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updated 5/19/2009

History

Lacy K. Ford Jr., Chair

Professors
Dan T. Carter, Ph.D., University of North Carolina, 1967, Education Foundation Professor of History
Owen Connelly, Ph.D., University of North Carolina, 1960, Caroline McKissick Dial Professor of History
Don H. Doyle, Ph.D., Northwestern University, 1973, McCausland Professor of History
Walter B. Edgar, Ph.D., University of South Carolina, 1969, George Washington Distinguished Professor of History, Claude Henry Neuffer Professor of Southern Studies
Lacy K. Ford Jr., Ph.D., University of South Carolina, 1983, Chair
Lawrence B. Glickman, Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley, 1992
Robert Edwin Herzstein, Ph.D., New York University, 1964, Carolina Distinguished Professor
Paul E. Johnson, Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles, 1975
Daniel C. Littlefield, Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1977, Carolina Professor of History
Simon Paul MacKenzie, D.Phil., Oxford University, 1989
Patrick J. Maney, Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1976
Kenneth J. Perkins, Ph.D., Princeton University, 1973
Constance B. Schulz, Ph.D., University of Cincinnati, 1973
Mark M. Smith, Ph.D., University of South Carolina, 1995, Carolina Distinguished Professor
Michael Smith, Ph.D., Cornell University, 1972
Marjorie J. Spruill, Ph.D., University of Virginia, 1990
Robert R. Weyeneth, Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley, 1984

Associate Professors
Ronald R. Atkinson, Ph.D., Northwestern University, 1978
Thomas J. Brown, Ph.D., Harvard University, 1995
Matt D. Childs, Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin, 2001
Kathryn Edwards, University of California, Berkeley, 1993
Karl G. Gerth, Ph.D., Harvard University, 2000
Katherine C. Grier, Ph.D., University of Delaware, 1988
Carol E. Harrison, D.Phil., Oxford University, 1993
Wanda A. Hendricks, Ph.D., Purdue University, 1990

William Dean Kinzley, Ph.D., University of Washington, 1984
Jessica Kross, Ph.D., University of Michigan, 1974
Thomas M. Lekan, Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, Madison, 1999
Elena A. Osokina, Ph.D., Moscow State University, 1998
Michael C. Scardaville, Ph.D., University of Florida, 1977
Patricia A. Sullivan, Ph.D., Emory University, 1983

Assistant Professors
Christine C. Ames, Ph.D., University of Notre Dame, 2002
Emily K. Brock, Ph.D., Princeton University, 2004
Saskia Coenen-Snyder, Ph.D., University of Michigan, 2008
Bobby Donaldson, Ph.D., Emory University, 2002
Kent B. Germany, Ph.D., Tulane University, 2000
Ann Johnson, Ph.D., Princeton University, 2000
Emil Kerenji, Ph.D., University of Michigan, 2008
E. Gabrielle Kuenzli, Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, Madison, 2005
Valinda W. Littlefield, Ph.D., University of Illinois, Champaign, 2003
Allison Marsh, Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 2007
Joseph A. November, Ph.D., Princeton University, 2006
Lauren R. Sklaroff, Ph.D., University of Virginia, 2003


Overview

The Department of History at the University of South Carolina strives to achieve the highest standards of excellence in both conventional and applied history fields. A traditionally excellent Southern history department is complemented by a strong faculty that provides graduates and undergraduates a wide variety of American, European, and non-Western fields and periods from ancient to modern. The public history program is among the best in the nation and prepares graduate students for the museum, archival, and historic preservation job markets.

Financial assistance is offered by way of a limited number of graduate assistantships each year. Incoming students and continuing students seeking aid for the summer and fall semesters should apply by February 15. Continuing students applying for the spring semester should apply by October 15.

Students are eligible for departmental financial assistance for a total of eight semesters. This limitation does not include summer sessions, nondepartmental funded assistantships, or one-semester research assistantships for students in ABD status.

Provided there is sufficient funding, the department awards several research assistantships to advanced doctoral students. Further, the department makes several postdoctoral appointments (of no more than one year) to new Ph.D.s, to give them experience teaching upper-division undergraduate courses in their major field.

Graduate students receiving assistantships from the department are entitled to reduced fees (including tuition) regardless of residence status. Those who hold assistantships for the spring semester or have letters of notification for the fall semester are entitled to reduced fees during the summer terms.

Admissions

The history department admits students once a year, in March, although accepted students may begin work in either the fall or spring semester. Completed applications shall be received by The Graduate School no later than January 5 of the year they are to be considered.

For the 2002-2003 academic year, there were 180 applicants for our graduate programs; 60 were admitted and 32 enrolled (ten each in the M.A. and Ph.D. programs and 12 in the M.A. in Public History program). This class has an average GRE score of 1250 on two of the three components of the exam and an average undergraduate GPA of 3.50.

For admission to the Ph.D. program, students normally shall have the M.A. degree in history. Exceptions will be considered on a case-by-case basis by the Committee on Graduate Studies. Incoming Ph.D. students who hold a master's degree from another university must complete our M.A. requirements or demonstrate that they have completed similar course work. No formal transfer credit is given, but the Graduate Committee normally takes previous graduate work in history into account, which may speed the student's progress toward the doctorate.

A student who intends to take both the M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of South Carolina shall be advised that the M.A. program (including the thesis and comprehensive examination) shall be completed, and the student shall otherwise be qualified as outlined herein, before proceeding to the Ph.D. program.

Degree Programs

Degrees offered include the M.A., M.A. in Public History, M.A.T. in social studies (history option) and Ph.D. In addition, a joint master's program in library and information science and public history is offered. The Department of History also oversees the Certificate of Graduate Study in Museum Management.

Normally, no more than 6 hours of courses in either the M.A. or Ph.D. programs may be taken at the 500 or 600 level. All other courses shall be at the 700 or 800 level. Courses taken at the 800 level may be repeated, but only with the permission of the Committee on Graduate Studies. Thesis or dissertation research and writing courses (799 and 899) may be taken as many times as deemed necessary by the student's advisor and with the approval of the Committee on Graduate Studies.

No courses that counted toward the M.A. may be used in the Ph.D. program, with the exception of historiography. No more than 6 hours of credit for courses offered by television or radio may be counted toward the M.A., M.A. (Public), or Ph.D. degree. No more than 3 hours of such courses may be counted toward the M.A.T. degree.

Master of Arts in History

The M.A. in History is offered in the following fields:

  • ancient world
  • medieval world
  • early modern Europe
  • modern Europe
  • history of culture, identity, and economic development
  • Middle East
  • East Asia
  • Latin America
  • sub-Saharan Africa
  • U.S. to 1877
  • U.S. since 1789.

Candidates for the M.A. degree shall file a program of study during their first semester of study and in no case later than 12 months after entering the program.

Candidates for the M.A. in History take a minimum of 30 semester hours, of which not more than 6 hours are for the thesis. Credit hours shall be distributed as follows:

1. two reading seminars (from HIST 701-712) in the major field of study.
2. HIST 720 (Introduction to the Study of History) is required of all entering M.A. students. European history students shall choose two of the following courses as part of their program of study: HIST 707A, 707B, 706, and 796. With the approval of their advisors, students specializing in U.S. history shall choose two of the following courses as part of their program of study: HIST 701, 702, 703, 797.
3. at least one 800-level research seminar
4. fifteen hours of course work, including 6 hours of HIST 799.

A reading knowledge of one foreign language or competence in an appropriate methodology is required. Choice of the latter must be approved by the Graduate Committee.

The M.A. thesis will be an expanded version of the student's 800-level research seminar paper, revised to the standard of a potentially publishable article-length essay. Normally, students will submit the thesis in the semester after completion of the 800-level research seminar paper, but students who complete their 800-level seminar in their first year may petition the Graduate Committee to submit their thesis during their final semester in the M.A. program. The thesis must be submitted in accordance with the regulations of The Graduate School.

Following successful completion of an 800-level research seminar, students will take an oral comprehensive examination on their thesis. In this examination, students will be asked to place their thesis in historiographic perspective. Normally, students will take the comprehensive examination in the semester after they complete an 800-level seminar. However, students who complete an 800-level seminar in their first year may petition the Graduate Committee to take their M.A. examination during their final semester in the program.

Master of Arts in Public History

The M.A. in Public History integrates traditional graduate study in history with professional training in the skills used in the public and private sectors. The curriculum offers a choice of three areas of concentration for the major field: historic preservation, museums, and archives. In addition, students complete course work in a minor field within the general graduate history curriculum, usually but not exclusively U.S. to 1877 or U.S. since 1789.

A reading knowledge of one foreign language or competence in an appropriate methodology is required. Choice of the latter must be approved by the Graduate Committee.

Candidates for the M.A. in Public History choose a major and a minor field, take written comprehensive examinations in both fields, and write a thesis. A minimum of 36 semester hours, of which 21 hours will be in public history courses and 15 hours will be in the history core, are required. Credit hours will be distributed between the major and minor fields as follows:

Major field (21 hours)

Students take 15 hours of course work chosen from one of three concentrations. As appropriate to their courses of study and with the approval of their advisors, students may petition to make substitutions for one or more of the courses listed below.

Historic Preservation: two courses in the preservation core (HIST 792, HIST 692, HIST 789, ARTH 542); two courses chosen from HIST 786, ARTH 790, ANTH 545, ANTH 576, ANTH 742, ANTH 745, or a remaining core course; and one course from any listed for the museums or archives track including cross-listed courses.

Museums: two courses in the museums core (HIST 789, COLA 700, COLA 701); two courses chosen from HIST 692, HIST 786, ARTH 543, ARTH 560, ARTH 561, ARTH 562, COLA 703, COLA 704, or a remaining core course; and one course from any listed for the preservation or archives track including cross-listed courses.

Archives: two courses in the archives core (HIST 790, HIST 791, CLIS 719, CLIS 750); two courses chosen from HIST 786, CLIS 710, CLIS 724, CLIS 734 or a remaining core course; and one course from any listed for the preservation or museums track including cross-listed courses.

Students must also complete 3 hours of internship (HIST 798; CLIS 794 for students in the M.A./M.L.I.S program) and 3 hours of thesis preparation (HIST 799).

Minor Field (15 hours)

For the minor field, students will complete HIST 720 and HIST 816; 3 hours of historiography (HIST 796 or HIST 797 as appropriate); and 9 hours in the minor field of study, 3 of which must be an overview of the field (HIST 701-712), and 3 of which must be an 800-level research seminar. With the approval of their advisors, students minoring in United States history may substitute HIST 701, HIST 702, HIST 703, or an appropriate thematic historiographical reading seminar, for HIST 797.

The M.A. thesis will be an expanded version of the student's 800-level research seminar paper, revised to the standard of a potentially publishable article-length essay. Normally, students will submit the thesis in the semester after completion of the 800-level research seminar paper, but students who complete their 800-level seminar in their first year may petition the Graduate Committee to submit their thesis during their final semester in the M.A. program. The thesis must be submitted in accordance with the regulations of The Graduate School.

Following successful completion of an 800-level research seminar, an oral comprehensive examination on the student's thesis will be taken. In this examination, the student will be asked to place his/her thesis in historiographic perspective. Normally, students will take the comprehensive examination in the semester after they complete an 800-level seminar. However, students who complete their 800-level seminar in their first year may petition the Graduate Committee to take their M.A. examination during their final semester in the program.

In addition to the thesis, students will compile a portfolio of their public history work in accordance with departmental policy.

Finally, the student will complete a thesis that is submitted according to the regulations of The Graduate School.

Candidates for the M.A. in Public History shall file a Program of Study during their first semester, and in no case later than 12 months after entering the program. A student in the M.A./M.L.I.S. joint program should prepare and file separate forms for each degree but should submit them together to The Graduate School.

All students enrolled in public history may also enter the Museum Certificate Program coordinated by the University's McKissick Museum. Students in the archives track may also enter the M.A./M.L.I.S., offered in conjunction with the School of Library and Information Science.

Master of Arts in Teaching in Social Studies (History Option)

The M.A.T. is a joint program run by the College of Education and the Department of History. All questions concerning education courses and other requirements shall be directed to the M.A.T. advisor in the College of Education.

Students must take 15 hours of graduate history. Of these, only 6 hours may be at the 500-600 level. Courses numbered 700 are most appropriate for M.A.T. students. One television course may be taken, if offered. Courses shall be chosen to enhance knowledge in fields pertaining to the subject matter taught in schools.

A Program of Study shall be drawn up in consultation with the M.A.T. advisor, College of Education, and filed within 12 months of entry into the program. The M.A.T. advisor is responsible for signing this document.

During their last semester, students shall contact the M.A.T. advisor to make arrangements for the oral comprehensive examination.

Doctor of Philosophy in History

The Ph.D. is offered in the following major fields:

  • ancient world
  • medieval world
  • early modern Europe
  • modern Europe
  • history of culture, identity and economic development
  • U.S. to 1877
  • U.S. since 1789.

Ph.D. candidates will choose three fields of specialization. The major field in which the dissertation is written shall be one in which the Ph.D. is offered. The second and third fields may include up to two of the following special fields: African American studies; diplomacy; Latin America; East Asia; sub-Saharan Africa; North Africa; Middle East; public history or one of the component areas of specialization in public history (archives, museum studies, historic preservation); military, legal, or constitutional history; U.S. South; women's history; gender studies; industrialization; labor; rural studies; environmental history; ethnicity; and nationalism, or one cognate field in another discipline may be substituted for one of the minor fields.

The major field shall reflect the student's main interest and shall be chronologically and/or geographically defined.

One of the student's two minor fields also may be defined chronologically and/or geographically, provided that it covers a different area and/or time from the student's major field; or it may be a topical, thematic, or comparative field. Students will be encouraged to select at least one minor field associated with the department's intellectual focus on history of culture, identity, and economic development. The second and third fields cannot be subsets of the student's major field. Normally, students will be expected to complete 9 hours of course work in the second field and 6 hours of course work in the third field.

The student's third field can be in any approved field if the student's second field is a topical, thematic, or comparative field; otherwise, it shall be a topical, thematic, comparative field, or cognate field.

A written qualifying examination in the student's major field (with two examiners) shall be taken within the first year of residence. Under the following conditions, students may exempt the qualifying examinations: the student has an M.A. in history from another accredited institution and has successfully completed 15 hours of Ph.D. course work at the University of South Carolina with at least a B+ average, or the student has passed the M.A. comprehensive examination at the University of South Carolina.

Qualifying exams may be retaken once and must be administered by the same committee.

Ph.D. candidates shall file a program of study immediately after their admission to candidacy, which follows the successful completion of the qualifying examination or comes no later than 24 months after entering the program.

Doctoral students are required to take a minimum of 18 hours of course work beyond the M.A., but additional hours may be specified by their advisor and approved by the Committee on Graduate Studies. Credit hours shall be distributed as follows:

1. Two 700-level reading seminars in two of the student's fields of study, unless taken at the M.A. level. The student's advisor may substitute other appropriate courses.
2. HIST 720 (Introduction to the Study of History) and HIST 783 (History and Theory). These courses will provide methodological and theoretical training that will complement the 700-level reading seminars in historiography.
3. One 800-level research seminar in the student's major field (in addition to the research seminar required for the M.A.), and HIST 815 (Dissertation Prospectus Seminar).
4. Any other appropriate course(s).

Every Ph.D. student shall prove competency in at least one foreign language or appropriate methodology. Additional languages and/or methodological requirements will be determined by the student’s program advisory committee when the chosen fields or research interests demand more.

Written comprehensive examinations in three fields are required and are offered in January, May, and August of each year. Minor-field examinations will be administered independently by the faculty in those areas and will consist of one four-hour examination for each field.

The major field will have two examiners, and there will be two four-hour examinations. All requirements for attaining the degree (except for completion of the dissertation) shall be accomplished prior to taking the comprehensive examination in the major field. This includes the satisfactory completion of the language requirement and the removal of any grades of incomplete.

If a student fails, the exam may be retaken one time and must be administered by the same examiner(s).

Oral examinations covering the major and minor fields will be scheduled after the successful completion of written examinations in all fields.

In order to achieve official ABD status, all students shall orally present and defend a written dissertation proposal to their committee and other interested members of the department. The dissertation prospectus defense will take place while the student is enrolled in HIST 815 or, with the approval of the committee, shortly after completion of the course.

Finally, candidates will prepare for submission a dissertation that is expected to represent a substantial contribution to historical knowledge.

Graduate Certificate in Museum Management

Any matriculated graduate student at the University of South Carolina may apply to the Museum Management Certificate Program. The Certificate of Graduate Study in Museum Management will be awarded upon the completion of 18 semester hours, including one internship project. The content of the project will be designed to suit the needs of the individual student.

All students must complete the core curriculum of 12 semester hours. Six approved hours may be taken in subject areas of graduate degree study such as anthropology, art, business administration, history, library and information science, or public administration. A number of departments have integrated the certificate program within their own areas of study. Up to 6 semester hours are recognized by the Departments of Anthropology and Art, the School of Library and Information Science, and the Master of Public Administration Program. The Public History Program of the Department of History recognizes up to 9 semester hours. Specific COLA courses are listed below.

For more information about this program, write: Museum Management Program, McKissick Museum, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208.


Course Descriptions

Museum Management (MUSM)

Required Courses

  • 700 -- Administration and Management of Museums. (3) The history and purpose of museums are examined. The basic management functions of museums and related cultural properties are considered.
  • 701 -- Exhibition Development. (3) Exhibition planning: research, writing, design, budgeting.
  • 702 -- Museum Internship. (6) (Prereq: COLA 700 and 701) This course is an internship in an AAM accredited museum. Students work under supervision in a museum setting.

Elective Courses

  • 703 -- Museum Management: Independent Study. (3) (Prereq: COLA 700 and 701) Independent study in museum practices.
  • 704 -- Collecting, Collections Management, and Curatorial Practice. (3) Professional practice in collections management and care. Legal requirements and ethics of museum collecting. Curatorial collecting strategies and research.

History (HIST)

  • 501 -- The Ancient Near East to 323 B.C. (3) The formation of ancient Near Eastern cultures, the ultimate synthesis of these cultures and the resulting establishment of the Near East as a historical entity.
  • 502 -- Greek History and Civilization to 146 B.C. (3) The origins and development of Greek civilization in its political, economic, social, and cultural aspects with special attention being given to the early and late classical periods and the Hellenistic Age.
  • 503 -- The History of Rome, 753-27 B.C. (3) The rise of the Roman Republic, its constitutional development, consolidation of Italy, and expansion throughout the Mediterranean to the establishment of the Principate and the birth of Christ.
  • 504 -- The Roman Empire, 27 B.C.-480 A.D. (3) The political, economic, and social structure and development of the Roman Empire from the establishment of the Principate to the fall of the Roman Empire in the West.
  • 515 -- Byzantine History: 4th to 11th Centuries. (3) The political, religious, and military developments within the Eastern Empire including its influence on Western and Slavonic Europe and Islam.
  • 516 -- Byzantine History: 11th to 15th Centuries. (3) The political and military developments within the Eastern Empire from the invasion of the Seljuk Turks to its final destruction by the Ottoman Turks.
  • 518 -- The Coinage of the Ancient World. (3) The origin and development of coinage among the Greeks and Romans, 700 B.C. to A.D. 500, with emphasis on the significance of coins in the study of ancient history, art, and religion.
  • 521 -- The Formation of Western Cultures, 300-1000 A.D. (3) The causes and course of the split of the Roman Mediterranean world into the three modern western cultures; Western European, Eastern Orthodox, and Islamic.
  • 523 -- The Crusades. (3) Holy war and realpolitik in Mediterranean East-West relations from the 10th through the 15th centuries with emphasis on the role of the crusades in the cultural formation, development, and international relations of East and West.
  • 541 -- The History of Russia from the Earliest Times to the Mid-19th Century. (3) The earliest life on the steppe, the Kievan State, the foundations of Moscow, and the Russian empire to the reign of Nicholas I.
  • 542 -- The History of Modern Russia and the Soviet Union. (3) The decline of Imperial Russia, the Revolution of 1917, Lenin, Stalin, and the Soviet Union since Stalin.
  • 543 -- Russian and Soviet Diplomatic History. (3) Imperial and Soviet foreign and military policies in the 19th and 20th centuries.
  • 562 -- The Middle East and the United States: 1800 to the Present. (3) Political, cultural, and economic ties which have linked the Middle East to the United States. Middle Eastern views of these relationships and their impact on modern Middle Eastern history.
  • 566 -- Problems in the History of Africa South of the Sahara. (3 each) Independent readings and written papers on appropriate topics.
  • 573 -- History of Traditional Chinese Thought. {=PHIL 573} (3) An introduction to the development of Chinese thought in relationship to the political and socioeconomic institutions of early China (6th century B.C. to 3rd century A.D.), with emphasis on Confucianism and Taoism.
  • 574 -- China to Revolution. (3) The impact of war and revolution on the traditional institutions of China from the Opium War in 1839 to the establishment of the People's Republic in 1949.
  • 575 -- China Since 1949. (3) Introduction to the major social, economic, and political changes in China from the Communist Revolution in 1949 to the present.
  • 576 -- Japan: The Military Tradition. (3) Origins and development of the samurai warrior class and the nature and implication of Japanese military power in political, social, and cultural life.
  • 577 -- Consumer Society in Modern East Asia. (3) An introduction to the issues, concepts, and theories underlying the study of commodity culture and their application to the study of modern East Asian history.
  • 599 -- Topics in History. (3) Reading and research on selected historical topics. Course content varies and will be announced in the schedule of classes by suffix and title.
  • 610 -- Everyday Life in Colonial America. (3) The customs, mores, attitudes, and living conditions of men and women of the 17th and 18th centuries. Emphasis on the common people of the American colonies.
  • 615 -- The Civil War in American History. (3) The causes, events, and results of the Civil War.
  • 616 -- The Reconstruction of the Nation. (3) The events and results of the attempt to reorder the American nation after the Civil War.
  • 621 -- Constitutional History of the United States. (3) A study of the constitutional development of the United States from the creation of the Articles of Confederation to the Civil War. It deals primarily with problems of governmental organization, judicial interpretation, and sectional politics.
  • 622 -- Constitutional History of the United States. (3) An analysis of the growth of constitutional power from 1860 to the present, giving special attention to the constitutional problems of the Civil War period, the increasing role of the judiciary in national affairs, and the general extension of constitutional authority in the 20th century.
  • 640 -- South Carolina History. (3) South Carolina since colonization. (Television instruction only.)
  • 641 -- The American South Comes of Age. (3) Changes in the Southern region since 1940. (Television instruction only.)
  • 648 -- The Black Experience in the United States. (3) The social, cultural, economic, and political life of black people in the United States. First semester: to 1865; second semester: since 1865.
  • 649 -- The Black Experience in the United States. (3) The social, cultural, economic, and political life of black people in the United States. First semester: to 1865; second semester: since 1865.
  • 663 -- Social and Economic History of Latin America. {=LASP 441} (3) The evolution of social groups and changes in economic patterns in Latin America from pre-Columbian times to the present.
  • 664 -- Gender in Latin America. {=LASP 440} (3) Comparative study of gender and women's history exploring intersections of gender with social structures such as race, class, and political beliefs.
  • 692 -- Historic Preservation Field Experience--Charleston, S.C. (3) (Prereq: consent of instructor) On-site introduction to historic preservation including research, interpretation, management, and economics of preservation. Offered only in Charleston during summer term.
  • 700 -- Topics in History. (3) Reading and research in selected historical subjects.
  • 701 -- Reading Seminar in Colonial American History. (3)
  • 702 -- Reading Seminar in American History, 1789-1876. (3)
  • 703 -- Reading Seminar in American History since 1876. (3)
  • 704 -- Reading Seminar in Ancient History. (3)
  • 705 -- Reading Seminar in Medieval History. (3)
  • 706 -- Reading Seminar in Early Modern European History. (3)
  • 707A -- Reading Seminar in Modern European History, 1789-1900. (3) Restricted to graduate students in history.
  • 707B -- Reading Seminar in European History, 1900-Present. (3) Restricted to graduate students in history.
  • 708 -- Reading Seminar in Russian and East European History. (3)
  • 709 -- Reading Seminar in British History, 1500-1815. (3)
  • 710 -- Reading Seminar in British History since 1815. (3)
  • 712 -- Reading Seminar in Special Fields. (3)
  • 713 -- The Age of the Antonines. (3) A consideration of the political, social, economic, and intellectual developments in the Roman world of the second century A.D.
  • 715 -- The Crusades. (3) Holy war and realpolitik in Mediterranean; East and West relations from the 10th through the 15th centuries.
  • 716 -- Normandy, France, and England, 911-1453. (3) The development of the French and English monarchies from the establishment of Normandy to the end of the Hundred Years' War.
  • 720 -- Introduction to the Study of History. (3) Introduction to the field for students who intend to become professional historians. Covers debates concerning the writing of history with a focus on recent theoretical and methodological issues. Restricted to M.A. and Ph.D. students in history.
  • 721 -- England Under the Tudors and Stuarts. (3) A detailed study of the history of England, 1485-1714.
  • 722 -- England Under the Tudors and Stuarts. (3) A detailed study of the history of England, 1485-1714.
  • 725 -- Modern British History. (3) A reading course in the literature of British history since 1815.
  • 726 -- Modern British History. (3) A reading course in the literature of British history since 1815.
  • 727 -- European Intellectual History, 1815-1900. (3) A reading course in art history, literature, and changing social thought in the 19th century.
  • 728 -- European Intellectual History, 1900-1960. (3) A reading course in art, architecture, the cinema, literature, and social thought in the 20th century.
  • 729 -- France since 1815. (3) Readings in the political, social, economic, and cultural history of modern France.
  • 730 -- Russia from Peter the Great to Nicholas I. (3) The history of Russia from 1675-1855.
  • 731 -- Russia, 1855-1930. (3) A reading course dealing with specific problems of modern Russian history.
  • 732 -- European Diplomatic History, 1870-1914. (3)
  • 733 -- Contemporary Europe. (3)
  • 734 -- Empire and Nation in Modern Europe. (3) Comparative study of the concepts and dynamics of empire and nation in 19th- and 20th-century Europe.
  • 735 -- State and Society in Eastern Europe. (3) Selected topics in the development of the area in the 19th and 20th centuries.
  • 739 -- Readings in Pre-Modern Chinese History. (3) Selected topics in the history of China from the founding of the Han Dynasty in 202 B.C. to the end of the Ming Dynasty in A.D. 1644.
  • 740 -- China and the West, 1840-1949. (3) A reading course on political, intellectual, and social changes in China resulting from the increased contacts with the West.
  • 741 -- Readings in the Social History of Sport. {=PEDU 741} (3) A reading and discussion of the analytical and critical literature on sport history.
  • 744 -- French Revolution and Napoleonic Era. (3) Reading course in the historical literature of the revolutionary era, including the 18th-century background.
  • 745 -- Readings in Modern Japanese History. (3) Topics include the Meiji Restoration, industrialization, nationhood and nationalism, World War II, and postwar changes.
  • 748 -- The Middle East and North Africa, 1798-1962. (3) A reading course emphasizing political, intellectual, social, and religious movements in the Ottoman Empire and its successor states. Special attention to the growth of contacts between the Middle East and the West.
  • 752 -- Readings in American Colonial History. (3)
  • 753 -- The Coming of the Civil War, 1815-1860. (3) A study of the various factors which produced a breakdown of the democratic process in the United States and produced a domestic war.
  • 754 -- Rise of Industrialism. (3)
  • 755 -- Contemporary United States. (3)
  • 756 -- United States History, 1800-1850. (3)
  • 757 -- African American Women in Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries. {=WOST 757} (3) This course will acquaint students with some of the secondary literature in African American women's history from the late nineteenth century through the twentieth century. The course examines the impact of race, gender, and class on the lives of black women and explores the historical relationship between African American women, work, family, community, and politics.
  • 761 -- Southern Intellectual and Cultural History. (3) A study of the Southern mind together with an investigation of such other aspects of Southern civilization as are clearly related to the mental life of the region.
  • 762 -- The New South. (3) A survey of the economic, social, and political development of the Southern region since 1876.
  • 763 -- Victorian America. (3) Readings in the social and political history of the United States in the period from Reconstruction to the First World War.
  • 764 -- History of American Women. {=WOST 764} (3) Selected research topics on the cultural, social, economic, and political roles and contributions of American women.
  • 765 -- Readings in American Diplomatic History, 1776-1914. (3)
  • 766 -- Readings in American Diplomatic History, 1914-present. (3)
  • 770 -- Latin American History. (3) Readings in selected topics in Latin American history.
  • 772 -- Exploring Ethnohistory. {=ANTH 773} (3) Cross-cultural study of history. Includes theoretical perspectives and cases from the Americas, Europe, Africa, and Asia.
  • 773 -- History of Mexico. (3) Readings in the political, economic and social history of Mexico.
  • 776 -- History of Brazil. (3) Readings in the political, economic and social history of Brazil.
  • 780 -- Readings in Modern Military Thought. (3) Major military thought from the French Revolution to the present.
  • 781 -- History and Theory of Museums. (3) Museums as central places for the creation, presentation, and representation of human knowledge knowledge and enhancement of civic ritual in modern states. U.S. museums considered in international context.
  • 782 -- Business History. (3) Readings in the modern history of business in Europe and America.
  • 783 -- History and Theory. (3) Examination of theory and case studies highlighting current themes in cultural history. Topics may include memory, ethnicity and race, gender and sexuality, popular culture, and truth and objectivity.
  • 784 -- Modern British Material Culture. (3) Use of material culture by historians of modern Britain including the country house, food and drink, slums and suburbs, the seaside resort, and the public school.
  • 785 -- Comparative History of Time. (3) Historical study of time-consciousness; how different modes of production have stimulated different forms of time-consciousness in American and other cultures.
  • 786 -- Comparative Applied History, U.S. and U.K. (3) (Prereq: permission of instructor) Summer field school in the U.K. to provide comparisons with U.S. theory and practice in archives administration, museum management, and historic preservation.
  • 787 -- Material Culture Studies. {=ANTH 787} (3) Seminar in historical study of material culture; principal disciplinary and theoretical perspectives; emphasis on material culture of North America.
  • 789 -- Historic Site Interpretation. (3) An examination of the issues and problems in the interpretation of historic house museums and historic sites, with special emphasis on the development of an interpretive exhibit related to state and local history. Field trips.
  • 790 -- Archival Administration and Techniques. (3) The nature, value, and use of public and private archives; the principles and techniques for preservation, arrangement, description, and reference service for archives, personal papers, and historical manuscripts.
  • 791 -- Historical Editing. (3) An introduction to and a synopsis of the editorial process, including canons of selection and textual criticism; the editorial commitment; annotation; preparing manuscript for the printer; and the one-person editorial project.
  • 792 -- Historic Preservation. (3) An examination of the preservation process, including the history of historic preservation, the development of preservation administrative systems, and preservation research methods and strategies. Field trips.
  • 793 -- State and Local History. (3) An intensive inquiry into the source materials of South Carolina and the unique problems associated with state and local history.
  • 794 -- Research for Teaching. (3) Course to familiarize M.A.T. students with the basic bibliographic aids and printed sources useful for the preparation of lectures.
  • 795 -- Special Topics: Study Travel in History. (1-6) Class time will be spent preparing a project that can be completed by faculty-supervised travel in the United States or abroad. Designed to be offered during summer sessions.
  • 796 -- European Historiography. (3) A course whose purpose is to acquaint students with the development of European historiography, schools of historical thought and interpretation. This course or HIST 797 is required of all history graduate students.
  • 797 -- American Historiography. (3) A course whose purpose is to acquaint students with the development of American historiography, schools of historical thought and interpretation. This course or HIST 796 is required of all history graduate students.
  • 798 -- Internship in History. (3) The application of historical skills in a sponsoring historical or public agency. (Pass-Fail Grading)
  • 799 -- Thesis Preparation. (1-9) For master's candidates.
  • 800 -- Topics in History Research. (3) Writing seminar on selected historical subjects. May be repeated for credit as topics and suffixes change.
  • 801 -- Research Seminar in Colonial American History. (3) Restricted to M.A. and Ph.D. students in history.
  • 802 -- Research Seminar in American History, 1789-1876. (3) Restricted to M.A. and Ph.D. students in history.
  • 803 -- Research Seminar in American History, 1876-present. (3) Restricted to M.A. and Ph.D. students in history.
  • 804 -- Research Seminar in Ancient History. (3) Restricted to M.A. and Ph.D. students in history.
  • 805 -- Research Seminar in Medieval History. (3) Restricted to M.A. and Ph.D. students in history.
  • 806 -- Research Seminar in Early Modern European History. (3) Restricted to M.A. and Ph.D. students in history.
  • 807 -- Research Seminar in Modern European History. (3) Restricted to M.A. and Ph.D. students in history.
  • 810 -- Research Seminar in British History. (3) Restricted to M.A. and Ph.D. students in history.
  • 811 -- Research Seminar in Latin American History. (3) Restricted to M.A. and Ph.D. students in history.
  • 812 -- Research Seminar in East Asian History. (3) Restricted to M.A. and Ph.D. students in history.
  • 813 -- Research Seminar in African History. (3) Restricted to M.A. and Ph.D. students in history.
  • 814 -- Research Seminar in Middle Eastern and Islamic History. (3) Restricted to M.A. and Ph.D. students in history.
  • 815 -- Dissertation Prospectus Seminar. (3) Preparation for the Dissertation Prospectus Defense and for professional activities such as grant writing, the preparation and submission of articles, and conference presentations. Restricted to Ph.D. students in history.
  • 816 -- Historical Research Methods. (3) The historical research process, including the definition of research, the determination, collection, and analysis of historical evidence.
  • 899 -- Dissertation Preparation.

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