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Public Health

Recommendations are intended to help students make the most of their education by providing examples of experiences that can enrich educational experience and illustrate how within and beyond the classroom experiences relate to one another. These are examples and options, not requirements. 

Athletic Training

To learn more about making the most of your educational experiences within and beyond the classroom contact searsojr@mailbox.sc.edu.

PARTICIPATE: Community Service

Related Course(s)
ATEP 263, 267, 392, 292, 293, 492, 494

Sites/Experiences

  • Allied health related field experiences
  • Special Olympics

Why this is important
Give back in area that may not be engaged during typical clinical education assignments

 

PARTICIPATE: Global Learning

Why this is important
Exposure to diverse populations in allied health field 

 

PARTICIPATE: Peer Leadership

Student Organization(s)

  • SC Athletic Training Student Association
  • AT Program Advisory Board (Student Section and Clinical Education Section)

Opportunities

  • Mid-atlantic AT Association Young Professionals Organization
  • National AT Association Young Professional Association

Why this is important
Opportunity to develop leadership skills are necessary for future career engagement

 

PARTICIPATE: Internships

Related Course(s)
ATEP 267: 40 Observational Hours
ATEP 292, 293: 150 Clinical Education Hours
ATEP 392, 393: 200 Clinical Education Hours
ATEP 492, 494: 250 Clinical Education Hours

Recommended Sites/Work Experiences 
All clinical education experiences are assigned by program

Professional Organizations

  • SC Athletic Training Association
  • National Athletic Training Association
  • Mid Atlantic Athletic Training Association

Why this is important
Engagement and exposure to professional field

 

PARTICIPATE: Research

Related Course(s)
ATEP 494

Sample Research Projects or Topics
Develop research questions based on evidenced-based medicine

Why this is important
Foundational course for developing and consuming evidence-based medicine

 

INTEGRATE

How to integrate 
e-Portfolio: develop reflection on clinical experiences as they relate to the classroom and previous experiences

 

LEAD

Initial career opportunities 
Young Professional Leadership with Regional and National Organizations 

Download this information as a PDF.

Exercise Science

To learn more about making the most of your educational experiences within and beyond the classroom contact: 
Barbara Cuevas, Instructor/Advisor, cuevas@mailbox.sc.edu

 For direct inquiries to Arnold School of Public Health, Exercise Science Department, 1300 Wheat Street, Blatt PE Center 102 Columbia, SC 29208, or call 803-777-5267

 

PARTICIPATE: Community Service

Related Course(s)
EXSC 444 – Exercise Science Practicum
EXSC 499 – Independent Study (Selected sections)
EXSC 555 – Current Special Topics in Exercise Science (Selected Sections)

Recommended Sites/Experiences
There are endless numbers of potential sites and experiences for public health students. Site and experience selection depends upon (individual/group project) student interests. Students are encouraged to seek Community Service opportunities on their own and as part of course requirements. Some recommended sites/experiences include, but are not limited to

  • schools (K-12, higher education)
  • churches
  • military bases
  • hospitals
  • free clinics
  • after school programs
  • community centers
  • All Star Gymnastics
  • PAC Baseball
  • Tai Chi
  • Still Hopes’
  • GoodBodies

Why this is Important
Students in exercise science need exposure to a variety of community agencies, organizations, governmental actions, community dynamics, community neighborhood structure and organization to understand how to best address communities’ priority health needs.

How Students Can Get Started
Students are encouraged to spend time reviewing student organizations through Garnet Gate. Look at the Leadership & Service Center website for more information.

 

PARTICIPATE: Diversity and Social Advocacy

Related Course(s)
EXSC 444 – Exercise Science Practicum
EXSC 499 – Independent Study (Selected Sections)
HPEB 300 – Introduction to Health Promotion, Education, and Behavior
HPEB 470 – Principles of Global Health
HPEB 511 – Health Problems in a Changing Society
HPEB 512 – Southern Discomfort: Public Health in the American South
HPEB 513 – Race, Ethnicity, and Health: Examining Health Inequalities
HPEB 551 – Medical Anthropology: Field Work
HPEB 552 – Medical Anthropology
HPEB 553 – Community Health Problems
HPEB 621 – Maternal and Child Health
HPEB 627 – Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) Health
HPEB 654 – Maternal and Child Nutrition
HPEB 674 – Social Networks, Social Capital, and Health
HPEB 679 – Addressing Childhood Obesity through Community Approaches
HPEB 680 – Laboratory Techniques in Physiological Measurement
HPEB 683 – Contemporary Topics in Sexual Health
HPEB 684 – HIV/STI Prevention 

Recommended Sites/Experiences
As with the other pathways, there are endless numbers of experiences and sites for students interested in social justice, diversity and inclusion and social advocacy. Students are encouraged to seek opportunities on their own but may consider such sites/experiences as:

Sample Research or Advocacy Project Topics

  • Innovative Therapies for Children with Special Needs
  • Experiences of Latinos during the 2015 Flooding in SC
  • Motor Development for Children with Special Needs
  • Modality use in Cancer Survivors
  • Research on Social Skills in Autism
  • Comparing Cultural Beliefs on Health Care Practices
  • Intervention to Prevent Excessive Weight Gain in Pregnancy
  • Novel DCQ Drug in Treating Colon Cancer Cells
  • Mobile-Based Health Interventions for Pregnant Women
  • Comparative Analysis of Health Indicators: Beaufort and the State of SC

Why this is Important
Exercise science professionals are faced with initiating actions to support individuals and communities on multiple levels. Students are encouraged to build their skills in, for example, innovative therapies to help diverse populations, working for non-profit and governmental organizations, assessing community needs and assets, and helping improve the health of the underserved and underrepresented in the community.

How Students Can Get Started 
Students are strongly encouraged to join campus organizations and clubs as well as take on leadership roles in these organizations. Exercise Science students can gain valuable experience by participating in local, state and national political and governmental activities. Many volunteer activities also provide direct experience with diversity and social advocacy efforts in the field of public health.  Students are encouraged to spend time reviewing student organizations through Garnet Gate. Look at the Leadership & Service Center and the Office of Multicultural Student Affairs websites for more information. Beyond USC's campus, students are encouraged to seek out community-based organizations that support their interests.

 

PARTICIPATE: Global Learning

Related Course(s)
PUBH 102 – Introduction to Public Health
EXSC 499 – Independent Study (Selected Sections)
EXSC 555 – Current Special Topics in Exercise Science (Global Health Sections)

Timing for Study Abroad
Working with your advisor, you can incorporate a study abroad experience at any point in your curriculum.

Opportunities/Destinations
Every summer, the Arnold School of Public Health has several faculty-led study abroad trips or global class opportunities. For example:

Comparing Health Professions in Ireland
Australia: Sports Medicine, History, and Culture
Global USC in Costa Rica: Global Health

 Again, since exercise science is everywhere, all study abroad destinations are recommended and relevant. Selection should be based on student’s interests. Many exercise science majors opt to travel to Spanish speaking countries as a way of improving their Spanish speaking skills for work with Hispanic/Latino populations. However, numerous students, who do not speak Spanish or who share this goal, have traveled to Africa, Italy, Germany, and countless other locations. 

USC Alternative Break (Spring & Fall); faculty led study abroad programs, student volunteer directory. Student organizations not limited to, but including: GlobeMed at the University of South Carolina, Global Leadership Network, Students Associated for Latin America (SALA), Amigos del Buen Samaritano, Carolina Against Sex Trafficking (CAST), Engineers Without Borders - USA, Operation Smile at USC, Students Helping Honduras at the University of South Carolina, Timmy Global Health at USC, TOMS at University of South Carolina, FACE AIDS- University of South Carolina Chapter. The Arnold School also has several Centers and faculty who travel and conduct community-based public health research and interventions (e.g., Consortium for Latino Immigration Studies).

Why this is Important
Global study is directly connected to and critical for students in exercise science. Not only are many of our health problems at home (in the U.S.) shared by others around the world, but the leading causes of death and morbidity world-wide have an impact on each and every one of us. Many exercise science students aspire to participate in the Peace Corps and such programs as Doctors Without Borders. Study abroad is the perfect complement to students who are passionate about travel and about helping others at the international level.

How Students Can Get Started 
Contact the Study Abroad Office about other opportunities.

 

PARTICIPATE: Peer Leadership

Student Organization(s)
Become active in a health-related student organization such as:

Other Leadership Opportunities
The Arnold School has a Dean’s Advisory Council (DSAC) which includes student representatives from both Public Health and Exercise Science. Students are encourage to be leaders in class projects and presentations. Students are also encouraged to participate in the numerous leadership opportunities through USC Student Government (as Arnold School Representatives), UNIV 101, Visitor Center Student Ambassadors, Student Success Center Peer Leaders, and Summer Orientation Peer Leaders

Why this is Important
Not only is leadership experience important for employability and successful admission to graduate programs, but it is essential for public health practitioners who direct, supervise and coordinate the many duties necessary to ensure the nation’s health. 

How Students Can Get Started
There are a variety of peer leadership opportunities throughout campus within the Arnold School of Public Health and the University. To learn more about student organizations, visit Garnet Gate through the Leadership and Service Center. Contact other University offices to learn more about other leadership opportunities on campus.

 

PARTICIPATE: Internships/Professional Practice

Related Course(s)
EXSC 201 – Foundations of Physical Therapy
EXSC 401 – Practicum Preparation
EXSC 444 – Exercise Science Practicum
EXSC 499 – Independent Study (Selected Sections)
EXSC 555 – Current Special Topics in Exercise Science (Selected Sections)  

Recommended Sites/Work Experiences
There are endless numbers of potential sites and work experiences for exercise science students. Site and experience selection depends upon individual student interests and career goals. Students are encouraged to select a site as part of EXSC 444 course requirements. Some recommended sites/experiences include, but are not limited to:

  • schools (K-12, higher education)
  • churches
  • military bases
  • hospitals
  • free clinics
  • after school programs
  • community centers – anywhere people are.

Student are encouraged to spend time reviewing USC’s Community Service Directory (Leadership and Service Center; engaging in the Community Internship Program through the Career Center; and by networking with advisors, faculty and public health professionals. 

Professional Organizations

Other 
Some students, especially those interested in health education, opt to take the Certified Health Education Specialist (CHES) exam which is a national competency-based examination administered by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. Many job positions in health education and health promotion require applicants to have their CHES certification.

Why this is Important 
Exercise Science is an applied profession and therefore requires students to develop a core set of skills and professional behaviors. Internship and practice opportunities are essential and critical to allow students the opportunity to “try-out” these skills and to be mentored/trained by practicing healthcare professionals. Students are strongly encouraged to seek summer internships, independent studies and volunteer opportunities during their entire 4-year program — not wait until their Senior Capstone Seminar course (EXSC 444). 

How Students Can Get Started
Visit MySPH.sc.edu and Handshake through the Career Center.

 

PARTICIPATE: Research

Related Course(s)
EXSC 395 – Research Seminar in Exercise Science
EXSC 444 – Exercise Science Practicum
EXSC 499 – Independent Study (Selected Sections)
EXSC 555 – Current Special Topics in Exercise Science (Selected Sections) 
EXSC 695 – Writing and Presenting in Research
EPID 410 – Principles of Epidemiology, Independent Study (by Faculty Department & Interest; must have special permission)

Sample Research Projects or Topics

  • Stroke Rehabilitation
  • Cognitive Neuroscience of Concussion
  • Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation
  • Exercise and Motor Skill Learning
  • Exercise and Concussion

Other Recommendations 
Students are strongly encourage to ask faculty teaching their exercise science core and related courses about their research interests and opportunities for involvement. Advisors routinely provide information about USC’s Office of Undergraduate Research, Arnold School and other campus faculty’s research areas, and Arnold School sections of UNIV101 introduce students to resources on campus related to research. Numerous exercise students have received Magellan Scholars awards to conduct health research with Arnold School faculty.

Why this is Important
Exercise Science is a discipline, which is grounded in science and in creating an evidence-base for not only understanding and prioritizing population health issues, but also for developing prevention and treatment strategies. Epidemiology is the cornerstone of exercise science and is concerned with rigorous, reliable and accurate research methods, statistical procedures, data collection and analysis, research study designs, creating population health surveillance systems and numerous other science related functions (e.g., labs, disease tracking, water & sanitation inspections, etc.). All exercise students must have an understanding of research principles and how to apply them to addressing current health issues to keep society well.

How Students Can Get Started
Visit the research website on Arnold School website, MySPH, and the searchable database on the Office of Undergraduate Research website. 

 

INTEGRATE

How to Integrate
All courses in the Exercise Science major focus on the “application” of theory, course concepts, course material, etc. to the “real world”. Because Exercise Science is an applied, practice-based discipline every course requires students to engage in integrative learning. Course assignments and activities include, but are not limited to: case studies, data collection, fitness assessments and prescriptions, and research projects. Exercise Science students are challenged to apply what they learn in a variety of new contexts throughout their coursework, laboratories, service learning activities, volunteer service, global study, peer leadership, leadership positions and ultimately in their Senior Capstone course (300 hours of required out-of-the-classroom experiences). Students are encouraged to participate in Discover USC and in other showcase settings as available. Exercise Science is an applied, practice based field which requires students to develop skills which transcend subject matter. For example, all students need to demonstrate: critical thinking skills, interpersonal communication (written & verbal) skills, how to locate and interpret health data, and public speaking/presentation skills.  

 

LEAD

Initial Career Opportunities 
Exercise Science students will be prepared for entry level positions in a variety of settings to include, but not limited to: Commercial fitness and wellness facilities, Not-for-profit agencies/organizations (e.g., United Way, Red Cross, American Heart Association , American Diabetes Association, Eat Smart Move More, Alzheimer’s Association), Local, state, federal governmental agencies (e.g., SC DHEC, county health departments, health & human services, CDC, offices of aging, etc.)

Related Graduate Programs 
Exercise Science students in the B.S. program will be prepared for graduate study in many areas including, but not limited to:

  • Medicine
  • Physician’s Assistant
  • Nursing
  • Pharmacy
  • Occupational Therapy
  • Physical Therapy
  • Athletic Training
  • Nutrition
  • Speech and Hearing Disorders
  • Public Health (MPH) in any area (i.e., Health Promotion, Environmental Science, Epidemiology, Biostatistics, Health Services Administration - MHA)
  • Social Work (MSW)
  • Law,
  • any social behavior science (e.g., medical anthropology, tropical disease/global health, psychology, sociology, education, counseling). 

Future Career Opportunities 
Advanced study in the field (PhD, EXSC) could result in employment as CEO of a not-for-profit organization, Director/Agency Head in a governmental agency such as the CDC or US Department of Health and Human Services, higher education settings (i.e., faculty and research positions), scientist/researcher in policy organizations such as Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Kaiser Permanente, Brookings Institute and/or as a self-employed consultant.

Public Health

To learn more about making the most of your educational experiences within and beyond the classroom contact: 
Sara Corwin, Associate Dean for Undergraduate Student Affairs, corwins@sc.edu
Direct Inquiries to Arnold School of Public Health, Office of Undergraduate Student Services, 921 Assembly Street, PHRC 204 Columbia, SC 29208, or call 803-777-6136

 

PARTICIPATE: Community Service

Related Course(s)
HPEB 502 – Applied Aspects of Human Nutrition
HPEB 511 – Health Problems in a Changing Society
HPEB 553 – Community Health Problems
PUBH 498 – Public Health Capstone Seminar

Recommended Sites/Experiences
There are endless numbers of potential sites and experiences for public health students. Site and experience selection depends upon (individual/group project) student interests. Students are encouraged to seek Community Service opportunities on their own and as part of course requirements. Some recommended sites/experiences include, but are not limited to

  • schools (K-12, higher education)
  • churches
  • military bases
  • hospitals
  • free clinics
  • after school programs
  • community centers
  • All Star Gymnastics
  • PAC Baseball
  • Tai Chi
  • Still Hopes’
  • Good Bodies

Why this is Important
Students in public health need exposure to a variety of community agencies, organizations, governmental actions, community dynamics, community neighborhood structure and organization to understand how to best address communities’ priority health needs.

How Students Can Get Started
Students are encouraged to spend time reviewing student organizations through Garnet Gate. Look at the Leadership & Service Center website for more information.

 

PARTICIPATE: Diversity and Social Advocacy

Related Course(s)
While there are many courses which address diversity, social advocacy and health disparities, the following list illustrates the breadth of courses available in the Arnold School. Students may take courses in other departments which also address the health of diverse populations and advocacy efforts to improve communities.

HPEB 300 — Introduction to Health Promotion, Education, and Behavior
HPEB 470 — Principles of Global Health
PUBH 498 — Public Health Capstone Seminar
HPEB 511 — Health Problems in a Changing Society
HPEB 512 — Southern Discomfort: Public Health in the American South
HPEB 513 — Race, Ethnicity, and Health: Examining Health Inequalities
HPEB 551 — Medical Anthropology: Field Work
HPEB 552 — Medical Anthropology
HPEB 553 — Community Health Problems
HPEB 621 — Maternal and Child Health
HPEB 627 — Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) Health
HPEB 654 — Maternal and Child Nutrition
HPEB 674 — Social Networks, Social Capital, and Health
HPEB 679 — Addressing Childhood Obesity through Community Approaches
HPEB 680 — Laboratory Techniques in Physiological Measurement
HPEB 683 — Contemporary Topics in Sexual Health
HPEB 684 — HIV/STI Prevention

Recommended Sites/Experiences
As with the other pathways, there are endless numbers of experiences and sites for students interested in social justice, diversity and inclusion and social advocacy. Students are encouraged to seek opportunities on their own but may consider such sites/experiences as:

Sample Research or Advocacy Project Topics
Public health students have participated in a wide array of research and advocacy projects as part of their degree requirements and their extracurricular activities, including:

  • Health Care for the Uninsured, The Hardin Street Free Medical Clinic
  • Community Partners for Healthy Eating & Active Living, Eat Smart, Move More
  • Behavioral Therapy and Children with Autism, Palmetto Autism Interventions
  • Social Health Services and Outreach, Sexual Trauma Services of the Midlands
  • Children Living in Poverty and Malnutrition, Mt. Horeb United Methodist Church
  • Analysis of Environmental Physical Activity and Nutrition Data, ASPH BEACH Lab
  • Military Health & Alternative Medicine, Veterans Diagnosed with PTSD, The Big Red Barn Retreat
  • Health Equity & African American Women, SC Department of Social Services
  • Mental Health and Underserved Populations, Rosa Clark Free Medical Clinic
  • Gun violence in SC & US, Carolina Peace

Why this is Important
Public health is grounded in the principles of social justice. To this end, public health professionals are faced with initiating actions to support individuals and communities on multiple levels. Students are encouraged to build their skills in, for example, mobilizing communities, working with non-profit and governmental organizations, assessing community needs and assets, utilizing various media to implement campaigns on specific health and social issues, and working with groups to bring about policy change.

How Students Can Get Started 
Students are strongly encouraged to join campus organizations and clubs as well as take on leadership roles in these organizations. Public health students can gain valuable experience by participating in local, state and national political and governmental activities. Many volunteer activities also provide direct experience with diversity and social advocacy efforts in the field of public health.  Students are encouraged to spend time reviewing student organizations through Garnet Gate. Look at the Leadership & Service Center and USC's Office of Diversity and Inclusion websites for more information. Beyond USC's campus, students are encouraged to seek out community-based organizations that support their interests.

 

PARTICIPATE: Global Learning

Related Course(s)
EPID 410 — Principles of Epidemiology
HPEB 470 — Principles of Global Health
PUBH 102 — Introduction to Public Health

Timing for Study Abroad
Students, in collaboration with their academic advisor, can incorporate a study abroad experience at any point in their curriculum. Students are encouraged to inform their advisor of their study abroad interests as early as possible so adequate planning time is allowed.   

Opportunities/Destinations
Every summer, the Arnold School of Public Health has several faculty-led study abroad trips or global class opportunities. For example, Comparing Health Professions in Ireland & the U.S., Australia: Sports Medicine, History, & Culture, and Global USC in Costa Rica: Global Health.

 Again, since public health is everywhere, all study abroad destinations are recommended and relevant. Selection should be based on student’s interests. Many public health majors opt to travel to Spanish speaking countries as a way of improving their Spanish speaking skills for work with Hispanic/Latino populations. However, numerous students, who do not speak Spanish or who share this goal, have traveled to Africa, Italy, Germany, and countless other locations. 

USC Alternative Break (Spring & Fall); faculty led study abroad programs, Garnet Gate. Student organizations not limited to, but including: GlobeMed at the University of South Carolina, Global Leadership Network, Students Associated for Latin America (SALA), Amigos del Buen Samaritano, Carolina Against Sex Trafficking (CAST), Engineers Without Borders - USA, Operation Smile at USC, Students Helping Honduras at the University of South Carolina, Timmy Global Health at USC, TOMS at University of South Carolina, FACE AIDS- University of South Carolina Chapter. The Arnold School also has several Centers and faculty who travel and conduct community-based public health research and interventions (e.g., Consortium for Latino Immigration Studies).

Why this is Important
Global study is directly connected to and critical for students in public health. Not only are many of our health problems at home (in the U.S.) shared by others around the world, but the leading causes of death and morbidity world-wide have an impact on each and every one of us. Many public health students aspire to participate in the Peace Corps and such programs as Doctors Without Borders. Study abroad is the perfect complement to students who are passionate about travel and about helping others at the international level.

How students can get started 
Contact USC's Study Abroad Office about the many opportunities available.

 

PARTICIPATE: Peer Leadership

Student Organization(s)
Become active in a health-related student organization such as:

Other Leadership Opportunities
The Arnold School has a Dean’s Advisory Council (DSAC) which includes student representatives from both Public Health and Exercise Science. Students are encourage to be leaders in class projects and presentations. Students are also encouraged to participate in the numerous leadership opportunities through USC Student Government (as Arnold School Representatives), UNIV 101, Visitor Center Student Ambassadors, Student Success Center Peer Leaders, and Summer Orientation Peer Leaders

Why this is Important
Not only is leadership experience important for employability and successful admission to graduate programs, but it is essential for public health practitioners who direct, supervise and coordinate the many duties necessary to ensure the nation’s health. 

How Students Can Get Started
There are a variety of peer leadership opportunities throughout campus within the Arnold School of Public Health and the University. To learn more about student organizations, visit Garnet Gate through the Leadership and Service Center. Contact other University offices to learn more about other leadership opportunities on campus.

 

PARTICIPATE: Internships/Professional Practice

Related Course(s)
HPEB 301 – Practicum in Health Education (varies by Faculty interest; must have special permission)
HPEB 399 – Independent Study (by Faculty Department & Interest; must have special permission)
PUBH 498 – Public Health Capstone Seminar

Recommended Sites/Work Experiences
There are endless numbers of potential sites and work experiences for public health students. Site and experience selection depends upon individual student interests and career goals. Students are encouraged to select a site as part of EXSC 444 course requirements. Some recommended sites/experiences include, but are not limited to:

  • schools (K-12, higher education)
  • churches
  • military bases
  • hospitals
  • free clinics
  • after school programs
  • Community Centers – anywhere people are.

Student are encouraged to spend time reviewing USC’s Community Service Directory (Leadership and Service Center; engaging in the Community Internship Program through the Career Center; and by networking with advisors, faculty and public health professionals. 

Professional Organizations

Other 
Some students, especially those interested in health education, opt to take the Certified Health Education Specialist (CHES) exam which is a national competency-based examination administered by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. Many job positions in health education and health promotion require applicants to have their CHES certification.

Why this is Important 
Public Health is an applied profession and therefore requires students to develop a core set of skills and professional behaviors. Internship and practice opportunities are essential and critical to allow students the opportunity to “try-out” these skills and to be mentored/trained by practicing healthcare professionals. Students are strongly encouraged to seek summer internships, independent studies and volunteer opportunities during their entire 4-year program — not wait until their Senior Capstone Seminar course (PUBH 498). 

How Students Can Get Started
MySPH.sc.edu and Handshake through the Career Center.

 

PARTICIPATE: Research

Related Course(s)
HPEB 399 – Independent Study (by Faculty Department & Interest; must have special permission) 
EPID 410 – Principles of Epidemiology
PUBH 498 – Public Health Capstone Seminar
HPEB 511 – Health Problems in a Changing Society (policy brief creation) 

Sample Research Projects or Topics

  • Underserved Community Members' Perceptions of Neighborhood Toxins from a Fertilizer Plant
  • Community Assessment of Mental Health Resources for LGBTQ Youth
  • Community Outreach to Support Pediatric Cancer Research
  • Railroad Safety & College Students
  • LRADAC/Marijuana Summit & Survey
  • Measles Outbreak Research
  • Midlands Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Research on Medicaid Patients and Oral Health

Other Recommendations 
Students are strongly encourage to ask faculty teaching their public health core and related courses about their research interests and opportunities for involvement. Advisors routinely provide information about USC’s Office of Undergraduate Research, Arnold School and other campus faculty’s research areas, and Arnold School sections of UNIV101 introduce students to resources on campus related to research. Numerous exercise students have received Magellan Scholars awards to conduct health research with Arnold School faculty.

Why this is Important
Public Health is a discipline, which is grounded in science and in creating an evidence-base for not only understanding and prioritizing population health issues, but also for developing prevention and treatment strategies. Epidemiology is the cornerstone of public health and is concerned with rigorous, reliable and accurate research methods, statistical procedures, data collection and analysis, research study designs, creating population health surveillance systems and numerous other science related functions (e.g., labs, disease tracking, water & sanitation inspections, etc.). All public health students must have an understanding of research principles and how to apply them to addressing current health issues to keep society well.

How Students Can Get Started
Visit the research website on Arnold School website, MySPH, and the searchable database on the Office of Undergraduate Research website. 

 

INTEGRATE

How to Integrate
All courses in the Public Health major focus on the “application” of theory, course concepts, course material, etc. to the “real world”. Because Public Health is an applied, practice-based discipline every course requires students to engage in integrative learning. Course assignments and activities include, but are not limited to: case studies, data collection, fitness assessments and prescriptions, and research projects. Public Health students are challenged to apply what they learn in a variety of new contexts throughout their coursework, laboratories, service learning activities, volunteer service, global study, peer leadership, leadership positions and ultimately in their Senior Capstone course (100-400+ hours of required out-of-the-classroom experiences). Students are encouraged to participate in Discover USC and in other showcase settings as available. Public Health is an applied, practice based field which requires students to develop skills which transcend subject matter. For example, all students need to demonstrate: critical thinking skills, interpersonal communication (written & verbal) skills, how to locate and interpret health data, and public speaking/presentation skills.  

 

LEAD

Initial Career Opportunities 
Public Health students will be prepared for entry level positions in a variety of settings to include, but not limited to: Not-for-profit agencies/organizations (e.g., United Way, Red Cross, American Heart Association, American Diabetes Association, Eat Smart Move More, Alzheimer’s Association), Local, state, federal governmental agencies (e.g., SC DHEC, county health departments, health & human services, CDC, offices of aging, etc.)

Related Graduate Programs 
Public Health students in the B.S. program will be prepared for graduate study in many areas including, but not limited to:

  • Medicine
  • Physician’s Assistant
  • Nursing
  • Pharmacy
  • Occupational Therapy
  • Physical Therapy
  • Athletic Training
  • Nutrition (Registered Dietitian)
  • Speech and Hearing Disorders
  • Public Health (MPH) in any area (i.e., Health Promotion, Environmental Science, Epidemiology, Biostatistics, Health Services Administration - MHA)
  • Social Work (MSW)
  • Law
  • Any social behavior science (e.g., medical anthropology, tropical disease/global health, psychology, sociology, education, counseling). 

Future Career Opportunities 
Advanced study in the field at the doctoral level could result in employment as CEO of a not-for-profit organization, Director/Agency Head in a governmental agency such as the CDC or US Department of Health and Human Services, higher education settings (i.e., faculty and research positions), scientist/researcher in policy organizations such as Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Kaiser Permanente, Brookings Institute and/or as a self-employed consultant.

For students interested in Environmental Health Science

To learn more about making the most of your educational experiences within and beyond the classroom contact: 
Joe Jones, w.joe-jones@gmail.com

 

PARTICIPATE: Community Service

Sites/Experiences

  • Spring Break trips focused on helping communities deal with environmental health issues
  • Practicum and Residency
  • Internships
  • Rocky Branch Watershed Association

Why this is important
Community service fosters awareness of human problems and common goals. Service Projects can illustrate in a concrete way some of the concepts and issues examined in the Environmental Health Sciences major (environmental projects) and give students the opportunity to share their knowledge within the community. Teaching others, particularly children, about the environment helps develop awareness of environmental and political issues that threaten public health.

Getting started
Check out the Office of Public Health Practice page.

 

PARTICIPATE: Global Learning

Timing for “study abroad”
Any fall or spring semester

Why this is important
Exposure to current and global impact of air and water pollution

 

PARTICIPATE: Peer Leadership

Student Organization(s)

  • mySPH
  • SAGE (Students Advocating a Greener Environment)

Opportunities

  • Peer leader for common courses
  • independent research in faculty labs

Why this is important
Demonstrated leadership can lead to departmental and university awards as well as successful application to graduate school.

 

PARTICIPATE: Internships

Related Courses
ENHS 490
ENVR 501

Recommended sites/work experiences

  • DHEC
  • local hospitals
  • Riverbanks Zoo

Professional organizations

  • Sustainable Carolina
  • Students Allied for Greener Environment (SAGE)
  • Students Engaged in Aquatic Sciences (SEAS)

Why this is important
Connect with other undergraduates with similar interests. Also, connect with faculty

 

PARTICIPATE: Research

Related courses
Independent research projects; ENHS 490

Sample research projects or topics

  • Microbial ecology
  • toxicology
  • water pollution
  • air pollution

Why this is important
Preparation for post-graduation work; peer reviewed publications

Getting started
Contact individual faculty, apply for Magellan grant or mini-Magellan grant

Download this information as a PDF.