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updated 11/19/2008

Psychology

John E. Richards, Interim Chair

Graduate Directors
Each graduate director chairs the graduate faculty committee responsible for degrees in a given area.

Jeffrey C. Schatz, Director, Graduate Program in Clinical-Community Psychology
Gordon C. Baylis, Director, Graduate Program in Experimental Psychology
E.
Scott Huebner, Director, Graduate Program in School Psychology

Professors
Gordon C. Baylis, Ph.D., Oxford University, 1985
Rosemarie M. Booze, Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1985, Bicentennial Professor in Behavioral Neuroscience
James R. Coleman, Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles, 1974
Mary Anne Fitzpatrick, Ph.D., Temple University, 1976
E. Scott Huebner, Ph.D., Indiana University, 1983
Sandra J. Kelly, Ph.D., McGill University, 1985
Peter R. Kilmann, Ph.D., Brigham Young University, 1973
Charles F. Mactutus, Ph.D., Kent State University, 1979
Robin K. Morris, Ph.D., University of Massachusetts, 1990
Ronald J. Prinz, Ph.D., State University of New York at Stony Brook, 1977
John E. Richards, Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles, 1982
Abraham H. Wandersman, Ph.D., Cornell University, 1976
Lynn Weber, Ph.D., University of Illinois, Urbana, 1976
Douglas H. Wedell, Ph.D., University of California, 1984
Dawn K. Wilson, Ph.D., Vanderbilt University, 1988

Associate Professors
Amit Almor, Ph.D., Brown University, 1995
Cheryl A. Armstead, Ph.D., University of Tennessee, Knoxville, 1991
Benjamin L. Hankin, Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, 2001
Kathleen C. Kirasic, Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh, 1979
Patrick S. Malone, Ph.D., University of Texas, Austin, 1993
Jane E. Roberts, Ph.D., University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, 1998
Patrick S. Malone, Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin, 1993
Jeffrey C. Schatz, Ph.D., Washington University, 1997
Bradley H. Smith, Ph.D., University of Arizona, 1996
Jennifer M.C. Ventemia, Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 1998

Assistant Professors
Shauna Cooper, Ph.D., University of Michigan, 2005
Amanda Fairchild, Ph.D., Arizona State University, 2008
Kate Flory, Ph.D., University of Kentucky, 2004
Tawanda M. Greer, Ph.D., Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, 2003
Steven B. Harrod, Ph.D., Kent State University, 1999
Bret R. Kloos, Ph.D., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1998
Svetlana V. Shinkareva, Ph.D., University of Illinois, 2005
Suzanne C. Swan, Ph.D., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1997
M. Lee Van Horn, Ph.D., University of Alabama, Birmingham, 2001
Nicole Zarrett, Ph.D., University of Michigan, 2006


Overview

The Department of Psychology offers programs leading to the degrees of Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy. There are three graduate programs in the department, including clinical-community psychology, experimental psychology, and school psychology. Faculty in all three areas are available to each graduate student in every program. Detailed information concerning each of these programs (including details of admission procedures and degree requirements not included in this bulletin) may be obtained directly from the department, the director of each graduate program, and the graduate admissions office.

The clinical-community psychology program offers the Ph.D. degree for students who seek to be clinical scientists and researchers/scholars. In addition to formal courses, supervised training in diagnosis and intervention, and supervised research experience, the program offers a wide range of clinical skills and community-based intervention experiences. Applicants for the Ph.D. program in clinical-community psychology who do not already have a research-based master's degree in psychology are required to earn the M.A. in Psychology in the course of earning their Ph.D. degrees. Graduates are employed in providing services within public and private institutions and service organizations, are engaged in independent practice as psychologists, and are employed as faculty members in colleges and universities. The program is fully accredited by the American Psychological Association as a doctoral program in clinical psychology.

The experimental psychology program offers the Ph.D. degree for students who seek to be research scientists and scholars. Many students also complete the M.A. degree as they progress toward the doctoral degree. Specializations include behavioral neuroscience, cognitive psychology, cognitive neuroscience, and developmental psychology. Graduates are employed as faculty members in colleges and universities and research psychologists within public agencies and private industry.

The school psychology program offers the Ph.D. degree for students who seek to be practitioners and researchers/scholars. In addition to formal courses, supervised training in diagnosis and intervention, and supervised research experience, the program offers a wide range of experiences in the public school systems. Graduates are employed in providing services within public schools as well as other public and private institutions and service organizations, are engaged in independent practice as psychologists, and are employed as faculty members in colleges and universities. The program is fully accredited by the American Psychological Association.

The Department of Psychology also participates in the Certificate Program in Gerontology, which is administered by The College of Social Work, and in the Certificate Program in Drug and Addiction Studies, which is administered by the Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice. These certificates are interdisciplinary in nature and are open to qualified graduate students in psychology and other participating departments.

It is important to note that graduate training in psychology includes all of the following: core content courses in the discipline, training and supervision in delivery and application of professional skills, and integration of these components as part of a formal program. Although didactic courses are open, under appropriate conditions, to students not in the psychology degree programs, such students do not have access to professional skills courses and practica or to the integrative program as mentioned. This is to clarify that individual course work is a necessary component of professional training, but such course work is not appropriate for professional applications unless taken by a degree-seeking student in one of the graduate programs in psychology.

Admission

Graduate students are permitted to begin programs only in the fall term. The application deadlines are as follows: clinical-community, December 1; school, January 1; and experimental, February 1.

To be admitted to full graduate standing, a student should have an undergraduate major in psychology or a closely related discipline with a minimum of 18 semester hours of psychology courses. Admission is competitive and is based upon the content of undergraduate and prior graduate courses taken in degree-seeking programs; performance in those courses (grade point average of better than 3.00 in all courses, and 3.50 or better in psychology course work is desirable); performance on the GRE (successful applicants in the past year have had an average of 1175 quantitative and verbal GRE combined scores); letters of recommendation; prior research involvement; and (for clinical-community psychology and school psychology programs) prior work and volunteer experiences relevant to the program practice area. The GRE Advanced Psychology test is recommended but not required for applicants to the experimental and school psychology programs. Applicants also are asked for a written statement of career goals and educational expectations. Criteria are somewhat compensatory (that is, high performance on one criterion can compensate for somewhat lower performance on another).

Degree Requirements

Doctor of Philosophy (Clinical-Community Psychology)

A minimum of 76 credit hours of course and practica work and 12 hours of dissertation work (PSYC 899) are required beyond the baccalaureate degree. Course work includes 19 hours of core psychology courses plus 8 hours of research courses, 20 hours of specialty content courses, 20 hours of specialty practica within the program area, and 9 hours of electives.*

The Ph.D. degree in clinical-community psychology also requires successful completion of qualifying requirements, a general comprehensive examination (comprehensive paper), a specialty comprehensive examination (either in clinical or community), an oral comprehensive examination, and a predoctoral research apprenticeship.

Also required are an approved Ph.D. dissertation, and a one-year, predoctoral, full-time internship. Most students obtain an APA-approved (or approval-seeking) internship.

The sequence of events and more details concerning specific aspects (including the required concurrent master's degree) are in the current Clinical-Community Psychology Doctoral Program Graduate Student Handbook, provided to all incoming students.

*Pending S.C. Commission on Higher Education approval.

Master of Arts (Experimental Psychology Only)

Students seeking a terminal master's degree are not admitted to the program; instead, students admitted to the doctoral program are automatically admitted to the master's program, if they desire that degree.

Thirty credit hours, with at least 15 hours at the 700 level or above. Required courses are: 3 hours of quantitative courses; 12 hours from PSYC 702A, B, C, and D or PSYC 703A, B, C, and D and 15 additional hours approved by the student's advisory committee of which no more than 6 hours may be in PSYC 799. With the approval of their advisory committee, students may take one course from PHPH 752A through G instead of one of the courses from PSYC 702A, B, C, and D or PSYC 703A, B, C, and D.

A research thesis is required, beginning with approval of a prospectus by the thesis committee and culminating in a defense of the written thesis. An M.A. comprehensive oral examination may be combined with the thesis defense or be conducted separately. The sequence of events and more details concerning specific aspects are in the current Graduate Program in Experimental Psychology Student Handbook, which is posted on the Web.

Doctor of Philosophy (Experimental Psychology)

A minimum of 48 credit hours of specified course or lab work plus 12 hours of dissertation work (PSYC 899) are required.

Course work includes 9 credit hours of research methods and quantitative courses, 12 hours of PSYC 702A, B, C, and D or PSYC 703A, B, C, and D, 2 hours of ethics courses, and a minimum of 25 hours of approved elective and complementary courses. At least 6 hours of the complementary course work must be taught by someone other than the student's major professor. With the approval of their advisory committee, students may take one course from PHPH 752A through G instead of one of the courses from PSYC 702A, B, C, and D or PSYC 703A, B, C, and D. Approval of elective and complementary courses is by the student's advisory committee.

The Ph.D. degree in experimental psychology also requires successful completion of a qualifying examination, a written comprehensive examination, and a doctoral oral comprehensive examination. Also required is an approved Ph.D. dissertation.

The sequence of events and more details concerning specific aspects are in the current Graduate Program in Experimental Psychology Student Handbook, which is posted on the Web.

Doctor of Philosophy (School Psychology)

A minimum of 78 credit hours of course and practica work, two hours for internship, and dissertation work (PSYC 899) are required.

Course work includes 30 hours of core school psychology courses, 31 hours of general psychology courses, 6 hours of education electives, and 12 hours of specialty practica.

The Ph.D. degree in school psychology also requires successful completion of a qualifying examination, a written specialty examination, and a general oral comprehensive examination. Also required is an approved Ph.D. dissertation and a one-year, predoctoral, full-time internship. Many students obtain an APA-approved (or approval-seeking) internship.

The sequence of events and more details concerning specific aspects are in the current Graduate Program in School Psychology Student Handbook, provided to all incoming students.


Course Descriptions (PSYC)

  • 501 -- Human Factors Psychology. (3) (Prereq: PSYC 101 and 9 hours of upper-level courses all in psychology, business, engineering, or nursing) Application of research in experimental psychology to ergonomics, the design of human-environment systems, with emphasis on work settings.
  • 503 -- Psychology of Drug Use and Effects. {=PHRM 513} (3) (Prereq: consent of instructor) Research and theoretical considerations of substance abuse. Pharmacological, sociological, psychological, medical, economic, forensic, and other relevant research and treatment disciplines.
  • 506 -- Psychology of Language. {=LING 567} (3) (Prereq: consent of instructor) Theories of speech perception, linguistic theories of syntax and semantics, the brain mechanisms underlying language, the development of language in children, and the role of language in thought.
  • 507 -- Cognitive Neuroscience. (3) (Prereq: one course from PSYC 400, 405, 450, or 460) Research and theories on the role of the brain in facets of cognitive behavior, including attention, short-term and working memory, perception, language, executive function, thinking, and problem solving.
  • 510 -- Abnormal Behavior in Children. (3) (Prereq: PSYC 420 or 410 or consent of instructor) Theories, description, and assessment of child behavior problems and disorders; methods of intervention.
  • 520 -- Psychology of Child Development. (3) (Prereq: PSYC 420 or consent of instructor) Examination of development from conception through older childhood. Specific cognitive and social processes will be given in-depth study.
  • 521 -- Psychology of Adolescence. (3) (Prereq: PSYC 420 or consent of instructor) Theories and research examining social, emotional, and intellectual development in adolescence. Explores influence of family, peer, school, and cultural contexts.
  • 522 -- Psychology of Early and Middle Adulthood. (3) (Prereq: PSYC 420 or consent of instructor) Developmental changes in abilities, personality, and behavior which occur between adolescence and old age.
  • 523 -- Psychology of Aging. (3) (Prereq: PSYC 420 or consent of instructor) Psychological, social, and biological phenomena associated with maturity and aging.
  • 524 -- Nature of Students with Mental Retardation. {=EDEX 619} (3) (Prereq: a course in the areas of child psychology-child development) Nature and causes of mental retardation; behavior and potentialities of persons with mental retardation.
    • 525 -- The Psychology of the Midlife Woman. {=WOST 525} (3) Biological, social, and psychological aspects of the midlife woman.
    • 526 -- Prevention of Psychological Problems in Children and Youth at Risk. (3) (Prereq: PSYC 410 or 420 or equivalent) Etiology, prevention of, and intervention in behavioral, social, emotional, educational, and psychological problems in children and youth at risk,
    • 528 -- Psychology of Children with Exceptionalities. (3) (Prereq: PSYC 420 or 520 or consent of instructor) Characteristics, causes, needs, and intervention strategies for children with a broad range of exceptionalities including mental, physical, social/emotional difficulties and atypical gifts and talents.
  • 529 -- Nature of Students with Specific Learning Disabilities. {=EDEX 531} (3) (Prereq: PSYC 528 or EDEX 523 or consent of instructor) Children with average/above average intelligence and specific learning impairments; diagnostic and remedial techniques. (Given jointly by the College of Education and the Department of Psychology.)
  • 530 -- Advanced Social Psychology. (3) (Prereq: PSYC 430) Intensive study of topics selected from the field of social psychology.
  • 550 -- Advanced Sensation and Perception. (3) (Prereq: PSYC 450) Intensive study of topics selected from the field of sensation and perception.
  • 560 -- Advanced Physiological Psychology. (3) (Prereq: PSYC 460) Intensive study of topics selected from the field of physiological psychology.
  • 565 -- Psychology of Physical Activity. {=EXSC 410} (3) (Prereq: PSYC 101, PSYC 228, or consent of instructor) Introduction to psychosocial factors in physical activity. Topics include mental health effects of exercise, behavior change theories applied to physical activity, and physical activity determinants and interventions.
  • 570 -- Physiological Psychology Laboratory. (3) (Prereq or coreq: PSYC 460 or consent of instructor) Practice in surgical, histological, and behavioral testing methodology. Two lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week.
  • 571 -- Cognitive Neuroscience Laboratory. (3) (Prereq: PSYC 226 and 227; prereq or coreq: one course from PSYC 400, 405, 450, or 460) Methods of observation and experimentation in cognitive neuroscience. Two lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week.
  • 572 -- Cognitive Psychology Laboratory. (3) (Prereq or coreq: PSYC 405) Practice in the experimental techniques used in the study of cognitive psychology. Two lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week.
  • 574 -- Sensation and Perception Laboratory. (3) (Prereq or coreq: PSYC 450 or consent of instructor) Concepts and principles in the study of sensation and perception in the laboratory. Two lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week.
  • 575 -- Developmental Psychology Laboratory. (3) (Prereq: PSYC 226 and 227; prereq or coreq: PSYC 420 or 520 or consent of instructor) Methods of observation and experimentation on human psychological development. Two lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week.
  • 580 -- Intermediate Statistics for Psychologists. (3) (Prereq: PSYC 226 and 227; undergraduate enrollment limited to psychology majors) Advanced analysis of the uses and applications of statistics to research in psychology, and interpretation of statistics in the psychological literature.
  • 581 -- Intermediate Statistics for Psychologists II. (3) (Prereq: PSYC 580; undergraduate enrollment limited to students majoring in psychology) Continuation of PSYC 580.
  • 583 -- Psychological Tests and Measurement. (3) (Prereq: PSYC 227 or consent of instructor) Overview of the nature, design, and application of psychological tests. Emphasis on test construction, the psychometric properties of psychological tests, intelligence and aptitude testing, objective and projective tests of personality, and general issues in the application of tests.
  • 584 -- History and Systems of Psychology. (3) (Prereq: 9 hours in psychology at 400 level or above) Systematic approaches to psychology.
  • 585 -- Advanced General Psychology. (3) (Prereq: 12 hours in psychology courses numbered above 300) Review and integration of general principles of psychology. Primarily for students planning graduate study in psychology.
  • 586 -- Applied Research in Substance Abuse. {=PHRM 625} (3) (Prereq: consent of instructor) Pharmacological, sociological, psychological, medical, economic, forensic, and other relevant research and treatment disciplines.
  • 589 -- Selected Topics in Psychology. (3) Course content varies and will be announced in the schedule of classes by suffix and title.
  • 598 -- Individual Research. (3) (Prereq: 15 hours of psychology and consent of instructor) Planning and execution of supervised research in psychology. Approved contract required.
  • 599 -- Individual Research. (3) (Prereq: 15 hours of psychology and consent of instructor) Planning and execution of supervised research in psychology. Approved contract required.
  • 700 -- Psychosocial Approaches to Gerontology. {=SOWK 771} (3) Introduction to gerontology from the fields of demography, psychology, sociology, social welfare, and economics.
  • 701 -- Behavioral Assessment and Intervention with Children and Youth. (3) (Prereq: PSYC 711 and special permission of instructor) A combination of lecture and practicum experiences emphasizing the application of behavioral assessment and intervention techniques in educational, institutional, and home settings. Students receive individual and group supervision throughout the semester on case projects.
  • 702A -- Basics of Neuroscience. (2) (Prereq: consent of instructor) Functional organization of the nervous system; research and theories of the neurological bases of behavior.
  • 702B -- Basics of Cognitive Psychology. (2) (Prereq: consent of instructor) Research and theories on attention, memory, language, thinking, and other cognitive processes.
  • 702C -- Basics of Developmental Psychology. (2) (Prereq: consent of instructor) Research and theories of psychological development across the lifespan.
  • 702D -- Basics of Learning and Motivation. (2) (Prereq: consent of instructor) Research and theories of instrumental conditioning, classical conditioning, learning, and motivation.
  • 703A -- Integration across Cognitive Psychology and Neuroscience. (2) (Prereq: consent of instructor) Research and theories of cognitive neuroscience.
  • 703B -- Integration across Developmental Psychology, Cognitive Psychology, and Neuroscience. (2) (Prereq: consent of instructor) Research and theories of developmental cognitive neuroscience.
  • 703C -- Integration across Developmental and Cognitive Psychology. (2) (Prereq: consent of instructor) Research and theories of cognitive development.
  • 703D -- Integration across Areas of Psychology. (2) (Prereq: consent of instructor) Presentation of research and theories that cross different areas within psychology.
  • 704 -- Group Dynamics. (3) (Prereq: permission of instructor) Offered for an interdisciplinary student clientele interested in group processes and structures. Training is provided in observational methods and techniques of group assessment. Laboratory and field study required.
  • 705 -- Psychological Systems and Theories. (3) Contemporary trends in systematic approaches and behavior theories.
  • 706 -- Seminar in Judgment and Decision Making. (3) Research and theories of processes in judgment, choice, and decision making.
  • 709 -- Basic Quantitative Methods in the Analysis of Behavioral Data I. (3) (Prereq: an introductory course in statistics in psychology or mathematics) Quantitative methods for graduate students in psychology and other behavioral sciences. Emphasizes logical/intuitive understanding of the basic techniques, focuses heavily on the application of these methods to psychological research. Three lecture/discussion hours and a one-hour scheduled lab per week.
  • 710 -- Basic Quantitative Methods in the Analysis of Behavioral Data II. (3) (Prereq: PSYC 709) A continuation of PSYC 709. Three lecture/discussion hours and a one-hour scheduled lab per week.
  • 713 -- Survey of Psychoeducational Tests and Assessment. (3) (Prereq: consent of instructor) Consideration of basic issues in evaluation of children, such as reliability, validity, item selection, standardization groups, criterion-referenced vs. norm-based testing, ethics, etc. Includes presentations via various instructional modes of a wide range of psychoeducational assessment procedures with a wide variety of children.
  • 714 -- Psychoeducational Assessment of Children I. (3) (Prereq: acceptance in graduate psychology department program) A combination of lectures and practicum concerned with interviewing, behavioral observation and analysis, and cognitive-intellectual assessment. Requires involvement in school psychology training-service centers in the schools.
  • 715 -- Psychoeducational Assessment of Children II. (3) (Prereq: PSYC 714 and acceptance in graduate psychology department program) A combination of lectures and practicum concerned with assessment of perceptual-motor processes, academic achievement, and personality and interpersonal skills. Requires involvement in school psychology training-service centers in the schools.
  • 716 -- Selected Topics in Psychoeducational Evaluation. (3) (Prereq: consent of instructor) Consideration, via lecture and/or practicum, of special areas of psychoeducational assessment. Possible topics include infant assessment, criterion-referenced assessment, assessment of neurological problems.
  • 717 -- Survey of Personality Theories. (3) (Prereq: 18 hours in psychology) Issues, theories, and research on personality.
  • 720 -- Psychological Interventions with Children and Families. (3) Integration of theory, research, and practice in child clinical and family psychology. Focus on systemic, behavioral, and other orientations in the treatment of children and families.
  • 721 -- Developmental Psychopathology and Resilience. (3) (Prereq: acceptance in graduate psychology department or consent of instructor) Theoretical, empirical, and methodological issues in the development of psychopathology or resilience in children, adolescents, and families. Emphasis on research topics related to nature, course, and etiology.
  • 725 -- Systems and Theories of Psychological Intervention. (3) Seminar emphasizing a critical analysis of psychotherapy systems and theories.
  • 726 -- Lifespan Psychopathology and Resilience. (3) (Prereq: PSYC 410) A survey of clinical disorders, their origins and characteristics. Includes a review of contemporary diagnostic systems, research, and theory.
  • 727 -- Foundations of Community Psychology. (3) (Prereq: consent of instructor) Survey of theoretical foundations, research and practice in community psychology. Topics include prevention, social systems intervention, community participation, innovation in community service delivery systems, and community change processes.
  • 728 -- Laboratory in Community Study. (1) (Prereq or coreq: PSYC 727) Designated to accompany Psychology 727. Laboratory will target specific problems, resources, or populations and will provide students with elementary exposure to a community system.
  • 732 -- Clinical Neuropsychology. (3) (Prereq or coreq: PSYC 702A or comparable course in biopsychology, consent of instructor) Overview of relationships between brain structures and function and the assessment of cognitive and emotional behavior in adults and children.
  • 733 -- Neuropsychological Syndromes in Childhood. (3) Applications of neuropsychological theory and research to the study of the learning process, with emphasis upon assessment and intervention with learning disabilities.
  • 734 -- Neuropsychological Screening and Assessment. (3) Assessment procedures for screening neuropsychological factors in individuals with neurobehavioral deficits.
  • 735 -- Survey of Psychopharmacology. (3) (Prereq: 18 hours in psychology) The effect of drugs upon internal psycho-physiological functioning and upon the behavior of human and animal subjects. Particular emphasis will be given to the psychoactive drugs.
  • 742 -- Theory and Practice of Mental Health Consultation I. (3) Focus on understanding the theoretical bases of consultation and developing the skills necessary for the practice of mental health consultation.
  • 743 -- Theory and Practice of Mental Health Consultation II. (3) Continues the practicum begun in Psychology 742 and develops the skills of administrative mental health consultation and evaluation of consultation programs.
  • 745 -- Organizational Behavior. (3) Analysis of the organization as a complex interaction system.
  • 746 -- Systems Applications in Psychological Services. (3) (Prereq: at least second year graduate standing or permission of instructor) The history and rationale for developing systems. Approach to the delivery of efficient psychological and support services to the educational community.
  • 750 -- Psychology of Women. (3) Women's diversity explored through research on personality, stereotypes, status and power, biological aspects, socialization, sexuality, relationships, mothering, work and achievement, violence against women, psychological disorders, and feminist therapies.
  • 760A -- Issues and Ethics in Clinical-Community Psychology. (1) The presentation of ethics in research and practice in clinical-community psychology and the discussion of current professional issues. (Pass-Fail grading)
  • 760B -- Issues and Ethics in Clinical-Community Psychology. (1) (Prereq: acceptance in clinical-community Ph.D. program) The presentation of ethics in research and practice in clinical-community psychology and the discussion of current professional issues. (Pass-Fail grading)
  • 761 -- Psychological Assessment I. (4) (Prereq: permission of instructor) Develop assessment skills through interviewing, observation, performance testing, and report writing. Experience includes assessment of individuals, couples, and/or families from a variety of perspectives. Didactic/practicum.
  • 762 -- Psychological Assessment II. (4) (Prereq: PSYC 761) Theory of measurement and the construction of measures specific to clinical and community psychology. Intellectual achievement, objective personality, and projective measures. Didactic/practicum.
  • 763 -- Clinical Psychology Assessment III. (4) (Prereq: PSYC 761) Conceptualization of cases involving psychological measures. Clients include individuals, couples, and families. Didactic/practicum.
  • 765 -- Externship in School Psychology. (3) A closely supervised 20-hour-per-week externship in the techniques of psychological services in school systems. Staff.
  • 770 -- Survey of Social Psychology. (3) (Prereq: 18 hours in psychology) Issues, research, and theories in social psychology.
  • 772 -- Research Approaches to Human Behavior. (3) (Prereq: PSYC 709) Nonquantitative aspects of research methodology and experimental design in laboratory and field settings. A critical investigation of artifacts and ethical issues in behavioral research.
  • 773 -- Research in Clinical-Community Psychology. (1) (Prereq: consent of instructor) Supervised training in the conduct of empirical research in clinical-community psychology. May be repeated once for credit. (Pass-Fail grading)
  • 777 -- Environmental Psychology. (3) (Prereq: PSYC 727) The study of human behavior and satisfaction in relation to the natural and person-made environment. Topics include environmental stress, risk, social ecology of families, behavior setting theory, and person-environmental relationships.
  • 780 -- Behavior Therapy. (3) A survey of principles, theory, methods, issues, and research in behavior therapy. Behavioral interventions with adults, children and families, organizations, and community settings.
  • 781 -- Behavior Therapy Practicum: Adults. (1-3) (Prereq: PSYC 780 and consent of instructor) Intensive practicum experience in the use of behavioral and cognitive-behavioral therapy with adult inpatients (psychiatric, geriatric, alcoholic, imprisoned), outpatients, and marital therapy clients.
  • 782 -- Child/Family Therapy Practicum. (3) (Prereq: PSYC 720 and consent of instructor) Individually supervised practicum in therapy with children and families. Includes exposure to multiple approaches including behavioral and family systems modes of intervention.
  • 783 -- Health Psychology/Behavioral Medicine. (3) (Prereq: PSYC 711 or 730 or consent of instructor) Scientific study of the application of psychological principles to prevention of illness, maintenance of health, and the treatment of related medical dysfunctions. Primary emphasis on the use of behavior therapy and behavior modification techniques.
  • 784 -- Clinical Health Psychology Practicum. (3) (Prereq: PSYC 762, 783) Applying clinical health psychology to health-related agencies in the community.
  • 785 -- Seminar in Psychotherapy Research. (3) Psychotherapy research and selected topics in other clinical research, such as alcoholism and hypnosis.
  • 790 -- College Teaching of Psychology I. (1-3) (Prereq: 18 hours in psychology or permission of instructor) Didactic, seminar, and experiential coverage of the teaching of psychology at the college level.
  • 791 -- College Teaching of Psychology II. (1-3) (Prereq: 18 hours in psychology or permission of instructor) Didactic, seminar, and experiential coverage of the teaching of psychology at the college level.
  • 792A -- Issues and Ethics in Research in Psychology and the Teaching of Psychology I. (1) (Prereq: consent of instructor) Presentation of ethics and issues pertaining to the teaching of psychology and psychological research.
  • 792B -- Issues and Ethics in Research in Psychology and the Teaching of Psychology II. (1) (Prereq: consent of instructor) Presentation of ethics and issues pertaining to the teaching of psychology and psychological research.
  • 799 -- Thesis Preparation. (1-9) To be arranged by candidates for the M.A. degree with the thesis advisor. Staff.
  • 816 -- Advanced Research in Clinical-Community Psychology. (1-3 each registration) (Prereq: consent of instructor) Supervised training in the conduct of empirical research in clinical-community psychology. (Pass-Fail grading)
  • 818 -- Research in the Schools. (3) Supervised psychological research on school-related problems; participation in ongoing program of research. Required of all doctoral candidates in psychology.
  • 819 -- Seminar in Biological Psychology. (3) (Prereq: PSYC 730) Theoretical and empirical issues in an area of current interest in biological psychology. May be repeated with different topics.
  • 820 -- Seminar in Developmental Psychology. (3) (Prereq: PSYC 751) Theoretical and empirical issues in an area of current interest in developmental psychology. May be repeated with different topics.
  • 821 -- Theory of Psychological Measurement. (3) (Prereq: PSYC 225 or the equivalent) A survey of psychological scaling and factor theory, together with special techniques for achieving reliability and validity, including item analysis.
  • 822 -- Seminar in Cognitive Psychology. (3) (Prereq: PSYC 712) Theoretical and empirical issues in an area of current interest in cognitive psychology. May be repeated with different topics.
  • 823 -- Multivariate Analysis of Behavioral Data. (3) (Prereq: PSYC 710) Advanced topics in multiple-variable research. Topics include multiple linear regression, polynomial regression, canonical correlation, discriminant function, and the analysis of variance using orthogonal polynomials and multidimensional scaling, both metric and nonmetric approaches.
  • 824 -- Seminar in Quantitative Psychology. (3) (Prereq: PSYC 710) Theoretical and empirical issues in an area of current interest in quantitative methods and quantitative psychology. May be repeated with different topics.
  • 826 -- Family Psychotherapy. (3) (Prereq: PSYC 720, acceptance in clinical-community or school psychology graduate program, and consent of instructor) Advanced topics in family psychotherapy.
  • 827 -- Applied Individual and Couples Psychotherapy. (3) (Prereq: PSYC 725 and acceptance in clinical-community or school psychology Ph.D. program, and consent of instructor) Individually supervised practice in individual and couples psychotherapy. (Pass-Fail grading)
  • 828 -- Applied Group Psychotherapy. (1-3) (Prereq: advanced standing in clinical-community or school psychology Ph.D. program and consent of instructor) Advanced theory and research methods with supervised practice in the modification of personality and behavior through group interaction.
  • 829 -- Community Psychology Practicum I. (3) (Prereq: acceptance in clinical-community Ph.D. program) Individually supervised field assignments in the community.
  • 830 -- Advanced Child and Family Practicum. (1-3) (Prereq: PSYC 720 and permission of the instructor) Individually supervised advanced practicum in child and family therapeutic intervention.
  • 831 -- Practicum in Psychological Assessment. (3) Training for advanced students in testing, assessment, and psychodiagnostics under the supervision of psychology staff.
  • 832A -- Practicum in School Psychology. (3) (Prereq: permission of instructor) Qualified advanced students will perform psychological evaluations and render other services in a public school setting under the supervision of the school psychology faculty. Cases dealt with include children with general or special learning difficulties, behavior problems, emotionally disturbed children, and mental retardation.
  • 832B -- Practicum in School Psychology. (3) (Prereq: permission of instructor) Qualified advanced students will perform psychological evaluations and render other services in a public school setting under the supervision of the school psychology faculty. Cases dealt with include children with general or special learning difficulties, behavior problems, emotionally disturbed children, and mental retardation.
  • 832C -- Practicum in School Psychology. (3) (Prereq: permission of instructor) Qualified advanced students will perform psychological evaluations and render other services in a public school setting under the supervision of the school psychology faculty. Cases dealt with include children with general or special learning difficulties, behavior problems, emotionally disturbed children, and mental retardation.
  • 833 -- Practicum in Mental Retardation. (1-3 each registration) (Prereq: PSYC 519 and permission of instructor) Qualified advanced students will perform psychological evaluations and other clinical services under the supervision of mental retardation faculty in designated settings such as the USC Psychological Service Center, Midlands Training School, and other agencies providing services for persons with mental retardation. The assignment of cases will be based on a previous diagnosis of mental retardation or the probable involvement of mental retardation in client to be studied.
  • 834 -- Experimental Psychopathology. (3) A survey of experimental findings on psychological behavior in animals and humans and their theoretical implications. An introduction to applicable research procedures.
  • 835A -- Advanced Psychotherapy Practicum. (1-3) (Prereq: PSYC 827 or 830 and permission of instructor) Supervised psychotherapy with children, adolescents, or adults, together with additional training in marriage counseling, behavior therapy, and family therapy. (Pass-Fail grading)
  • 835B -- Advanced Psychotherapy Practicum. (1-3) (Prereq: PSYC 827 or 830 and permission of instructor) Supervised psychotherapy with children, adolescents, or adults, together with additional training in marriage counseling, behavior therapy, and family therapy. (Pass-Fail grading)
  • 835C -- Advanced Psychotherapy Practicum. (1-3) (Prereq: PSYC 827 or 830 and permission of instructor) Supervised psychotherapy with children, adolescents, or adults, together with additional training in marriage counseling, behavior therapy, and family therapy. (Pass-Fail grading)
  • 836 -- Seminar in Psychopharmacology. (3) (Prereq: PSYC 735) Theoretical and empirical issues in an area of current interest in psychopharmacology. May be repeated with different topics.
  • 837 -- Psychological Test Construction. (3) A study of the design and standardization of psychological assessment devices, theory, and method.
  • 838 -- Seminar in Learning and Conditioning. (3) (Prereq: PSYC 711) Theoretical and empirical issues in an area of current interest in learning and conditioning. May be repeated with different topics.
  • 839 -- Community Psychology Practicum II. (3) (Prereq: PSYC 727 and 829, and consent of instructor) Supervised practicum experience in community need assessment and the development of grant applications. Placement in state agencies and community programs.
  • 840 -- Seminar in Professional School Psychology. (3) (Prereq: advanced graduate standing in psychology) A survey of the role of the psychologist functioning in a school setting, the associated problems and methods, including relationships with children and parents with teachers, administrators, and other school personnel.
  • 841 -- Advanced Study in Selected Topics. (1-6) Special assignments to meet the needs of individual students. Conferences with instructor and staff. May be repeated with different topics.
  • 842 -- Seminar in Mental Retardation. (3) (Prereq: consent of instructor) The exploration in depth of problems, theories, and research in the area of mental retardation.
  • 843 -- Seminar in Social Psychology. (3) (Prereq: PSYC 770) Theoretical and empirical issues in an area of current interest in social psychology. May be repeated with different topics.
  • 845 -- Topics in Community Psychology. (3) (Prereq: PSYC 727 or permission of instructor) Theoretical and empirical issues in an area of current interest in community psychology. May be repeated with different topics.
  • 860 -- Advanced Study of Selected Problems in Clinical Psychology. (3)
  • 865 -- Internship in School Psychology. (1) Two semesters required for Ph.D. Student is registered upon recommendation of the student's advisory committee. Will be graded as satisfactory (S) or unsatisfactory (U).
  • 888 -- Selected Topics in Psychology. (1-6) (Prereq: permission of instructor) Intensive study in an advanced area in psychology.
  • 889 -- Independent Advanced Research. (1-9) (Prereq: Admission to doctoral program and permission of instructor) Doctoral-level research additional to that involved in the doctoral dissertation.
  • 899 -- Doctoral Research and Dissertation Preparation. (1-12)
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