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Previous Events

Modern Constitution Making

March 22, 2017

USC School of Law Auditorium
701 Main Street
Columbia, SC 29201

5:30-7:00pm

On March 22, former President of Tunisia Moncef Marzouki and a panel of experts engaged in a discussion on constitution making in the modern era.

Panelists

  • Hon. Moncef Marzouki - Former President of Tunisia
  • Terry Hoverter - Senior Associate, Electoral Education and Integrity Practice Area, Creative Associates
  • Hamid Khan - Deputy Director, Rule of Law Collaborative
  • Aparna Polavarapu (Moderator) - Assistant Professor of Law, USC
  • Wadie Said - Professor of Law, USC
  • Joel Samuels (Introduction) - Professor of Law & Director, Rule of Law Collaborative

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Emerging Scholars Workshop

November 12, 2016

The Rule of Law Collaborative's Emerging Scholars Workshop is a small, closed-door, interdisciplinary gathering of academics whose work significantly impacts or centers on the rule of law. Six emerging scholars presented a draft of a journal article, a book or dissertation chapter, or a nascent concept piece to discuss at the workshop. Each scholar was paired with an Academic Partner here at USC, who reviewed the work and offered comments. The purpose of the workshop is to provide a collegial forum for academics to discuss important rule of law work as well as help participants build a strong, lasting peer network across disciplines and institutions.

The workshop took place on November 12, from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. in Faculty Conference Room 302. The following academics participated:

  • Brady G'sell, University of Michigan, Anthropology (Role of South African family maintenance courts in mediating gendered access to social citizenship and political identity)
  • Academic Partner: Breanne Grace, Assistant Professor, College of Social Work

 

  • Daysi Diaz-Strong, University of Chicago, Social Service Administration (Developmental vulnerabilities of undocumented adolescent arrivals and the role of immigration policy)
  • Academic Partner: Ben Roth, Assistant Professor, College of Social Work

 

  • David Nguyen, University of North Dakota, Education, (Not Just About Bathrooms: Gender Variant Students, Equity in Education, and the Rule of Law)
  • Academic Partner: Doyle Stevick, Associate Professor, College of Education

 

  • Renato Lima de Oliveira, M.I.T., Political Science, (How resource-rich developing countries change regulations and laws instead of getting locked into the resource curses)
  • Academic Partner: Gerald A. McDermott, Professor, School of Business

 

  • Roger-Claude Liwanga, Harvard University, FXB Center for Health & Human Rights (Roof-Knocking Tactic: A Legal and Effective Warning Technique under the Laws of War?)
  • Academic Partner: Steven Austermiller, Senior International Development Expert, Rule of Law Collaborative

 

  • Nora Webb Williams, University of Washington, Political Science, (Origins and impact of Kazakhstan's Constitutional Council in terms of authoritarian consolidation)
  • Academic Partner: Brad Epperly, Assistant Professor, Political Science

Annual Constitution Day Lecture

September 16, 2016

4:00-6:00pm
Law School Auditorium
701 Main St, Columbia, SC

Mr. William Hubbard, past President of the American Bar Association and Member of the USC Board of Trustees, discusses “The Magna Carta, the U.S. Constitution, and the Rule of Law”

Sponsored by the Office of the Provost, the College of Arts and Sciences, the School of Law, and the Department of Political Science.

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Countering Violent Extremism

May 4, 2016

Wednesday - May 4, 2016 from 12:30pm to 1:30pm

The Palmetto Forum is a world affairs luncheon seminar designed to stimulate the discussion of international issues within the Columbia professional community. The Palmetto Forum meets monthly at Palmetto Club and members are among some of Columbia's most prominent citizens.

This month's topic is "Countering Violent Extremism" presented by Hamid Khan.

Hamid Khan joined the Rule of Law Collaborative as Deputy Director in January 2015. Hamid previously served as a Senior Rule of Law Program Officer at the United States Institute of Peace (USIP), where he worked on rule of law issues throughout the Islamic world. During his time with USIP, he also served as a Professorial Lecturer of Islamic Law at the George Washington School of Law. His substantive work and instruction has delved into the intersection of Islamic law and tribal legal systems, Islamic constitutionalism, issues of Islamic law both in the context of armed conflict and post-conflict justice, gender issues under Islamic law, classical and contemporary Islamic criminal law, Islamic property law, and trends in contemporary Islamic political thought.
Before his tenure with USIP, Hamid served as Postdoctoral Fellow for Stanford Law School's Afghanistan Legal Education Project, and he has consulted on rule of law issues with a wide variety of international organizations, nongovernmental organizations, and U.S. Government agencies. He currently serves as a resident member of the World Justice Project's Rule of Law Consortium on Islamic law and source expert on Islamic Law for the International Network to Promote of Law. He is a former adjunct professor of Islamic law at the University of Colorado Law School and former visiting professor of Islamic Studies at the University of Wyoming.

Please RSVP by Friday, April 29th
***We cannot guarantee a name-tag to guests who reserve after this date***
If you must cancel, please do so before Friday-April 29th.

$20- Public
$10 - Students
(Lunch will be provided)

***Student Offer- 1st 10 students to RSVP and pay in advance will receive a 50% discount**

Islamophobia: A Response

April 21, 2016

Thursday, April 21, 2016
7:00pm
Wardlaw College
Room 126
820 Main St.
Columbia, SC

Sponsored by: The University of South Carolina Islamic World Studies Program and the Carolina Peace Resource Center

The prospect of Syrian refugee resettlement has raised concerns among some South Carolinians about the growing presence of Muslims in the state.  This panel will addresses such concerns and will attempt to put fears about Muslims and Islamic extremism into perspective.  Panel participants will discuss the history of Islamophobia in the West and will describe the ethnic and socio-economic diversity of U.S. Muslims.  The panel will explain how the situation in Europe in terms of immigration and refugee resettlement differs from that in the U.S.

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Testing Period Effects on Democratization:  Varieties of Democracy in Central and Eastern Europe, pre-1940 and post-1990 Lecture

April 12, 2016

 

Tuesday, April 12, 2016
3pm
Gambrell Hall
Room 431
University of South Carolina

Sponsored by: European Studies Program

The democratization of the countries of Central and Eastern Europe since 1989 stands in marked contrast to the political travails seen in the region during the 1920s and 1930s. An obvious difference between the two periods is the vastly more conducive and supportive environment for democratization that existed following the collapse of communism, not least through the existence of the European Union and other international organizations. While this observation is self-evident to any casual observer of the region's history, trying to actually pinpoint these differences has so far rested largely on narrative-historical comparisons. This lecture therefore undertakes this challenge by scrutinizing the structure of democracy across these countries and during the two periods in question by using the recently released Varieties of Democracy (V-Dem) dataset.

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Discover Islam Week

March 28, 2016

Sponsored By: The University of South Carolina Muslim Students Association  

Monday, March 28, 2016:
Sharia Law
Speaker: Hamid Khan
Location: Russell House Ballroom
7:00pm
Tuesday, March 29, 2016:
Abraham in Islam
Speaker: Mutahhir Sabree
Location: Williams-Brice Nursing 133
7:00pm
Wednesday, March 30, 2016:
Women in Islam
Speaker: Imam Muhammad S. Adly
Location: Williams-Brice Nursing 133
7:00pm
Thursday, March 31, 2016:
Science in Islam
Speaker: Sister Afroze Habib
Location: Williams-Brice Nursing 133
7:00pm

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In the Wild East: Putin's Russia and the Fate of Ukraine

February 18, 2016

6:00pm
Gambrell Hall
Room 005
University of South Carolina Pedestrian Mall, Columbia, SC 29201

Speaker: Dr. Asle Toje is the Research Director of the Norwegian Nobel Institute in Oslo, Norway. Toje completed his Ph.D. in International Relations at Cambridge in 2006. He has been a Fulbright Fellow to Columbia University, and a visiting scholar at both the Norwegian Institute for Defense Studies and the European Union Institute for Security Studies in Paris. His books include America, the EU and Strategic Culture: Renegotiating the Transatlantic Bargain (Routledge, 2008) and The European Union as a small Power: After the Post-Cold War (Palgrave, 2010), as well as other volumes in Norwegian. He is a foreign policy columnist in several Norwegian dailies.

This event is sponsored by the Carolina International House at Maxcy College and the Walker Institute of International and Area Studies.

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Under Pressure: Can the EU Survive the Migrant Crisis?

February 17, 2016

6:00pm
Gambrell Hall 153

On Wednesday, February 17, Dr. Asle Toje, Research Director of the Norwegian Nobel Institute and Maxcy College Visiting Fellow, will give a public lecture, "Under Pressure: Can the EU Survive the Migrant Crisis?"

This event is sponsored by the Carolina International House at Maxcy College and the Walker Institute of International and Area Studies.

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The Syrian Refugee Crisis: a Nordic Perspective

February 9, 2016

4:00pm
Gambrell Hall
Room 431
University of South Carolina Pedestrian Mall, Columbia, SC 29201

Panel sponsored by Preston Residential College and The Walker Institute 

Speaker: Edda Jonsdottir is the Leadership Coach at Edda Coaching, Norway. She has a graduate degree in Human Rights and Humanitarian Intervention from the University of Bologna in Italy. Her undergraduate degree is in Media and Communication Studies and Italian, from the University of Iceland. She was a research journalist at the Icelandic National Radio for 7 years, where she covered human rights issues and international affairs. Furthermore, she has worked as a human rights specialist and adviser to governmental and international organizations. Edda is a social entrepreneur and has been active in raising awareness on women's human rights. She has substantial experience as a board member for NGO's, all of them with an international scope.

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Performing the Law:  Artists and Police Collaborations in Latin America 

November 12, 2015

 

Thursday, November 12, 2015
Sloan 104
4:00pm

Please join us for this open lecture related to Professor Rosenberg's
forthcoming book, After Human Rights: Literature, Visual Arts, and Film in Latin
America (1990-2010). His recent work traces how contemporary cultural
production in Latin America encounters and reveals the insufficiency of statecentered
terms and institutions concerned with enacting justice. As the
language of rights has come to define both the horizon of the possible and the
limits of the imaginable, he analyzes films, visual arts, and literary works that
problematize the intersection of the logic of market-globalization and the
discourse of rights in the formation of political subjectivities, as they generate
both (capital) value and (human) dignity.


Panel on the Syrian Refugee Crisis

November 11, 2015

Wednesday, November 11, 2015 - 6:30 pm
Carolina Room
7th floor, Capstone Building
902 Barnwell Street

This panel, sponsored by the Islamic World Studies Program, will include several speakers to explore the causes and consequences of the Syrian refugee crisis.
Speakers: Dr. Byron R. McCane of Wofford College-Professor of Religion, Dr. Laura Barbas-Rhoden of Wofford College-Professor of Spanish, Dr. Phil Dorroll of Wofford College-Assistant Professor of Religion, Dr. Mark Byrnes of Wofford College-Associate Professor of History, Dr. Breanne Grace of UofSC-College of Social Work, Dr. Rajeev Bais of UofSC School of Medicine-Assistant Professor of Clinical Internal Medicine.


Event flyer

Thomas Tobin: Food and Health: Food Law and Policy Perspectives 

October 30, 2015

 

Friday, October 30, 2015 - 2pm
Discover I, Room 140

The Harvard Center for Health Law and Policy Innovation has launched several research projects at the intersection of food and health. In 2010, the Center developed a law school clinic focused on food law & policy. A clinical student from South Carolina will outline the Center's current projects regarding Food as Prevention and Food as Medicine. Particular emphasis will be given to the Center's projects relating to (a) policies to address diabetes and (b) the role of food banks as partners in community health promotion.

Tommy Tobin is a student at the Harvard Law School and Harvard Kennedy School, and serves as a Teaching Fellow in the Harvard Economics Department. Tommy's publications have appeared in academic journals and newspapers, including the San Francisco Chronicle and The State. He served as the lead author on a recent Feeding America report entitled Food Banks as Partners in Health Promotion. 

Event flyer

Dr. Fran Vavrus: Teachers' Rights in a Global Context: Monitoring and Implementing the Status of Teachers Internationally

October 28, 2015

 

Wednesday, October 28, 2015 - 4:30pm
Maxcy College Classroom

This talk, supported by the Rule of Law Collaborative, will address teachers’ rights around the world and examine the work of the Joint ILO-UNESCO Committee of Experts on the Application of the Recommendation concerning the Status of Teachers (CEART).

Frances Vavrus is Professor of Comparative and International Development Education at the University of Minnesota and Co-Director of the University’s Interdisciplinary Center for the Study of Global Change. For the past 25 years, she has been involved in education in Tanzania as a secondary school teacher, university lecturer, teacher educator, and researcher. Her research and teaching focus primarily on postcolonial education, critical development studies, and comparative teacher education. Vavrus also serves as a member
of the Joint ILO-UNESCO Committee of Experts on the Application of the Recommendation concerning the Status of Teachers (CEART).

Event flyer

Wednesday, October 28, 2015 - 4:30pm
Maxcy College Classroom

This talk, supported by the Rule of Law Collaborative, will address teachers’ rights around the world and examine the work of the Joint ILO-UNESCO Committee of Experts on the Application of the Recommendation concerning the Status of Teachers (CEART).

Frances Vavrus is Professor of Comparative and International Development Education at the University of Minnesota and Co-Director of the University’s Interdisciplinary Center for the Study of Global Change. For the past 25 years, she has been involved in education in Tanzania as a secondary school teacher, university lecturer, teacher educator, and researcher. Her research and teaching focus primarily on postcolonial education, critical development studies, and comparative teacher education. Vavrus also serves as a member
of the Joint ILO-UNESCO Committee of Experts on the Application of the Recommendation concerning the Status of Teachers (CEART).

Event flyer

Russell Kaschula: Malumalele Burning: Language Rights in South African Courtrooms

October 15, 2015

 

Thursday, October 15, 2015 - 4:30pm

Dr. Russell H. Kaschula: NRF SARChI Chair in the Intellectualisation of African Languages, Multilingualism and Education, School of Languages-African Language Studies, Rhodes University in Grahamstown, South Africa

 

Location: Williams-Brice Building, Room 125

"Malumalele Burning: Language Rights in South African Courtrooms"

This talk will focus on section 6 of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa. Although the section seems to entrench the language rights of individuals, including requests that court trials could be held in their native language, this is not the case. This talk will argue that although language rights are in the Constitution, they have not been enforced. The State provides court interpreters for all eleven official languages, but the western cultural paradigm prevails, leaving very little space for intercultural communication in the courts. English remains the language of record and court interpreters face several challenges. The protests at Malumalele serve as a backdrop for these linguistic battles. 

http://www.walkerinstitute.sc.edu/russell-kaschula-malumalele-burning-language-rights-south-african-courtrooms

Joshua Greene: Betrayal of the Rule of Law in Nazi Germany

October 14, 2015

 

4:20pm

USC Law School, Rm. 333

This talk will discuss Hitler’s rule and his totalitarian dictatorship.  In 1933, less than a month after he was elected chancellor, Hitler used the pretext of a fire in the Reichstag building to suspend constitutional law in Germany, aggregating unlimited judicial authority in his government to himself.  After the fire, he proclaimed: “We have to provide certain temporary measures to stem this tide of terrorism.”  When those charged with defending the rule of law betray that trust, the victory of tyrants is assured.  Greene will look at the rare confluence of events that caused a highly sophisticated, highly motivated, legal and judicial system to become complicit with a totalitarian dictatorship bent on achieving racial purity and territorial conquest.  Hitler was given enormous emergency powers, granting him license to do almost anything he wanted, in direct contravention of a democratic state. Ten thousand German lawyers and judges thereupon took an oath of personal loyalty to him, not to the constitution — the very antithesis of the Rule of Law.

 

Mr. Greene is an adjunct professor of religion at Hofstra University and Fordham Lincoln Center. The New York Times describes him as “a storyteller who traces journeys to enlightenment.” In 1982, after returning from twelve years in Hindu monasteries, he produced a series of Emmy award nominated children’s films for The Disney Channel. In 1995 he became Director of Programming for Cablevision, the nation’s fifth largest cable provider. From 1999 to 2002 he served as Senior Vice President at Ruder Finn, New York’s largest public relations firm, where he advised faith communities on their role in peacekeeping initiatives.

 

South Carolina Assistant Attorney General on the South Carolina Human Trafficking Task Force

September 30, 2015

12:40pm

USC Law School, Rm. 231

Marie Sazehn from the SC Attorney General's Office will present a talk on South Carolina Against Human Trafficking through the SC Human Trafficking Task Force on September 30, 2015.

Event Flyer

Magna Carta: A Legacy 800 Years in the Making

Ernest F. Hollings Special Collections Library Program Room, Thomas Cooper Library

The University of South Carolina School of Law and the University Libraries announce the 2015 Benjamin Adger Hagood Lecture, "Magna Carta: A Legacy 800 Years in the Making," presented by Professor A. E. Dick Howard of the University of Virginia School of Law. Howard's lecture will be given Tuesday, April 7 at 5:30 p.m. in the Ernest F. Hollings Special Collections Library Program Room at the Thomas Cooper Library, located at 1322 Greene Street, Columbia, SC. A reception will follow sponsored by the Thomas Cooper Society. Guests may also tour the Magna Carta companion exhibit, which runs through April 30, 2015.

Click here for more information

USC Symposium: Africa and the Information Society

April 7-8, 2015

A two-day symposium titled Africa and the Information Society will be held on April 7-8, 2015. This symposium will bring together people from across the University of South Carolina campus to focus on issues related to Africa and the Information Society. There are two intended outcomes of this symposium:

To provide an overview of the information society in Africa and its impacts/challenges to USC faculty with interests in Sub-Saharan Africa; and

To create intellectual and social space for people to meet and discuss possibilities of interdisciplinary research across the University.

Topics will include economics of the information society, politics and corruption, impact of technology, gender issues, and more. USC faculty and students who are interested in the relationship between information and communication technologies (ICTs) and economic, political, social, and cultural factors are invited to attend and participate. The two-day event will allow USC researchers to hear overviews of the African continent as it relates to information, including several notable keynote speakers.

Click here for more information.

On the Portability of Procedural Justice Theory: A Cross-National Comparative Analysis

February 10, 2015

In the 2015 Ellis MacDougall Lecture, Dr. Jonathan Jackson, Professor of Research Methodology in the London School of Economics Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice, presented findings from a cross-national study of procedural justice theory in diverse social, legal, and political contexts. A key focus throughout the presentation was a discussion of the meaning, measurement, and motivating force of trust and legitimacy in the context of the police and law.

On the Origins of Inalienable and Imprescriptible Human Rights, 1625-1761

January 28, 2015

Dr. Colin Wilder, the Associate Director of the Center for Digital Humanities and a specialist in early modern European history, discussed his work in progress, "Origins of Inalienable and Imprescriptible Human Rights, 1625-1761," in the History Center's first work-in-progress seminar for Spring 2015. Dr. Wilder's scholarly research focuses on the development of ideas of liberty and equality in German and broader European history in the Early Modern period (ca 1500-1800). Dr. Kathryn Edwards (History) served as commentator and moderator for the seminar.

Barnes Symposium on Law and Morality

November 14, 2014

The Barnes Symposium on Law and Morality, hosted annually by the University of South Carolina School of Law, featured prominent scholars and leaders from around the world. This year, speakers from Indonesia, Belgium, Nigeria, South Africa, the European University, Gadjah Mada University, Notre Dame University, Virginia Tech, the University of South Carolina, and the World Bank discussed three issues related to the growing economic, health, and human rights challenges in Africa:

  • The costly long-term economic impact of the Ebola epidemic across Africa;
  • The underlying cause of the Islamic militant group Boko Haram's growing presence in Nigeria and other nations; and
  • The future of South-South Cooperation in African development and the geopolitical push for stronger economic ties between Africa and other developing countries, most notably Brazil, China and India (the BRIC nations).

This event was free and open to the public. Bar association members could register for Continuing Legal Education (CLE) Credit.

Documentary Film Screening of Decade of Discovery

November 3, 2014

On November 3, 2014, the Rule of Law Collaborative and the NMRS Center on Professionalism at the University of South Carolina co-hosted one of the first screenings of Decade of Discovery. This documentary film explores the consequences of access to email records in the modern electronic era. The rule of law implications on these issues are significant, and the event is a reminder that the rule o flaw is as much an issue in the domestic context as in foreign ones.

Palmetto Forum Luncheon

September 3, 2014

The Walker Institute of International and Area Studies kicked off the 2014/2015 academic year with a lecture by three USC experts on European affairs. Robert Cox, Director of the Walker Institute, and Joel Samuels and Gordon Smith of the Rule of Law Collaborative offered their perspectives on the Crimea conflict and the Ukrainian crisis in general, as well as touched on the ways in which international relations between the Former Soviet Union and the West are evolving.

United States Institute of Peace (USIP) Public Education for Peacebuilding Support Lecture Series on Post-Conflict Transitions and Vulnerable Populations

Various

This lecture series for Fall 2013 was intended to advance the understanding and promotion of peacebuilding and conflict. The three-speaker series focused on post-conflict transitions and the importance of addressing the needs of vulnerable populations such as women and children; and involved local and regional speakers with expertise on a variety of case studies and relevant thematic issues.

What's Law Got to Do With it? Egypt's Quest for Freedom and Democracy
Sahar F. Aziz, Texas A&M University School of Law
November 14, 2013

Peacebuilders or Spoilers?: South Sudanese Youth's Role in Post-Conflict Reconstruction and Nation-Building
Dr. Marisa O. Ensor, University of Tennessee-Knoxville
October 10, 2013

Children and International Criminal Justice
Diane Marie Amann, University of Georgia School of Law
September 24, 2013

Associate Faculty Gathering

September 18, 2013

Director Gordon Smith and Deputy Director Joel Samuels hosted informal gatherings over the Fall 2013 semester so that faculty associates could become more familiar with each others' research and teaching interests. At this event, professor Kiel Downey (Political Science) and Dr. Gerald McDermott (International Business) spoke about their research agendas and teaching interests as they relate to the rule of law.

Rule of Law: From the Local and the Global

September 4, 2013

Victor Ashe, former United States Ambassador to Poland (2004-2009) and former Mayor of Knoxville, Tennessee (1987-2003) offered a unique perspective on the rule of law at multiple levels, from the local to the global. During his speech he reflected on his experiences as they relate to rule of law, but also discussed his career trajectory and opportunities for student engagement.

View the flyer here

The Provision of Insurance? Judicial Independence and the Post-Tenure Fate of Leaders

July 25, 2013

Leading explanations of judicial independence argue political competition incentivizes those in power to create independent courts as insurance against uncertain futures. Dr. Epperly's work offered an original hypothesis as to how independent courts provide insurance against post-tenure punishment. In this lecture he tested this hypothesis using data on post-tenure fate of leaders from 1960-2004.

Associate Faculty Gathering

March 28, 2013

Director Gordon Smith and Deputy Director Joel Samuels hosted several informal gatherings throughout the Spring 2013 semester so that faculty associates could become more familiar with each others' research and teaching interests. Professors Justin Weinberg (Philosophy) and Andy Spicer (International Business) provided brief presentations on their respective teaching and research interests relative to rule of law issues.

Too Much of a Food Thing?: Assessing Access to Civil Justice in Russia

March 26, 2013

Kathryn Hendley is the William Voss-Bascom Professor of Law and Political Science and Associate Dean of the Law School at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She is also currently a Fellow of the Program in Law and Public Affairs at Princeton University. Dr. Hendley has published widely in journals, including Post-Soviet Affairs, Law and Social Inquiry, and American Journal of Comparative Law. Her research focuses on legal and economic reform in the former Soviet Union and on how law is actually experienced and used in Russia. This talk was co-sponsored by the Russian and Eurasian Studies Program.

Rule of Law Conversations

February 22, 2013

Kedar Patel, an SC Honor's College graduating senior, led two separate discussions on rule of law, focusing on definitional and philosophical issues. This conversation assisted in developing a better understanding of how "rule of law" differs across disciplines by highlighting the varying perspectives of ROLC Faculty Associates in attendance.

Associate Faculty Gathering

February 21, 2013

Director Gordon Smith and Deputy Director Joel Samuels hosted several informal gatherings throughout the semester so that faculty associates could become more familiar with each other's research and teaching interests. Professors
Aparna Polavarapu (Law), Kirk Randazzo (Political Science) and Doyle Stevick (Education) provided brief presentations on their respective teaching and research interests relative to rule of law issues.

Can Africa Heal Itself?: Three Hinges of Opportunity

September 27, 2012

Dr. Charles Villa-Vicencio is a global authority on transitional justice and reconciliation. A distinguished theologian and a visiting research fellow at the Berkeley Center for Religion, Peace, and World Affairs at Georgetown University, he has published numerous books, including Walk with Us and Listen: Political Reconciliation in Africa (2009).

This lecture was co-sponsored by the Walker Institute and the African Studies Program.

The False Promise of Justice: Guantanamo, the CIA, and 9/11

September 20, 2012

Zachary Katznelson is Senior Staff Attorney at the American Civil Liberties Union's National Security Project. He focuses on accountability for abuse, torture and other crimes committed in the name of combating terrorism, and on privacy and surveillance matters, including the intersection between civil liberties and cybersecurity. During the course of his career, he has specialized in a blend of legal, public, and diplomatic advocacy while bringing cases concerning national security and civil rights issues.

This lecture was co-sponsored by the Walker Institute and the Rule of Law Collaborative.

Islam, Politics, and Gender Equality Movements

August 30, 2012

Dr. Fatemeh Haghighatjoo is a well-known proponent of global human rights and of women's rights in Iran. In 2005, Dr. Haghighatjoo was honored as a Young Global Leader by the World Economic Forum; and in 2010 she helped found the Nonviolent Initiative for Democracy. More recently, Dr. Haghighatjoo has held several academic posts in the United States, including at the University of Connecticut, Harvard and MIT. She is a noted and widely cited expert on Iranian politics, as well as a leading advocate for a civil and democratic Iranian society.

This lecture was free and open to the public and was co-sponsored by the Walker Institute, the Department of Religious Studies, the Department of Political Science, the Department of Women's and Gender Studies, the Provost Office and the College of Arts and Sciences.

The Russian Legal System

February 27, 2012

Pavel Ivlev is Executive Director of the Institute of Modern Russia, a non-profit organization devoted to the advancement of democratic values and the rule of law in Russia. At this lecture Mr. Ivlev discussed the current legal system in Russia and his role as a former adviser to Yukos, the Russian oil company formerly run by political dissident Mikhail Khodorkovsky.

This event was free and open to the public and was co-sponsored with the Russian and Eurasian Studies Program, the School of Law, and the Walker Institute.

Unheard Voices

January 25, 2012

Acclaimed actor and activist Melissa Fitzgerald (The West Wing) discussed her volunteer work in Northern Uganda. Her presentation included a brief history of the 20+ year war in the region as well as clips from her documentary "Staging Hope: Acts of Peace in Northern Uganda".

This event was co-sponsored by the Department of History and the African Studies Program.

Transnational Governance and Local Practices: Labor and Environmental Standards in Global Supply Chains

January 19, 2012

Dr. Tim Bartley, Associate Professor of Sociology at Indiana University, gave a senior hire job talk in the International Business Department. Dr. Bartley is a rising star in the fields of transnationalization of regulation and private standards and development. His talk, "Transnational Governance and Local Practices: Labor and Environmental Standards in Global Supply Chains", addressed the importance of such issues in the global economy.

Eurolegalism 

November 2, 2011

Speaker Dan Kelemen, Associate Professor of Political Science, Jean Monnet Chair, and Director of the Center for European Studies at Rutgers, present work related to his new book, "Eurolegalism: The Transformation of Law and Regulation in the European Union" (Harvard University Press). You can find more information about Dr. Kelemen and his work here. Professor Kelemen is a leading scholar on EU politics, jurisprudence and regulation, and is in turn a leading thinker on the transnationalization of law and regulation and its effects on the ground for both firms and local governments.

The Future of International Criminal Justice: The Crucial Role of the United States

September 22, 2011

Walker Institute of International and Area Studies. 

Justice Richard Goldstone chaired the Goldstone Commission which investigated violence in South Africa during apartheid. More recently he has chaired commissions prosecuting war crimes in Yugoslavia and Rwanda and led the U.N. Fact Finding Mission on the Gaza Conflict. In this lecture Justice Goldstone discussed the important role the United States will likely play in the realm of international criminal justice in the future.