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updated 5/19/2009

Languages, Literatures, and Cultures

Marja Warehime, Chair

Professors
Celso De Oliveira, Ph.D., University of South Carolina, 1976
William F. Edmiston, Ph.D., Indiana University, 1978
Kurt Goblirsch, Ph.D., University of Minnesota, 1990
Freeman G. Henry, Ph.D., University of Colorado, 1973
Paul Allen Miller, Ph.D., University of Texas, 1989
Francisco J. Sanchez, Ph.D., University of Minnesota, 1990
Marja Warehime, Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1975

Associate Professors
Junko Baba, Ph.D., University of Texas, 1996
Alfredo Alejandro Bernal, Ph.D., Indiana University, 1984
Catherine J. Castner, Ph.D., University of North Carolina, 1979
Lucile C. Charlebois, Ph.D., University of Massachusetts, 1982
James T. Day, Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1978
Daniela DiCecco, Ph.D., University of British Columbia, 1998
Jeanne M. Garane, Ph.D., University of Michigan, 1994
D. Eric Holt, Ph.D., Georgetown University, 1997
Judith E. Kalb, Ph.D., Stanford University, 1996
Ramona Lagos, Ph.D., University of Arizona, 1982
Nancy E. Lane, Ph.D., Indiana University, 1976
María C. Mabrey, Ph.D., University of North Carolina, 1991
Agnes Mueller, Ph.D., Vanderbilt University, 1997
J. Alexander Ogden, Ph.D., Stanford University, 1997
Jeffery C. Persels, Ph.D., University of Virginia, 1991
Yoshitaka Sakakibara, Ph.D., University of Southern California, 1984
Stephen P. Sheehi, Ph.D., University of Michigan, 1998
Wiebke Strehl, Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University, 1992
Nicholas Vazsonyi, Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles, 1993
Tan Ye, Ph.D., Washington University, 1991

Assistant Professors
Mark A. Beck, Ph.D., University of North Carolina, 1998
Jorge L. Camacho, Ph.D., University of Toronto, 2000
Lara C. Ducate, Ph.D., University of Texas, 2003
Annie P. Duménil, Ph.D., University of South Carolina, 1983
Hunter H. Gardner, Ph.D., University of North Carolina, 2005
Jie Guo, Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 2007
David P. Hill, Ph.D., Duke University, 1978
Yvonne Ivory, Ph.D., University of California Los Angeles, 2001
Lara L. Lomicka, Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University, 2001
Paul Malovrh, Ph.D., Indiana University, 2008
Nina Moreno, Ph.D., Georgetown University, 2007
Faust F. Pauluzzi, Ph.D., Rutgers University, 1980
Isis Sadek, Ph.D., Duke University, 2008
Krista Van Fleit Hang, Ph.D., University of Chicago, 2006

Comparative Literature

Faculty
Jorge Camacho, Ph.D., University of Toronto, 2000 (Spanish)
Kwame Senu Neville Dawes, Ph.D., University of New Brunswick, 1992 (English)
Martin J. Donougho, Ph.D., University of Toronto, 1980 (Philosophy)
Jeanne M. Garane, Ph.D. University of Michigan, 1994 (French)
Jie Guo, Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 2007
Scott Gwara, Ph.D., University of Toronto, 1993 (English)
Freeman Henry, Ph.D., University of Colorado, 1973 (French)
Yvonne Ivory, Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles, 2001 (German)
Judith Kalb, Ph.D. Stanford University, 1996 (Russian)
Nancy E. Lane, Ph.D., Indiana University, 1976 (French)
Maria Angelica G. Lopes, Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, 1980 (Portuguese)
Maria C. Mabrey, Ph.D., University of North Carolina, 1991 (Spanish)
David Miller, Ph.D., University of California, Irvine, 1979 (English)
Paul Allen Miller, Ph.D., University of Texas, 1989 (French, Greek, Latin)
John Muckelbauer, Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University, 2002 (English)
Agnes Mueller, Ph.D. Vanderbilt University, 1997 (German)
J. Alexander Ogden, Ph.D. Stanford University, 1997 (Russian)
Celso de Oliveira, Ph.D., University of South Carolina, 1976 (Portuguese)
Lawrence Rhu, Ph.D., Harvard University, 1987 (English)
Francisco J. Sanchez, Ph.D., University of Minnesota, 1990 (Spanish)
Stephen Sheehi, Ph.D., University of Michigan, 1998 (Arabic)
Andrew Shifflett, Ph.D., Princeton University, 1993 (English)
Meili Steele, Ph.D., University of North Carolina, 1984 (English)
Nicholas Vazsonyi, Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles, 1993 (German)


Overview

The department offers programs leading to the Master of Arts degree in comparative literature, French, German, or Spanish; the Doctor of Philosophy degree in comparative literature; and, in collaboration with the College of Education, the Master of Arts in Teaching degree in foreign languages. There also exist options whereby students may pursue an M.A. in French, German, or Spanish leading to the Ph.D. in comparative literature or linguistics.

The Master of Arts in Comparative Literature

Admission for M.A. (and concurrent M.A. and Ph.D.)

The following are guidelines, not minimums for acceptance. It is recognized that each student is unique, and applicants are considered on an individual basis.

Applicants should have a minimum 3.00 GPA in their undergraduate major, evidence of work in literature, and a foreign language. They should have minimum GRE scores of 480 on the verbal section and 4 on the analytical section (or scores of 400 and 3.5, respectively, for non-native English speakers). Students submitting GRE scores from before October 1, 2002, should normally have obtained minimum GRE scores of 480 on the verbal section and 500 on the analytical section (400 and 400, respectively, for non-native English speakers). Applicants are asked to submit a writing sample of 3,000 words and a statement of purpose (300 words maximum).

Degree Requirements

Candidates for the M.A. degree must take graduate-level literature courses in one foreign language and study at least two national literatures. The written portion of the M.A. comprehensive is identical to the Ph.D. qualifying exam. There is also an oral exam. Students will write a thesis on a topic chosen by them in conjunction with their committee and the graduate director. Additional information is available on the Web at www.cas.sc.edu/dllc/Geninfo/grad-all.html.

Requests for further information should be addressed to Director, Comparative Literature Program, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208.

The Master of Arts in French

Admission

Admission requirements include complete transcripts from all post-secondary institutions, at least two letters of recommendation, satisfactory GRE scores (described below), and an undergraduate major (or its equivalent) in French (for candidates who hold an undergraduate degree from a North American institution). They should have minimum GRE scores of 480 on the verbal section and 4 on the analytical section (or scores of 400 and 3.5, respectively, for non-native English speakers). Students submitting GRE scores from before October 1, 2002, should normally have obtained minimum GRE scores of 480 on the verbal section and 500 on the analytical section (400 and 400, respectively, for non-native English speakers). Applicants to the interdisciplinary M.A.T. program may present a minimum score of 40 on the Miller Analogies Test in lieu of GRE scores. Candidates should have a minimum overall GPA of 2.75, with a minimum GPA of 3.00 in French. An applicant whose native language is not English is required to submit a satisfactory score on the TOEFL or the IELTS Intl. Academic Course Type 2 exam. The minimum acceptable score on the TOEFL is 75 (iBT), 230 (computer-based) or 570 (paper-based). The minimum acceptable overall band score on the IELTS Intl. Academic Course Type 2 exam is 6.5. Applicants who wish to be considered for an assistantship must apply by February 15.

In order to pursue the Master of Arts in French, candidates may be required to make up such deficiencies as may be shown by a diagnostic examination. The department reserves the right to require its degree candidates to audit or enroll in undergraduate courses when this appears to be advisable.

Degree Requirements

The M.A. (languages, literatures, and cultures option) requires, in addition to course work, a written and oral comprehensive examination based on a reading list; demonstration of a reading knowledge in a second foreign language. Candidates who elect to write an M.A. thesis will take 24 semester hours of course work, at least 15 of which must be taken in 700-level or above courses. In addition, they will submit a thesis (6 hours of FREN 799) and will present a final oral defense of the thesis.

Candidates who elect to replace the M.A. thesis with extra course work must complete 33 hours of graduate-level courses (of which at least 18 must be at the 700 level or above), and they must submit a substantial research project, typically a revised and expanded version of a paper written for one of the M.A. courses.

FREN 511 is required for all M.A. candidates except for those minoring in linguistics, who must take FREN 516 and 517.

The M.A. (language instruction option) is designed for college graduates who already hold a professional teaching certificate in French and who wish to earn a master's degree adapted to the needs of teachers. The M.A. (language instruction option) requires reading knowledge of a second foreign language; 33 hours of graduate-level course work (of which at least half must be at the 700 level or above), with 21 hours in French (including FREN 511), 9 hours in professional education (including EDSE 730), and 3 hours of elective credit in a course that addresses current issues and concerns of teachers; and successful completion of a comprehensive written and oral examination based on a reading list.

Master of Arts in German

Admission

Generally, applicants should have minimum GRE scores of 480 on the verbal section and 4 on the analytical section (or scores of 400 and 3.5, respectively, for non-native English speakers). Students submitting GRE scores from before October 1, 2002, should normally have obtained minimum GRE scores of 480 on the verbal section and 500 on the analytical section (400 and 400, respectively, for non-native English speakers). A minimum score of 40 on the Miller Analogies Test may be submitted in lieu of GRE scores for the M.A.T. An applicant whose native language is not English is required to submit a satisfactory score on the TOEFL or the IELTS Intl. Academic Course Type 2 exam. The minimum acceptable score on the TOEFL is 75 (iBT), 230 (computer-based) or 570 (paper-based). The minimum acceptable overall band score on the IELTS Intl. Academic Course Type 2 exam is 6.5.

In order to pursue the Master of Arts in German, candidates may be required to make up any such deficiencies demonstrated on a diagnostic examination. The background required in any foreign language is that normally completed by an undergraduate major in the field concerned.

The department reserves the right to require its candidates for the degree of Master of Arts to take special examinations on any undergraduate courses when advisable.

Degree Requirements

The three basic requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in German consist of: 30-33 semester hours of course work, a written and oral comprehensive examination, and demonstration of a reading knowledge in a second foreign language. Students who write a thesis must take a total of 30 semester hours, of which no more than 6 may be thesis credits (GERM 799) and at least 15 must be in non-thesis 700 level courses; there is a final oral examination for students who write a thesis. Students who do not write a thesis must submit an enhanced seminar paper; they are required to take a total of 33 semester hours of course work, at least 24 of which must be in 700-level courses.

The final draft of the thesis signed by the professors concerned must be filed with The Graduate School not less than 20 days before the end of the final semester. GERM 799 may be included as part of the Master of Arts programs in the department.

Master of Arts in Spanish

Admission

To be accepted into the M.A. and M.A.T. programs in Spanish, candidates must hold a B.A. degree in Spanish from an accredited college or university. Graduates of foreign university programs where Spanish is the official language may be able, with permission of the graduate director, to substitute this experience for a Spanish major. A minimum overall GPA of 2.50 on a 4.00 scale indicates candidates possess the capability to pursue graduate studies in Hispanic languages, literatures, and cultures. This is demonstrated by means of official college or university transcripts to be forwarded to this University. Also, three letters of recommendation from previous Spanish instructors are required for inclusion in the candidate's application.

In order to pursue the Master of Arts in Spanish, the candidate should have minimum GRE scores of 480 on the verbal section and 4 on the analytical section (or scores of 400 and 3.5, respectively, for non-native English speakers). Students submitting GRE scores from before October 1, 2002, should normally have obtained minimum GRE scores of 480 on the verbal section and 500 on the analytical section (400 and 400, respectively, for non-native English speakers). A minimum score of 40 on the Miller Analogies Test may be submitted in lieu of GRE scores for the M.A.T. An applicant whose native language is not English is required to submit a satisfactory score on the TOEFL or the IELTS Intl. Academic Course Type 2 exam. The minimum acceptable score on the TOEFL is 75 (iBT), 230 (computer-based) or 570 (paper-based). The minimum acceptable overall band score on the IELTS Intl. Academic Course Type 2 exam is 6.5.

The department reserves the right to require all candidates for the M.A. and M.A.T. degrees to take a special examination on any undergraduate courses when this appears to be advisable according to the results of a mandatory written/diagnostic exam in Spanish that is administered during the first week of classes in the fall and spring semesters. This diagnostic exam includes an interview with a member of the department's graduate faculty.

If a prospective student is seeking a departmental assistantship, a statement of purpose and a taped recording of the person's voice reading a Spanish-language text (or English-language text for international students), in addition to the standard application materials, must be received by March 1 for consideration for a fall assistantship. The department does not normally permit students to begin assistantships in the spring semester.

No more than 12 semester hours of approved graduate credit, with grades of B or higher, may be accepted as transfer credit.

Degree Requirements

The following requirements are specific to the degree programs in Spanish.

Master of Arts in Spanish, thesis option

To receive the M.A. in Spanish (thesis option), a student must:

1. complete 33 hours of graduate work in Spanish (of which SPAN 512, 711, and 515 are required), exclusive of SPAN 776 (of these, at least 18 hours must be taken at the 700 level or above); (With permission of the graduate director, one graduate course in another foreign language, linguistics, comparative literature, or women's studies may be taken as a cognate.)
2. demonstrate a reading knowledge of a second language by passing the exam administered in the foreign language 315 courses;
3. demonstrate both oral and written control of Spanish at the advanced level;
4. successfully complete a comprehensive examination;
5. present and successfuly defend an M.A. thesis.

Master of Arts in Spanish, non-thesis option

To receive the M.A. in Spanish (non-thesis option), a student must:

1. complete 33 hours of graduate work in Spanish (of which SPAN 512, 711, and 515 are required), exclusive of SPAN 776 (of these, at least 18 hours must be taken at the 700 level or above); (With permission of the graduate director, one graduate course in another foreign language, linguistics, comparative literature, or women's studies may be taken as a cognate.)
2. demonstrate a reading knowledge of a second language by passing the exam administered in the foreign language 315 courses;
3. demonstrate both oral and written control of Spanish at the advanced level;
4. successfully complete a comprehensive examination.

Master of Arts in Teaching in Foreign Language (French, German, and Spanish Options)

The M.A.T. is designed for those persons seeking a master's degree and initial South Carolina certification as an educator. All candidates must complete 21 hours of graduate course work in the respective language and 33 hours of graduate course work in professional education as well as fulfill all other requirements for Class I certification.

The Doctor of Philosophy in Comparative Literature

Admission

Applicants should have a minimum 3.00 GPA in their undergraduate major and 3.50 GPA in graduate course work. They should have minimum GRE scores of 480 on the verbal section and 4 on the analytical section (or scores of 400 and 3.5, respectively, for non-native English speakers). Students submitting GRE scores from before October 1, 2002, should normally have obtained minimum GRE scores of 480 on the verbal section and 500 on the analytical section (400 and 400, respectively, for non-native English speakers). Applicants are asked to submit a writing sample of 3,000 words and a statement of purpose (300 words maximum).

Degree Requirements

Candidates for the Ph.D. degree are required to take 60 graduate hours beyond the baccalaureate degree (30 graduate hours beyond the master's degre), including graduate-level course work in at least one foreign language, and demonstrate reading knowledge in two foreign languages. Each candidate must study three or more national literatures, although students may substitute an outside area for their third literature with the approval of the graduate director. Each student will pass a three-hour qualifying examination in two equal parts: an essay on literary theory and an explication of a passage in the student's first foreign literature. The comprehensive examination will consist of three two-hour written exams on each of three reading lists that the student will draw up in conjunction with the committee, followed by a one-hour oral exam. Students whose first literature is not English will write one of their essays in the language of that literature. Each student will write a dissertation on a topic chosen in conjunction with the committee and the graduate director.

Requests for further information should be addressed to Director, Comparative Literature Program, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208.


Course Descriptions

The Department of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures offers the following courses, contingent on approval of the degree-awarding department and The Graduate School, to students who need to fulfill the reading-knowledge requirement for certain graduate degrees. In such cases graduate students fulfill their language requirement by obtaining a grade of S in the course. Courses offered in the Comparative Literature Program may also be taken for graduate credit.

  • ARAB 315 -- Intensive Readings in Arabic
  • FREN 315 -- Intensive Readings in French
  • GERM 315 -- Intensive Readings in German
  • ITAL 315 -- Intensive Readings in Italian
  • LATN 315 -- Intensive Readings in Latin
  • PORT 315 -- Intensive Readings in Portuguese
  • RUSS 315, 316 -- Intensive Readings in Russian
  • SPAN 315 -- Intensive Readings in Spanish

Classics (CLAS)

  • 586 -- Classical Mythology. (3) The major Greek and Roman myths, with emphasis on their meaning, functions, and influence on ancient and later Western culture.
  • 598 -- Classics of Western Literary Theory. {=CPLT 701, =ENGL 733} (3) Problems of literary theory in texts from the ancients to the 17th century, with an emphasis on the classical tradition.

Comparative Literature (CPLT)

  • 597 -- Comparative Studies in Film. {=FILM 597} (3) Topics in film from an international perspective. National cinematic traditions are compared and contrasted.
  • 700 -- Proseminar in Comparative Literature. (1) Introduction to methods and topics of comparative literature. Pass-Fail Grading.
  • 701 -- Classics of Western Literary Theory. {=ENGL 733} (3) Problems of literary theory in texts from the ancients to the 17th century, with an emphasis on the classical tradition.
  • 702 -- Modern Literary Theory. {=ENGL 734} (3) Problems of literary theory from the 18th century to the 1960s.
  • 703 -- Topics in Contemporary Literary Theory. (3) Presents an in-depth study of selected schools or trends in contemporary literary theory.
  • 720 -- The Periods of Literature. (3) The study of one cultural period as an international movement. Topics will vary.
  • 730 -- The Literary Genre. (3) Study of a genre from its inception to the present and its manifestations in the several literatures. Topics will vary.
  • 740 -- Themes in Literature. (3) The study of recurrence and mutation in literary themes. Topics will vary.
  • 750 -- Cross-Cultural Literary Relations. (3) Topics will vary and will be announced (e.g., Anglo-French literary relations, 1740-1900; 20th-century German-American literary relations).
  • 760 -- Literature and Translation: Theory and Practice. (3) A survey of recent translation theory as it relates to literature, combined with translation analysis and actual translation of literary texts.
  • 765 -- Advanced Film Study. {=ENGL 765} (3) Methods of film analysis, resources for research, and the major critical theories.
  • 799 -- Thesis Preparation. (1-9)
  • 850 -- The Teaching of Comparative Literature. (3) Open to Ph.D. candidates who have passed their comprehensive examinations.
  • 880 -- Seminar in Comparative Literature. (3)
  • 881 -- Seminar in Comparative Literature. (3)
  • 882 -- Seminar in Comparative Literature. (3)
  • 883 -- Seminar in Comparative Literature. (3)
  • 895 -- Research. (3)
  • 896 -- Research. (3)
  • 899 -- Dissertation Preparation. (1-12)

Foreign Languages (FORL)

  • 501 -- Spanish for Medical Personnel. (3) (Prereq: 2 semesters of college-level Spanish or equivalent) Basic course in health professions. Functional language and lexicon as well as cultural practices for interaction with Hispanic clients.
  • 510 -- Teaching Second Languages to Young Children. {=EDEL 510} (3) (Prereq: 210 level of a foreign language or its equivalent) To assist prospective teachers of young children in the development of a second language and multicultural learning activities. Practicum sessions are an integral part.
  • 511 -- Teaching Foreign Languages in Secondary Schools. {=EDSE 575} (3)
  • 598 -- Topics in World Film. {=FILM 598} (3) Intensive study of a specific topic concerning films produced in a country other than the United States. Course content varies and will be announced in the schedule of courses by suffix and title.
  • 700A, C, E, F, G, I, J, K, P, R, S -- Language Training in International Business I. {=DMSB 700A, C, E, F, G, I, J, K, P, R, S} (1-12) An introduction to the fundamentals of Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Spanish, Russian, English, or such other languages as may be required, and an intensive study of the culture and specialized language of the business world in which the language is used as may be necessary for I.M.B.A. candidates to function as business specialists in regions other than their native country. Open to I.M.B.A. majors only. Not for graduate credit in a foreign language department. (A suffix will denote the language to be taught.)
  • 703A, C, E, F, G, I, J, K, P, R, S -- Language Training in International Business II. {=DMSB 703A, C, E, F, G, I, J, K, P, R, S} (6) A continuation of FORL/DMSB 700 for practice in written and oral communication as may be required for students enrolled in the International Master of Business Administration program. Open to I.M.B.A. majors only. Not for major credit in a graduate program in the foreign language departments.
  • 705A, C, E, F, G, I, J, K, P, R, S -- Language Training in International Business III. {=DMSB 705A, C, E, F, G, I, J, K, P, R, S} (6) Intensive course for students in the I.M.B.A. program, intended to investigate on an advanced level the linguistic and cultural aspects of business and to prepare the student for an internship either in the United States or abroad. Not for major credit in a graduate program in the foreign language departments.
  • 730 -- Advanced Study of Teaching of Foreign Languages in Secondary Schools. {=EDSE 730} (3) A study of historical developments and recent innovations in curricula resources and techniques in the field of teaching foreign languages in secondary schools. Students will be expected to investigate research as it relates to the improvement of instruction.
  • 772 -- Technology in Foreign Language Education. {=EDTE 772, LING 797} (3) Introduction to technology in language teaching and the connection between language acquisition and the implementation of Internet and multimedia technology.
  • 774A -- Teaching Internship (Foreign Languages). {=EDTE 774A} (3) (Prereq: acceptance to the professional program in education) Application of effective teaching techniques and organization of instructional settings in foreign languages for K-12.
  • 774B -- Teaching Internship (Foreign Languages). {=EDTE 774B} (9) (Prereq: FORL 774A; coreq: EDSE 584) Application of effective teaching techniques and organization of instructional settings in foreign languages for K-12.
  • 776 -- The Teaching of Foreign Languages in College. (2) Basic theoretical principles of foreign language teaching in college. (Required of all graduate assistants. This course will not count toward the M.A., M.A.T., or Ph.D. degrees.)
  • 776A, C, F, G, J, L, P, R, S -- The Teaching of Specific Foreign Languages in College. (1) Basic theoretical principles of foreign language teaching in college. (Languages include Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Japanese, Latin, Portuguese, Russian, and Spanish, by prefix. Required of all graduate assistants teaching that specific language. This course will not count toward the M.A., M.A.T., or Ph.D. degrees.)

French (FREN)

  • 501 -- La France Contemporaine. (3) (Prereq: FREN 310 and 311 or equivalent) Readings in and discussion of the culture of contemporary France.
  • 510 -- L’Actualité Française. (3) (Prereq: FREN 310 or permission of instructor) Development of advanced oral skills in French. Study of linguistic and cultural aspects of French-language media. Does not count toward the M.A. degree in French.
  • 511 -- Techniques of Literary Analysis. (3) Texts from standard authors, with emphasis on explication de texte.
  • 515 -- Advanced French Stylistics. (3) Practice in descriptive and narrative composition with special attention to contrastive stylistics; thème et version.
  • 516 -- French Phonology. {=LING 512} (3) The sound system and its functioning in the morphological system of French from the point of view of current phonological theory.
  • 517 -- French Linguistics. {=LING 502} (3) (Prereq: FREN 515) The structure, morphology, and syntax of modern French.
  • 595 -- Selected Topics in French. (3) Poetry, prose, theatre, cinema, civilization. May be repeated.
  • 715 -- History of the French Language. {=LING 732} (3) Development of the French language from its origins to 1600.
  • 720 -- La Nouvelle Vague et Après/The New Wave and After. (3) Modern French films in their cultural context beginning with the cinema of the Tradition of Quality and the Nouvelle Vague of the late 1950s.
  • 730 -- Francophone Literatures. (3) Literatures in French from Africa and the New World.
  • 735 -- Francophone Literature from Quebec. (3) Introduction to the literature and culture of French-speaking Canada and specifically of Quebec. A survey of influential works will be discussed in relation to their historical and cultural background.
  • 740 -- Old French Literature. (3) French literature from 842 to 1500.
  • 750 -- Sixteenth-Century French Literature. (3) Extensive readings and study in the prose, poetry, and drama of 16th-century literature.
  • 760 -- Seventeenth-Century French Literature. (3)
  • 770 -- Eighteenth-Century French Literature. (3)
  • 775 -- Seminars on Selected Topics in Foreign Language Education. {=EDSE 785, =GERM 775, =LATN 775, =SPAN 775} (3) (Prereq: permission of instructor) Topics will be indentified by suffix and title in the schedule of classes. Each topic may be taken only once.
  • 776 -- The Teaching of Foreign Languages in College. (3) Basic principles of foreign language teaching in college combined with practical demonstrations. (Required of all graduate assistants. This course will not count toward the 30-hour M.A. or M.A.T. degree.
  • 777 -- Supervised Instruction in Teaching Foreign Languages in College. (1) Supervised direction of foreign language teaching in college. Required of all graduate assistants who are teaching. This course will not count toward the 30-hour M.A. or M.A.T. degree.
  • 780 -- Nineteenth-Century French Literature. (3)
  • 790 -- Twentienth-Century French Literature. (3)
  • 795 -- French Seminar. (3) May be repeated with approval of advisor.
  • 796 -- Special Projects in French. (1-3) Directed research and reading in subjects to be individually assigned. Prior written approval of professor required. May be repeated once for credit.
  • 799 -- Thesis Preparation. (1-9)

German (GERM)

  • 500 -- Survey of German Culture. (3) (Prereq: advanced reading ability in German) Historical survey of the German contribution to the intellectual and cultural life of Europe. Texts and films in German.
  • 515 -- Introduction to German Linguistics. {=LING 503} (3) (Prereq: consent of instructor) Structural and descriptive linguistics applied to the German language.
  • 580 -- Topics in German Film. (3) Examination of recurring themes and issues or of significant periods and influential styles in German film. Course content varies and individual topics will be announced with course suffix and title.
  • 598 -- Selected Topics in German. (3) (Prereq: consent of instructor)
  • 700 -- Proseminar. (3) Introduction to literary methods in the field of Germanics, combined with practical instruction in bibliography and in the preparation of elementary research projects.
  • 705 -- History of the German Language. {=LING 733} (3) (Prereq: reading knowledge of High German) Relationship of German to the other Germanic languages. Phonological and morphological development of German. Attention also to syntax, vocabulary, and dialects.
  • 710 -- Middle High German. (3) A study of Middle High German language and literature with special emphasis on the lyric and epic poetry of the late 12th and early 13th centuries.
  • 720 -- The German Renaissance and Baroque. (3) Reading and interpretation of significant literary works of the 16th and 17th centuries.
  • 730 -- The German Enlightenment and its Counter-Currents. (3) Reading and discussion of key literary and classical works from specific 18th-century movements, including Enlightenment, Storm and Stress, and Weimar Classicism.
  • 740 -- German Romanticism. (3) The development of German Romanticism, its major literary works and personalities.
  • 750 -- German Realism. (3) German Realism, its major literary works and background.
  • 760 -- German Literature from 1889 to 1945. (3) Currents of German literature since Naturalism, accompanied by critical reading of characteristic works by major writers of the period.
  • 770 -- Recent and Contemporary German Literature. (3) The development of German literature since World War II, through critical reading and interpretation of major representative works.
  • 775 -- Seminars on Selected Topics in Foreign Language Education. {=EDSE 785, =FREN 775, =LATN 775, =SPAN 775} (3) (Prereq: permission of instructor) Topics will be identified by suffix and title in the schedule of classes. Each topic may be taken only once.
  • 776 -- The Teaching of Foreign Languages in College. (3) Basic principles of foreign language teaching in college combined with practical demonstrations. (Required of all graduate assistants. This course will not count toward the 30-hour M.A. or M.A.T degree.)
  • 777 -- Supervised Instruction in Teaching Foreign Languages in College. (1) Supervised direction of foreign language teaching in college. Required of all graduate assistants who are teaching. This course will not count toward the M.A. or M.A.T. degree.
  • 780 -- German Seminar. (3) Content varies.
  • 781 -- German Seminar. (3) Content varies.
  • 790 -- Directed Reading and Research. (3)
  • 799 -- Thesis Preparation. (1-9)

Greek (GREK)

  • 501 -- Herodotus. (3) Readings from the Histories.
  • 502 -- Thucydides. (3) Readings from the History of the Peloponnesian War.
  • 533 -- Sophocles. (3) Selected plays.
  • 534 -- Euripides. (3) Selected plays.
  • 543 -- Hesiod and the Homeric Hymns. (3) Readings from the Works and Days, the Theogony, and the Homeric Hymns.
  • 550 -- Greek Seminar. (3) Authors and topics not covered in other Greek language courses, chosen to meet the needs of individual students. May be repeated with the approval of the department.
  • 560 -- Independent Study. (3) (Prereq: permission of head of department) Special projects for independent study and research.
  • 561 -- Independent Study. (3) (Prereq: permission of head of department) Special projects for independent study and research.

Italian (ITAL)

  • 516 -- Practical Italian Phonetics. (3) Synchronic analysis of the Italian sound system; intensive exercises to perfect Italian pronunciation.
  • 560, 561 -- Independent Studies in Italian Literature. (3) (Prereq: permission of head of department) Special topics in Italian literature.

Japanese (JAPA)

  • 500 -- Japanese Language in Society. {=LING 546} (3) Japanese language and communication in its sociocultural context; emphasis on comparison with American English. Taught in English.

Latin (LATN)

  • 501 -- Latin Drama. (3) Selected plays of Plautus and Terence.
  • 502 -- Cicero. (3) Readings from a variety of Cicero's works to gain a concept of the man as a humanist.
  • 504 -- Horace. (3) Readings from the Odes.
  • 508 -- Ovid. (3) Selected readings from the Metamorphoses.
  • 513 -- Tacitus. (3) Agricola or selections from the Annales.
  • 514 -- Livy. (3) Readings from Ab Urbe Condita.
  • 525 -- Roman Satire. (3) Readings in Horace, Juvenal, and Petronius.
  • 530 -- Latin Erotic Poetry. (3) Readings from the elegies of Catullus, Tibullus, Propertius, and Ovid.
  • 537 -- Lucretius. (3) Readings from the De Rerum Natura.
  • 551 -- History of Latin Literature from the Origins to the Golden Age. (3) Readings from the Twelve Tables to Virgil, supplemented by readings in history and scholarship. Designed to prepare majors and honors students for further study.
  • 552 -- History of Latin Literature in the Silver Age. (3) Readings from Ovid to Ammianus, supplemented by readings in history and scholarship. Designed to prepare majors and honors students for further study.
  • 560 -- Independent Study. (1-3) (Prereq: permission of head of department) Special projects for independent study and research.
  • 561 -- Independent Study. (1-3) (Prereq: permission of head of department) Special projects for independent study and research.
  • 575 -- Teaching Latin in Secondary Schools. {=EDSE 577} (3) Current methods, techniques, and materials of instruction appropriate for secondary schools.
  • 580 -- Teaching Advanced Latin in Secondary School. {=EDSE 580} (3) (Prereq: permission of instructor) Methods and materials for teaching the Latin Advanced Placement courses in secondary school.
  • 703 -- Medieval Latin. (3 each) (Prereq: LATN 315 or equivalent) Survey of the survival of the classical tradition in the middle ages from the birth of Ammianus Marcellinus to the fall of Constantinople (A.D. 330-1453).
  • 775 -- Seminars on Selected Topics in Foreign Language Education. {=EDSE 785, =FREN 775, =GERM 775, =SPAN 775} (3) (Prereq: permission of instructor) Topics will be identified by suffix and title in the schedule of classes. Each topic may be taken only once.
  • 790 -- Directed Reading and Research. (3)

Russian (RUSS)

  • 598 -- Selected Topics in Russian. (3) Reading and research on selected topics in Russian. Course content varies and will be announced in the schedule of courses by suffix and title.
  • 790 -- Directed Reading and Research. (1-3) Special permission required from the professor.

Spanish (SPAN)

  • 500 -- Contemporary Spain. (3) Analysis and discussion of 20th-century Spanish history and the sociocultural forces that have contributed to define this country's national identity. Taught in Spanish.
  • 501 -- Contemporary Spanish America. (3) Analysis and discussion of 20th-century Spanish American history and the sociocultural forces that have contributed to define this area's national identities. Taught in Spanish.
  • 512 -- Advanced Writing and Research in Spanish Language Studies. (3) Reading, writing, and research methodologies, bibliographic documentation, and research papers on Spanish language and Hispanic literatures. (Required of all M.A. and M.A.T. candidates in the first year of study.)
  • 513 -- Introduction to Professional and Technical Translation. (3) (Prereq: SPAN 409 or consent of instructor) Introduction to translation and practice of skills required for professional and technical Spanish/English translation.
  • 515 -- Introduction to Spanish Linguistics. {=LING 504} (3) Phonology, morphology, and syntax of modern Spanish.
  • 516 -- The Structure of Modern Spanish. [=LING 554] (3) Description of the grammatical structures of Modern Spanish. Intensive study of the theory and practice of word formation and sentence structure of Spanish.
  • 517 -- Contrastive English-Spanish Phonetics and Phonology. {=LING 514} (3) Introduction to the study of phonetics and phonology and their application to the sounds and sound systems of English and Spanish. Includes transcription practice and discussion of relevance to teaching.
  • 518 -- Introduction to Spanish Medieval Literature. (3) Survey of Spanish literature from its first manifestations to La Celestina. Introduction; early works; the epic; 13th- through 15th-century prose and verse; Berceo, Alfonso X, Juan Ruiz, Marqués de Santillana; others.
  • 524 -- Renaissance and Golden Age Literature. (3) Survey of the works of Garcilaso, the Spanish mystics, Lope, Quevedo, Tirso, Calderón, Gongóra and others.
  • 534 -- Nineteenth-Century Spanish Literature. (3) Survey of the works of the major literary figures of the period.
  • 538 -- Twentieth-Century Spanish Literature. (3) Survey of major peninsular writers from the Generation of '98 to the present.
  • 541 -- Colonial Spanish-American Literature to Neoclassicism. (3) Survey of pre-Columbian poetry and of texts dating from the time of Columbus to the end of the Colonial period.
  • 543 -- Spanish-American Literature from the Independence Through Modernism. (3) Survey of the most significant works of the Independence through Modernism.
  • 550 -- Advanced Language Study Abroad. (3) Intensive language practice in native environment with special emphasis on oral skills. Instruction by native speakers; extensive community contact and home stay. Prior placement test required.
  • 555 -- Spanish-American Literature from Modernism Through 1960. (3) Survey of the most significant works of this period.
  • 557 -- Contemporary Spanish-American Literature. (3) Survey of the most significant works from 1960 to the present.
  • 575 -- Teaching Spanish in Secondary Schools. {=EDSE 576} (3) Current methods, techniques, and materials of instruction appropriate for secondary schools.
  • 711 -- Introduction to Literary Theory and Criticism. (3) Overview of the main theories and methods in analyzing Spanish and Spanish-American literature. (Required of all M.A. and M.A.T. candidates in the first year of study.)
  • 715 -- History of the Spanish Language. {=LING 734} (3) Development of the language from its origins to the present day.
  • 722 -- Cervantes. (3) Selected topics from among the works of Cervantes, including Don Quixote, the Galatea, the Persiles, the Novelas ejemplares, and his dramatic works.
  • 724 -- Renaissance and Baroque Poetry and Drama. (3) In-depth study of the works of Lope de Vega, Quevedo, Góngora, Calderón, and others.
  • 730 -- Contemporary Spanish Prose Fiction. (3) Emphasis on the post-Spanish Civil War narrative.
  • 732 -- Nineteenth-Century Spanish Prose and Poetry. (3) Intensive reading of major works of Spanish Romanticism and Realism.
  • 733 -- Trans-Atlantic Perspectives. (3) (Prereq: graduate standing) An exploration of the Inter-connection between Spain and the Americas including issues relating to processes of articulation and assimilation between the Spanish legacy and America‚Äôs cultures, together with the African dimensions.
  • 734 -- Spanish Poetry: Generation of '27. (3) Intensive study of the works of Alberti, Aleixandre, Cernuda, García Lorca, Guillén, Salinas and others.
  • 736 -- The Generation of 1898. (3) Essay, verse, drama, and fiction of the major writers of this generation.
  • 745 -- Seminar in Spanish-American Drama. (3) Selected Spanish-American dramatic works from the colonial period to the present.
  • 746 -- Post-Baroque Spanish Drama. (3) An application of major European stage theories to the Spanish modern stage (1800-2000).
  • 747 -- The Modern Spanish-American Novel. (3) Seminar on selected Spanish-American novels from independence through the Hispanic Vanguard.
  • 751 -- Twentieth-Century Spanish-American Short Story. (3) Spanish-American short story from 1901 to 2000.
  • 752 -- Twentieth-Century Spanish Exile Literature. (3) Study of the creative works written by high-profile Spanish writers while in exile (in Mexico, Puerto Rico, Argentina, and the United States) during the Spanish Civil War and ensuing Francoist regime.
  • 763 -- Contemporary Spanish-American Narrative. (3) Study of the Spanish-American narrative of the 20th century (novel and short story).
  • 765 -- Contemporary Spanish-American Poets. (3) The works of Vallejo, Mistral, Neruda, Borges, Cardenal, Paz, and others.
  • 767 -- Spanish-American Testimonial Literature. (3) Study of texts revealing patterns of disenfranchisement and human rights violations. All genres, including films.
  • 769 -- Hispanic Women Writers. (3) The works of significant women authors in Spain and Spanish America.
  • 771 -- Spanish-American Modernism. (3) Study of the poetry and prose of the most significant authors of the late 19th and early 20th centuries.
  • 775 -- Seminars on Selected Topics in Foreign Language Education. {=EDSE 785, =FREN 775, =GERM 775, =LATN 775} (3) (Prereq: permission of instructor) Topics will be identified by suffix and title in the schedule of classes. Each topic may be taken only once.
  • 776 -- The Teaching of Foreign Languages in College. (3) Basic principles of foreign language teaching in college combined with practical demonstrations. Required of all graduate assistants. This course will not count toward the 30-hour M.A. or M.A.T. requirements.
  • 777 -- Supervised Instruction in Teaching Foreign Languages in College. (1) Supervised direction of foreign language teaching in college. Required of all graduate assistants who are teaching. This course will not count toward the 30-hour M.A. or M.A.T. degree.
  • 780 -- Seminars in Hispanic Literature. (3 each) Topics to be announced each semester.
  • 783 -- Seminars on Selected Topics. (1-3) Topics will be identified by suffix and title in the schedule of classes. Course can be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 hours.
  • 796 -- Independent Study. (1-3) Up to a maximum of 3 total hours, if repeated.
  • 799 -- Thesis Preparation. (1-9)

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