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Center for Digital Humanities Workshop: Introduction to Methods of Historical Network Analysis

Where: Center for Digital Humanities, Thomas Cooper Library

When: Thursday, November 7th - Friday, November 8th 2013

Join the Center for Digital Humanities and Paul McLean, Professor of Sociology at Rutgers, for a 2-day intensive workshop in historical network analysis.

From the event sponsors:

INVITATION TO FREE WORKSHOP:

Introduction to Methods of Historical Network Analysis
with Visiting Lecturer Paul McLean (Rutgers)
Thursday 11/7 & Friday 11/8

We are pleased to announce that Paul McLean, Professor of Sociology at Rutgers, will give a free 2-day intensive workshop in historical network analysis. McLean is a leading scholar in historical network research, focusing especially on Renaissance Florence. Coming in addition to his public lecture, this workshop offers a chance for hands-on practice with the methods and software tools of network analysis, or a close demonstration of their use.

The training will consist of one session on Thursday 11/7 and one on Friday 11/8, for 10-12 participants. Each session will last approximately 2 hours. The sessions are cumulative and participants are encouraged to attend both. We will make every effort to find a time for these sessions that best suits all participants' schedules.

We welcome two sorts of participation in this workshop. Active participants, who are planning or working on projects that feature social network analysis, are invited to come prepared for a consultation. Research projects by active participants need not be in any way polished or thoroughly planned. Projects may focus on historical situations or contemporary social interaction. Observing participants, who are not actively researching projects using network analysis but are curious about the methods and tools (and willing to try working with them), are also welcome.

To get the most benefit out of these sessions, both active and observing participants are encouraged to read any of several short introductions to network research. For a good, short introductory text, consider Knoke and Yang's Social Network Analysis (SAGE 2008) or consult with us for other suggested readings.

If interested, please send an email to Colin Wilder, associate director of the Center for Digital Humanities (wildercf@mailbox.sc.edu)

Participation is free. Sponsored by the Center for Digital Humanities, the History Center and the Department of Sociology.