University of South Carolina

South Carolina in the News

The Office of Media Relations compiles news stories about the University of South Carolina; its students, faculty, and administration; and alumni. For more information, call our office at 803-777-5400.

Top Media Hits
  • CBS Philadelphia, April 26, 2011
    Study: Weight Lifting Can Help Lower Blood Pressure
    ". . . But, according to a new study out of the University of South Carolina there may be one way to reduce your risk by as much as 34%. It is a way many people have not really thought about."
  • Golfmagic.com, April 26, 2011
    Best time to play golf - by 'Sleep Doctor'
    ". . . 'In terms of physiology and body alertness, there are so many components that go into playing golf,' says Shawn Youngstedt from the department of exercise science at the University of South Carolina. 'There are basic things to understand that might help the golfer.'"
  • NPR, April 25, 2011
    Sitting All Day: Worse For You Than You Might Think
    ". . . Epidemiologist Steven Blair is a professor of public health at the University of South Carolina. Blair has spent 40 years investigating physical activity and health."
  • USA TODAY, and elsewhere, via Gannett Co., April 25, 2011
    Kids with ADHD more likely to use drugs, analysis finds
    ". . . The study, by psychologists at the University of California-Los Angeles and the University of South Carolina-Columbia, was funded by the National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. It was published online in the journal Clinical Psychology Review and will appear in the journal's print edition this summer."
  • Forbes, April 25, 2011
    Sir Isaac Newton’s Third Law of Physics: Gas Prices and Spending [column, by Marianne Bickle, chair of department of retailing and director of Center for Retailing]
    ". . . For anyone who may have forgotten sixth grade science, Newton’s third law of physics states that for every force there is a reaction force that is equal in size but opposite in direction. So let’s talk about the recent gas prices and consumer spending patterns."
  • The New York Times, April 24, 2011
    Early Birds Less Likely to Catch the Birdies
    ". . . 'In terms of physiology and body alertness, there are so many components that go into playing golf,' said Shawn Youngstedt, an associate professor in the department of exercise science at the University of South Carolina. 'There are basic things to understand that might help the golfer.'"
  • USA TODAY, April 24, 2011
    Close games raise risks of traffic deaths
    ". . . The study by researchers from North Carolina State University and the University of South Carolina finds that traffic deaths rise in the hometowns of winning teams on game days — and even more the closer a game is."
  • The Seattle Post-Intelligencer, April 22, 2011
    GOP 2012: Let the race (finally) begin
    ". . . On May 7, Huntsman is slated to deliver a commencement address at the University of South Carolina, an event that will mark his first trip to an early primary state."
  • Scientific American, April 22, 2011
    Control Yourself!
    ". . . In 1986 psychologist Icek Ajzen of the University of Massachusetts Amherst and economist Thomas J. Madden of the University of South Carolina developed a well-known explanation—the theory of planned behavior—in which all our actions derive from our intentions alone."
  • Time magazine, April 21, 2011
    When Is a Salad Not a Salad? Why Dieters Are Easily Confused by Labels
    ". . . 'Over time, dieters learn to focus on simply avoiding foods that they recognize as forbidden based on product name,' said the authors, Caglar Irmak, assistant professor of marketing at University of South Carolina; Beth Vallen, assistant professor of marketing at Loyola University Maryland; and Stefanie Rosen Robinson, a graduate student at University of South Carolina. . . ."
  • The Los Angeles Times, and elsewhere, via HealthKey, April 21, 2011
    Dieters find 'healthy' food labels can be tricky
    ". . . In one of several similar experiments, researchers from the University of South Carolina found that dieters were more likely to rate a pasta dish as healthful if it was labeled as a salad. They reported their findings online April 12 in the Journal of Consumer Research."
  • CNN Politics, April 21, 2011
    2012 hopefuls to address South Carolina GOP Convention
    ". . . Ambassador to China Jon Huntsman, another potential GOP candidate, will be in Columbia on May 7 delivering a commencement address at the University of South Carolina but is not likely to attend the state GOP convention."
  • MSNBC, via MyHealthNewsDaily, April 20, 2011
    Dieters easily deluded by so-called 'healthy' foods
    ". . . 'Over time, dieters learn to focus on simply avoiding foods that they recognize as forbidden based on product name. Thus dieters likely assume that an item assigned an unhealthy name (for example, pasta) is less healthy than an item assigned a healthy name (for example, salad),' the researchers from the University of South Carolina and Loyola University reported."
  • United Press International, April 19, 2011
    Study: Avoid a salad in name only
    ". . . Study authors Caglar Irmak of the University of South Carolina, Beth Vallen of Loyola University and Stefanie Rosen Robinson of the University of South Carolina say dieters can be so involved with trying to eat virtuously that they are more likely than non-dieters to choose unhealthy foods that are labeled as healthy."
  • Science Daily, April 19, 2011
    When a Salad Is Not a Salad: Why Are Dieters Easily Misled by Food Names?
    ". . . 'Keeping your weight-loss goal in mind as you scan the lunch menu at a café, you are careful to avoid pasta selections and instead order from the list of salad options,' write authors Caglar Irmak (University of South Carolina), Beth Vallen (Loyola University), and Stefanie Rosen Robinson (University of South Carolina). 'But before you congratulate yourself for making a virtuous selection, you might want to consider whether your choice is a salad in name only.'"
  • Forbes, April 18, 2011
    McDonald’s National Hiring Day: Retailers and Congress Should Take Notes [column, by Marianne Bickle, chair of department of retailing and director of Center for Retailing]
    ". . . The National Hiring Day is a stroke of marketing and economic genius on multiple levels."
  • Yahoo! News UK, and elsewhere, via Agence France-Presse, April 18, 2011
    25 years on, Chernobyl fallout still an eco-hazard
    ". . . But this picture is misleading, said University of South Carolina biology professor Tim Mousseau, one of the few scientists to have probed biodiversity around Chernobyl in depth."
  • The National Law Journal, April 18, 2011
    New deans at Loyola, South Carolina and Kansas
    ". . . On Friday, the University of South Carolina School of Law announced that its associate dean for academic affairs, Robert Wilcox, will be its next dean."
  • The (Ontario, Canada) National Post, April 16, 2011
    Brave new words
    ". . . Steven Millies, a professor of political science at the University of South Carolina [Aiken], said the Church has worked for years to connect what goes on in the Mass with how Catholics should behave in the world -and the danger of the new language is that it could break that link."
  • The (Ontario, Canada) National Post, April 16, 2011
    New missal, new meaning
    ". . . Steven Millies, professor at University of South Carolina The Latin 'calix' should be translated as 'cup.'"
  • CNN Health, April 15, 2011
    Why isn't there a safe weight-loss pill?
    ". . . Dr. Patricia Powell, clinical assistant professor for the clinical pharmacy at the University of South Carolina said 'the problem with those stimulants are side effects -- cardiovascular risk, stroke, heart attack, high blood pressure. They're causing you extra work on the heart.'"
  • The Chronicle of Higher Education, April 14, 2011
    M.F.A. Application-Season Etiquette [column, by Elise Blackwell, director of M.F.A. program in creative writing]
    "I’m nearing the end of my first application and notification season as an M.F.A. director, and it’s been a good one here. In fiction alone, we received around 70 mostly very strong applications from every region of the United States and several other countries, and we wound up accepting six talented writers to fill our four slots."
  • The Austin American-Statesman, April 14, 2011
    Many Texas schoolchildren fail fitness evaluation
    ". . . Russell Pate, a national expert who was on an advisory group that worked on the Fitnessgram, said the legislative maps are an important step."
  • Roll Call, April 14, 2011
    Planned Parenthood Once Had GOP Pals
    ". . . Laura Woliver, a professor of political science and expert in women’s studies at the University of South Carolina, said as states adopted restrictions that made it harder for smaller independent abortion providers to survive, Planned Parenthood stepped into the vacuum."
  • The New York Times, April 13, 2011
    The Lasting Imprint of the Civil War [letter, by Patricia Sullivan, professor of history]
    ". . . The key to understanding how and why race continues to structure and divide American society does not lie in the Civil War, but in the inconclusive battles waged in the wake of Emancipation to 'achieve our country,' in the words of James Baldwin."
  • The Tampa Tribune, April 13, 2011
    Pop star Lady Gaga gets into character
    ". . . University of South Carolina sociology professor Mathieu Deflem teaches 'Lady Gaga and the Sociology of the Fame,' which he describes at as focusing 'on the societal contexts of Lady Gaga's rise to fame. … [It] is not a course about Lady Gaga as much as about the culture of the fame as exemplified by the case of Lady Gaga.'"
  • The (Austin, Texas) American-Statesman, April 13, 2011
    Obesity expert at free lecture
    "Russell Pate, a national expert on childhood obesity, will give the fifth annual Michael & Susan Dell Lectureship in Child Health at 1 p.m. Friday at the AT&T Executive Conference Center at the University of Texas."
  • Science News, April 12, 2011
    Public Relatively Unconcerned About Nanotechnology Risks
    ". . . The article is forthcoming from the Journal of Nanoparticle Research. The paper was co-authored by Berube and Binder; Jordan Frith and Christopher Cummings, Ph.D. students at NC State; and Dr. Robert Oldendick of the University of South Carolina. The research was funded by the National Science Foundation."
  • PBS "News Hour," April 12, 2011
    Civil War's Causes: Historians Largely United on Slavery, But Public Divided
    "On the 150th anniversary of the start of the Civil War at South Carolina's Fort Sumter, Judy Woodruff has an excerpt from Ken Burns' 'The Civil War' and discusses the conflict's causes and legacy with Harvard University's Drew Gilpin Faust, Howard University's Edna Medford and the University of South Carolina's Walter Edgar."
  • MSNBC, April 11, 2011
    2012: None of the above
    ". . . HUNSTMAN: Jon Huntsman has added another primary-state commencement speech to his agenda, according to Fox News. Huntsman will give the graduation address at the University of South Carolina on May 7, having already RSVP’d to Southern New Hampshire University’s commencement on May 21."
  • BBC News, April 9, 2011
    Century-old Book of Khalid sheds light on Arab unrest
    ". . . 'Rihani's work is attractive to a few niche communities in the US but his real impact is in Arabic literature, culture, politics and thought,' says Stephen Sheehi, Director of the Arabic Programme at the University of South Carolina."
  • The New York Times, and elsewhee, via AP, April 8, 2011
    Possible GOP Candidate Jon Huntsman to Speak in SC
    "Expected GOP presidential candidate and U.S. Ambassador Jon Huntsman is giving a University of South Carolina commencement speech May 7."
  • Reuters, April 8, 2011
    Plain cigarette packaging highlights warnings
    ". . . On the other hand, the results could mean that smokers are paying comparatively more attention to the plain information because they are not used to seeing that on cigarette packaging, said Dr. Jim Thrasher, a professor of public health at the University of South Carolina, who was not involved in this study."
  • Fox News, April 8, 2011
    Huntsman to Speak at South Carolina Commencement
    ". . . Huntsman now has an appearance scheduled for May in South Carolina. University of South Carolina Media Relations Director Margaret Lamb confirms to Fox that he will speak to graduating classes in Columbia on May 7."
  • CNN "American Morning," April 6, 2011
    [Radiation] detected in Japanese fish localized to small coastal area
    ". . . How vulnerable is the sea life and world-renowned seafood off Japan’s coast? Today on American Morning, Dr. Timothy Mousseau, radiation ecologist and professor of biological sciences at the University of South Carolina, explains radiation’s effect on marine life."
  • ABC News, April 5, 2011
    Radioactive Water in Japan Threatens U.S. Tuna
    " . . . Dr. Timothy Mousseau, a professor of biology at the University of South Carolina, discusses radiation Tuna in the Pacific near damaged nuclear plant will migrate to U.S. waters."
  • Fox Business, April 5, 2011
    Understanding Your Home Insurance Policy
    ". . . 'It's common sense, but it's not what people think about,' says Tena B. Crews, director of business education at the University of South Carolina and author of 'Fundamentals of Insurance.'"
  • KABC-TV (Los Angeles), April 5, 2011
    Radiation fears rise in LA over Japan-imported fish
    ". . . 'There is a potential for genetic damage to these tunas for instance, as well as impacts on their reproductive abilities,' said Timothy Mousseau, a professor of biological sciences at the University of South Carolina."
  • The Wall Street Journal, April 5, 2011
    Despite Worries, Experts Suggest Damage to Marine Life Is Contained
    ". . . 'The cesium 137 is water soluble and it will be diluted out of the fish flesh, once the input has stopped,' said radiation ecologist Timothy Mousseau at the University of South Carolina, who studied the impact on wildlife of fallout from the Chernobyl nuclear accident."
  • Reuters, April 5, 2011
    Analysis: China pumps up Cambodia economy, but at what cost?
    ". . . 'The long-range economic costs to a country's development impact ultimately on the welfare of the people,' said Donald Weatherbee, an expert on Southeast Asian politics at the University of South Carolina."
  • Forbes, April 4, 2011
    Main Street USA Brings In The Bucks Using Pride [column, by Marianne Bickle, chair of department of retailing and director of Center for Retailing]
    ". . . Someone in the town was very business savvy. The community knew that in order to survive, they needed one or more big attractions to keep this little community alive and thriving. A quilt museum was just the ticket."
  • Scientific American, April 4, 2011
    Gateway Disorder?: Kids with ADHD Show Higher Risk for Later Substance Abuse Problems
    ". . . The two studies' results on marijuana and other drugs, however, were more mixed. One review—a meta-analysis published in the April issue of Clinical Psychology Review by a team of researchers at the University of California, Los Angeles, (U.C.L.A.) and the University of South Carolina, Columbia—concluded that children with ADHD also have a strong risk of abusing marijuana, cocaine and other unspecified drugs."
  • USA TODAY, March 30, 2011
    NAACP diversifies its leadership, agenda
    ". . . Patricia Sullivan, a history professor at the University of South Carolina and author of Lift Every Voice: The NAACP and the Making of the Civil Rights Movement, called the new push for diversity thrilling. 'It's really reflecting what the NAACP has represented historically and what its vision has been,' she said."
  • PBS "NewsHour," March 29, 2011
    Revisiting Chernobyl: A Nuclear Disaster Site of Epic Proportions
    ". . . TIMOTHY MOUSSEAU, University of South Carolina: But it's clear that this low-level contamination is -- is probably more dangerous in the long run than -- than having a single hot spot."
  • Science Daily, March 29, 2011
    Mothers Abused During Childhood at Risk for Having Low Birth Weight Babies
    ". . . Co-authors are . . . Carl Maas, former research assistant at UW's Social Developmental Research and now an assistant professor of social work at the University of South Carolina."
  • The New York Times, March 28, 2011
    From San Marino, With Love [column, by Don Doyle, professor of history]
    "Hundreds of letters congratulating Abraham Lincoln on his inauguration poured in from all over the world in the spring of 1861, but one in particular caught the eye of Secretary of State William Henry Seward: it was from the oldest surviving republic in the world, “the Most Serene Republic of San Marino,” addressed to the new president of a much younger and most troubled republic facing secession and civil war."
  • MSNBC, and elsewhere, via AP, March 24, 2011
    Ousted board member offers $5 million gift to school
    "A University of South Carolina benefactor ousted from the school's Board of Trustees shrugged off the snub Thursday and promised to give the school $5 million for a new aerospace research center."
  • Science magazine, March 24, 2011
    Radioecologists Developing Japan-Response Recommendations
    ". . . “It’s very clear there’s a paucity of expertise in this area,” says radioecologist Timothy Mousseau of the University of South Carolina, Columbia."
  • USA TODAY, via The Greenville News, March 24, 2011
    South Carolina grows more urban
    ". . . 'South Carolina is becoming increasingly more of an urban state,' said Doug Woodward, a research economist at the University of South Carolina. 'That's where the jobs are. That's where people want to be.'"
  • The Washington Post, March 23, 2011
    New NAACP seeing more gay, diverse chapter leaders as group seeks to increase membership
    ". . . Patricia Sullivan, a history professor at the University of South Carolina and author of 'Lift Every Voice: The NAACP and the Making of the Civil Rights Movement,' called the new push for diversity thrilling and said: 'It’s really reflecting what the NAACP has represented historically and what its vision has been.'"
  • The Seattle Times, via AP, March 22, 2011
    Facing jail time, deadbeat parents seeking lawyers
    ". . . Judges often use jail as a last resort in child-support cases. A survey by a University of South Carolina law professor found nearly 1,100 of the 8,200 inmates in 21 county jails in South Carolina on one day in 2009 were locked up for not paying child support. Sometimes jail time amounts to only a few hours until a relative or friend can provide enough money to satisfy a judge."
  • More magazine, March 22, 2011
    The Workout Numbers You Need to Know
    ". . . 'The benefits are huge, and they are extensive,' says Steven Blair, PED, professor of exercise science, epidemiology and biostatistics at the University of South Carolina, who has been studying the effects of exercise for 44 years. 'Being inactive is one of the strongest predictors of mortality—far more important than even obesity.'"
  • The Huffington Post, March 21, 2011
    Should You Wait to Start an MBA Program?
    ". . . Thomas Halasz, director of the Career Center at the University of South Carolina, said students should talk to professionals in the industry they're interested in working in to understand the value of the degree, schools they should consider and areas of focus in the program."
  • The (Mobile, Ala.) Press-Register, March 21, 2011
    Foreign-owned firms writing lots of paychecks in coastal Alabama and Mississippi
    ". . . 'That's part of being an indebted country,' said Douglas Woodward, a business professor at the University of South Carolina who wrote a book about foreign investment."
  • The Los Angeles Times, March 19, 2011
    New progress, worries in Japan nuclear crisis
    ". . . Dr. Daniel Zurosky, director of radiation safety at the University of South Carolina School of Medicine, said contamination could also turn up in fish -- a staple of the Japanese diet -- from radioactive material that has entered the water, become part of the food chain and is consumed by fish."
  • Reuters, March 18, 2011
    Welcome mat still out for new US nuclear plants
    ". . . John Besley, a professor at the University of South Carolina, said the findings were broadly in line with the results of surveys he has commissioned in his state, although he cautioned there was no fresh opinion data post-Japan."
  • The Chronicle of Higher Education, March 17, 2011
    New White House Effort Urges College Leaders to Promote Interfaith Understanding
    ". . . Harris Pastides, president of the University of South Carolina at Columbia and an advocate of the White House project, said in an interview that it is important for college presidents to take an active role in creating programs that will 'build stronger communities.' He says that 'prevention is better than dealing with an outbreak' of religious intolerance. 'In a time of crisis, a strong community will prevent violence,' he adds."
  • The New York Observer, March 15, 2011
    The Economic Consequences of Japan’s Natural Disaster
    ". . . In the aftermath of Hurricane Hugo, which struck the Caribbean and South Carolina at a cost of billions of dollars in September 1989, Paulo Guimaraes, Frank Hefner and Douglass Woodward described the reconstruction phenomenon as follows (1): . . ."
  • Live Science, March 15, 2011
    March Madness Extends to Roadways After Close Games
    ". . . In an analysis comparing traffic fatalities with exciting basketball and football games (both college and professional) in the last eight years, study researchers Stacy Wood of North Carolina State University and Melayne McInnes, of the University of South Carolina, discovered that, after a close game, fatal car crashes in the winning team's hometown were over 130 percent higher than when the win was a complete blowout."
  • Scientific American, March 15, 2011
    The worst nuclear plant accident in history: Live from Chernobyl
    ". . . On the other hand, biologist Tim Mousseau at the University of South Carolina at Columbia and his colleagues have found that species richness of forest birds was reduced by more than half when comparing sites with normal background levels of radiation to sites with the highest levels in the exclusion zone, and the numbers of bumblebees, grasshoppers, butterflies, dragonflies and spiders decreased too."
  • The Santa Fe New Mexican, March 14, 2011
    Saturday Chat - Man: 'Black holes' nothing like movie portrayals
    ". . . Nine years ago, Los Alamos National Laboratory theorist Emil Mottola, in collaboration with Pawel Mazur of the University of South Carolina, offered a new definition of the dark stars that are so heavy that light cannot escape from them."
  • The Chronicle of Higher Education, March 14, 2011
    Blackwell on Writing: In Defense of M.F.A. Programs, Part 2 [column, by Elise Blackwell, director of the M.F.A. program in creative writing]
    "Last month I partially refuted the assertion that M.F.A. programs generate “cookie cutter” fiction, arguing that the geographical realities of creative-writing programs are one protection against a literature produced by the same recipe. Before leaving the subject, I’d like to offer some anecdotal evidence that fiction written by those working in the academy is richly varied. While sampling some of this aesthetic diversity, I hope to highlight some trends in contemporary fiction—and call attention to a few of the many interesting writers who also teach."
  • The Washington Post, March 13, 2011
    Ultimate impact of damage to Japan nuclear reactors still unknown
    ". . . 'If the wind carries the emissions to sea, that will certainly minimize the human and environmental impacts in Japan,' said Timothy Mousseau of the University of South Carolina, who has spent the past decade studying the ecological consequences of the 1986 Chernobyl disaster."
  • The Chronicle of Higher Education, March 13, 2011
    The ProfHacker Week in Review
    "This week, I’m delighted to be able to make another introduction: Cory Bohon has joined ProfHacker as a writer and editorial assistant. He has previously contributed guest posts on screencasting and other topics, as well as an OS X dashboard widget. Cory’s an undergrad at University of South Carolina, Upstate, a blogger at Mac|Life, and an iOS app developer. On Twitter, he’s @coryb. Welcome, Cory!"
  • Forbes, and elsewhere, via AP, March 10, 2011
    SC jobless rate drops to 10.5 percent in January
    ". . . 'That's not a good year, but it's positive,' said University of South Carolina research economist Doug Woodward."
  • The San Francisco Chronicle, and elsewhere, via AP, March 9, 2011
    Auto industry guards against hacking
    ". . . Research teams at Rutgers University and the University of South Carolina showed vulnerabilities of in-car wireless networks that operate tire pressure monitoring systems that tell motorists if their tire needs more air."
  • Diverse Issues in Higher Education, March 8, 2011
    Ochoa Hails Catalytic Impact of TRIO Programs on K-12 Level
    ". . . 'In TRIO programs, students are empowered to perform and succeed and there are many promising programs that demonstrate that fact,' he said, pointing to the Upward Bound summer program at the University of South Carolina as an example. Through the program, graduating high school seniors can take a college-credit research methodology course taught by one of the university’s professors."
  • Science, March 7, 2011
    Memristors Make Fast Work of Mazes
    ". . . Yuriy Pershin of the University of South Carolina, Columbia, and Massimiliano Di Ventra of the University of California, San Diego, claim to have developed the first parallel way to automatically solve mazes."
  • The Columbus (Ohio) Dispatch, March 6, 2011
    Monster of personality
    ". . . "She is taken far more seriously than the usual pop star - especially by her critics," said Mathieu Deflem, a University of South Carolina sociology professor who this year began teaching a course on Lady Gaga."
  • Bloomberg / Businessweek, March 3, 2011
    The Best Undergraduate B-Schools of 2011
    ". . . Lucky for Jensen, administrators at the University of South Carolina's Moore School of Business (Moore Undergraduate Business Profile)—just 100 miles from his home in Greenville—were finalizing plans to introduce what can only be described as an extreme immersion option for undergraduate business majors called International Business and Chinese Enterprise (IBCE). The program could have been designed specifically for Jensen."
  • Fox News Latino, Feb. 24, 2011
    S. Carolina business sector divided over anti-immigrant bill
    ". . . According to Elaine Lacy, a researcher at the University of South Carolina Aiken, if undocumented immigrants leave, the state would lose $1.8 billion in consumer spending, $783 million in production and about 12,000 jobs."
  • Education Week, Feb. 22, 2011
    Evaluating the Evaluators: The Evaluation of Teacher Education Programs Needs to Be Rigorous [column, by Les Sternberg, dean of the College of Education]
    "Not a day seems to go by without yet another announcement of an attempt to fix what is ostensibly wrong with education. Recently, U.S. News & World Report indicated that it is now going to get into the business of evaluating teacher education programs offered by institutions of higher education. On the surface, this seems to mirror what the publication has been doing for years: providing rankings of colleges and universities and many degree programs. These rankings continue to produce spirited debate, especially regarding the criteria that are used to judge institutions. What U.S. News & World Report is now going to embark on is pure folly."
  • Forbes, Feb. 21, 2011
    The Outrage Over the Borders Bankruptcy Filing [column, by Marianne Bickle, chair of the department of retailing and director of the Center for Retailing]
    "The recent announcement of the bankruptcy filing by Borders should not surprise anyone. It certainly didn’t surprise anyone who reads the newspapers."
  • Psychology Today, Feb. 21, 2011
    What Honest Abe Would Say About Cut and Paste Plagarism in the Age of Email
    ". . . The weekend edition of my sleepy town's paper reported on a University of South Carolina study that found 92% of the participants lied when communicating via Email (all efforts to find the original study failed so for the purposes of this post, I am going to give the newspaper the benefit of the doubt)."
  • The Washington Post, Feb. 20, 2011
    Two books on blacks and the White House [review, by Patricia Sullivan, professor of history]
    "On Jan. 20, 2009, more than 1 million people crowded into Washington, D.C., to witness and celebrate the inauguration of Barack Obama."
  • The (Toronto) National Post, Feb. 19, 2011
    Doctor Rocker: A McMaster prof knows why Bono can turn a lemon into a beautiful day
    ". . . Andrews is not only a health expert, but also a devoted pop music fan. Along with his colleagues Robin Kearns at the University of Auckland, Edward Carr at the University of South Carolina and Paul Kingsbury at Simon Fraser University, Andrews has just published a paper entitled 'Cool aid? Health, well-being and place in the work of Bono and U2,' and the results are astounding. Apparently, listening to U2 might be good for your health."
  • Asian Journal, Feb. 19, 2011
    Is fame equal to talent?
    ". . . Matthew Deflem, a professor in the University of South Carolina, examined the culture of fame and how Lady Gaga unlocked its secrets to catapult herself into popularity."
  • The (Biloxi/Gulfport, Miss.) Sun Herald, Feb. 19, 2011
    Geographer re-creates ‘The Great Louisiana Hurricane of 1812’
    ". . . But a University of South Carolina geographer has reconstructed the storm, using maritime records, and has uncovered new information about its intensity, how it was formed and the track it took."
  • The Economist, Feb. 17, 2011
    New world order
    ". . . By 2006 journals had a far more continental feel, according to a new paper by Ana Rute Cardoso, Paulo Guimarães and Klaus Zimmermann. In that year 40% of all articles were by European-affiliated economists, while the North American share had fallen to 45%. Asia’s share had risen from 3% to 9%."
  • NPR, and elsewhere, via AP, Feb. 17, 2011
    Analysis: Barbour Followed By Confederate Images
    ". . . Robert Oldendick, a University of South Carolina political scientist, said the decision not to speak ill of a long-dead Confederate leader won't hurt Barbour in that state's presidential primary but it could play differently in other parts of the country."
  • The Chronicle of Higher Education, Feb. 15, 2011
    Blackwell on Writing: A Geography of Fiction [column, by Elise Blackwell, director of M.F.A. Program]
    "A particularly active stretch of anti-M.F.A. online hate culminated in a satirical video titled “So you want to write an article about M.F.A. programs” that blamed those programs for problems both geopolitical and personal. That the Internet has not slowed the pace of M.F.A. criticism call and response isn’t surprising. What does surprise me is the tenacity of one particular criticism: that M.F.A. programs churn out “cookie cutter” fiction."
  • The (Phoenix) Arizona Republic, Feb. 15, 2011
    Business schools slow on globalization
    ". . . As a result, business executives often have to learn as they go and provide on-the-job training to deal with the growing number of countries they are doing business with and the complexity of international laws, said Hildy Teegan, a dean of the Darla Moore School of Business at the University of South Carolina and one of the authors of the 355-page report."
  • Discovery News, Feb. 14, 2011
    Big Bird Brains - Not In Chernobyl
    ". . . Timothy Mousseau, of the University of South Carolina and one of the study's authors, believes that the smaller brains may be reducing mental capacities."
  • Forbes, Feb. 14, 2011
    Romance is in the Air! But Which Group is Backs up Love with the Best Gift? [column, by Marianne Bickle, chair of the department of retailing and director of the Center for Retailing]
    ". . . As Valentine’s Day 2011 approached I began to wonder which group (committed vs. playing the field) or gender the most romantic. Okay, maybe not the most romantic; which group was most willing to crow-bar the wallet open for a decent gift?"
  • Science Daily, Feb. 12, 2011
    Kids With ADHD Much More Likely to Develop Substance Abuse Problems as They Age, Study Finds
    "Children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder are two to three times more likely than children without the disorder to develop serious substance abuse problems in adolescence and adulthood, according to a study by UCLA psychologists and colleagues at the University of South Carolina."
  • The Chronicle of Higher Education, Feb. 10, 2011
    Business Schools Worldwide Fall Short on Globalization, Report Says
    ". . . Even in financially challenging times, business schools need to expand their global reach, said Hildy Teegen, dean of the University of South Carolina's Moore School of Business, who also served on the task force."
  • Nature, Feb. 10, 2011
    US senators object to NIH reorganization
    ". . . The senators are not the only ones who are concerned about the disruption they see as inherent in dissolving the NCRR. 'I sense a continued uneasiness in virtually all of the IDeA [principal investigators] with the uncertainties that IDeA faces because of the restructuring of the NCRR,' Lucia A. Pirisi-Creek, an IDeA principal investigator wrote two days ago on NIH's Feedback website. Pirisi-Creek is a professor in the department of pathology, microbiology and immunology at the University of South Carolina School of Medicine. . . ."
  • Bloomberg / Businessweek, Feb. 10, 2011
    AACSB Urges B-Schools to Adapt to a Global World
    ". . . But Hildy Teegen, dean of the University of South Carolina's Darla Moore School of Business (Moore Full-Time MBA Profile) and a member of the task force, says she worries that some of these partnerships have the potential to be "pretty shallow" and are often not tied into the curriculum in a more meaningful manner or aligned to specific learning objectives."
  • New York Daily News, Feb. 10, 2011
    Chernobyl study: Birds in the radiated region have on average 5% smaller brains
    ". . . Dr. Timothy Mousseau, the USC biology professor who co-led the multinational research team, told the Daily News that the results show there is still enough residual radiation in that area of the Ukraine to affect brain development -- and that it likely has left less-noticeable effects on humans in the region, too."
  • Campus Technology, Feb. 10, 2011
    Rebuilding Campus IT Systems with ERP
    "It's not often that you hear about a large university gutting its IT infrastructure, but that's exactly what's happening at the University of South Carolina right now. Currently less than a year into the IT overhaul that will take about four years to complete, the school is getting rid of its "homegrown" systems and implementing a commercial enterprise resource planning (ERP) solution."
  • MSNBC (and elsewhere, via OurAmazingPlanet.com), Feb. 8, 2011
    A look back at Louisiana's 1812 Great Hurricane
    ". . . 'It was a lost event, dwarfed by history itself,' said study author Cary Mock, a geographer at the University of South Carolina. 'Louisiana was just in possession by the United States at the time, having been purchased from France only years before, and was isolated from the press.'"
  • The Wall Street Journal, Feb. 7, 2011
    Ideological Litmus Test 101.
    ". . . Eugene Volokh does not find the credibility of the author of “Islamophobia: The Ideological Campaign Against Muslims” [Stephen Sheehi]—who happens to be a professor at the University of South Carolina—enhanced by those associations."
  • Science Daily, Feb. 6, 2011
    Geographer Recreates ‘The Great Louisiana Hurricane of 1812’
    ". . . But a University of South Carolina geographer has reconstructed the storm, using maritime records, and has uncovered new information about its intensity, how it was formed and the track it took."
  • BBC "Earth News," Feb. 5, 2011
    Chernobyl birds are small brained
    ". . . The discovery was made by a team of researchers from Norway, France and the US led by Professor Timothy Mousseau from the University of South Carolina, US, and Dr Anders Moller from the University of Paris-Sud, France."
  • Fox News, Feb. 4, 2011
    Super Bowl Ads Bring Students to Class
    "For most college students, Super Bowl Sunday means football, food and beer. But for a certain group of University of South Carolina students, it means commercials."
  • NPR "Morning Edition," Feb. 4, 2011
    Tiny Water Flea Clocks In Record Number Of Genes
    ". . . Jeff Dudycha, an assistant professor of biological sciences at the University of South Carolina, says knowing the DNA sequence of Daphnia is particularly useful because many of the animals used for genetic research have only been studied in the lab."
  • United Press International, Feb. 3, 2011
    Researcher reconstructs 1812 La. hurricane
    ". . . Cary Mock of the University of South Carolina say because the War of 1812 was raging when the storm hit, the hurricane's strength, direction and other historically significant details were quickly forgotten or never recorded, a university release reported Thursday."
  • The Wall Street Journal, Feb. 2, 2011
    In College Football Recruiting, The Star Player Is the Fax Machine
    ". . . 'I've never seen a bunch of grown men so worried about a fax machine,' said Shane Beamer, the University of South Carolina's recruiting coordinator."
  • The Miami Herald, and elsewhere, via McClatchy Newspapers, Feb. 1, 2011
    Illegal immigration declines dramatically in South Carolina
    ". . . Myriam Torres, the director of the Consortium for Latino Immigration Studies at the University of South Carolina, said the state's crackdown on undocumented workers has dissuaded foreigners from coming. Torres said South Carolina doesn't really need an Arizona-style law giving police the power to detain anyone they suspect is an illegal immigrant."

 

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