knowledge and practice, environmental history, environmental literature, culture & environment.

Why This is Important
Research experience, particularly independent research, plays a major role in departmental awards, national scholarships (Hollings, Goldwater, Udall) and successful application to graduate school. It is also instrumental in helping students decide which facet of environmental science to focus on in the future. These projects are often supported by SURF (Honors College) and Magellan grants.

How Students Can Get Started
Contact any faculty member, faculty affiliate, or faculty advisor in the Environment and Sustainability program of the School of the Earth, Ocean and Environment.

 

INTEGRATE

ENVR/POLI 121 - Green Explorations
ENVR/POLI 122 - Green Engagements
ENVR 200 - Natural History of South Carolina
ENVR 201 - Environmental Science and Policy I
ENVR 202 - Environmental Science and Policy II
ENVR/GERM 295 - Green Technology in Germany
ENVR/PHIL 322 - Environmental Ethics
ENVR 331 - Integrating Sustainability
ENVR 460 - Congaree National Park
ENVR 490 - Special Topics in Sustainability and the Environment
ENVR 499 - Research in Environmental Science
ENVR 500 - Environmental Practicum
ENVR 501 - Special Topics in the Environment
ENVR 531 - Sustainability Management and Leadership Strategies
ENVR 548 - Environmental Economics
ENVR/BIOL 571 - Conservation Biology
ENVR/BIOL 572 - Freshwater Ecology
ENVR 590 - Environmental Issues Seminar

 

LEAD

Initial Career Opportunities
Sustainability Educator; Sustainability Coordinator; Environmental Outreach Coordinator ; Park Ranger; and in business, non-governmental, education, and governmental sectors.

Related Graduate Programs
There are many options. Some examples: Law School; Master’s in Earth and Environmental Resource Management (MEERM); Master of Environmental Management (MEM); Medical School; M.A., PhD.

Future Career Opportunities
Sustainability Manager, Environmental Manager; Program Officer in business, education, humanitarian agencies, and service agencies.

Film and Media Studies

To learn more about making the most of your educational experiences within and beyond the classroom contact: 
Dwan Samuel, Administrative Assistant, samueldl@mailbox.sc.edu
Mark Cooper, Director of Film and Media Studies, coopermg@sc.edu

 

PARTICIPATE: Community Service

Related Course(s)
FAMS 511 - Special Topics: Critical Interactives (cross-listed with CSCE and MART)

Recommended Sites/Experiences
The Helen Hill Media Education Center (HHMEC) in Columbia, SC, a program of the Nickelodeon Theater. The HHMEC mission is to teach media literacy skills and media production to Columbia’s undeserved and at-risk youth. Students interested in working with media and young people in an educational setting as mentors can volunteer or create an internship. Volunteer with the SCETV and Indie Grits Festival. For more information about how to get involved, contact the Film and Media Studies Program office at FAMS@sc.edu.

Volunteer with the Moving Image Research Collections (MIRC), part of USC Libraries. MIRC is one of the top academic film and media archives in the United States. Students gain experiences at MIRC that provide exposure to an array of film and media concerns such as: preservation, identification and description of archival materials, migration of analog media onto digital platforms, and more.

Why this is Important
Media literacy skills are necessary for every citizen in our media saturated, digital age. Students in Film and Media Studies gain valuable skills in media analysis that they can share with young people to guide them in becoming well informed media consumers and citizens. In addition, students can gain valuable experience in community building through media curation.

How Students Can Get Started 
Talk to your faculty advisor as soon as you’ve taken FAMS 240 and FAMS 300 to learn more about the listed course.

 

PARTICIPATE: Diversity & Social Advocacy

Related Course(s)
FAMS 470 - Genre in Film and Media (Selected Sections)
FAMS 511 - Special Topics in Film and Media Studies (Selected Sections)
FAMS 555 - Documentary Film and Media Studies

Recommended Sites/Experiences

  • Hellen Hill Media Education Center’s program at CA Johnson High School
  • Writing workshop with community members at Richland County Public Library (RCPL)

Sample Research or Advocacy Project Topics
Students in Critical Interactives work closely with the Ward One Community Organization to bring broader awareness to the legacy of urban renewal (1950s-1970s) which cleared this historically African American community to make room for the University of South Carolina’s expansion.

Why this is Important
Media connect audiences as well as divide them. They circulate stereotypes and reinforce social norms--and can also challenge them. Understanding how media work is an important part of any project of social transformation. Opportunities in this pathway encourage students to synthesize knowledge gained in the classroom and apply it concretely to projects of social change.

How Students Can Get Started 
Talk to your faculty advisor as soon as you’ve taken FAMS 240 and FAMS 300 to learn more about the listed courses.

 

PARTICIPATE: Global Learning

Related Course(s)
FAMS 300 - Film and Media History
FAMS 598 - Special Topics in Global Film and Media

Timing for Study Abroad
Timing ideal for junior year if during the semester; or, any summer between semesters. Discuss plans with your faculty advisor as soon as possible.

Opportunities/Destinations

  • Australia
  • Brazil
  • China- City University, Hong Kong and Taiwan (some language proficiency needed)
  • Europe
  • Germany
  • Spain
  • Bath, United Kingdom

Why this is Important
Media industries are global. The fastest growing media markets in the world are in developing countries such as Brazil, China, and India. Students who enter the media industry should expect to work internationally in media business and media production.

How Students Can Get Started
Talk to your faculty advisor as soon as you’ve taken FAMS 240 and FAMS 300 to learn more about the listed courses.

 

PARTICIPATE: Peer Leadership

Student Organization(s)

  • StudentGamecockTV
  • Carolina Productions
  • Gamecock Productions (including Campus Movie Fest)
  • Phi Beta Kappa

Other Leadership Opportunities

  • Living Learning Community for the Arts-Patterson RM
  • Student Success Center support for FAMS courses
  • University 101

Why this is Important
Peer support is a leading factor in student success. In developing peer leadership skills, students not only support the learning experience of fellow students but also cultivate habits of listening, organizing, supporting, teaching, and guiding that will have value after graduation.

How Students Can Get started
Talk to your faculty advisor as soon as you’ve taken FAMS 240 and FAMS 300, visit the Leadership and Service Center, and visit Garnet Gate to learn more about these organizations.

 

PARTICIPATE: Internships/Professional Practice

Related Course(s)
Upper level Film and Media Studies courses expose students to concepts that will prepare them for internships in film and media environments that range from businesses to media production to library/media archives. The Film and Media Studies Program is in the process of developing an internship course for credit that can be taken as part of the major or minor.
Independent Studies courses FAMS399, contact the director.

Recommended Sites/Work Experiences 
South Carolina Educational Television (SCETV) Internship; Helen Hill Media Education Center (HHMEC is organized through the Nickelodeon); Nickelodeon Theater (Indie Grits Film Festival, Special Programing, and more); Flock and Rally (local public relations firm); Consult the South Carolina Film Office for more information about local media companies.

Why this is Important
An internship in some aspect of film and media can provide students exposure to professional opportunities that they may choose to explore after graduation.

How Students Can Get Started
Students should work with their advisor to determine if an internship experience will support their learning objectives and professional goals. Talk to your faculty advisor as soon as you’ve taken FAMS 240 and FAMS 300.

 

PARTICIPATE: Research

Related Course(s)
All upper level courses in Film and Media Studies courses have research components. Example(s) include FAMS 300 - Film and Media History

Sample Research Projects or Topics
Our students have conducted original research on rare film prints housed at MIRC, the University’s film and media archive, and curated films from MIRC’s collections for presentation with live musical accompaniment at Indie Grits, the Nickelodeon’s film festival. The diverse range of films at MIRC afford many unique research opportunities Students have undertaken Magellan supported research on topics as various as the Let’s Play phenomenon, telenovelas in Columbia, and user analytics and location tracking. Students in FAMS 300 have opportunities to publish their research findings on the Columbia Screens website, which allows visitors to explore the early history of movie going in Columbia, SC.

Other Recommendations

  • Office of Undergraduate Research Magellan Scholarships, grants and mini grants
  • Travel grants to present original research at conferences

Why this is Important
Pursuing a unique research question within the field of film and media studies provides students an opportunity to apply their skills in research, analysis, critical thinking, creative problem solving, writing, and presentation. Conducting independent research distinguishes students from others within the field, prepares them for graduate school, and equips them to innovate jobs of the future.

How Students Can Get Started
Talk with their favorite professor who shares your research interest. Talk to your faculty advisor as soon as you’ve taken FAMS 240 and FAMS 300.

 

INTEGRATE

How to Integrate
The research and production of media projects frequently takes place within interdisciplinary teams that call upon unique skill sets from a range of disciplines. It is common for media scholars to work with media producers, computer scientists, and historians to develop media projects.

 

LEAD

Initial Career Opportunities

  • Media Management/Consultant
  • Editorial Assistant
  • Grant Writer
  • Film and Media Production Assistant
  • Entry level positions in industrial, educational, and entertainment production environments, as well as with non-profit organizations and NGOs.
  • Social Media coordinator

Related Graduate Programs
Master of Fine Arts (M.F.A.)
Masters in Library and Information Science (M.L.I.S.)
M.A. or Ph.D. in Journalism or Communications
Law Degree
Ph.D. in Film/Media

Future Career Opportunities

  • Media Education/Media Literacy Specialist
  • Film and Media Production (educational and entertainment media industries)
  • Film and Media archivist/librarian
  • Film and Media scholar
  • Entertainment Law
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Media Policy
  • Marketing

Other Comments
It is important to note that the strong foundation in the liberal arts that a Film and Media Studies degree provides can lead to many different career options. A degree in Film and Media Studies provides students the opportunity to develop skills that include: written and oral communication skills; research skills; critical thinking and analytical skills; collaboration and leadership skills.

French

To learn more about making the most of your educational experiences within and beyond the classroom contact:
Jeff Persels, Program Director, perselsj@sc.edu

 

PARTICIPATE: Global Learning

Related Course(s)
FREN 350

Timing for “study abroad”
The French Program sponsors a wide variety of study abroad experiences, from its faculty-led one-month intensive summer immersion at the Institut de Touraine in Tours, France to it’s brand-new semester- or year-long direct exchange with the Université d’Artois in Arras, France. Working with our Study Abroad Office, students can also choose from a large number of programs, whether coordinated by vetted outside providers or USC, such as the long-standing direct exchange with the various French campuses of Sciences Po. Many French majors and minors also apply to the French Ministry of Education’s Teaching Assistantship program (TAPIF) and teach English abroad in metropolitan France or one of the DOM-TOM the year after graduation.

Opportunities
French students can live on campus in a Francophone environment at the Max cy International House, sharing living space and activities with other students of French, coordinated by faculty and graduate student advisors. The French Club also meets weekly for a conversation hour at a local café, and the local chapter of the Alliance Française offers several events throughout the year — picnics, film festivals, French theatre productions, short video contests — which provide students with opportunities to mingle with Francophone and Francophile members of the Columbia community beyond the university. 

Why this is important
As successful as one can be in second-language acquisition at USC, there is nothing to compare with an actual immersion experience abroad, both linguistically and culturally. We strongly encourage all of our majors and minors to build a study abroad experience into their undergraduate curriculum. And the French Program has more money than all other languages combined to support those experiences, awarding over $20,000 annually in study abroad scholarships. 

How students can get started
Students can find more information on the College the Arts and Sciences study abroad page or use the Study Abroad Office to also make an appointment to meet with a Study Abroad adviser to go over all the options. Or students can consult French faculty directly for guidance.

 

PARTICIPATE: Peer Leadership

Student Organization(s)
USC is home to a student-run French Club that hosts a weekly conversation hour and cosponsors and/or participates in other events. French Club officers, working with a faculty advisor, have held book sales, dined out at local French restaurants, and staged puppet shows, etc.

Why this is important
Such student initiatives expand the use of French into social relationships, allowing for a more natural integration of the language into everyday life.

How students can get started
French Events and Activities

 

PARTICIPATE: Research

Sample Research Projects or Topics
Many USC French students have conducted original research and produced useful materials, often obtaining university grants (Magellan, Walker Institute, French Program) to help offset the costs of their projects. Recent examples include formal analyses of the rise of extremist political parties in Europe, the role of the financial crisis in the 2012 French Presidential elections, the production of a promotional video (which can be found on the French homepage) and even a course project on pastry that led a recent graduate to study professionally in Paris.

 

LEAD

Initial career opportunities 
USC French graduates from just the last five years have gone on to

  • train as professional pastry chefs in Paris
  • pursue musical training at a conservatory in Strasbourg
  • intern with the Organization for Economic Co-Operation and Development in Paris
  • teach English in Auvergne, Ile-de-France and Languedoc-Roussillon
  • research in chemistry labs in Caen and Lausanne and in a biology lab in Angers
  • work for Michelin, the North American headquarters for which is in South Carolina, and L’Oreal
  • pursue graduate work in French at the University of Virginia and Linguistics at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, and graduate work in Art History and Museum Conservatorship in the Netherlands.

USC graduates in French have won Fulbrights or French Ministry of Education Grants, among other awards, for almost every one of the last ten years. The majority of private and public secondary school French teachers in the Midlands are graduates of USC’s Undergraduate Foreign Language Certification program, M.A. or M.A.T. programs.

Related graduate programs 
M.A. or Ph.D. in French
M.A. or Ph.D. in Comparative Literature
M.A. or Ph.D. in Linguistics

We often have students go onto advanced degrees in political science or psychology; and applications to law and medical schools are often boosted by the B.A. in a more unusual language--the historical language of science.

Future career opportunities 

  • Management in multi-national firms
  • teachers and professors
  • politicians and political analysts
  • diplomats
  • travel agents
  • airline admin
  • translators
  • simultaneous translators
  • administrators in international NGOs
  • journalists

Other comments on careers
Learning another language helps individuals see one idea from multiple perspectives. Among the benefits of hiring a language major: they are sensitive to nuances, trained to read and analyze difficult material quickly, and most importantly, are not afraid to swim against the tide.

Download this information as a PDF.

Geography

To learn more about making the most of your educational experiences within and beyond the classroom contact: 
Greg Carbone, Director of Undergraduate Studies, carbone@mailbox.sc.edu  

 

PARTICIPATE: Community Service

Related Course(s)
GEOG 495 - Seminar in Geography
GEOG 497 - Service Learning in Geography

Recommended Sites/Experiences

Why this is Important
Geography is sometimes defined as the study of the earth as the home of humans. Community service engagement fosters an awareness of human problems, illustrates in a concrete way some of the concepts and issues examined in geography, and gives students the opportunity to share their knowledge with the community. See, for example: CityServe Project.

How Students Can Get Started
Contact Edith Pietrykowski, Undergraduate Coordinator, at pietryko@mailbox.sc.edu and join the Geography Department Facebook page.

 

PARTICIPATE: Diversity & Social Advocacy

Related Course(s)
GEOG 121 - Globalization of World Regions
GEOG 210 - Peoples, Places, and Environments
GEOG 311 - Cultural Geography
GEOG 566 - Social Aspects of Environmental Planning and Management

Recommended Site/Experiences
Sustainable Carolina
Refugee Resettlement

Sample Research or Advocacy Project Topics

  • Immigration work with Refugees
  • Assimilation of immigrants to different cultures

Why is this Important
Understanding the roles of different peoples in our society is important to establishing and maintaining a multicultural society.

How Students Can Get Started
Enroll in one of the listed Geography courses.

 

PARTICIPATE: Global Learning

Related Course(s)
For those wanting to learn more about the world from Columbia, we offer GEOG 121 (Globalization of World Regions), GEOG 210 (Peoples, Places, and Environments), and regional geography courses of Europe, Sub-Saharan Africa, Latin America, and the Middle East (GEOG 223-228).

Timing for Study Abroad
There is often a Maymester study abroad opportunity sponsored by Geography (for example GEOG 226). Geography is also often included in Study Abroad’s Global Classrooms.

Study abroad allows you to earn academic credits toward your USC degree while seeing the world. Geography majors often choose to study abroad to enhance their academic experience, both through semester-long experiences and as shorter summer courses. You can study a variety of topics overseas including resource management, ecotourism, environmental conservation and education, development, and geographic information science.

Opportunities/Destinations
Our majors have undertaken study abroad experiences in Chile, Spain, New Zealand, Egypt, Costa Rica, among others, but we encourage students to seek out destinations and topics that best fit their interests. Students can also participate in International House at Maxcy College.

Geography also regularly hosts international scholars providing an opportunity for student interaction with people from around the world.

Other

Why this is Important
Global study opportunities connect course material in geography to real-world experiences in other countries and help students draw comparisons between their own cultural norms and institutions and those of other cultures.

How Students Can Get Started 
Talk to your advisor about Maymester travel course opportunities through the department and transfer of coursework from study abroad opportunities. Contact the Study Abroad Office about other opportunities.

 

PARTICIPATE: Peer Leadership

Student Organization(s)

  • Gamma Theta Upsilon - Geography Honor Society
  • Geography Club - hosts Map-a-thons and organizes professional and social activities related to geography

Opportunities

Why this is Important
Leadership activities train students to be leaders in all walks of life, and help them to draw connections between geography course material and real-world leadership. 

How Students Can Get Started
Contact Edith Pietrykowski, Undergraduate Coordinator, at pietryko@mailbox.sc.edu.

 

PARTICIPATE: Internships/Professional Practice

Related Course(s)
GEOG 595 - Internship in Geography

Recommended sites/Work experiences 
Geography majors at USC have had a wide range of exciting and unique internship opportunities. Students have interned at federal, state, and local government agencies including the National Park Service, National Weather Service, National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency, South Carolina Department of Natural Resources, South Carolina State Climatologist’s Office, South Carolina Department of Transportation and Richland County Soil and Water District. They have also worked with private and commercial interests, including ESRI (the maker of ArcGIS software) and local real estate and homeowners associations. Internally, undergraduates regularly work with the USC Hazards and Vulnerability Research Institute, the South Carolina Geographic Alliance, and the Carolina’s Integrated Science Assessment lab.

Professional Organizations

Why this is Important
Internships can be an important asset to your overall educational experience. Internship experiences often help you confirm your career interests, give you hands-on experience in a professional setting, help build your resume, reinforce what you’ve learned in class, and can lead to full-time employment.

How Students Can Get Started
Join the Geography Department Facebook page. Make sure you are on the Geography distribution list and watch for internship opportunities in emails. Talk with the Undergraduate Coordinator about opportunities.

 

PARTICIPATE: Research

Related Course(s)
GEOG 498 - Directed Research 

Sample Research Projects or Topics
Examples of recent undergraduate projects and theses include:

  • Evaluating environmental education in St. Lucia
  • Overcoming barriers to ecovillage mainstreaming
  • Cultural history of the Congaree River
  • Critical analysis of environmental imagery
  • Globalization of English soccer
  • Indonesia’s One-Map policy
  • Wetlands in the South Carolina Conservation Bank
  • An atlas of women in American government
  • Effects of forest type and management history on downed woody material and leaf litter in a managed southeastern pine and hardwood forest
  • Analyzing the role of networks in the transfer of alternative culture: People and places facilitating the punk community in South Carolina
  • Spatial and market analysis of college football recruiting using ESRI Business Analyst

Other Recommendations
We encourage our students to present at professional conferences and workshops, and help to subsidize their travel to such events, when possible. Students have also been successful at garnering research funding from the Office of Undergraduate Research and been active in presenting at Discover USC.

Why this is Important
The Department of Geography at USC has been ranked as one of the Top 10 geography departments in the nation and includes faculty engaged in a wide variety of research. Pursuing professional research opportunities as an undergraduate student can help to enrich your academic experience while at the university. As an undergraduate student, you can work closely with faculty research mentors, explore a discipline that interests you and build a competitive edge in the job market. 

How Students Can Get Started
Learn about your favorite faculty member’s area of research and ask about working on a project. Watch departmental e-mails for research opportunities. 

 

INTEGRATE

How to Integrate
The integration and application of classroom knowledge is a central aspect of our undergraduate senior seminar (GEOG 495 - Seminar in Geography), in which students conduct and present independent research on a topic of local relevance. For example in past semesters, students worked on projects with local and state agencies (the Gills Creek Watershed Association, Lexington County GIS, and Sustainable Midlands, State Energy Office, Historic Columbia) to develop virtual tours and additional mapping products.

Students are given the opportunity to apply the knowledge and tools gained in their coursework through internships, research opportunities and other beyond-the-classroom experiences. A number of geography courses give students experience in conducting field work, challenging them to think about the first hand collection, analysis, interpretation and application of geographic data. Recent students have also had the opportunity to conduct field work in locations across the U.S. and the globe as part of Magellan Scholarships.

 

LEAD

Initial career opportunities
Many graduates pursue careers in areas such as:

  • geographic information science (e.g., cartographer, remote sensing specialist, government intelligence agent)
  • environmental consulting
  • education
  • planning (e.g., economic/transportation planners, community developers, emergency managers)
  • resource managers (e.g., park rangers, coastal zone managers, water managers)
  • economic geography (e.g., market and location researchers)
  • atmospheric science (e.g., meteorologists, climatologists, air quality specialists)

Related Graduate Programs 
M.A. in Geography
M.S. in Geography
Masters in Earth and Environmental Resource Management (MEERM)
Ph.D. in Geography

Students attending graduate school elsewhere have also gone into masters and Ph.D. programs in Natural Resources, Forestry, Geosciences, and Development Studies, among others.

Future Career Opportunities 
Job growth in geography and related fields for which our students are trained such as cartography and surveying is predicted to be exceptionally strong in the next decade. Check out these projections and suggestions from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Other career comments
For a more complete discussion of jobs in geography, ways to prepare for a career in geography, please see: Association of American Geographers.

Geological Science

To learn more about making the most of your educational experiences within and beyond the classroom contact:
Gwen Geidel, Undergraduate Director, geidel@sc.edu

 

PARTICIPATE: Community Service

Sites/Experiences
Students in the Geology Club have assisted with science fairs at the local and regional levels 

Why this is important
Provides high school and middle school students an opportunity to learn about geology and earth systems

 

PARTICIPATE: Global Learning

Related Course(s)
GEOL 318
GEOL 500

Timing for “study abroad”
GEOL 318 during Spring Break (students select an area of travel such as Hawaii, Grand Canyon, Spain, Azores)

Why this is important
Students select a faculty member from the department of Earth and Ocean Science to lead a course to an area of that world during Spring Break

 

PARTICIPATE: Peer Leadership

Student Organization(s)

  • Geology Club
  • Student Geophysical Society

Opportunities
Opportunities to plan field trips or organize bake sales

Why this is important
Students learn how to organize events and field trips

 

PARTICIPATE: Internships

Program internship requirements
A field experience is required and most students attend field camp in Colorado. Some students also complete internships

Recommended Sites/Work Experiences 
Students have worked and interned at Congaree National Park, mining operations, USGS, SC Geological Survey

Professional Organizations
American Geophysical Union; Geological Society of America

Why this is important
Students learn how to apply the classroom knowledge to field experience

 

PARTICIPATE: Research

Related Course(s)
GEOL 315, 318, 399, 498, 499, 500, 560, 548

Sample Research Projects or Topics

  • Geology of Sheep Mountain, CO
  • Exploring faults and earthquakes in SC

Why this is important
Applies course work to real earth experiences

 

INTEGRATE

How to integrate 
GEOL 318, 500, 548

 

LEAD

Initial career opportunities 
SC Department of Health and Environmental Control, other state DEC, Environmental Consulting firms

Related graduate programs
SM.S. Geology
Ph.D. Geology
M.S. Earth and Environmental Resources Management

Future career opportunities

  • State Departments of Environmental Control (DEC)
  • SC DHEC
  • SC Geological Survey
  • U.S Geological Survey
  • Mining companies
  • National Parks
  • Environmental Consulting Companies

Download this information as a PDF.

German

To learn more about making the most of your educational experiences within and beyond the classroom contact: 
Kurt Goblirsch, Program Director, kggoblir@mailbox.sc.edu

 

PARTICIPATE: Community Service

Related Course(s)
GERM 401P - Practicum in teaching German to Young Children

Recommended Sites/Experiences
Outreach for early language programs (German) at sites like Brennen Elementary School and Rosewood Elementary School

Other
German majors and minors often take a class that allows them to experience teaching German to elementary school children. We see this as a kind of community service, too: for no monetary remuneration, the German program is helping foster the acquisition of language skills among the youth of Columbia.

Why this is Important
If we don’t cultivate language acquisition at an early age, we risk missing the window during which language proficiency develops most easily and rapidly. Multicultural understanding and literacy in a language besides English is increasingly valuable in a rapidly globalizing world. We set children up for future success by exposing them to linguistic diversity at an early age.

How Students Can Get Started
Students interested in community service opportunities should register for GERM 401P or talk with the Program Director.

 

PARTICIPATE: Diversity & Social Advocacy

Related Course(s)
Any German course addresses diverse topics. Please consult the bulletin for more information about German courses. One such example includes:

GERM 460 - Post-War and Contemporary German Literature

Opportunities

  • Oktoberfest
  • Living or serving as an RM in the Maxcy Language Annex

 Sample Research or Advocacy Project Topics
“American Millennials’ Perceptions of the German Language (or Nonnative Speakers Perceive and Judge Native Speakers of a Different Language)”

Why is this Important
It is necessary to have competence in intercultural understanding.

 How Students Can Get Started
Take the courses listed above or contact a German professor regarding a research or advocacy project.

 

PARTICIPATE: Global Learning

Related Course(s)
GERM 333 - Study of German Abroad
FORL 398 - Special Topics
GERM 398 - Selected Topics

Timing for Study Abroad
For minors, Summer of Sophomore or Junior year; for majors, either all of Junior year, or Spring of Junior year. These are ideal times, but others are available.

Destinations

Opportunities
We present all of our programs (Bamberg, Wittenberg, and Sustainability in Saxony-Anhalt) at the Study Abroad Fair; we visit classes to discuss the programs; have pre-departure workshops; integrate cultural information about each area into our 100- and 200-level courses

Why this is Important
Everyone should get a chance to study abroad, but for no-one is it more essential than for a language major. A short intensive summer program can give a boost to your language skills (especially comprehension and speaking ability) and also help you appreciate much more deeply the different cultural contexts of places like Germany, Austria and Switzerland. Spending a semester or a year in Germany at the University of Bamberg means moving out of your linguistic and cultural comfort zone. It can be a challenge, but the rewards can be extraordinary--life-changing even--as you learn to see the world from a difference perspective. It is one of the most important experiences of your college education.

How Students Can Get Started
Attend an interest meeting in the Fall semester about any of our Study Abroad Programs.

 

PARTICIPATE: Peer Leadership

Student Organization(s)
German Club 

Other Leadership Opportunities
Living or serving as an RM in the Maxcy Language Annex.

Why this is Important
German Club organizes cultural and linguistic activities that supplement the coursework of majors and minors in German for students to practice their German.

How Students Can Get Started
Contact the Faculty Advisor for German Club.

 

PARTICIPATE: Internships/Professional Practice

Related Course(s)
GERM 401P - Practicum in teaching German to Young Children
FORL 448 - Teaching Internship in Foreign Languages
FORL 474 - Directed Teaching in Foreign Languages

Recommended Sites/Work Experiences 
Elementary Schools

Other
We have had many students get Teaching Fulbrights in Germany upon graduating based primarily on the fact that they had this experience (401p and/or the Teaching English in Saxony-Anhalt Program).

Why this is Important
Any student who has ever wanted to become a teacher of young children can experience the reality of it in a safe context through our GERM 401p course.

How Students Can Get Started 
Students should talk with the Undergraduate Director or faculty advisor regarding these courses.

 

PARTICIPATE: Research

Related Course(s)
GERM 399 - Independent Study

Sample Research Projects or Topics

  • The practice of teaching math to young people in Germany versus the US.
  • Medicine under the Nazis
  • Nostalgia for East Germany in German Popular Culture
  • “American Millennials’ Perceptions of the German Language (or Nonnative Speakers Perceive and udge Native Speakers of a Different Language)”
  • Comparative Study of American and German Universities
  • Research on etymology of pronoun “she” (seo – Germanic linguistics)
  • “American University Students’ Perception of the German Language: a study of attitudinal linguistics” 

Why this is Important
Research experience, particularly independent research, is a valuable enhancement to classroom experience in undergraduate studies and can increase chances for national scholarships (Hollings, Goldwater, Udall) and successful application to graduate school. It is also instrumental in helping students decide on career paths and directions in graduate school.

How Students Can Get Started
Contact a faculty member with similar research interests.

 

INTEGRATE

How to Integrate 
Most of our advanced language classes have individual and group presentations that marry specialized knowledge with advanced aural and oral skills (GERM 316, 416, 411, etc.). Students can apply their in-class knowledge during study abroad and bring their new intercultural understandings to the classroom.

 

LEAD

Initial career opportunities

  • Teaching
  • Research
  • Translation and interpreting
  • Journalism
  • International Business
  • Foreign Service
  • Travel and Hospitality fields
  • International NGOs
  • International Law
  • Flight attendant

Related graduate programs
M.A. or Ph.D. in German
M.A. or Ph.D. in Comparative Literature
M.A. or Ph.D. in Linguistics
M.A.T. in German

We often have students go onto advanced degrees in history, political science, or psychology; and applications to law and medical schools are often boosted by the BA in German--the historical language of science.

Future Career Opportunities

  • Teachers and professors
  • Translators
  • Simultaneous translators
  • Journalists
  • Managers in multi-national corporations
  • Lawyers
  • Politicians and political analysts
  • Diplomats
  • Travel agents
  • Airline administration
  • Administrators in international NGOs

Other Comments on Careers 
Learning another language helps individuals see one idea from multiple perspectives. Among the benefits of hiring a language major: they are sensitive to nuances, trained to read and analyze difficult material quickly, and most importantly, are not afraid to swim against the tide. 

Global Studies

The Global Studies major is a flexible, interdisciplinary degree that familiarizes students with the complex historical and contemporary relationships that link together people and places. By focusing on themes relating to globalization, this major also encourages students to recognize and to appreciate the world’s diversity. To achieve this end, this major requires students to focus on a particular world region and to attain proficiency in a modern foreign language. The overall aim of this degree is to foster in students a critical, global outlook that will allow them to engage with pressing global questions and to thrive in an interconnected world.

To learn more about making the most of your educational experiences within and beyond the classroom contact:  Dr. Robert Cox, Director of Global Studies, rhcox@sc.edu

 

PARTICIPATE: Community Service

Related courses 
GLST 490 – Global Studies Internship                                                         

Recommended sites/experiences

  • PASOs  
  • Carolina Survivor Clinic – Rajeev Bais, Medical School
  • Peace Corps Prep: The Peace Corps Prep program will prepare you for international development fieldwork and potential Peace Corps service. Through interrelated coursework, hands-on experience, and professional development, you’ll build competencies in training and experience in a work sector, foreign language skills, intercultural competence, and professional leadership development.

Why this is Important
It allows students to understand that global issues affect the local community. Furthermore, students will be able to apply knowledge and theory acquired in the classroom to real-life challenges and gain valuable work experience.

How Students Can Get Started
Contact a faculty member affiliated with community service programs.

 

PARTICIPATE: Diversity and Social Advocacy

Related Course(s) 
AFAM 202 - Introduction to African-American Studies: Arts and Cultural Foundations
ANTH/WGST 381 - Gender and Globalization
ANTH 581 - Globalization and Cultural Questions
CHIN 335 - Women in China
GEOG 311 - Cultural Geography
GEOG 568 - Human Dimensions of Global Environmental Change
SOCY 315 - Global Population Issues
SOWK 306 - Social Work in Other Nations
SOWK 307 - International Social Work and Social Justice
WGST 113 - Women’s Health

Sample Research or Advocacy Project Topics

  • Social work initiatives in Ghana
  • Progress and challenges of LGBT communities in the American South
  • Across women’s lives: girls’ education in India
  • Women’s reproductive health in underserved communities

Why this is Important
Exposure to diversity and social advocacy widen students’ intellectual horizons and increase their understanding of multi-cultural societies. 

How Students Can Get Started
Browse through the Global Studies program’s course listings and meet with student adviser to select courses emphasizing diversity and social advocacy.

 

PARTICIPATE: Global Learning

Related Course(s)
All courses in the Global Studies program.

Timing for study abroad
Sophomore and Junior year is recommended, as well as any summer.

Destinations/Opportunities
Any destination as appropriate to their region of specialization.

The Warwick Exchange program is a great opportunity for students who have a history cognate, minor, or major. This allows students to study abroad for various lengths of time along with scholarship opportunities.  

Global Classroom

Why this is Important
Immersion abroad offers students the opportunity to practice and build competency in language skills and a better understanding of cultures other than their own. Students in the Global Studies program also must develop deep knowledge of a world region, a specialty acquired through study abroad.

How Students Can Get Started
Contact Dr. Carol Harrison for Warwick Exchange Program
Contact the Study Abroad Office.

 

PARTICIPATE: Peer Leadership

Student Organization(s)
Model United Nations: NMUN draws a diverse group of informed university students and faculty from around the world to address current global issues. NMUN conferences are experiential learning programs that provide students with a better understanding of the inner workings of the UN and a forum to hone skills in diplomacy, negotiation, critical thinking, compromise, public speaking, writing, and research.

International student groups through Garnet Gate.

Other Leadership Opportunities
International House at Maxcy College.

Why this is Important
Peer leadership opportunities provide students with professional skills required for their post-graduate careers, such as the ability to negotiate, to speak confidently in public settings, to think critically, and to implement effective leadership.

How Students Can Get Started
Contact Faculty Principal at Maxcy College or check Garnet Gate for opportunities to be involved with international student organizations.

 

PARTICIPATE: Internships/Professional Practice

Related Course(s)
GLST 490 - Global Studies Internship

Recommended Sites/Work Experiences
Summer internships at US Embassies and Consulates
Columbia World Affairs Council: a non-profit organization fostering public awareness of international activities in the Midlands of South Carolina
Columbia Department of Commerce

Why this is Important  
Internships with an international component provide real world application of global knowledge and provides valuable work experience. They also create professional networks and can connect students to future career opportunities.

How Students Can Get Started
Talk with your faculty advisor about the course listed above.

 

PARTICIPATE: Research

Related Course(s)
Any GLST 490 class with an approved international topic (e.g. EURO 490 or HIST 497)

Sample Research Projects or Topics

  • Impact of eurozone economic crisis on 2012 French presidential elections
  • Legacy of the Irish 1916 Easter Rising
  • Environmental sustainability practices in international business
  • Gender and food culture in modern China
  • Rise of far-right political parties in Europe
  • Images of the US in the Russian media
  • Comparative analysis of persecution of gay men in Nazi Germany and Stalin’s Russia
  • Environmental sustainability and education in Jordan

Other Recommendations
Research projects can be combined with South Carolina Honors College project and/or thesis research.

Why this is Important
Allows student to undertake extended research project, synthesize major coursework, assess study abroad experiences, develop clear written and oral arguments on a topic related to his/her area of interest, prepare for graduate-level work.

How Students Can Get Started
Contact a faculty member with expertise in your topic of interest. 

 

INTEGRATE

How to Integrate
Students can, for example, participate in Discover USC: Discover USC showcases research, scholarship, leadership and creative projects by undergraduate and graduate students, postdoctoral scholars and medical scholars representing the entire USC System. Take advantage of opportunities to share what you have learned from your international experiences

Why this is Important
Encourages reflection, which in turn reinforces learning.

 

LEAD

Related Graduate Programs

  • Law school
  • Graduate work in diplomacy and human rights
  • Public Policy
  • History
  • International Studies
  • Conflict Resolution
  • Global Health

Future Career Opportunities

  • International law
  • Academia
  • Foreign service
  • State department
  • International agencies
  • International NGOs
  • International business
History

To learn more about making the most of your educational experiences within and beyond the classroom contact:
Adam Schor, Associate Professor, Director of Undergraduate Studies, schor@mailbox.sc.edu

  

PARTICIPATE: Global Learning

Related Course(s)
Dozens of upper-division (200-400 level) history courses offered each year provide insights into societies and cultures beyond the US, including those in Latin America and the Caribbean, Europe, Africa, the Middle East, Central Asia, and East Asia.

Specific courses include History 215, 421, 422, 425 and all history courses numbered HIST 301-398, as well as some sections of History 492, 497, and 498.

Most history courses taken while studying abroad at university-approved pro grams can be counted as credit toward a history major in some way

Timing for “study abroad”
Every semester multiple global study courses in history are offered.

Destinations
University of Warwick (UK) Exchange Programs: A Year or Semester studying and living abroad in Warwick (a town approximately 1 hour train right NW from London, with a prestigious university), organized by the USC History department.

This program and many other study abroad programs can work well with a degree in history, supplying a broader perspective on the past and its powerful influence on the global present.

Why this is important
Knowledge of history of multiple global regions can provide critical understanding of the current cultures and societies of these regions, as well as a powerful means to connect with people inhabiting various regions of the world today.

Global historical knowledge can also help to understand the complicated webs of interconnection that link seemingly distant societies and better appreciate the place of our local and national society within the wider world.

How students can get started
Take any course in history with a focus on global issues or regions beyond the US.

Contact the History Department main office about requirements and deadlines to study at the University of Warwick for a year or a semester.

 

PARTICIPATE: Peer Leadership

Student Organization(s)
Phi Alpha Theta (Honors Society for students of history, including non-majors) sponsors events and gatherings devoted to discussing aspects of the past.

Many student organizations devoted to Area Studies (African Studies, E. Asian Studies, European Studies, Latin American Studies, etc.), to African American Studies, to Women and Gender Studies, and to other disciplines in the humanities and social sciences often sponsor events on historical topics and invite participation from students of history.

Opportunities
Help to organize and lead history-related events (debates, discussions, film showings, speakers, commemorations). Lead efforts to present the history of USC, Columbia, and South Carolina.

Why this is important
History is always a community conversation, open to those people who seek to participate, to learn and to contribute.

How students can get started
Speak with the current president of Phi Alpha Theta, the History Department Undergraduate Student Service Coordinator, or the Director of Undergraduate Studies in History for how to get involved in local event planning.

 

PARTICIPATE: Internships

Related Course(s)
The History Department organizes a regular program of internships in “Public History” (the practice of presenting history to a wider audience, outside the classroom, through museum exhibits, archives, public markers, public events, preservation of historic sites, documentaries and other media productions), and much more.

Program Internship Requirements
Too seek an internship in public history through the History Department, sign up for HIST 480 (Internship in Public History), which is offered during the Summer term as well as the traditional academic terms. Enrollment in HIST 480 is granted only by application, sent to the instructor. Contact the History Department main office for details.

Recommended Sites/Work Experiences 
The professors of public history maintain a constantly shifting list of historical sites, archives, historical societies, government agencies, and parks (national, state, and local) at which undergraduate students may seek internships. Contact the history office for contact information.

Why this is important
Internships in public history provide a way to apply historical knowledge directly to enriching the cultural lives and knowledge of the wider population. Internships in public history may also provide valuable experience translating the skills of doing history, especially historical analysis and public presentation through various media, to varied professional endeavors.

How students can get started
Speak with the professor leading HIST 480, whenever it is scheduled. (Contact the History Department main office for more details.) Then apply to enroll in HIST 480 (Internship in Public History).

 

PARTICIPATE: Research

Related Course(s)
HIST 300, The Historian’s Craft, is a course devoted to introducing students to all the major skills and practices needed to conduct historical research, create new historical arguments, and present arguments and conclusions in writing, in public speaking, and in other forms. HIST 300 is required of all History majors, and is the gateway to doing all other forms of historical research at USC.

HIST 497 and 498 (Senior Research Seminars) are courses designed to guide history majors as they work on their own research projects. Each section of HIST 497/498 is based on a general historic topic or theme, such as “Reconstruction in Columbia,” “Inside Nazi Germany,” “Middle Ages in the Movies,” and “Cold War Civil Defense.”

HIST 499 (Senior Thesis) provides opportunities for highly skilled, self-driven students to design and complete individual research projects. Every student seeking to write a senior thesis must work with a history department faculty member as a supervisor.

Students planning research projects to be started before their senior year are encouraged to apply for Magellan Scholarships which can be linked to independent study courses for additional credit.

Many other history courses often involve components of historical research.

Sample Research Projects or Topics
Topics of individual research projects vary enormously, and can be arranged in many different ways depending on the circumstances

Why this is important
Historical research is an essential task of doing history. It is the basis for our building knowledge and deepening debates about the human past and its meaning for the human present. Historical research is also a highly challenging practice which demands personal initiative and builds skills in incisive questioning, close reading, persuasive writing and speaking, and the transformation of disorganized information into meaningful claims supported by evidence.

How students can get started
Take HIST 300 as soon as you know you wish to major in History or otherwise engage in historical research. (Multiple sections are taught every fall and spring semester.) Speak with faculty members who do their on research on regions, topics, and themes that captivate your interest. Ask about burning questions and the sorts of primary sources accessible and ripe for additional study. Contact the History office about applying for Magellan Scholarships. Contact instructors of specific courses about whether the course involves a research project.

 

INTEGRATE

How to integrate 
HIST 497/498 (Senior Seminar) and HIST 499 (Senior Thesis) are Capstone courses, which enable students to combine the various bodies of knowledge, analytical practices, methods of argument, and forms of persuasive writing and speaking that they have picked up throughout their collegiate years. Personal experiences researching, studying abroad, working in internships in public history, and leading other students to engage in historical thinking almost always contribute to excellent work in these Capstone, research-centered courses.

 

LEAD

Initial career opportunities 
An education in History provides unparalleled opportunities to build skills in critical reading, evidence-based argument, persuasive writing and presentation in other media, and the transformation of mass information into meaningful knowledge. These skills serve students well in nearly any field. Professional sectors that often employ people who majored in History include:

  • commercial business (domestic and international)
  • journalism and new media ventures
  • legal practice
  • primary and secondary teaching
  • academic research and teaching
  • government and non-governmental organizations.

Related graduate programs 
Directly related to history:

  • M.A. in Public History
  • M.A. in History
  • Ph.D. in History

Other graduate programs that benefit deeply from a background in History:

  • M.A. in Secondary Education (esp. in Social Studies)
  • Law school
  • Journalism programs
  • M.A. or Ph.D. in Area Studies (African Studies, E. Asian Studies, European Studies, Latin American Studies, etc.).

Download this information as a PDF.

International Studies

To learn more about making the most of your educational experiences within and beyond the classroom contact:
Neal Woods, Director of Undergraduate Studies, woodsn@mailbox.sc.edu
Janis Leaphart, Undergraduate Coordinator, leaphartj@sc.edu

 

PARTICIPATE: Community Service

Related Course(s)
POLI 121 — Green Explorations
POLI 122 — Green Engagements

Sites/Experiences

  • Martin Luther King Day of Service
  • Service Saturdays
  • Students Advocating a Greener Environment (SAGE)
  • Alternative Breaks
  • CityServe
  • Big Brothers and Big Sisters of Greater Columbia

Why this is important
Community service fosters awareness of political and social problems and common goals. Service projects can illustrate, in a concrete way, some of the concepts and issues examined in the International Studies major (environmental projects) and give students the opportunity to share their knowledge with the community.

 

PARTICIPATE: Global Learning

Related Course(s)

POLI 391M — The Foundations of Law and Government
POLI 391M — The Political Economy of Central America

Why this is important
Global study opportunities connect international studies course material to real-world experiences in other countries and help students draw comparisons between their own cultural norms/institutions and those of other cultures. 

 

PARTICIPATE: Peer Leadership

Student Organization(s)

  • Sigma Iota Rho: Honor Society for International Studies;
  • Students Advocating a Greener Environment (SAGE)
  • Amnesty International
  • Model United Nations

Opportunities

  • POLI 215: Introduction to Leadership Studies
  • Minor in Leadership Studies

Why this is important
Leadership activities train students to be and assess leaders in all walks of life, and help them to draw connections between political science course material and real-world leadership.

 

PARTICIPATE: Internships

Related Course(s)
POLI 379 — Public Affairs Internship (requires sophomore standing and prior completion of at least 6 credit hours of 300-level POLI coursework)

Recommended Sites/Work Experiences 

  • Columbia World Affairs Council
  • Office of the Governor
  • Columbia offices of Members of Congress and state legislators
  • South Carolina Republican Party
  • South Carolina Democratic Party (the content of International Studies internships must be internationally focused)
  • South Carolina Dialogue Foundation

Why this is important
Internships allow students to apply knowledge learned in the classroom, build professional skills, and develop a professional network

 

PARTICIPATE: Research

Related Course(s)
POLI 399B — Independent Study (International Studies)
POLI 498 — Research Experience
POLI 499 — Senior Thesis

Sample Research Projects or Topics
The status of human rights in specific countries

Why this is important
The development of general research skills is part of an international studies education and is helpful for those seeking advanced degrees. Research opportunities also allow for further exploration of specific topics of interest. 

 

INTEGRATE

How to integrate 
POLI 121 — Green Explorations
POLI 122 — Green Engagements
POLI 215 — Introduction to Leadership Studies

 

LEAD

Initial career opportunities

  • State Department of Commerce
  • International Trade Officer
  • Foreign Service Officer
  • International Program Evaluator
  • International Trade Negotiator

Related graduate programs
Master of Arts in International Studies (M.A.I.S.)
Master of Public Administration (M.P.A.)
Ph.D. in Political Science
Graduate programs in law

Future career opportunities

  • Leaders in national government
  • Academia
  • Law
  • Corporations
  • Non-governmental organizations
  • Community organizations and schools
  • Local politics
  • Public interest groups

Download this information as a PDF.

Marine Science

To learn more about making the most of your educational experiences within and beyond the classroom contact: 
Sheri Foxworth, Undergraduate Coordinator, foxworsd@mailbox.sc.edu
Dr. Gwen Geidel, Undergraduate Director, UGradDir@seoe.sc.edu

 

PARTICIPATE: Community Service

Many of our Marine Science majors participate in community service on campus and throughout the local community.  Many of these activities are through students run clubs and societies mentored by Faculty in the School of the Earth, Ocean & Environment.

Related Course(s)

  • MSCI 399 – Independent Research.  Students develop independent study projects that focus on a number of community outreach topics.
  • MSCI 599 – Special topic - Riverbanks Zoo Internship.  Students work in the aquarium of the Riverbanks Zoo
  • MSCI 599 – Special topic - Carolina Wildlife Association Internship.  Students intern in both the education and local wildlife rehabilitation.

Recommended Sites/Experiences

  • SEAS (Students Engaged in Aquatic Sciences) - Students are involved a variety of community events and regularly conduct outreach to local K-12 schools to teach about a number of Marine Science topics.
  • Green Scholars for those students living in the Green Quad – Students participate in a variety of community service events through the Green Quad
  • Gills Creek Watershed Association – Students have the opportunity to participate in a variety of events related to preservation of the Gills Creek Watershed. 
  • River/Beach Sweep occurs annually and is the largest one-day litter cleanup of South Carolina's beaches and waterways. 
  • Project Aware
  • ScienceQuest – Students conduct science experiments at a transitional housing facility throughout the semester.
  • Women in Geosciences – Students participate in a number of science fairs, outreach events, etc. to promote women in the geosciences.

Why this is Important
Community service and engagement activities are critical for all Marine Science majors.  It not only improves their ability to communicate with the public, it also educates communities about our incredible lakes, rivers, and oceans. Developing an awareness of environmental and political issues that threaten aquatic health is the first step to preservation and sustainability.

How Students Can Get Started
Visit the School of the Earth, Ocean & Environment website and/or contact organizations directly. Students should also contact our Undergraduate Director directly for more information as many community service events occur throughout the year.

 

PARTICIPATE: Diversity & Social Advocacy

Many of our Marine Science majors are interested in social advocacy and increasing diversity in geoscience majors.  Students volunteer in a number of outreach events that include local K-12 school visits, march to college day, mentoring, and tutoring.  Many of our students further participate in University wide activities and societies geared towards specific groups.

Related Course(s)
MSCI 399 – Independent Research.  Students develop independent study projects that focus on a number of diversity related and social advocacy projects

Recommended Sites/Experiences

  • ScienceQuest – Students conduct science experiments at a transitional housing facility throughout the semester. 
  • Women in Geosciences – Students participate in a number of science fairs, outreach events, etc. to promote women in the geosciences.
  • SACNAS USC Chapter – SACNAS is an inclusive organization dedicated to fostering the success of Chicano/Hispanic and Native American scientists, from college students to professionals, in attaining advanced degrees, careers, and positions of leadership in STEM.
  • Student Success Center – Students serve as Peer Leaders, mentors, and tutors via the Student Success Center
  • Cocky’s Reading Express – The Cocky's Reading Express literacy program features the Carolina mascot and USC student volunteers who travel the state in their own bus, visiting elementary schools and reading to students.
  • PASOs – Statewide organization supports Latino community with health care education, resources and environmental stewardship.
  • Conservation Voters of South Carolina – Conservation Voters of South Carolina is a group focused on air, water, land, and energy through political action.  

Sample Research or Advocacy Project Topics
Our students have worked on projects from all the sites listed above!  

Why this is Important
Numerous research has shown that diverse (gender, socioeconomic, first generation college, ethnic, etc.) populations are critical for science innovation and technology development.  Simply put, a lack of diversity limits the insight and creativity with which geoscientists can approach problems. At the same time, diverse populations, particularly ethnic minorities and those of lower socio economic status are disproportionately impacted by aquatic pollution, overfishing, rising sea level, hurricanes, etc.  Educating these communities is therefore critical for sustainable aquatic resources. 

How Students Can Get Started
Contact specific organizations listed above as well as your Faculty Advisor and the Marine Science Undergraduate Director.

 

PARTICIPATE: Global Learning

Related Course(s)
MSCI 460 – Field and Laboratory Investigations 

Timing for Study Abroad
Students typically participate in Study Abroad during the summer or either Fall or Spring semester of their Junior Year.  However, students have also participated in Study Abroad as Sophomores and Seniors (with special permission).

Destinations

  • Australia
  • Costa Rica
  • Ecuador (Galapagos Islands)
  • New Zealand
  • South Africa
  • SEA Semester (various ports throughout the world)
  • Thailand
  • Indonesia

Opportunities 

  • Baruch Marine Field Lab located near Georgetown, SC
  • USC Study Abroad in Galapagos: MSCI 210 and other courses
  • Research cruises with faculty in the School of the Earth, Ocean & Environment.

Why this is Important 
Marine Science majors are encouraged to visit oceans in other parts of the world for firsthand experience with different ecosystems. Study abroad experiences are particularly useful for Marine Scientists, who travel the world to reach their study areas, interact with local communities and often have international collaborators.

How Students Can Get Started
Visit the Study Abroad Office and talk with their Faculty Advisor about emerging opportunities.

 

PARTICIPATE: Peer Leadership

Student Organization(s)

  • SEAS (Students Engaged in Aquatic Sciences)
  • SCUBA Club
  • Sustainable Carolina
  • Wildlife Association
  • SACNAS
  • Women in the Geosciences

 Other Leadership Opportunities

  • Serving as Peer Leaders for common courses  
  • Serving as Residential Mentors particularly in the Green Quad  
  • Green Scholars Program
  • ScienceQuest

Why this is Important
Demonstrated leadership can be a factor in departmental awards, national scholarships (Hollings, Udall, Goldwater, etc.) and successful application to graduate school.

How Students Can Get Started
Contact specific organizations listed above as well as your Faculty Advisor and the Marine Science Undergraduate Director.

 

PARTICIPATE: Internships/Professional Practice

Internships and research experiences for undergraduate are critical for Marine Science majors.  These experiences allow students to obtain hands on experience and explore various aspects of the marine science field.  Over half of our students participate in an internship or research experience prior to graduation.  Numerous emails are sent out each year listing the variety of research experiences available to students both nationally and internationally.

Related Course(s)
MSCI 599 — Special topics: Riverbanks Zoo Internship, Carolina Wildlife Association
MSCI 460 — Field and Laboratory Investigations
MSCI 399 — Independent Study

Program Internship Requirements
Students are required to complete at least 3 weeks of approved fieldwork prior to graduation (MSCI 460).

Recommended Sites/Work Experiences 

  • Riverbanks Aquarium & Reptile Complex
  • Baruch Field Laboratory
  • Summer Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) opportunities
  • DNR Fish Hatcheries

How Students Can Get Started
Students should contact Ms. Jackie McClary (Mcclaryj@mailbox.sc.edu) to be placed on the Marine Science list-serve that regularly sends out information on a variety of internship/research experience for undergraduate opportunities.  Students should also contact their Faculty Advisor regarding opportunities to conduct research in Faculty Laboratories.

 

PARTICIPATE: Research

Internships and research experiences for undergraduate are critical for Marine Science majors.  These experiences allow students to obtain hands on experience and explore various aspects of the marine science field.  Over half of our students participate in an internship or research experience prior to graduation.  Numerous emails are sent out each year listing the variety of research experiences available to students both nationally and internationally.

Related Course(s)
MSCI 496, 497, 498, 499 — Research in Marine Science
MSCI 599 — Special topic: Riverbanks Zoo Internship, Carolina Wildlife Association
MSCI 460 — Field and Laboratory Investigations
MSCI 399 — Independent Study

Sample Research Projects or Topics

  • nutrient cycling
  • global climate change
  • invasive species
  • phytoplankton
  • impact of humans on the marine environment
  • coastal erosion
  • shark tagging
  • turtle ecology
  • ocean acidification

Other Recommendations 
Magellan Research Grants  

Summer Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) opportunities

Why this is Important
Research experience, particularly independent research, plays a major role in departmental awards, national scholarships (Hollings, Goldwater, Udall) and successful application to graduate school. It is also instrumental in helping students decide which facet of oceanography to focus on in the future.

How Students Can Get Started
Students should contact Ms. Jackie McClary (Mcclaryj@mailbox.sc.edu) to be placed on the Marine Science list-serve that regularly sends out information on a variety of internship/research experience for undergraduate opportunities.  Students should also contact their Faculty Advisor regarding opportunities to conduct research in Faculty Laboratories.

 

INTEGRATE

How to Integrate 
Field trips associated with MSCI 101, 102, 311, 510 and 536 give students firsthand experience with concepts they have been learning about in the classroom; MSCI 460 includes three weeks of intensive field research at the Baruch Marine Field Lab in which students use skills, concepts, equipment and theories they have been learning about for 3-4 years.

 

LEAD

Initial Career Opportunities

  • Zoos and Aquariums
  • US Navy/ NAVOCEANO
  • Alaska Fisheries department
  • SC DNR and other state agencies in coastal states
  • Environmental Education Centers
  • National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

 Future career opportunities

  • National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)
  • Zoos and Aquariums
  • US Navy/ NAVOCEANO
  • Alaska Fisheries department
  • SC DNR and other state agencies in coastal states
  • Environmental Education Centers
  • Faculty at Colleges and Universities
  • K-12 Teaching
  • Private, University and Government Lab Managers
  • Private industry including oil, pharmaceutical, and environmental companies
Mathematics

To learn more about making the most of your educational experiences within and beyond the classroom contact: 
Ronda Sanders, Senior Instructor, sanders@math.sc.edu
Matt Miller, Undergraduate Director, ugraddir@math.sc.edu 

 

PARTICIPATE: Community Service

Recommended Sites/Experiences

Why this is Important
While the experiences listed here do have a mathematical theme, community service does not have to relate to a student’s major for it to be important. Gamecock Math Club is open to the entire USC community. Mathematics students are encouraged also to seek out additional community service opportunities not directly related to mathematics.

How Students Can Get Started
Students should contact Ronda Sanders at sanders@math.sc.edu for more information related to community service opportunities.

 

PARTICIPATE: Diversity and Social Advocacy

Recommended Sites/Experiences

How Students Can Get Started
Contact local non-profit or community agencies about opportunities to get involved.

 

PARTICIPATE: Global Learning

Timing for Study Abroad
Any time during a student’s undergraduate years

Opportunities/Destinations
Budapest Semesters in Mathematics

Why this is Important 
The study abroad opportunities listed above provide mathematics students with excellent opportunities to become exposed to mathematical topics not available at USC. Other students, who are ahead of the typical pace as far as MATH courses are concerned, can study abroad to develop a foundation in a second (or third) area (e.g., another language, culture, history, art, religion).

How Students Can Get Started
Students should contact the undergraduate director for more information related to study abroad opportunities in mathematics. For general study abroad opportunities, contact the Study Abroad Office.

 

PARTICIPATE: Peer Leadership

Student Organization(s) 

Other Leadership Opportunities

Why this is Important
Mathematics is difficult for many students. Sometimes learning from fellow students can help students overcome some of the psychological obstacles to being successful in mathematics. Most tutors will report that they learned as much from being a tutor as the students they were helping. This makes these opportunities particularly attractive to pre-service teachers.

How Students Get Started
Students interested in the Gamecock Math Club/Pi Mu Epsilon can find information on the University of South Carolina Pi Mu Epsilon Facebook page or contact Ronda Sanders. Visit the Student Success Center website for more information regarding peer leadership opportunities in math.

 

PARTICIPATE: Internships/Professional Practice

Related Course(s)
MATH 490 – Internship in Mathematics

Recommended Sites/Work Experiences

  • Colonial Life (most insurance companies have internships like this)
  • Secondary school-based experiences are recommended for those interested in teaching mathematics

Professional Organizations

Why this is Important 
Mathematics at USC does not require an internship or other professional experience. However, we do encourage students to seek mathematics related work experiences in the summer. These programs are typically most appropriate after the second or third year of study. The USC Career Center is an excellent resource for information about summer internships.

How Students Can Get Started
Students should contact the Undergraduate Director to discuss course opportunities. For general internship interests, sign up for an appointment with a Career Development Coach in the Career Center.

 

PARTICIPATE: Research

Related Course(s)
MATH 499 – Undergraduate Research

Sample Research Projects or Topics
USC Sponsored Research Projects:

Why this is Important
Research opportunities are open to all students but are most appropriate for students thinking about pursuing graduate education in mathematics and a career as a research mathematician. These experiences can be an excellent way to get some first-hand exposure to graduate schools and their faculty.

How Students Can Get Started
The National Science Foundation (NSF) funds a number of Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REUs) at schools across the country.  The Mathematical Association of America and American Mathematics Society websites listed are the best sources for almost all of these opportunities. The specific mathematics prerequisites vary, but these are typically most appropriate for students after their second and third years in the undergraduate program.

 

INTEGRATE

How to Integrate 
Through engagement in community service, research projects, and work experience students integrate their skills in mathematics in a variety of contexts.

 

LEAD

Initial Career Opportunities

  • Actuary
  • Consultant
  • Data Analyst
  • Financial Analyst
  • Teacher
  • Federal, State, and Local Government positions

Related Graduate Programs 

  • Master of Science in Mathematics
  • D. in Mathematics
  • Master of Teaching in Secondary Education (with an emphasis in Mathematics)
  • Master of Arts in Teaching
  • B.A. (analytically oriented programs)
  • Professional Masters Degrees in Business and Finance

Future Career Opportunities 
The skills that mathematics students develop that are attractive to employers include critical thinking, problem-solving, quantitative analysis, and logical reasoning. While mathematics majors often find jobs that do not include “mathematics” in their title, it is their mathematical background that employers report as being very attractive (assuming the new employee is willing to learn the details of their employer’s business). Sometimes the jobs are closely related to the student’s cognate or minor, but it’s their mathematical background that makes them most attractive to employers.

Media Arts

To learn more about making the most of your educational experiences within and beyond the classroom contact: 
Simon Tarr, Program Coordinator, tarr@mailbox.sc.edu

 

PARTICIPATE: Community Service

Related Course(s)
MART 499 — Internship
MART 571B — Moving Image Advanced: Documentary
MART 590 — Special Topics: check each semester, approved by advisor
MART 591 – Topics in Film and Media Studies: Critical Interactives or other approved by advisor

Recommended Sites/Experiences
Outreach projects within the community, such as working for local film and art festivals, developing public service messages for local non-profit organizations, or teaching media production skills to community youth.

Why this is Important
Projects that have consequence in our community also teach lasting lessons to Media Arts students. Forming connections with community organizations increases a students’ ability to be informed of current issues and areas for growth.

How Students Can Get Started
Contact the Leadership and Service Center for more information. Contact your faculty advisor.

 

PARTICIPATE: Diversity and Social Advocacy

Related Course(s)
MART 499 — Internship
*Projects in any Media Arts course at the 500 level with guidance from the professor could integrative diversity and social advocacy into your degree        

Recommended Sites/Experiences
Give voice to a non-profit organization to tell the story of its mission. Help showcase current issues related to the community that you are passionate about.

Why this is Important
Creating meaningful projects that have purpose beyond the classroom leads to deeper understanding of topics and demonstrates a more accomplished body of work.

How Students Can Get Started
Contact your faculty advisor.

 

PARTICIPATE: Global Learning

Related Course(s)
MART 499 – Internship
MART 521C – Media Writing Advanced (Manga & Anime)
MART 571B – Moving Image Advanced: Documentary
MART 571C – Moving Image Advanced: Animation
MART 592 – Special Topics in Film and Media Histories
MART 594 – Topics in Global Film and Media
MART 595 – Documentary Film and Media Studies

We encourage students to travel abroad to study or take an internship, or they can study subjects that are global in scope here at home.

Timing for Study Abroad
The best time to study abroad in media arts is your junior year, but other options may work as well, so be sure to consult with your academic advisor

Destinations
Japan, Australia, the United Kingdom, Italy, Spain, and Germany have been recent destinations - anywhere is possible.

Why this is Important
Media production is global, and students with international experience will have a strong foothold in many industries.

How Students Can Get Started 
Contact the Study Abroad Office and your faculty advisor.

 

PARTICIPATE: Peer Leadership

Leadership Opportunities
Beyond the classroom, students make media for film festivals, the internet and broadcast and industry conferences. They participate and take leadership roles in faculty productions.

Why this is Important
Students with independent production experience are valuable mentors to newer students and are more competitive in the job market. 

How Students Can Get Started 
Connect with more advanced students. Join the Media Arts Facebook Group.  

 

PARTICIPATE: Internships/Professional Practice

Related Course(s)
MART 499 – Internship in Media Arts
MART 521 – All Sections
MART 571 – All Sections
MART 581 – All Sections
MART 590 – Special Topics
MART 598 – Media Management and Distribution

Recommended Sites/Work Experiences 
There are opportunities to do media work in every industry. In addition to working at traditional production companies, students can intern in hospitals, law firms, sports, government agencies and other industries. Students who want to complete their internship outside of Columbia may be interested in a summer internship.

Why this is Important
Students integrate the knowledge and skills learned in their prior coursework and use them in real work situations.

How Students Can Get Started 
Students should research companies and non-profit organizations where they would be interested in interning. Each semester there is a mandatory internship information session where students are provided information regarding contracts and logistics. Contact the instructor of MART 499 with questions regarding internships. 

 

PARTICIPATE: Research

Related Course(s)
MART 571 — Moving Image Advanced: Narrative, Documentary, Animation, and Experimental
MART 581 — New Media Advanced: Video Game Design, Performance
MART 591 — Topics in Film and Media Studies
MART 592 — Topics in Film and Media Histories
MART 598 — Media Management and Distribution.

All MART 500 level courses

Other Recommendations

  • Capstone Scholars
  • BA/MA Accelerated Program – 5 year program
  • Honor’s College Scholars
  • the Magellan Program
  • Office of Undergraduate Research grants and travel grants

Sample Research Projects or Topics
At the upper levels, media arts students investigate unique questions. These investigations may result in a film, screen play, video game or other art work. They present their work at film festivals and conferences every year and have used University programs like Magellan to fund their projects.

Why this is Important
To distinguish yourself in the field is to show that you can apply your media art training in new ways, not just to duplicate and follow others’ instructions. Original research and production is the best way to do that.

How Students Can Get Started 
Connect with more advanced students, find out more about what productions are going on by joining the Media Arts Facebook Group.

 

INTEGRATE

How to Integrate 
From the first to the last media art class you take, you are making things ... producing films, creating video games, writing screenplays, building interactive art projects. Assignments are developed to encourage critical thinking and problem solving skills. It is important to have an active portfolio of your own media artworks as you enter the professional world. 

 

LEAD

Initial Career Opportunities

  • Production Assistant
  • Assistant Camera
  • Assistant Motion Picture Editor
  • Assistant Animator
  • Web Developer
  • Sound Studio Assistant
  • Television Student Production Assistant

Related Graduate Programs 

  • Master of Fine Arts (M.F.A.) in Film or Media Production
  • Master of Library and Information Science (M.L.I.S.)
  • A. or Ph.D. in Communications, Film/Media, Law

Future Career Opportunities 

  • Film Director
  • Cinematographer
  • Animator
  • Game Designer
  • Screenwriter
  • Theatrical Projections Designer
  • Documentary Filmmaker
  • Sound Designer
  • Business Owner
Philosophy

To learn more about making the most of your educational experiences within and beyond the classroom contact:
Undergraduate Director Anne Pollok, pollok@mailbox.sc.edu
Undergraduate Advisor Jeff Turner, turnerj3@mailbox.sc.edu.

 

PARTICIPATE: Community Service

Related Course(s)
PHIL 311 - Existentialism
PHIL 321 - Medical Ethics
PHIL 322 - Environmental Ethics
PHIL 325 - Engineering Ethics 

Recommended Sites/Experiences

  • Green Quad
  • MLK Day of Service
  • Non-profit organizations

Why this is Important
The experience of service can prepare our students for after-graduation activities such as volunteering for the Peace Corps, working at Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs), or help preparing themselves for careers in areas such as environmental law.

How Students Can Get Started
Students should enroll in a course listed above or contact the Leadership and Service Center for more opportunities.

 

PARTICIPATE: Diversity and Social Advocacy

Related Course(s)
PHIL 103 - Special Topics in Ethics and Values
PHIL 211 - Contemporary Moral Issues
PHIL 320 - Ethics
PHIL 322 - Environmental Ethics
PHIL 323 - Ethics of Science and Technology
PHIL 331 - Crime and Justice
PHIL 532 - Social Justice

Recommended Sites/Experiences

  • Lexington Department of Juvenile Justice
  • Sexual Trauma Services
  • Planned Parenthood (all of them do an excellent job in student supervising)

Why this is Important
The actual experience of diversity and advocacy can help students to relate what they learned in their courses to “real-world-situations” (they might even discover that doing philosophy is much closer to this ‘reality’ as they previously thought). Oftentimes, these experiences help to reshape one’s preconceived ideas, and develop more openness to new and opposing ideas. Additionally, being a philosopher does not automatically translate to being a professor, so entering a different field would bring valuable transferable experiences to enhance visibility on the job market.

How Students Can Get Started
Browse PHIL 103 sections to find areas of interest or enroll in any other courses listed above.

 

PARTICIPATE: Global Learning

Related Course(s)
There are not necessarily related courses within Philosophy. First move forward with interest in a specific place, then reach out to faculty who might have a connection or experience with that destination.

Timing for Study Abroad
Sophomore or Junior years are excellent times to study abroad.

Destinations/Opportunities 
Faculty have connections to organizations throughout the world, in particular Germany, Finland, Netherlands, and Italy.

Why this is Important
Study abroad is always a rewarding experience. This is particularly true when the opportunity is used to learn a foreign language well, establish academic connections, and to make friends in the country one is visiting.

How Students Can Get Started 
Speak to the undergraduate director (apollok@sc.edu), the undergraduate advisor (turnerj3@mailbox.sc.edu), and the Study Abroad Office.

 

PARTICIPATE: Peer Leadership

Student Organization(s) 

Other Leadership Opportunities
Look for PHIL 550 Healthcare courses that emphasize leadership within the healthcare field.

Why this is Important 
Adequate and informed leadership is an important virtue in our society. Leadership also entails the idea of a “first follower” – you do not have to re-invent the wheel, but lead by supporting the Philosophy club, or the endeavor of philosophy in any form, and help it continue in the future. We want to encourage our students to speak up, and speak out, about their ideas.

How Students Can Get Started
Contact Anne Pollok to get connected to the Philosophy Club.

 

PARTICIPATE: Internships/Professional Practice

Related Course(s)
PHIL 311 - Existentialism
PHIL 321 - Medical Ethics
PHIL 322 - Environmental Ethics
PHIL 324 - Business Ethics
PHIL 325 - Engineering Ethics
PHIL 399 - Independent Study
PHIL 527 - Virtues, Acts, and Consequences
PHIL 550 - Health Care Ethics
PHIL 598 - Readings in Philosophy

Recommended Sites/Work Experiences 
It is possible to pair our internship course with Political Science department, and other departments. Some examples include:

  • State and Local Government Offices
  • Law Firms
  • State Political Offices
  • Local Social Work Organizations
  • Phi Sigma Tau Honor Society

Why this is Important 
Students can learn to bring their philosophical skills to bear on real-world challenges in a positive way, helping to prepare them for a career in which their philosophical training can be used to advantage.

How Students Can Get Started
Talk with your academic advisor or the Undergraduate Director about opportunities.

 

PARTICIPATE: Research

Related Course(s) 
PHIL 390 - Junior Seminar
PHIL 399 - Independent Study
PHIL 490 - Senior Seminar
PHIL 495 - Senior Thesis
PHIL 598 - Readings in Philosophy

Sample Research Projects or Topics 

  • Ancient Philosophy
  • Philosophy of Science and Capability Theory regarding Justice
  • Joint projects integrating philosophy with other areas of the sciences or the humanities

Why this is Important 
Student research typically places a higher value on original thinking than other forms of student performance. It is a highly student-centered form of scholarly activity. We find that our mentoring of student research improves student engagement, greatly furthers academic development, and helps to prepare these researchers for post-graduate careers and graduate studies.

How Students Can Get Started
If you find yourself interested in a specific topic, but cannot find a fitting course, contact your advisor, a faculty member who works in the respective area, or the Undergraduate Director regarding a Special Topics course (PHIL 370).

 

INTEGRATE

How to Integrate 
PHIL 490 is our capstone, integrative course. Students outside our major have on occasion taken the course out of personal interest in philosophy. And they have done well. Making progress in thinking, writing, and speaking about philosophical issues has helped our students in thinking and writing on other subjects as well. Double majoring is encouraged, and we offer minor tracks that are geared toward developing interest in specific skill sets and applied tracks (i.e. medical, law, arts and culture). And we think philosophy is an excellent option in this case, both for the present opportunities it affords and for the benefits it offers for a future career and even for a future change in career. 

 

LEAD

Initial Career Opportunities 
Philosophy majors find employment in a wide variety of fields, including law, politics, social work and social advocacy, think tanks, business and banking, and education, among others. Philosophy majors are well trained in exactly the areas that employers say are important - clear thinking, ability to express oneself, ability to think creatively, and ability to adapt to new circumstances. These skills are valuable in many different jobs.

Related Graduate Programs 
Philosophy majors outperform other majors on the G.M.A.T., L.S.A.T., and G.R.E. tests for admission to business school, law school, and graduate school. Philosophy majors succeed in all of these programs, and a few other more specialized programs (such as bioethics and public policy).

Future Career Opportunities 
Philosophy trains one for a lifetime of careers. A 2008 study showed that philosophy majors outperformed all other majors in percentage salary increase over the first ten years of their career. Using the lifetime skills mentioned above, philosophers have been able to advance to a high level in many different fields.

Physics

To learn more about making the most of your educational experiences within and beyond the classroom contact: 
Dr. Jeff Wilson, jwilson@physics.sc.edu

 

PARTICIPATE: Community Service

Sites/Experiences

  • R. L. Childers Midway Physics Day at the S.C. State Fair
  • Carolina Science Outreach

Why this is important
A significant part of any physicist’s career involves explaining physics to someone. Practicing communication skills early and often is the best way to improve theses skills. These are also opportunities to start taking part in the national conversation about science.

 

PARTICIPATE: Global Learning

Timing for “study abroad”
The exact timing of a study abroad experience depends on an individual student’s program of study, but usually summer or May sessions involve the smallest impact.

Why this is important
Science is a global enterprise and most large projects involve international collaboration. Many physicists will at some point in their careers work closely with foreign scientists, or spend time in a laboratory or at an institution in another country. Studying abroad is a perfect opportunity to have this experience now.

How students can get started
Visit the USC Study Abroad Office

 

PARTICIPATE: Peer Leadership

Student Organization(s)

  • Society of Physics Students (SPS)
  • Carolina Science Outreach

Why this is important
Most science is done in collaborative groups. Learning leadership skills early can lead to expanded opportunities later.

 

PARTICIPATE: Internships

Professional Organizations
Physics professional organizations are a good way for students to become acquainted with the field. The American Physical Society offers student memberships, and for students interested in teaching careers, the American Association of Physics Teachers also has student membership packages.

Why this is important
These organizations publish monthly magazines with a broad range of articles that are very accessible to an undergraduate reader.

 

PARTICIPATE: Research

Related Course(s) 
PHYS 499, 531, 532

Sample research projects or topics 
Research Experiences for Undergraduates sponsored by many institutions through the National Science Foundation.

Why this is important 
Most careers in physics are research based. Your coursework at USC only provides some of the background information and skills you need to get started in research. If you are intrigued by physics, how ill you know whether a research career is “your cup of tea?” You owe it to yourself to try it! Research experience will also make you more attractive as a candidate at the next stage of your life, be it graduate school, or if you move directly into the workforce. Getting involved in a research project also means working closely with USC Physics faculty - the very people who can offer you invaluable advice and assistance for choosing that next step in your career.

How students can get started
Knock on doors. Most Physics faculty are happy to discuss their work with students. Research opportunities can also be discovered through casual interactions with your Physics teachers and other students.

  

LEAD

Initial career opportunities 
Many Physics graduates continue their education in Physics (~60%), with the remainder choosing to enter the workforce immediately. The majority of initially employed Physics graduates get jobs in engineering or computer science related fields. Smaller numbers work in academic or government research labs, or go into teaching. B.S. Physicists earn salaries in the same range as engineers. Furthermore, unemployment rates among Physics B.S. degree holders is also very low and comparable to that for engineers.

Related graduate programs 
Many students continue on to graduate study in Physics, but some also continue their studies in areas of Engineering, Astronomy, and Math.

Future career opportunities 
Physicists are problem solvers. Their analytical skills make them versatile and adaptable-this prepares them for a wide range of careers. Some careers are traditional, like engineering, computer science, and astronomy, but many can be quite surprising, like journalism, law, finance, biology, and medicine. The American Physical Society and the American Institute of Physics both have a wealth of information and statistics of careers for physicists.

Download this information as a PDF.

Political Science

To learn more about making the most of your educational experiences within and beyond the classroom contact: 
Neal Woods, Director of Undergraduate Studies, woodsn@mailbox.sc.edu
Janis Leaphart, Undergraduate Coordinator, leaphartj@sc.edu

 

PARTICIPATE: Community Service

Related course(s)
POLI 121 — Green Explorations
POLI 122 — Green Engagements

Sites/Experiences

  • Martin Luther King Day of Service
  • Service Saturdays
  • Students Advocating a Greener Environment (SAGE)
  • Alternative Breaks
  • CityServe
  • Big Brothers Big Sisters of Greater Columbia

Why this is important
Community service fosters awareness of political and social problems and common goals. Service projects can illustrate in a concrete way some of the concepts and issues examined in the Political Science major (environmental projects) and give students the opportunity to share their knowledge with the community.

 

PARTICIPATE: Global Learning

Related course(s)
POLI 391M — The Foundations of Law and Government
POLI 391M — The Political Economy of Central America
Study Abroad

Timing for “study abroad”
Summers, Junior Year

Why this is important
Global study opportunities connect political science course material to real world experiences in other countries and help students draw comparisons between their own cultural norms and institutions and those of other cultures. 

 

PARTICIPATE: Peer Leadership

Student Organization(s)

  • Pi Sigma Alpha: the National Political Science Honor Society
  • Students Advocating a Greener Environment (SAGE)
  • Mock Trial
  • Student Government
  • College Republicans
  • College Democrats
  • College Libertarians

Opportunities
POLI 215: Introduction to Leadership Studies
Minor in Leadership Studies

Why this is important 
Leadership activities train students to be and assess leaders in all walks of life, and help them to draw connections between political science course material and real-world leadership.

 

PARTICIPATE: Internships

Related Course(s)
POLI 379 — Public Affairs Internship (requires sophomore standing and prior completion of at least 6 credit hours of 300-level POLI coursework)

Recommended sites/work experiences

  • South Carolina Senate Judiciary Committee
  • Office of the Governor
  • Office of the Attorney General
  • Mayor’s Fellows
  • Columbia offices of Members of Congress and state legislators
  • South Carolina Republican Party
  • South Carolina Democratic Party campaigns
  • political consulting firms

Why this is important 
Internships allow students to apply knowledge learned in the classroom, build professional skills, and develop a professional network.

 

PARTICIPATE: Research

Related Course(s) 
POLI 399A — Independent Study (Political Science)
POLI 498 — Research Experience
POLI 499 — Senior Thesis

Sample research projects or topics 
Professor Finocchiaro offers a research experience for undergraduate students, “Exploring the Historical Congress,” in which a small cohort gains experience in basic social science research. The team meets once a week to discuss scholarly work and to collaborate on an ongoing research project. Students are mentored over the course of the semester in the development of their own research proposal, and emerge from the experience with a better understanding of both the U.S. Congress and the tools of modern social science.

Why this is important 
The development of general research skills is part of a political science education and is helpful for those seeking advanced degrees. Research opportunities also allow for further exploration of specific topics of interest.

  

INTEGRATE

How to integrate
POLI 121 — Green Explorations
POLI 122 — Green Engagements
POLI 215 — Introduction to Leadership Studies

 

LEAD

Initial career opportunities 
Variety of careers in public affairs; local, state, and national government; NGOs

Related graduate programs 
Master of Arts in International Studies (M.A.I.S.)
Master of Public Administration (M.P.A.)
Ph.D. in Political Science
Graduate programs in law

Future career opportunities 

  • leaders in national government
  • academia
  • law
  • corporations
  • non-governmental organizations
  • community organizations and schools
  • local politics
  • public interest groups

Download this information as a PDF.

Psychology

To learn more about making the most of your educational experiences within and beyond the classroom contact:
Connie Outen, Student Services Coordinator, couten@mailbox.sc.edu
Caitlyn Brockington, Student Services Program Coordinator, brockicl@mailbox.sc.edu

 

PARTICIPATE: Community Service

Related Course(s) 
PSYC 487 - Community Psychology
PSYC 489 - Community Psychology Practicum
PSYC 510 - Child Behavioral and Mental Disorders 

Other
Psi Chi, the international honors society in psychology also participates in community service.

Why this is Important
Participating in community service makes students better citizens while getting hands-on experience in applying principles learned in the classroom to the “real world.”

How Students can get Started
Speak with your advisor about engaging in courses related to community service in psychology. (Psychology UG program website about community service opportunities in psychology.) Visit the Leadership and Service Center.

 

PARTICIPATE: Diversity and Social Advocacy

Related Course(s)
PSYC 300 – Human Sexual Behavior
PSYC 310 – Psychology of Women
PSYC 320 – Psychology of Religion
PSYC 330 – Psychology and the African-American Experience
PSYC 430 – Social Psychology
PSYC 465 – Health Psychology
PSYC 480 – Multicultural Psychology
PSYC 487 – Community Psychology

How Students can get Started
Talk with your advisor about signing up for one of the listed courses.

 

PARTICIPATE: Global Learning

Timing for Study Abroad
Summer, Spring Sophomore or Junior Year

Why this is Important
Many psychology students have benefited from study abroad. Learning about another culture expands student understanding of the human condition. Global study opportunities connect psychology course material to real-world experiences in other countries and help students draw comparisons between their own cultural experiences and institutions and those of other cultures.

How Students can get Started
Contact the Study Abroad Office. The study abroad office has a list of many programs including some that are directly related to psychology; however a broad range of programs would benefit psychology majors.

 

PARTICIPATE: Peer Leadership

Student Organization(s)
Psi Chi is the international honors society for psychology majors. Students can seek leadership opportunities as executive board members or through the newly introduced mentoring program, whereby older students can mentor first year students.

Other Leadership Opportunities

  • Advanced majors can serve as Supplemental Instruction (SI) peer leaders for PSYC 101, 226, or 227.
  • Undergraduates can serve as Psychology Peer Counselors in the undergraduate student services office.

How Students can get Started
Contact Connie Outen, for more information on serving as a Psychology Peer Counselor or the Student Success Center to learn more about becoming a Supplemental Instruction Peer Leader.

 

PARTICIPATE: Internships/Professional Practice

Related Course(s)
PSYC 489 – Community Psychology Practicum - This course gives students an opportunity to work with professionals in the psychological services professions.

Internships in psychology are often related to research. See our research section.

Professional Organizations

Why this is Important
Psychology is a major that prepares you for many different professions. We encourage students to take advantage of related work, research, and professional opportunities.

How Students can get Started
Contact Connie Outen or visit the Psychology Undergraduate Student Services Office for more information.

 

PARTICIPATE: Research

Related Course(s)
The following research courses are required for all psychology majors:
PSYC 226 – Research Methods
PSYC 227 – Psychological Statistics
PSYC 228 – Research Methods Lab

Courses where students develop research skills in specific areas:
PSYC 571 – Cognitive Neuroscience Laboratory
PSYC 572 – Cognitive Laboratory
PSYC 580 – Intermediate Statistics for Psychologists

Courses in which students would engage in individual research projects:
PSYC 399 – Independent Study
PSYC 498 – Independent Study
PSYC 598 – Independent Study
PSCY 599 – Independent Study  

Many students in psychology take independent study classes and present research at Discover USC or at regional conferences such as the one hosted by the Southeastern Psychological Association. Students can also apply for research grants through the Magellan Program.

Why this is Important  
This is an essential activity for students applying to doctoral programs in psychology and related professions.

How Students can get Started
After completing the research sequence, visit the undergraduate program website for psychology to find research opportunities with psychology faculty or contact the Office of Undergraduate Research for help in identifying a faculty mentor.

 

LEAD

Career Opportunities 
Psychology is an excellent basis for career in many fields. The skills students learn as psychology majors, knowledge of human behavior and how to conduct and analyze research, are beneficial in most career fields. 

Related Graduate Programs 

  • Masters in counseling psychology, social work, school psychology, speech or occupational therapy, rehabilitation counseling
  • Ph.D. in clinical, experimental, or school psychology
  • PsyD. in professional psychology
  • Medicine, nursing, law, or education
Religious Studies

To learn more about making the most of your educational experiences within and beyond the classroom contact: 
James S. Cutsinger, Program Coordinator, cutsinge@sc.edu

PARTICIPATE: Community Service

Recommended Sites/Experiences

Why this is Important
Community service fosters a deeper awareness of common human needs and promotes a deeper understanding of the ethical ideals shared by a wide variety of religious traditions.

How Students Can Get Started 
We highly encourage our students to discuss community service interests with their faculty advisor. Students should also connect with University Chaplains, and the Religious Workers Council.

 

PARTICIPATE: Diversity and Social Advocacy

Related Course(s) 
All religious studies courses incorporate diversity into the curriculum. Religious studies courses not only discuss religious ideas but the cultures, practices, and institutions that emerge.

Recommended Sites/Experiences

Sample Research or Advocacy Project Topics

  • Experiencing religious life in South Carolina
  • Sacred Spaces
  • Blog of Judaism in South Carolina
  • University Diversity initiatives

Why this is Important
Religion is one of the major lenses to view humanity, culture, and thought. Religious studies not only focuses on religious ideas but the cultures, practices, and institutions that emerge.

How Students Can Get Started
We highly encourage our students to discuss interests with their faculty advisor. Students should also connect with University Chaplains, and the Religious Workers Council.

 

PARTICIPATE: Global Learning

Related Course(s)
Virtually all RELG courses that focus on world religions and/or specific religions (Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity, Islam, etc.) Many of the course taught are analyzed trans-historically where we focus on these more than just in modern times.

Timing for Study Abroad
We encourage our students to study abroad at any point. 

Destinations

  • Greece
  • Italy
  • Israel
  • Turkey
  • India
  • Nepal
  • Japan
  • Tibet
  • China
  • Jordan
  • Morocco
  • Oman
  • Thailand
  • Cambodia
  • Vietnam
  • Spain

Opportunities

  • Carolina International House at Maxcy College
  • Conversation Partners Program
  • Jewish Studies program – money for funding for study abroad, travel, language study
  • Classics program
  • Southeast Asian programs – connect with Mardi, Admin, in religious studies

Other

  • Service Learning Abroad
  • Teach Abroad
  • Volunteer Abroad

Why this is Important
To understand-experientially and not only theoretically-the teachings and practices of the world’s religions, there is no substitute for living and learning abroad. Another opportunity for language immersion abroad, diversity of religious experience and sacred sites, etc.

How Students Can Get Started 
Connect with your faculty advisor and the Study Abroad Office or the Jewish Studies program.

 

PARTICIPATE: Peer Leadership

Student Organization(s)

Other Leadership Opportunities 
Leadership opportunities abound on campus in the various Religious Organizations and Student Groups.

Why this is Important
Pastoral ministry, youth ministry, work with social service and relief organizations, and a host of other careers which Religious Studies majors pursue, all depend on leadership skills. There are a variety of opportunities that incorporate religious studies work where you develop knowledge and skills. Developing critical thinking skills and so on that develop you for an array of opportunities.

How Students Can Get Started
Connect with your faculty advisor and the Leadership and Service Center.

 

PARTICIPATE: Internships/Professional Practice

Recommended Sites/Work Experiences
Local churches, synagogues, and other religious communities.

Professional Organizations
American Academy of Religion

How Students Can Get Started
We highly encourage our students to discuss interests with their faculty advisor.

 

PARTICIPATE: Research

Related Course(s)
RELG 498– Advanced Topics

Many of the Religious studies courses have research requirements

Sample Research Projects or Topics
Past Magellan projects in Religious Studies:

  • “Silent to Quiet: The Decline of Trappist Sign Language”
  • “A Glass Theology: The Spirituality of J. D. Salinger”
  • “Worlds Apart: Monastic Seclusion and Witness” 

Other Recommendations

  • Community Based Research
  • Discover USC
  • Magellan Scholar program
  • Research Abroad 

Why this is Important
Engaging in research will help students learn how to learn to develop their skills and application that will allow students to understand what they have done in their major to further understand their work.

How Students Can Get Started 
Students are encouraged to connect with a faculty member who is involved in research the student is interested in.

 

INTEGRATE

How to Integrate 
Recent Maymester courses have included travel to India, Japan, and the American Southwest to study Hindu, Buddhist, Jain, and Shinto traditions and Christian monasticism.

Students can, for example, participate in Discover USC: Discover USC showcases research, scholarship, leadership and creative projects by undergraduate and graduate students, postdoctoral scholars and medical scholars representing the entire USC System. Take advantage of opportunities to share what you have learned from your experiences within the classroom and your experiences outside the classroom.

 

LEAD

Initial Career Opportunities 
Students who hold a B.A. in Religious Studies find employment in a wide variety of positions requiring the critical thinking and problem solving skills which a liberal arts education provides.

Related Graduate Programs 
The department’s graduates frequently continue their education in graduate and professional schools, including theological seminaries as well as law, medical, and business schools. A number have completed masters and doctoral degrees, including the Master of Divinity (M.Div.) or Master of Theological Studies (M.T.S.) from a seminary or divinity school, and the Ph.D. or Doctor of Ministry (D.Min.)

Future Career Opportunities 
The strong liberal arts education gained from Religious Studies also allows graduates to pursue positions in business administration, criminal justice, law, urban planning, medicine, journalism, and social work. Religious Studies majors enter a wide variety of careers ranging from pastoral ministry, college teaching, mission work, church music, and religious publishing to directing children’s homes and lobbying for passage of church-supported legislation.

Russian

To learn more about making the most of your educational experiences within and beyond the classroom contact:
Dr. Judith Kalb, Program Director, kalbj@mailbox.sc.edu

 

PARTICIPATE: Community Service

Recommended Sites/Experiences
In Columbia, we encourage our students to become acquainted with members of Columbia’s Russian émigré community; students have assisted elderly Russian emigres with adjustments to life in the US and have tutored Russians in English. In Russia, students have participated in spring-break service trips to various Russian cities to do volunteer work organized by the American Home in Vladimir, Russia. We have also had several students teach English to young Russians in Aigir, a camp outside of Ufa, Russia.

Why this is Important
Using Russian language in an everyday setting that helps others combines intellectual and personal growth and is an ideal combination: learning Russian and helping others at the same time.

How Students Can Get Started
Students interested in community service should contact the Leadership and Service Center.

 

PARTICIPATE: Diversity and Social Advocacy

Related Course(s)
The Russian curriculum covers various topics related to social justice.

Recommended Sites/Experiences
Our study abroad partner, SRAS.org, offers study abroad opportunities throughout the former Soviet states and sphere of influence, including Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan (where students can learn Kyrgyz language and customs), Khabarovsk, Russia (where students can study some of Russia’s native peoples’ cultures and traditions), and Warsaw, Poland (where students can study Jewish history among other course offerings).

Sample Research or Advocacy Project Topics
Students have done independent research projects and senior theses (some funded by Magellan grants) on diverse related topics, such as the participation of Russian women in the Russian political process and on the marginalization of gay activists in Russia.

Why this is Important
The largest country in the world, with territory in Europe and Asia and over 160 ethnic groups speaking approximately 100 languages, Russia presents unparalleled opportunities for ethnographic, anthropological, and linguistic study.  With an increasingly autocratic regime whose adherents have suppressed women’s and gay rights, Russia is a challenging place for minorities and human rights groups at present, a situation which should be publicized and addressed.  

How Students Can Get Started
Start taking courses in Russian area studies, including RUSS 280: Introduction to Russian Civilization, to begin the learning process!

 

PARTICIPATE: Global Learning

Timing for Study Abroad
We encourage study abroad at any point, but particularly after two years of college Russian.

Destinations
We are affiliated with SRAS, The School of Russian and Asian Studies, specializing in research and study abroad in Russia and Eurasia.  With a wealth of programs available through SRAS, students can pick the program that suits their needs best, be it studying business in St. Petersburg, diplomacy and international relations at the Moscow State Institute of International Relations, or the Russian Far East in Vladivostok.  Russian Program faculty work closely with students to guide them to the program that best fits their academic and career goals.

Opportunities
We present information at Study Abroad fairs and make the students in our courses aware of these exciting opportunities. The Russian Program director advises students extensively on study abroad options, timing, and opportunities for funding.

Other
We encourage students to apply for any fellowships that will fund study abroad.  With government focus on national security languages, our students interested in international relations and government service have applied successfully for Critical Language Scholarships and Boren Scholarships, both national fellowship programs to fund study abroad for critical security languages.

Why this is Important
Study abroad is increasingly important and expected for Russian majors to solidify linguistic and cultural knowledge and demonstrate such knowledge to future employers. Moreover, the very experience of being immersed in a culture and language one has studied intensively is exciting, worthwhile, educational, and life-changing!

How Students Can Get Started
Talk with the Study Abroad Office along with your faculty advisor.

 

PARTICIPATE: Peer Leadership

Student Organization(s)
Russian Club

Opportunities
There are opportunities for tutoring less advanced language students.  We also recommend Russian Table a weekly conversation table.

Why this is Important
Students run the Russian Club and organize activities. Holding officer positions in the Russian Club demonstrates leadership and commitment, important as many of our students apply for highly competitive national fellowships and scholarships.

How Students Can Get Started
Contact the Undergraduate Director for more information.

 

PARTICIPATE: Internships/Professional Practice

Recommended Sites/Work Experiences
As noted above, a number of our students have found English-language teaching internships in Aigir, Russia, an ideal way for students interested in a teaching career to gain valuable work experience while studying abroad.  In addition, as we have increasing numbers of International Business students studying Russian, we encourage these students to participate in business internships available through study abroad programs in Russia 

Professional Organizations
Students, both undergraduate and graduate, have presented papers at regional and national Slavic conferences, thereby increasing job and graduate school marketability.

Other
We have had several Russian majors win Fulbright teaching grants to Russia over the past years, and we continue to encourage students to apply!

Why this is Important
Work before graduation is enormously helpful in later, relevant job seeking.

How Students Can Get Started
Contact the Undergraduate Director for more information.  

 

PARTICIPATE: Research

Related Course(s)
RUSS 399 – Independent Study

Sample Research Projects or Topics
Topics for independent research projects have included Terrorism in Russia; Women’s Lack of Participation in Contemporary Russian Politics (research in Russia funded by a Magellan grant); Old Church Slavic Language; The Bering Strait Region; and more. Students have presented their research at Discovery Day and used it in graduate school and fellowship applications. Russian Program faculty also regularly advise Honors theses; topics in recent years have included Homosexuality in the USSR and Nazi Germany; Studies in Dostoevsky’s The Brothers Karamazov; and A Comparison of Dr. Zhivago and Gone with the Wind.

Why this is Important
Working with a professor and learning the skills necessary to conduct research and then applying what one has learned to create new knowledge and skills is exciting and inspirational: students often come away from a research project with a new commitment to their field and to learning itself, and they inspire their professors in the process!

How Students Can Get Started
Contact the Undergraduate Director for more information.

 

INTEGRATE

How to Integrate 
Our fourth-year Russian language students always end the semester with a presentation on a topic of their choosing; this allows them to integrate the skills they have learned in one activity. They prepare for this through a series of smaller presentations and creative activities in other RUSS classes and activities, including activities such as the ever-popular Russian Cuisine Day we hold at least once a year! We encourage Russian students involved in the arts to share their work with their fellow-students: an art student may create a work based on Russian culture (a recent project for the RUSS course “Homer in Russia” inspired a spectacular painting of a Homeric Achilles as Russia’s St. George, for instance), or a music student may perform a work by a Russian composer.

It is gratifying to hear from students that they are using their Russian language in summer jobs to communicate with fellow workers, for example, or that they are using their knowledge of language and culture while abroad to facilitate interactions and achieve their goals, be it in an educational or work/internship setting.

Students’ faces light up when they tell us that they used their Russian while at a restaurant to order, or to help a Russian-speaker who was struggling with English, or to explain to a friend or family member just why President Putin seems to reacting in a given way to a particular event. Students learn to use what they have gotten from class to understand situations they encounter elsewhere.

 

LEAD

Initial Career Opportunities

  • Government work, including Foreign Service, CIA, State Department
  • translating
  • teaching either in the US or abroad
  • international business
  • law enforcement
  • international NGOs
  • RUSS students tend to be successful in national fellowship competitions as well, which then lead to greater career opportunities

Related Graduate Programs

  • M.A. in Russian Area Studies, leading to diverse career options
  • Law school
  • Business school with focus on international business
  • Ph.D. in Russian, History, Literature, Comparative Literature, Linguistics

Future Career Opportunities

  • Legal profession (international law)
  • College/University Teaching
  • Political Analyst and Career Diplomat
  • Professional Translator
  • NGO Administrator/Officer
  • International Business Executive

Other Career Comments
A Russian major demonstrates to prospective employers that this is not a typical candidate, but rather someone who enjoys challenges, is particularly good at communication and interacting with people from diverse cultures, is open to learning about new fields, and can analyze information effectively and efficiently. Since Russian is designated a National Security Language, students with a RUSS major find national security job opportunities.

Sociology

To learn more about making the most of your educational experiences within and beyond the classroom contact:
Douglas Anderton, danderto@mailbox.sc.edu
Shelley A. Smith, Program Coordinator, smithsa@mailbox.sc.edu

 

PARTICIPATE: Community Service

Related course(s)
SOCY 340 — Introduction to Social Problems
SOCY 309 — An Introduction to Social Inequality

Sites/Experiences

  • Alternative Breaks
  • City Serve
  • Carolina Reads

Why this is important
Community service frequently enables us to leave our comfort zones and interact with others in environments with which we a not familiar. It also frequently requires critical thinking skills be brought to bear on social or community problems.

 

PARTICIPATE: Global Learning

Related Course(s)
SOCY 102 — Human Societies: An Introduction to Macrosociology
SOCY 315 — World Population: Problems and Policies

Opportunities

  • Magellan Scholar Program
  • Alternative Breaks

Why this is important
Learn about different cultures and how to analyze the interactions of groups and societies through a global and historical perspective.

 

PARTICIPATE: Peer Leadership

Student Organization(s)

  • Alpha Kappa Delta (AKD)
  • Honor Society (Honor Society of Sociology undergraduates; name implies social research for the purpose of service)

Why this is important
AKD members who become Civil Service employees meet one of the requirements for entrance at the GS-7 level (an increase in pay-grade) if they list AKD membership on their applications (providing they enter at the GS-5 level).

  

PARTICIPATE: Research

Related Course(s)
SOCY 303
SOCY 561

Sample Research Projects or Topics

  • Interview fellow students about attitudes towards current events
  • historical research using archival materials to determine the social status of particular groups in the past
  • conduct statistical analyses of data collected by the U.S. census bureau to examine racial and ethnic variation in work experience

Other recommendations
This is an ideal activity leading to Magellan Scholar application; BA or BS Graduation with Distinction; Discovery Day

Why this is important 
This will allow you to recognize trends and patterns and produce social statistics such as those used in market research, opinion polling, sales, and countless other applications.

 

INTEGRATE

How to integrate 
Discovery Day participation; Caravel (USC’s journal of undergraduate research and scholarly excellence). These activities teach you how to convey your ideas effectively in writing and presentations

 

LEAD

Initial career opportunities

  • Social science research
  • researcher for non-profits
  • social services
  • public health analyst
  • management
  • administrative support
  • sales and marketing 

Related graduate programs 
Masters of Art/Sciences
Ph.D. Sociology

Other kinds of graduate programs may include Psychology, Teaching, Social Work , Law

Future career opportunities

  • Senior researcher in the Federal or State government
  • college professor
  • private sector research (in marketing, for example)
  • consulting work

Download this information as a PDF.

Spanish

To learn more about making the most of your educational experiences within and beyond the classroom contact:
Jorge Camacho, Faculty Program Coordinator, camachoj@mailbox.sc.edu

 

PARTICIPATE: Community Service

Related course(s)
SPAN 301 — Service Learning Course
SPAN 305 — Working with Hispanic Clients
SPAN 360

Why this is important
SPAN 305 fosters cross-cultural approaches to interactions with persons of Hispanic origin in a variety of professional settings. This course has two purposes: a) a cross-cultural orientation, especially related to issues faced by Hispanics living in the United States; and b) a pre-professional orientation; knowledge and vocabulary useful for working with Hispanics in the U.S in a variety of professional areas

 

PARTICIPATE: Global Learning

Related Course(s)
SPAN 350 — Spanish Language Study Abroad

Timing for “study abroad”
Summer

Destinations

  • Costa Rica
  • Bilbao
  • Madrid
  • Buenos Aires

Why this is important
SPAN 350 is an intensive language practice in native environment with emphasis on oral skills. Instruction by native speakers; community contact and home stay

 

PARTICIPATE: Peer Leadership

Student Organization(s)

  • SIGMA DELTA PI
  • LASA

Opportunities

  • Spanish Programs
  • Community outreach programs

Why this is important
Students help and create connection between what they learn at school and the actual needs of the community.

  

PARTICIPATE: Internships

Professional Organizations

  • PASO
  • Palmetto Luna
  • Hispanic Connections

Why is this important
Learn about the Hispanic community in South Carolina

 

PARTICIPATE: Research

Related Course(s)
SPAN 401
SPAN 405
SPAN 375
SPAN 380

Sample Research Projects or Topics 
Hispanics in the US

Why this is important 
Students learn about larger Hispanic community in the US

  

LEAD

Initial career opportunities

  • Translation and interpretation
  • Teaching position at different levels (High schools, University, College)
  • Career in foreign affairs
  • Career in government

Related graduate programs 
M.A., M.A.T., and Ph.D. in Spanish

Download this information as a PDF.

Statistics

To learn more about making the most of your educational experiences within and beyond the classroom contact: 
David Hitchcock, Undergraduate Director, hitchcock@stat.sc.edu

 

PARTICIPATE: Community Service

Recommended Sites/Experiences

Why this is Important
Students can find opportunities to give back to their communities by volunteers or helping support in improving community organizations.

How Students Can Get Started
A good first step towards finding service opportunities is to contact the Leadership and Service Center.

 

PARTICIPATE: Diversity and Social Advocacy

How Students Can Get Started
Students interested in DSA should reach out to a University professor with research focus of interest. Student may be able to assist in data analysis to make additional contributions to the research of interest.

 

PARTICIPATE: Global Learning

Timing for Study Abroad
Students should consider studying abroad either during sophomore or junior year. It is important to discuss this opportunity early with your statistics advisor.

Destinations/Opportunities 
All of the information needed for organizing your study abroad experience can be found at USC Study Abroad. We encourage that students study abroad wherever they choose. The National Student Exchange provides opportunities within the U.S. and Canada.

Why this is Important
Studying abroad is essential for students to develop a general understanding of other cultures and the role it has in society.

How Students Can Get Started
Talk with your statistics advisor or the Undergraduate Director and visit with the Study Abroad Office to see what opportunities are available.

 

PARTICIPATE: Peer Leadership

Student Organization(s)

Why this is Important
Student organizations are a tremendous opportunity to find out about internships, courses, and other opportunities around campus. They also provide a great opportunity to take on-campus leadership roles. Gamma Iota Sigma often hosts career fairs advertising opportunities for internships and professional positions in actuarial science.

How Students Can Get Started
Visit the websites for these organizations and contact the advisor of the organization.

 

PARTICIPATE: Internships/Professional Practice

Professional Organizations

Why this is Important
Internships are an invaluable first foot in the door for your future career. The American Statistical Association posts information on available internships in government, academic, and other research institutions and industry. In actuarial science, the larger companies who employ actuaries typically have summer internship programs, with applications sometimes due as early as September or October for the following summer. Speakers brought in by the various organizations listed above are a good source of ways to locate additional internship opportunities.

How Students Can Get Started
Students can visit STAT-MAJORS Blackboard page for announcements about internships that are available and visit the Undergraduate Director.  

 

PARTICIPATE: Research

Related Course(s)
STAT 516 – Statistical Methods II
STAT 517 – Advanced Statistical Models
STAT 530 – Applied Multivariate Statistics and Data Mining 

Sample Research Project or Topics
Regression Analysis of Success in Major League Baseball (a 2016 honors thesis title)

Recommendations 
The National Institute of Statistical Science and The Statistical and Applied Mathematical Science Institute in the research triangle of NC are excellent sources of research workshops for undergraduates. Funding to attend is often available. The Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) also has a variety of opportunities to do focused research at various locations.

Why this is Important 
Research experience, either through an external program or with a USC faculty member, can be a tremendous boost in applications to graduate school.

How Students Can Get Started 
Visit the STAT-MAJORS Blackboard page to look at external research opportunities. Talk with the Undergraduate Director to discuss possible research projects with USC faculty within the statistics department or other departments across campus.

 

INTEGRATE

How to Integrate 
The USC Connect office has numerous ideas on how to link all of your learning at USC together so that you can strengthen each separate piece while still in school, and make the most of them after you’ve graduated. Courses often include projects that allow students integrate classwork with students’ interests as well as their current and future careers. Courses such as STAT 513, 516, 530 typically include projects that allow students to analyze data relevant to their own interests or career goals.

 

LEAD

Initial Career Opportunities

  • Actuary
  • Data Analyst
  • SAS Programmer
  • Statistician
  • Secondary Education / Teacher

Related Graduate Programs 

  • S./Ph.D. in Statistics
  • S./Ph.D. in Biostatistics
  • S./Ph.D. in Education Research
  • Business Master’s Degree with a focus in analytics

Future Career Opportunities 
Students could eventually become lead statisticians on projects and could potentially work for government agencies focused on statistical and data analysis. Students who pursue graduate school may become university professors or statisticians in government or industry.

Other Career Comments 
We strongly encourage all students to begin their college careers preparing themselves for Actuarial Science, SAS Programming, and graduate school so that they are strongly qualified for as many opportunities as possible when they approach graduation.

Theatre

To learn more about making the most of your educational experiences within and beyond the classroom contact: 
Stephanie Milling, Undergraduate Director, smilling@mailbox.sc.edu
Robert Richmond, Department Chair, bourner@mailbox.sc.edu

 

PARTICIPATE: Community Service

Recommended Sites/Experiences 

  • National Arts Advocacy Days
  • Participation in community theatre
  • Assistance with local middle school and high school theatre production programs
  • Supporting local theatre backstage, etc. (pull from the Dance form)
  • Theatre educational outreach and performances
  • Fronter House staffing for USC Performance events

Why this is Important 
Community Service enables students to support local arts organizations, gain experience for future careers in a variety of fields, and increase appreciation of theatre in the community.

How Students Can Get Started
Talk with your faculty advisor and contact community agencies directly.

 

PARTICIPATE: Diversity and Social Advocacy

Related Course(s)
THEA 120 - Laboratory Theatre Production
THEA 123 - Theatre Production Studio

Recommended Sites/Experiences

  • Theatre production programs focus on different populations and demographics (telling educational stories to education and promote change)
  • Community theatre
  • Nonprofit arts organizations
  • State and national arts advocacy days
  • Volunteering in organizations working with individuals with disabilities
  • Very Special Arts at the Kennedy Center

Sample Research or Advocacy Project Topics

  • Relevance of theatre in education
  • Creating a play or work about a social justice issues
  • Race and gender issues in theatre
  • Theatre production for individuals with disabilities
  • Sensory friendly performances and programming

Why this is Important
Immersion in diverse settings demonstrates how theatre can be used as a vehicle for social change and recognizing the discipline as having many opportunities for inclusivity.

How Students Can Get Started 
Talk with the Undergraduate Director or contact a faculty member with a similar interest to you.

 

PARTICIPATE: Global Learning

Related Course(s)
THEA 200 - Understanding and Appreciation of Theatre
THEA 561 - History of the Theatre I
THEA 562 - History of the Theatre II
THEA 563 - History of Modern Theatre

Timing for Study Abroad 
Spring Junior year - fall Senior year

Destinations/Opportunities

  • National and International training programs
  • London (Barder, Lamdon, and others)
  • Monte Costello, Italy
  • Florence
  • Puerto Rico

Why this is Important
Studying theatre abroad provides students with an opportunity to learn about how various cultural values and traditions inform dance practice and performance across the globe.

How Students Can Get Started
Talk with the Undergraduate Director regarding your interest in study abroad and talk with the Study Abroad Office.

 

PARTICIPATE: Peer Leadership

Student Organization(s)

Other Leadership Opportunities

Why this is Important
Students develop skills and learn to collaborate with colleagues and their community to build leadership skills in creating theatre productions. playwriting, directing, acting, design, production, management, marketing, promotions, and box office.

How Students Can Get Started  
Contact the student organizations for more information about getting started. Attend a production and introduce yourself to leadership.

 

PARTICIPATE: Internships/Professional Practice

Recommended Sites/Work experiences

Professional Organizations

Why this is Important
Internships prepare students for careers in theatre, professional performance, and arts administration through mentored, hands-on work experiences in a variety of arts organizations.

How Students Can Get Started
Talk with the Undergraduate Director for more information and make contact with the organization of interest.

 

PARTICIPATE: Research

Related Course(s) 

  • THEA 490 - Theatre Capstone Course
  • THEA 561 - History of the Theatre I
  • THEA 562 - History of the Theatre II
  • THEA 578 - Play Direction I
  • THEA 599 - Special Topics in Theatre - students must find a faculty advisor to enroll in this course.

Sample Research Projects or Topics

  • Playwriting
  • Directing
  • Design
  • Theatre History research
  • Script analysis of famous plays

Other Recommendations 

  • Magellan grants
  • Honors thesis

 Why this is Important
Creative/Scholarly research provides students with opportunities to investigate creative processes and apply qualitative methodologies to performance-based and written projects in theatre.

How Students Can Get Started
Talk with a faculty member with a specific area of expertise that has a similar interest to you. Also talk with the Undergraduate Director.

 

INTEGRATE

How to Integrate 
The Production program challenges students to utilize their skills they have learned in the classroom to apply their learning to practical experiences and performance. Students are put in the real world setting to maintain professionalism, meet deadlines, and establish collaborations that develop network.

One experience sparks another and provides a continuing of ideas and a an interchange of professional guest arts, stage mangers, artists, etc. and work with graduate students to immerse yourself in the professional world of dance and develop the skills to learn to be more creative to see the need to tell the stories shared within theatre.

When students go outside of the classroom, students are prepared for the professional field and equipped to handle their first position within theatre.

 

LEAD

Initial Career Opportunities

  • Performance
  • Community Outreach
  • Apprenticeships
  • Internships
  • Teaching
  • Design
  • Stage Productions and Management
  • Technicians

Related Graduate Programs 

  • M.A. in Arts Administration
  • M.A. / M.F.A.  / Ph.D. programs in performance studies, directing, playwriting, dramaturgy, theatre history, design, theatre management
  • M.A.T. in Theatre 

Future Career Opportunities

  • Academia
  • Playwriting
  • Directing
  • Arts Administration

 

RECOMMENDATIONS FOR GRADUATION WITH LEADERSHIP DISTINCTION

 

 PATHWAY: Research

Beyond the Classroom Extensive Experience
With faculty supervision, complete one of the following:

  • Assistant Design and Design on 2 productions (2 semesters)
  • Stage management (1 semester), and Directing/Assistant Directing (1 semester)
  • In-depth research of a significant role: Character development, historical significance, production history, and playwright biography (2 semesters, a different role/production each semester)

Enhancement Activities

  • Participate in department read-throughs and production show and tells
  • Theater conferences: South Carolina Theater Association [SCTA], United States Institute of Theater Technology [UITT], Southeast Theater Conference [SETC]
  • Guest lectures related to Theater
  • Interviews of directors, playwrights, or designers
  • Community plays

Course Work

  • THEA 201: Introduction to Theater Studies
  • THEA 399: Independent Study
  • THEA 380, 561, 562, 563

Presentation
Performance with talk back session or required reflection.

E-Portfolio
THEA 490: Senior Capstone and UNIV 401
Students will gather their materials and begin to work toward their E-Portfolio in THEA 490.  It is recommended that students take UNIV 401to complete the E-Portfolio. 

Women and Gender Studies

To learn more about making the most of your educational experiences within and beyond the classroom contact:
Anna Sykes, Program Coordinator, esykes@mailbox.sc.edu
Dr. Erica Gibson, Assistant Professor
Dr. Suzanne Swan, Interim Undergraduate Director, drsuzanne.swan@gmail.com

 

PARTICIPATE: Community Service

Related course
WGST 112 — Women In Society service learning section taught by Dr. Mary Baskin Waters
WGST 430 — Men & Masculinity
WGST 499 — Internship

Sites/Experiences
WGST 112 provides a social science perspective of the changing roles and images of women in psychological, sociological, historical, anthropological, economic, and political contexts. The service-learning section emphasizes the importance of active learning both in the classroom and in the community through individualized service-learning placements in local organizations. Students will enhance their values of civic responsibility and community collaboration through service opportunities that address gendered social issues, such as domestic violence, sexual assault, medically underserved individuals, homelessness, and incarcerated youth.

In WGST 430, students explore gender and masculinity through a service learning component. Students either 1) volunteer with an organization that works to prevent or aid victims of dating violence, domestic violence, sexual violence, or child abuse; or 2) do a social marketing activity that in some way gives information to the broader community about issues covered in the course (e.g., violence, men’s health, intersexuality, etc.).

The WGST 499 Internship is described in detail in the internship section below The Women’s Well-Being Initiative (WWBI) is an active coalition of faculty, students, and community members. WWBI activities include school-based literacy initiatives, an on-going collaboration with the Juvenile Arbitration Program of Lexington County to provide an arts program for at-risk girls, outreach and educational initiatives with the local Hispanic population, and oral history projects aimed at gathering and disseminating community members’ experiences and perspectives. WWBI is led by Dr. Lynn Weber and Dr. DeAnne Messias in WGST.

Why this is important
Women’s and Gender Studies as a discipline has always been concerned with making connections between theory and practice. Community service as part of the learning experience helps students see connections between theories discussed in class and what happens in the real world.

 

PARTICIPATE: Global Learning

Related Course(s)
WGST 113 — Women’s Health
WGST 320 — Sexual and Gender in Ancient Greece
WGST 358 — Gender and Culture
WGST 381 — Gender and Globalization
WGST 430 — Sex, Gender, & Religion
WGST 555 — Language and Gender

WGST 320 examines topics such as gender roles and standards of sexual behavior as manifested in ancient Greek literary and archaeological evidence; attitudes toward homosexuality; the modern media’s representation of famous Greeks.

WGST 358 is the anthropological study of gender, with emphasis on cross-cultural investigation of the interaction of biological, cultural, and environmental factors including intersections of race, social class, and sexuality as influences on gender behavior.

WGST 430 explores the role of gender and sexuality in the shaping of individual and social religious identities. The course employs critical theories of the body and religion to explore issues such as how one’s biological body impacts one’s religious practices, and how these practices are affected when bodies or sexuality are non-traditional (e.g., LGBTQ).

WGST 555 examines approaches to gender and language emphasizing the social grounding of both; and how language reflects sociocultural values and is a tool for constructing different types of social organization.

Timing for “study abroad”
Varies by student

Opportunities
Study Abroad Office

Why this is important
A major theme of Women’s and Gender Studies as a discipline is that gender is constructed and enacted in many different ways around the world. 

 

PARTICIPATE: Peer Leadership

Student Organization(s)
Feminist Majority Leadership Alliance at USC — Brings together USC feminists in a forum for discussion and activism.

Why this is important 
Students apply the concepts they have learning in WGST classes to leadership positions that allow them to make a difference in their communities

 

 

PARTICIPATE: Internships

Related Courses
WGST 499 — Internship, a 3 credit class, is required for the major. Practical service learning internship experience integrating knowledge and materials from previous Women’s and Gender Studies courses.

Recommended sites/work experiences
Students have interned at numerous non-governmental and governmental organizations. Community agencies include:

  • Sexual Trauma Services of the Midlands
  • Sistercare
  • Girls Inc.
  • Planned Parenthood
  • Boys & Girls Club of the Midlands
  • The Dickerson Center
  • The Free Medical Clinic
  • Tell Them
  • PASOS
  • The Harriet Hancock Center

University-based organizations include:

  • Sexual Assault Violence Intervention & Prevention
  • Healthy Carolina
  • Office of Sexual Health.

Governmental organizations include:

  • Juvenile Arbitration Program of the 11th Circuit
  • SC Attorney General’s office
  • SC Department of Juvenile Justice.

Why this is important
The goals of the internship are for students to 1) gain an understanding of how the dynamics of gender, race, class, sexual orientation, and other categories of difference operate in the real world through working with a community or other organization; 2) to make a difference in the community by helping to address problems caused by treating people differently or unjustly because of their gender, race, class, sexual orientation, or other categories of difference.

 

PARTICIPATE: Research

Related Course(s)
WGST 499 — Internship. Students can choose a research-based activity to fulfill this requirement.

Sample Research Projects or Topics 
In Fall 2013, a student will be helping Dr. Dana DeHart in the College of Social Work to analyze her data examining pathways to prison for girls in the juvenile justice system.

Why this is important 
Research allows students another avenue to integrate what they have learned about gender, race, class, and other categories of difference into a meaningful project. It also allows them to form a close working relationship with the professor and other students in the professor’s lab that they are working with.

 

INTEGRATE

How to integrate
A sample of the creative work students do in WGST courses:

  • In the WGST 499 Internship, students create a poster of their work at their internship site. A poster session on community-based research is held at the end of the semester. Students discuss their work with faculty, students, and community members who attend the poster session.
  • In WGST 113 Women’s Health, students create Powerpoint presentations of a women’s health issue and present these to the class. Students also interview an important woman in their life about a women’s health issue and write a paper for the class based on this interview.
  • In the WGST 499 Internship students apply what they have learned in the major to the problems and issues that community agencies and other groups are working to address. The experience of applying the knowledge learned in the major to solving real world problems is invaluable. The purpose of learning is not just to gather knowledge but to use that knowledge to make a difference in the world. 

 

LEAD

Initial career opportunities 
Careers WGST graduates have pursued include:

  • public policy and advocacy positions
  • health-related careers
  • social work careers
  • business/service industries
  • legal services and
  • community development.

Related graduate programs 
Law school, Public Policy, Women’s & Gender Studies master’s programs, Women’s and Gender Studies Ph.D. programs, Master’s/Ph.D. in Public Health, Urban Planning master’s programs are some of the graduate programs WGST majors have gone to. Many WGST majors are double majors, and the 2nd major in WGST enhances their first major. For example, students who double major in Public Health and WGST have specialized in careers related to women’s health. Such students have often gone to graduate programs in Social Work, Psychology, and Sociology as well.

Future career opportunities

  • Law
  • Public Policy
  • Academia
  • Urban Planning
  • Public Health
  • Social Work
  • Psychology
  • Sociology

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