Facilitators

  • Michelle Maher
  • Associate Professor,
    College of Education

  • Amber Fallucca
  • Director of Assessment,
    University Housing

  • Details

  • Tuesday,
  • February 25, 2014
  • 10:05 a.m. - 11:20 a.m.
  • Center for Teaching Excellence
  • Thomas Cooper Library, Room L511

This event is sponsored by the Center for Teaching Excellence.

Description

Teaching students to write for their discipline can be a challenge. Whether they are writing a class assignment or a manuscript submission, students often find it difficult to contextualize their writing within the broader disciplinary landscape and to understand the often tacit genre conventions and knowledge-making practices that govern such writing. This session will show you how to get students to think of their disciplinary writing as telling a story, a concept that may be initially foreign to students. As one USC physics professor observed, "Students need to...make a convincing story about what needs to be known, what was produced, (and) convince people that the result is solvent and discuss what impact we have through those measurements." One of the easiest ways to help your students shape their stories is to use the one-page writing outline that will be introduced in this session. This one-page outline format can be used across disciplines to organize thoughts into specific sections, and to promote writing efficiency. You'll learn how to use the outline - and get to hear the presenters' personal and observed successes from their experiences using this tool.

About the Facilitators

Michelle Maher, Ph.D., serves as an Associate Professor of Higher Education Administration. Her research explores doctoral student development during the transformation from student to scholar, with a focus on how students learn to write for their discipline. She has recently completed a NSF-funded study undertaken to investigate the development of graduate student teaching and research skills.

Amber Fallucca is the Director of Assessment for University Housing. Her research interests include measurement of college student engagement outcomes and exploring relationships between intercollegiate athletics and the higher education enterprise. She has co-authored a publication with Dr. Maher regarding research-based outcomes associated with doctoral-based writing group participation.

Registration

Teaching Students to Write for Their Discipline (rescheduled)