Emendations List for a Critical Edition of

Tender Is the Night

by Matthew J. Bruccoli
 

                            

 

     The 1934 Scribners first edition of Tender Is the Night was peppered with errors and inconsistencies, which troubled readers and reviewers.  In particular, the chronological contradictions distracted careful readers.  An emended text is required for F. Scott Fitzgerald’s most profound and ambitious novel.  Copyright restrictions prevent a “critical edition” from being published in the United States.  But the serious reader can prepare an accurate text of Tender Is the Night by entering these emendations in the text identified on the copyright page as “First Scribner Paperback Fiction Edition 1995.”  The first reading is the emended reading for the edited text; the left-pointing bracket ( ] ) is followed by the reading in the 1934 first printing and in the in-print paperback.  The notation stet identifies a reading that has not been emended although emendation is possible.  Carets indicate omitted punctuation mark; the wavy rule signifies that the word is unchanged.  The letter C following an emendation indicates that Malcolm Cowley introduced this reading in his 1951 “Author’s Final Version.” The first page-line reference for each entry is that of the first printing of Tender Is the Night (New York:  Scribners, 1934); the page-line reference in parenthesis is that of the in-print “First Scribner Paperback Fiction Edition 1995” (New York:  Simon & Schuster, 1995).

 

Two editions of Tender Is the Night have been prepared from this emendations list:  an annotated facsimile of the 1934 Scribners first printing (London:  Samuel Johnson, 1995) and the Centennial Edition (London:  Dent/Everyman, 1996).  Asterisks on the page/line references identify readings that have explanatory notes in Bruccoli and Baughman, The Reader’s Companion to F. Scott Fitzgerald’s Tender Is the Night (Columbia:  University of South Carolina Press, 1996).

___________________________________________

* The emendations list utilizes the standard abbreviations:  MS (manuscript – a document in Fitzgerald’s hand); TS (secretarial typescript – Fitzgerald did not type); and RTS (revised typescript – a typescript revised in Fitzgerald’s hand).

 

The following words have been silently regularized in accordance with Fitzgerald’s MS usage: 
 

anyone ] any one

            One-word spelling for pronoun usage is invariable in MS. 
 

everyone ] every one
            Invariable in MS.
 

goodbye ] good-by

            The “bye” spelling is invariable in MS; it is impossible to be certain whether Fitzgerald wrote two words or one word in every case, but “goodbye” is his clear preference.

Monte-Carlo ] Monte ^ Carlo


Rue ] stet

            Although “rue” is now the standard French form, “Rue” is acceptable in English-language publications, and it was Fitzgerald’s invariable usage.
 

someone ] some one

            It is impossible to be certain in every case whether Fitzgerald wrote one word or two words, but “someone” is his MS preference for adverbial use.

 

sometimes ] some times

            It is impossible to be certain in every case whether Fitzgerald wrote one word or two words, but “sometimes” is his clear MS preference.

 

today ] to-day

            Invariable in MS.

 

tomorrow ] to-morrow

            Invariable in MS.
 

tonight ] to-night

            Invariable in MS.  Scribners practice in 1934 was to hyphenate “to-day,” “to-morrow,” and “to-night;” but A Manual of Style, Seventh Edition (Chicago:  University of Chicago Press, [1920]) and Eighth Edition (1937), stipulates that they are to be printed as one word.  The hyphenated forms were used in England at that time, and it is possible that the Scribners proofreaders were under the influence of a British style guide, such as F. Howard Collins’s Authors’ & Printers’ Dictionary, Sixth Edition (London:  Humphrey Milford, 1928). 
 



 

*Epigraph line 1 ^ Already ] “~
 

Epigraph line 1 night. . . . ] ~ ^ . . .
 

Epigraph line 2 ^ ^ ^  But ] . . . ~
 

Epigraph line 4 ways. ^ ] ~ .”
 

*3.14 (3.13)                 alp ] Alp
 

4.10 (3.28)                   hotel ] C; Hotel
 

6.9 (5.18)                     bottle ^ ] ~ ,
 

*6.13; 354.7 (5.23;      Golfe-Juan ] ~ ^ ~

275.9)
 

9.9 (8.3)                       know,” ] ~,”
 

*12.6 (10.3)                 Antheil ] C; Anthiel
 

* 12.8 (10.5)              ‘Ulysses’ ] ^ ~ ^
 

13.5 (10.33)                 ‘Ulysses,’ ” ] ^ ~ , ^
 

*17.11–12 (14.9)         the Pont du Gard at Nîmes ] The ~ ~ ~ ~ Arles
 

*17.12  (14.10)            amphitheatre ] Ampitheatre
 

*18.9 (14.36)               Allées ] Alliés See Emendations, 213.2.
 

*18.12–13 (15.2)         “Le Temps” ] ^ ~ ~ ^
 

*18.13 (15.23)             “The Saturday Evening Post” ] ^ ~ ~ ~ ~ ^
 

*18.14 (15.3)               citronnade ] citronade
 

18.25 (15.13)               hotel ] Hotel
 

*18.30 (15.18)             czar ] C; Czar
 

*19.1 (15.21)               Buddhas’ ] C; Buddha’s
 

*19.6 (15.26)               church ] Church
 

19.16 (15.36)               hotel ] C; Hotel
 

20.19 (16.28)               were ] stet Cowley corrected were to was, but the use of were is common.
 

21.26 (17.19)               swimming.” ] C; ~ ,”
 

*22.18 (18.5)               the “Paris Herald.” ] ^ The New York Herald. ^
 

23.28 (19.8)                 other—she ] ~ , ~ Fitzgerald wrote paired dashes in MS and retained them through serial.  The comma was substituted for the dash after other in the book text.
 

24.23 (19.34)               uninterested ] C; disinterested The sense requires uninterested; but Fitzgerald wrote disinterestedly in MS and revised to disinterested in first TS.
 

*24.30 (20.3)               Signor Campion ] stet
 

*25.3 (20.8)                 ‘Book of Etiquette’ ] ^ ~ ~ ~ ^
 

25.19 (20.23)               umbrella— ] ~ .
 

*28.10 (22.28)             dwarf ] dwarfed
 

29.8 (23.4–5)               of a stage ] ~ ^ ~ Fitzgerald wrote “wall of a studio” in the Melarky MS, which became “wall of a stage” in TS and was retained through the serial.  The book reading is presumably a compositorial oversight.
 

*33.4 (25.26)               twenty-five ] ~ -four
 

36.20 (28.27)               Nicole’s ^ ] ~ .
 

*36.23 (28.29)             Speck ^ ] ~ , This comma first appears in book text.
 

37.13 (29.13)               ^ Au ] “ ~
 

37.20 (29.20)               Dieu. ^ ] ~ .”
 

38.6 (29.37)                 heels. “In ] ~ , “in
 

38.11 (30.3)                 think——” ] ~ —”
 

38.11 (30.3)                 game. ] ~ ,
 

42.8 (32.29)                 Divers’ ] Diver’s
 

*43.4 (33.22)               Clicquot ] Cliquot
 

43.18 (33.36)               madonna ] Madonna
 

45.24 (35.28)               communist ] Communist
 

45.25 (35.29)               socialist ] Socialist
 

45.25 (35.29)               McKisco. ] ~ ,
 

45.30 (35.34)               excuses.” ] ~ ,”
 

46.7 (36.6)                   world ^ and, ] ~ , ~ ^ Fitzgerald misplaced this comma in all drafts.
 

*48.20 (37.20)             Iles de Lérins ] C; Isles des Lerins
 

49.32 (38.23)               too-obvious ] ~ ^ ~

52.7 (40.3)                   education ^ ] ~ , The comma after education first appears in book text.

54.7 (41.28)                 thing——” ] ~ —”

 

54.22 (42.5)                 her, ] ~ . Fitzgerald’s comma after her in MS and TS was altered to a period in the serial text.
 

55.13 (42.29)               moved another bench ] stet Thus in MS, first TS, and serial.

59.8 (45.38)                 temper——” ] ~ —”

 

59.19–20 (46.10)         years, we ] stet Thus in MS.  The comma splice presumably represents McKisco’s strained speech.
 

*60.4 (46.26)               parties ] stet
 

*60.10 (46.31)             Pushkin’s ] stet
 

*61.10 (47.24)             words ] stet
 

62.11 (48.6)                 Speers’s ] Speer’s
 

*63.3–4; 223.30;         Juan-les-Pins ] ~ ^ ~ ^ ~

354.8 (48.31–32;

171.9–10; 275.10)
 

65.25 (51.5)                 doctor, ] ~ .
 

*67.1 (51.18)               Voisin ] Voisins
 

68.16 (52.13)               chair. . . . ] ~ ^ . . .
 

69.19 (53.9)                 count ] Count
 

69.24 (53.14)               other, ] ~ ^ Fitzgerald emended this sentence in first TS by employing paired commas; but the comma after other was not retained in serial setting copy.
 

*70.8 (53.30)               Rue de Saint-Ange ] ~ des Saintes ^ Anges
 

*71.27 (55.4–5)           Hermès ] Hermes
 

*75.5 (57.6)                 Western ^ Front ] western-front
 

*75.7 (57.8)                 First Marne ] first ~
 

*75.21 (57.22)             ‘Undine,’ ] ^ ~ , ^
 

*75.23 (57.23)             Württemberg ] C; Wurtemburg
 

75.29 (57.30)               high-explosive ] ~ ^ ~
 

*77.23 (59.12–13)       Waterloo Station ] ~ station
 

*78.6 (59.29)               Württembergers ] C; Wurtemburgers
 

*78.8 (59.30–31)         Old Etonians ] C; old ~
 

*78.10 (59.32)             mortadella ] mortadel
 

*79.2 (60.2)                 Arts ] C; Art
 

*79.4 (60.3)                 Hôtel Roi George ] C; Hotel ~ ~
 

79.16 (60.16)               ambition ^ ] ~ , Fitzgerald inserted this superfluous comma in the first TS, and it was retained thereafter.
 

83.7 (63.2)                   you——” ] ~ —”
 

83.18 (63.11)               him, ] ~ ; In the MS a semicolon connects two independent clauses.  In the first TS Fitzgerald emended the construction to an independent clause followed by a participial phrase; his alteration of the semicolon to a comma was not clear, and the semicolon was retained in subsequent stages.
 

84.6 (63.27)                 so——” ] ~ —”
 

85.3 (64.19)                 he ] He
 

85.4 (64.20)                 proximity— ] ~ ,
 

85.21–22 (64.37)         show me, I’m ] stet Thus in MS.  The comma splice may have been intended to represent Rosemary’s passionate speech.
 

85.29 (65.7)                 Mother ] mother
 

86.1 (65.11)                 Mother ] mother
 

86.22 (65.32)               simply——” ] ~ —”
 

88.4 (66.23)                 fall ] stet The Yale Junior and Senior Proms were held in February during the Twenties, but the internal chronology of the novel requires “fall” here.
 

88.5 (66.24)                 Paris, was ] ~ ^ ~ Since the rest of the sentence is carefully punctuated, this comma has been supplied.
 

89.10 (67.21)               Mother ] mother
 

89.24 (67.34)               say, ] ~ ^
 

90.3 (68.9)                   before.  When ] ~ — ~ Fitzgerald rewrote this paragraph between serial and book; the dash construction originates in the book text.
 

90.20 (68.25)               “Daddy’s Girl” ] ^ Daddy’s Girl ^

*90.32 (68.37)             Tanagra ] tanagra
 

91.9–10 (69.9)             inevitability ] inevitably Fitzgerald wrote “inevitability” in MS and retained it in serial setting copy and serial.  The book reading “inevitably” is almost certainly unauthoritative.
 

91.10 (69.9)                 evitable; ] ~ , A semicolon is required to link two independent clauses.
 

91.26 (69.25)               “Daddy’s Girl” ] ^ Daddy’s Girl ^
 

91.32 (69.31)               large. ] ~ ,
 

*93.6 (70.30)               Lutétia ] Lutetia
 

93.10 (70.34)               “But——” ] ” ~ —”
 

95.2 (71.33)                 esoteric; ] ~ , The sentence first appears in book text; a semicolon is required to link two independent clauses.
 

*95.28 (72.26)             spic ] slick The first TS has spick inserted in holograph.  This word is retained in the serial setting copy and the serial.  The alteration to slick in the book text is probably nonauthorial.  The word is spelled “spic” in MS appearances for 285.3 and 335.26.
 

96.6 (72.37)                 all——” ] ~ —”
 

97.5 (73.32)                 hotel ] Hôtel
 

97.9 (73.36)                 Mr.——” ] ~ —”
 

102.5 (77.20–21)         whom Abe addressed conscientiously ] stet The phrase first appears in the book text; Fitzgerald may have meant punctiliously.
 

*102.5 (77.21)             Hengist ] C; Hengest

 

102.11 (77.26)             technic ] stet The use of this word with the meaning of technique is acceptable.  Fitzgerald wrote technique in MS and retained it through the serial setting copy; technic first appears in the serial.
 

*104.20 (79.23)           Saint ^ Sulpice ] Saint-Sulpice
 

*104.28; 136.15;         Champs-Élysées ] C; ~ ^ ~
137.2 (79.31;

104.10; 104.13)                      

 

*105.1 (80.1)               Saint-Lazare ] C; ~ ^ ~
 

105.9 (80.8)                 beach ] Beach
 

106.9 (81.1)                 on world cruise ] stet Fitzgerald wrote “on the world cruise of the Adriatic” in MS and revised it to “on the world cruise of the Paris” in the first and second TSS.  The serial text reads “on world cruise.”
 

*106.17 (81.9)             Genevieve’s——” ] ~ —”
 

*108.26 (83.3)             survivant ] stet
 

109.31 (83.38)             yards ] years Fitzgerald wrote yards in the MS, which is retained in the first and second TSS and serial text.  The reading years is almost certainly a printer’s error.
 

111.21 (85.16)             décor ] C; décor
 

111.30 (85.25)             accustomed ] stet The sense here seems to require unaccustomed, but Fitzgerald wrote accustomed in MS and retained it in all subsequent drafts.
 

113.5 (86.9)                 asthma ] stet Fitzgerald may have intended miasma, but he wrote asthma in MS and retained it in subsequent drafts.
 

113.26 (86.31)             unmodulated. “We ] ~ , “we
 

*114.10–11 (87.9)       Grand-Guignol ] ~ ^ ~
 

116.24 (89.10)             desks, ] ~ ^
 

117.5 (89.22)               friend ] friends The sense requires a singular noun.
 

117.22 (90.1)               Zürich ] Zurich All appearances.
 

*117.31 (90.9)             saw with his heels ] stet Thus in MS, first and second TSS, and serial.
 

*119.10, 12 (91.31,     100,000 Chemises ] C; 1000 chemises

14–15)
 

*119.30 (91.31)           Canossa ] Ferrara
 

120.6 (92.6)                 purposes; ] stet Fitzgerald inserted the incorrect semicolon in the revised second TS to break up a long sentence; it was retained thereafter.
 

120.14 (92.13)             Rue de Saint-Ange ] ~ des Saintes-Anges

121.11 (93.1)               a while ] awhile
 

121.11 (93.1)               through?” ] ~ .”  The question mark appears in every draft until the book text.
 

*121.28 (93.18)           ‘Times’ ] ^ ~ ^
 

*122.31 (94.16)           Marie Brizard ] C; ~ Brizzard
 

*122.31 (94.16)           Punch Orangéade ] ~ Orangeade
 

*122.31–32 (94.16)     ^ Fernet-Branca ] André ~ -Blanco
 

*122.31–32                 Cherry Rocher ] C; ~ Rochet

(94.16–17)
 

123.8 (94.26)               ^ And ] “ ~
 

123.11 (94.29)             Alow-own. ^ ] ~ - ~ .”
 

125.4 (96.3–4)             she had awakened by ] stet Fitzgerald wrote “what had awakened her” in MS and revised to “she had awakened by” in first TS, which was retained in second TS and serial.
 

*125.8 (96.7)               sergent ^ de ^ ville ] ~ - ~ - ~
 

127.20 (98.3)               who, ] ~ ^ The comma appears in all drafts beginning with the revised first TS but was omitted from the book text.
 

*127.25–26 (98.9)       Teput Dome ] teput dome
 

127.29 (98.13)             a——” ] ~ —”
 

128.20 (98.36)             there——” ] ~ —”

*128.23 (99.2)             Évreux ] C; Evreux
 

128.26 (99.4)               baroque ] Baroque
 

129.26–27                   conservatism ] conversation The second TS has Fitzgerald’s holograph insertion: 

(99.37-100.1)              “Nicole clung to her conservatism.”  The word conservatism is retained in the serial setting copy, the serial galleys, and the serial.  The reading conversation in the book text is a typo.
 

*131.4 (101.4)             Mosby ] C; Moseby
 

*132.10 (101.17)         concessionnaire ] concessionaire
 

*132.23 (101.30)         ‘Liberty’ ] ^ ~ ^
 

*133.4 (102.4)             ‘France’ ] ^ ~ ^
 

133.4–5 (102.4–5)       this name ] stet The first and second TS and serial read “his name.” In the lost book proof Fitzgerald may have revised “his name” to “this name” to characterize Paul’s speech.
 

133.8 (102.8)               ‘France.’ ” ] ^ ~ . ^
 

134.31 (103.23)           here——” ] ~ —”
 

*136.2–3 (103.32)       arrondissement ] C; arrondisement

 

*136.16 (104.10)         falling ] failing Fitzgerald wrote falling in MS and retained it in first and second TSS.  The word failing, which first appears in the serial text, is probably a compositorial blunder.
 

137.18–19 (104.27)     and been watching ] stet Fitzgerald wrote “she had been watching the rain” in MS and revised the clause to “she had just dressed and been watching the rain” in first TS.  The revised reading is retained in second TS and serial.
 

137.21 (104.30)           godlike ] C; Godlike
 

*139.8–9 (106.3–4)     Party in the border states ] party ~ ~ ~ States
 

*139.29 (106.23)         Latin Quarter ] ~ quarter
141.17 (107.37)           watch man ] stet Fitzgerald wrote “watch a man” in RTS, but the a was marked for

                                     deletion in proof.
 

*142.13 (108.27)         George the Third ] C; ~ ~ third
 

144.16 (109.29)           still-unfastened ] ~ ^ ~
 

145.32 (110.35–36)     unexceptionably ] unexceptionally Fitzgerald wrote unexceptionally in MS and retained it in all subsequent drafts; but the sense requires unexceptionably.
 

147.27–28 (112.19)     Zürichsee ] Zurichsee All appearances.
 

*151.2 (115.2)             twenty-seven ] ~ -six
 

151.3 (115.3)               bachelorhood.  ] ~ ^
 

*152.18–19 (116.1)     Damenstiftgasse ] C; Damenstiff Strasse
 

*153.18 (116.31–32)   at New Haven ] in ~ ~ Fitzgerald made this correction in his copy.
 

153.27 (117.1)             criterion ] C; criteria The sense requires a singular noun.
 

*153.31 (117.5)           “The Rose and the Ring,” ] ^ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ , ^
 

154.17 (117.23)           yourself.  Once ] ~ —once Fitzgerald made this emendation in his marked copy.
 

154.28 (117.33–34)     people— ] ~ ; An unidentified hand altered Fitzgerald’s dash to a semicolon in the serial setting copy.
 

154.29 (117.35)           falsely ^ ] ~ , This comma first appeared in serial setting copy.  An unidentified hand deleted and then restored it in serial galleys, and it was retained in the serial and the book.
 

*156.16 (118.24)         cortex ] C; cervical
 

157.1 (118.32)             Gregorovious ] stet The usual spelling for this German-Swiss name is “Gregorovius” (see 227.23).
 

*157.2 (118.33)           psychopathologist ] pathologist
 

*157.7 (119.4)             Kraepelin ] Krapaelin
 

158.5 (119.35–36)       privates ] private soldiers Fitzgerald made this correction in his marked copy.
 

*158.13 (120.7)           Kreuzegg ] Krenzegg In first TS Fitzgerald altered Jugenhorn to Kreuzegg, which was typed as Krenzegg in second TS and retained thereafter.
 

159.10 (120.37)           menacing ^ ] ~ , Fitzgerald inserted this unnecessary comma in the second TS.
 

159.13 (121.1)             one ] they Fitzgerald made this correction in his marked copy.
 

159.20 (121.9)             room.  Pushing ] ~ ; pushing Fitzgerald made this emendation in his marked copy.
 

*160.1 (121.23)           Armistice ] armistice
 

160.3 (121.24)             thence ] stet Fitzgerald wrote there in RTS and retained it in subsequent TSS, but he altered it to thence in serial galleys.
 

161.31 (122.40)           on ] in Fitzgerald wrote “harping constantly on the” in MS and retained it through the serial; the book reading “in” may be a printer’s error.
 

162.21 (123.20)           farcical ] farcicle There are no other spelling errors in Nicole’s letters; this misspelling, which was usual for Fitzgerald, was almost certainly an unintentional error here.  There is no MS corresponding to this appearance, but in the MSS for other appearances of the word Fitzgerald spelled it “farcicle” at 211.6 and 248.17 (the latter of which he corrected to farcical).
 

163.10 (123.41)           train nurse ] stet There is no MS for this passage; the first TS and all subsequent stages read “train nurse.”
 

164.3 (124.23)             life. . . . ] C; ~ ^ . . .
 

164.4 (124.24)             clouds. . . . ] C; ~ ^ . . .
 

164.5 (124.25)             war. . . . ] C; ~ ^ . . .
 

164.8 (124.28)             me. . . . ] C; ~ ^ . . .
 

164.13 (124.31)           edelweiss. . . . ] C; ~ ^ . . .
 

*166.6 (125.24)           seventeen ] sixteen
 

*167.7 (126.9)             fourteen ] eleven
 

168.21 (127.17)           that.” ] that. ^
 

169.6 (127.33)             down——” ] ~ —”
 

170.31 (128.35)           Personality. ] ~ ,
 

171.9–10 (129.23)       God ^ damned ] ~ -/ ~ Fitzgerald’s MS preference was to spell this expletive as two words with a capital G (see 297.31 and 305.7).
 

173.11 (131.1)             phantasy ] phantom Fitzgerald wrote phantasy in MS and retained it in TSS and serial; phantom is probably a printer’s error.
 

*174.27;  192.16         Grossmünster ] Gross-Münster
(132.10–11; 145.30)   
 

*175.9 (132.25)           clinic at Interlaken ] Clinic on Interlacken
 

175.33 (133.11)           watch ^ ] ~ , When Fitzgerald revised this sentence in the second TS, he retained the unnecessary comma.
 

*178.10 (134.29)         Suppé’s ] C; Suppe’s
 

*179.8 (135.19)           Good ^ Bye ] ~ -by
 

*179.31 (136.4)           Swiss ] Valais In MS and first TS Fitzgerald wrote Swiss, which he emended to Valois in second TS and retained through serial.  Valais first appeared in book.
 

180.1 (136.7)               ^ Lay ] “ ~
 

180.4 (136.10)             round—^ ] ~ —”
 

180.12 (136.18)           down. . . . ] ~ ^ . . .
 

180.17 (136.23)           complementary ] complimentary The sense requires complementary.
 

180.29 (136.34)           There! ^ ” ] ~ !,”
 

181.26 (137.25)           service ] Service
 

182.4 (137.30)             theme ] stet Fitzgerald may have meant plan, but he wrote theme in MS and retained it in TSS and serial.
 

*183.11 (138.32)         Glas ^ Bier ] C; ~ - ~
 

*184.4 (139.19)           afternoon ] morning
 

186.2 (141.4)               do— ] ~ , The comma splice first appears in a typed insert for the revised serial galleys.
 

185.11 (140.20)           diminished, ] ~ ^
 

*186.18 (141.19)         twenty-three ] ~ -four
 

*187.17 (142.2)           Burberry ] burberry
 

188.2–3 (142.20–21)   forthcoming. ^ ] ~ .”
 

190.19 (144.23)           Well——” ] ~ —”
 

191.3 (145.3)               alpine ] Alpine
 

192.12 (145.27)           who ] whom Fitzgerald inserted whom in the first TS; the serial corrects the word to who, but the book restores whom.
 

193.10 twice              -Kraepelin ] C; -Krapaelin

(146.19, 20)
 

193.15–16)                  German.* space break ¶Going ] ~ .* no space break¶ ~ The space break

(146.24-25)                 was marked by Fitzgerald in the first and second TSS and in the serial setting copy.  The break appears in the revised serial galleys and in the serial.  The loss of the space break in the book text certainly resulted from a printer’s error.  Fitzgerald restored the space break in his marked copy of the book.
 

*193.17 (146.26)         Dent du Jaman ] Jugenhorn
 

*193.22 (146.31)         train-bands ] trained- ~ The correct term is train-bands.
 

*193.26 (147.3)           July ] June
 

193.29 (146.33)           Versuch, ] ~ ^
 

193.31 twice                -Kraepelin ] C; -Krapaelin

(146.35)
 

193.31 (146.35)           sie ] C; siz
 

193.34 (146.38)           Meinung, ] ~ ^
 

*194.4 (147.9)             Tour-de-Peilz ] ~ ^ ~ ^ Pelz
 

194.7 (147.11–12)       slid down port ] stet In the second TS Fitzgerald revised “slid into port” to “slid down port.”
 

*194.20 (147.22–23)   Two years ago ] stet
 

*194.27 (147.30)         confrère ] confrere
 

195.33 (148.31)           di ] de The character is an Italian.
 

196.5 (148.37)             dignified——” ] ~ —”
 

*197.19 (150.7)           twenty-three ] ~ -five
 

*199.24 (151.29)         schizoid ] schizzoid
 

*200.1 (152.2)             Guards ^ ] C; guards’
 

201.2 (152.37)             doctor—— ] ~ —
 

202.14 (154.8)             you——” ] ~ —”
 

202.22 (154.16)           nurse——” ] ~ —”
 

203.25–26 (155.14)     how he could do with me ] stet Fitzgerald wrote this phrase in MS and retained it in all subsequent drafts.
 

205.4 (156.20)             whomever ] whoever Correct usage requires whomever.
 

205.18 (156.33)           ^ I’m ] “ ~
 

205.20 (156.35)           happened. ^ ] ~ .”
 

207.3 (158.2)               ill-advised ] ~ ^ ~
 

207.3 (158.2)               said. ] ~ ,
 

208.1 (158.17)             Rhodes Scholar ] ~ scholar
 

208.1 (158.18)             governor ] Governor
 

208.26 (159.6)             Sister ] sister
 

208.33 (159.13)           supposed ^ ] ~ . The mark after supposed is a printing-plate flaw that resembles a period.
 

*209.23 (159.35)         camérière ] camerière
 

*209.30 (160.7)           Grotto ] C; Grotte Fitzgerald wrote Grotte in MS and retained it in subsequent drafts.  His spelling may have reflected the pronunciation of the Italian La Grotta Azzurra.
 

210.4 (160.15)             ^ Oh ] “ ~
 

210.7 (160.18)             me—— ^ ] ~ ——”
 

*210.20 (160.30)         Athena ] Athene
 

*211.28–29 (161.31)   Affaires Étrangères ] C; Affaires Etrangères
 

*211.32 (161.34)         Mistinguett ] Mistinguet
 

*211.33 (161.35)         “Pas sur la Bouche” ] ^ Pas sur la Bouche ^
 

*212.30 (162.26)         June ] July
 

213.2; 215.6;               Allées ] Alliées See Emendations, 18.9.
349.21; 398.9 (162.30;

164.20; 271.18;

308.1)
 

213.16 (163.10)           hands. ^ ] ~ .”
 

214.7; 215.17;             Speers’s ] Speers’
215.27 (163.27;

164.31; 165.3)
 

215.14 (164.27)           caffeine ] caffein
 

216.7 (165.15)             high stool ] highstool Fitzgerald wrote this phrase as two words in MS and all subsequent stages; highstool in the book text is a printer’s error.
 

216.17 (165.23–24)     “A Psychology for Psychiatrists.” ] ^ A Psychology for Psychiatrists. ^
 

216.25 (165.30)           lived, ] stet Fitzgerald inserted this unnecessary comma in second TS and retained it thereafter.
 

217.23 (166.22)           McBeth ] C; MacBeth See 146.8, 11, 21, 24, 28.
 

218.25 (167.18)           anywhere——” ] ~ —”
 

220.2 (168.20)             hotel ] Hotel
 

*220.5 (168.23)           poussée ] pousse
 

*221.11 (169.13)         menagerie ] C; Menagerie
 

222.16 (170.3)             ^ Just ] “ ~
 

222.18 (170.5)             me—— ^ ] ~ ——”
 

223.28 (171.8)             hotel ] C; Hôtel
 

223.29 (171.9)             casino ] C; Casino
 

227.23 (173.18)           Gregorovious ] Gregorovius The name is spelled “Gregorovious” in all other appearances.
 

227.24 (173.18)           half ^ hour ] ~ - ~
 

230.11 (175.23)           have ] C; haven’t The sense requires Franz to have examined the books.  Fitzgerald wrote have in MS, which was retained in first and second TSS.  The serial alters the reading to haven’t.
 

*230.20 (175.31)         Privatdozent ] Privat docent
 

232.17 (177.13)           without, ] stet The superfluous comma has been retained as written by Fitzgerald because he seems to have wanted a pause in the rhythm of the sentence at this point.
 

*233.3 (177.30–31)     Humpty ^ Dumpty ] C; ~ - ~
 

235.11 (179.24–25)     season ] Season
 

235.18 (179.32)           good bye! ^ ] good-by!”
 

*236.5 (180.1)             Love for ] C; ~ of
 

237.7 (180.30)             Nothing ] stet Fitzgerald wrote nothing in MS and retained it through serial; the personification Nothing appears only in the book.
 

239.30 (183.4–5)         uninstructed ] instructed The second TS has instructed inserted in holograph, which is retained in serial; but the sense requires uninstructed.
 

239.31 (183.5)             filigree ] filagree
 

*240.25 (183.31–32)   as imprisoned in the Iron Maiden. ] stet Fitzgerald revised “like a turtle beneath a shell” to “imprisoned in the iron maiden” in the second TS; the serial reads “as imprisoned in the Iron Maiden.”
 

242.7 (185.4)               here——” ] ~ —”
 

243.14 (186.5)             with ^ nail ] C; ~ a ~ Correct usage requires that scissors be treated as a plural form.
 

245.1 (187.7)               manic ] maniac In the setting copy for the serial Fitzgerald altered manic depressive to manic.  The book reading maniac is almost certainly a typographical error.
 

*246.5 (188.5)             Ägeri ] Agiri
 

*247.29 (189.20)         pleasance ] plaisance
 

*247.30 (189.21)         Ferris wheel ] ferris ~
 

248.1 (189.25)             the crowd, a crowd ] stet This construction first appears in the serial setting copy.
 

*248.23 (190.8)           Bock ] bock
 

249.20 (190.36)           apposite ] stet Fitzgerald wrote this word in MS and retained it through all subsequent drafts.
 

*250.21 (191.31)         schizophrène ] schizophrêne
 

252.20 (193.20)           Émile’s ] C; Emile’s
 

252.30 (193.30)           Émile ] C; Emile
 

253.18 (194.17)           persuasive ] stet A holograph insertion on the second TS, this word was retained through all stages.  Fitzgerald may have meant pervasive.
 

254.7 (194.23)             patients’ ] patient’s
 

255.8 (195.20)             usurp ] stet The meaning requires reclaim, but Fitzgerald wrote usurp in MS and retained it in all subsequent drafts.
 

*255.10–11 (195.23    the “Century,” the “Motion Picture,” “L’Illustration,” and the “Fliegende

-24)                              Blätter,” ] The ^ ~ , ^ The ^ ~ ~ , ^ ^ ~ , ^ ~ ~ ^ ~ ~ , ^
 

256.13 (196.20)           a battered ] C; A ~
 

256.20–21 (196.27)     Munich anyhow? ] stet Formal punctuation requires a comma after Munich, but Fitzgerald omitted it in MS and all subsequent drafts.
 

257.7 (197.7)               or feel his ] nor ~ their Fitzgerald wrote “he did not like any man much nor feel the presence of other men” in MS; he revised the phrase to “he did not like any man much nor feel their presence” in the second TS.
 

258.2 (197.34)             tour ] Tour
 

*258.16 (198.11)         Marxian ] stet  
 

258.22 (198.17)           papier-mâché ] ~ ^ ~
 

*259.7 (198.33)           drawn into ] ~ in Correct usage required into.
 

*259.11 (198.36–37)   stood ready to depart ] departed
 

259.31 (199.20)           the “Herald” ] The ^ ~ ^
 

*262.7 (200.30)           Erbsensuppe ] erbsen-suppe
 

*262.7 (200.30)           Würstschen ] C; würstschen
 

*262.8 (200.31)           steins ] helles
 

*262.9 (200.32)           “Kaiserschmarren.” ] “kaiser-schmarren.”
 

262.27 (201.14–15)     Zurichsee ] Zürichsee
 

*263.13 (201.29)         January ] October
 

265.5 (203.6)               ^ YOUR FATHER DIED PEACEFULLY TONIGHT HOLMES

                                    ^ ] “Your father died peacefully tonight. Holmes.”
 

*266.16 (204.10)         the income ] C; it
 

*266.18 (204.11)         Gilded Age ] gilded age
 

268.17 (205.24)           the ship’s ] its The pronoun cannot refer to harbor.
 

269.26 (206.29–30)     that , ^ falling . . . plot ^ and . . . women ^ thought ] ~ , and ~ . . . ~ , ~ . . . ~ , ~ This sentence was revised by Fitzgerald in the second TS:  “He pretended they were this and that and falling in with his own plot, drinking too much to keep up the illusion – and all this time the women thinking only that this was a windfall from heaven – riding along with them all night and even kissing one of the sisters on the platform of the train. . . .”
 

*269.33; 287.1;           Quirinale ] Quirinal
292.24; 293.3, 5, 11;

294.15, 27; 306.21

(206.34; 219.30;

224.9; 224.20, 22, 28;

225.27, 37; 235.17)
 

*270.11 (207.7)           black-seed oil ] Black-~ ~
 

*270.11 (207.8)           hoofs ] C; hoops The sense requires hoofs.  The word hoops first appears in the book text and is probably a printer’s error.
 

270.17 (207.14)           Was ] was
 

*271.1 (207.28)           “Corriere della Sera” ] ^ ~ ~ ~ ^
 

*271.1–3 (207.28–29) “un romanzo di Sainclair Lewis, ‘Wall Street,’ nel quale l’autore . . . città Americana.” ] “una novella ~ ~ ~ ^ ‘~ ~ ^ ‘nella ~ autore . . . citta ~ .”
 

*271.7, 14 (207.33,     three ] four

208.4)
 

*271.15 (208.4)           thirty-six ] ~ -four
 

*271.16 (208.5)           twenty-one ] ~ -two
 

*271.16 (208.6)           thirty-nine ] ~ -eight
 

274.2 (209.19)             ‘Daddy’s Girl’ ] ^ ~ ~ ^
 

274.17 (209.34)           now. . . .” ] C; ~ ^ . . .”
 

274.21 (210.3)             heaven. . . . ] C; ~ ^ . . .
 

276.11 (211.16)           psychology?” ] ~ ?’
 

*276.12 (211.17)         twenty-one ] ~ -two
 

*277.11, 12                  Forum ] forum

(212.9, twice)
 

277.13 (212.10)           props; ] stet This semicolon appears in MS and is retained in every subsequent stage.
 

277.32 (212.29)           answer, ] ~ ^
 

*278.20 (213.13)         Castello dei Cesari ] Castelli ~ Caesari
 

279.6 (213.26)             from ] to Idiomatic usage requires from.
 

282.6 (216.5)               Englishmen ] Englismen
 

282.29 (216.27)           ^ ——Only the very big ones, Baby. ^ ] “— ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ , ~. ” This sentence is Dick Diver’s thought, not his speech.  The quotation marks first appear in the book text, probably the result of a proofreader’s error.
 

285.3 (218.19)             jealousy— ] ~ , Fitzgerald inserted this dash in the revised second TS, but a comma appears in serial and book texts.
 

288.16 (220.28)           Nazionale ] C; Nationale
 

*288.28; (221.2)          Bomboniera ] Bonbonieri
 

289.3; (221.9)              March ] November
 

289.20; 293.7              Bomboniera ] Bonbonieri

(221.26; 224.24)
 

*290.5 (222.6)             mousseux ] mousseaux
 

*292.10 (223.34)         lenci ] Yenci
 

*292.19 (224.4)           campagna ] Campagna
 

*294.16, 23                 soûl ] C; saoûl
(225.28, 34)
 

295.12 (226.16)           down ^ ] ~ , Fitzgerald employed the comma in the revised second TS; it was omitted in the serial but restored in the book text.
 

295.19 (226.22)           ghastly ] stet The word is aghast in the first and second TSS and serial.
 

*296.7 (227.3)             guards ^ ] guards’
 

*297.20 (228.4)           Wops!” ] ~ ! ^
 

297.31 (228.14)           God damn ] goddamn
 

*298.3 (228.18)           l’inglese.” ] inglese.”
 

*301.18 (231.12)         semper dritte, dextra and sinestra ] stet
 

*301.22 (231.16)         Piazza di Spagna ] C; Piazzo d’Espagna
 

302.2 (231.30)             himself, ] ~ ^
 

303.16 (232.35)           continent, ] stet The superfluous comma has been retained as written by Fitzgerald because he seems to have wanted a pause in the rhythm of the sentence at this point.
 

304.8 (233.20)             forgives, ] ~ ^
 

304.8 (233.21)             life; ] ~ ,
 

305.7 (234.13)             God damn ] god ~
 

306.18 (235.15)           palpable ] stet Fitzgerald may have intended palatable (agreeable), but palpable (tangible) first appears in the TS for the Melarky version and continues through the Diver TSS, serial, and book.
 

*309.28 (239.27)         telegram ] C; cable
 

311.4 (240.30)             children——” ] ~ —”
 

311.26 (241.12)           clinic ] C; Clinic
 

*314.3 (243.3)             Wassermanns ] Wassermans
 

314.15 (243.15)           Chilean ] C; Chilian
 

*314.31; 315.3;            Pardo ^ Ciudad Real ] ~ y Cuidad ~
319.20; 320.19
(243.30; 243.34–35;

247.30; 248.23–24)
 

316.1 (244.29)             Francisco. ] ~ ,
 

316.7, 25; 319.22        Chile ] C; Chili

(244.35; 245.14;

247.32)
 

317.21 (246.5)             collect ] stet In the serial setting copy Fitzgerald revised “trying to put the name of the man together” to “trying to collect the man’s name.” Emendation to recollect is not required.
 

*318.28 (247.6)           Genevois ] Génevois
 

319.15 (247.25)           best-known medicine men ] stet Fitzgerald wrote “one of the best internal medicine man” in MS, which was typed as “one of the best internal medicine men” in the first TS.  The holograph insertion known was made in the second TS but retyped as “one of the best known medicine men” in the serial setting copy.
 

319.24 (247.34)           Paris——” ] ~ —”
 

*320.17 (248.22)         Devereux ] Charles
 

*320.22 (248.27)         barbital ] barbitol
 

*320.27 (248.32)         grata ] gratis
 

322.33 (250.28)           must—— ] ~ —
 

323.6–7 (250.34–35)   the “Paris Herald” ] The ^ New York Herald ^ See Explanatory Notes, 22.18.
 

323.33 (251.21)           thousand-dollar ] ~ ^ ~
 

324.7 (251.28)             Father ] father
 

*325.5 (252.21)           “The Wedding of the Painted Doll.” ] ^ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ . ^
 

*327.18 (253.31)         ^ cess ] C; ‘ ~
 

329.26 (255.26)           pair. “Lladislau ] ~ . ^ ~ Dick Diver’s speech resumes after pair.
 

*331.11 (257.3–4)       eight and six ] eleven ~ nine
 

332.4 (257.14–15)       regimen ] C; regimentation The sense here requires regimen; regimentation first appears in the serial setting copy and is retained in the retyped serial galley insert.
 

332.12 (257.21–22)     Father ] father
 

*332.13 (257.23)         six ] nine
 

*332.29 (258.1)           Bozen ] Boyen In the first TS Fitzgerald inserted Offengotten, which was altered to Boyen in a typed revision for the serial galleys.
 

*333.9 (258.13–14)     a chest of servants’ trunks ] stet
 

*333.33 (258.37)         Pullman ] pullman
 

*334.1 (259.1)             Kabyle- ] C; Kyble-
 

335.26 (260.20)           ‘spic’ ] ^ ~ ^
 

336.27–28 (261.15)     of itself ] ~ herself Fitzgerald inserted “of herself” in the first TS and retained it in subsequent drafts.  It is unlikely that he was using incorrect pronoun reference to characterize Lanier.
 

337.11 (261.32)           La ] El Mary Minghetti’s title is Italian, not Spanish.
 

337.27 (262.11)           Western ] western
 

340.5 (264.12)             saying——” ] ~ —”
 

340.22 (264.27)           “blunder,” ] ^ ~ , ^
 

*342.10 (265.18)         trident ] tripos
 

*343.5 (265.32)           bastide ] Bastide
 

*343.14–15 (266.6–7) Commune ] commune
 

343.18 (266.10)           you——” ] ~ —”
 

*344.7 (266.31)           Salaud ] Saland The correction was made in the fourth printing (1951).
 

345.7 (267.27)             him, ^ which ] ~ , about ~ In the second RTS Fitzgerald revised “in his mind toward some conclusion and that Nicole could only snatch at” to “inside him toward which she could only guess at.” The serial reads “inside him which she could only guess at.”
 

345.23 (268.5)             bay ] C; Bay
 

*345.31 (268.12–13)   already ^ dusk ] ~ summer ~
 

*345.32 (268.14)         “Margin” ] ^ ~ ^
 

346.6 (268.21)             ‘Margin’!” ] ^ ~ ^ ! ”
 

*346.7 (268.22)           ladder ] companionway
 

346.8 (268.22)             mounted, ] ~ ^
 

347.3 (269.11)             down ] own The word own, which first appears in the book text, is clearly a typographical error for down.
 

347.5 (269.14)             Negroes ] negroes
 

*347.17 (269.26)         Four ] Five
 

*347.23–25 (269.32     nous autres héros . . . il ^ faut . . . d’héroïsme ] ~ ^ ~ . . . ~ nous ~ . . .

-33)                              d’héroisme   Barban’s French presumably is fluent.
 

347.32 (270.4)             all——” ] ~ —”
 

*348.6–7 (270.11)       Légion Étrangère ] Corps d’Afrique du Nord
 

349.16 (271.14)           “Margin” ] ^ ~ ^
 

*349.23 (271.21)         Lady Caroline ] C; ~ Sibly-Biers The form Lady Caroline is appropriate for the daughter of a duke, marquess, or earl.  Lady Sibly-Biers is appropriate for the wife of a knight, baronet, or other titled gentleman ranking from baron through marquess.  Since the character is referred to as Lady Caroline at 349.30; 350.27; 351.4; 353.30; 392.22; 393.1; 393.8–9; 393.20; 393.28; 395.20; 395.26; 396.2; and 396.6 in the novel, Lady Sibly-Biers should be emended.
 

350.13 (272.6)             ^ There ] “There
 

350.19 (272.12)           hell^ ] hell—”
 

*350.24–26 (272.16)   “Quelle enfantillage!” ] C; “ ~ enfanterie!” The correct French word for childishness is enfantillage.
 

*353.16 (274.25)         it ] stet
 

*353.19 (274.28)         afterdeck ] after deck
 

353.30 (274.38)           ‘Margin’ ] ^ ~ ^
 

*354.13 (275.15)         brains addled à l’anglaise ] Brains ~ a l’Anglaise
 

355.14 (275.30)           waking ] stet Fitzgerald inserted “waiting for café au lait” in the second TS, but the serial reads “waking for café au lait.”
 

357.4 (276.37)             death ^ ] ~ , The superfluous comma first appears in serial text.
 

*357.17 (277.13)         Niçois ] C; Niçoise
 

360.4–6 (279.21–22)   DEARS WILL BE AT GAUSSES TOMORROW UNFORTUNATELY WITHOUT MOTHER AM COUNTING ON SEEING YOU ROSEMARY ] Dears will be at Gausses to-morrow unfortunately without mother am counting on seeing you.  Rosemary.
 

361.14 (280.4–5)         hopeful ^ — ] ~ ,— The comma-dash combination first appears in book text.
 

361.20 (280.10)           personified ] stet Fitzgerald may have meant indicated, symptomized, or expressed.
 

362.3–5 (280.13–14)   guess . . . or ] ~ . . . nor Fitzgerald inserted this holograph wording in the second RTS:  “She could not guess . . . nor.”  He revised this passage to “she couldn’t guess . . nor” in serial setting copy—which he retained in serial and book.
 

*362.33 (281.4)           couturiers— ] ~ ,
 

*363.24 (281.27)         four ] five
 

*363.30 (281.33)         hook ] nook The word nook, clearly a printer’s error for hook, appears only in the book.
 

*364.5, 14                   four ] five

(282.3, 11)
 

*364.8 (282.5)             Four ] Five
 

364.15 (282.12)           some, ] ~ ^
 

*365.1 (282.29)           The summer before last ] Last summer
 

368.17 (285.25)           her ] Her
 

368.18 (285.26)           direction— ] ~ ^
 

368.33 (286.2)             Abrams’ ] Abram’s
 

*369.31 (286.31)         Loos ] Loos’
 

*369.31–32 (286.31)   faits accomplis ] Faits Accomplis
 

370.12 (287.7)             boat ^ — ] ~ ,— The comma-dash combination first appears in book text.
 

372.20 (289.2)             Michel ] Michelle The chauffeur would have been male; Michelle is the feminine form of the name.
 

372.28 (289.9)             changed ^ — ] ~ ,— The comma-dash combination first appears in book text.
 

*374.1 (290.9)             ^ Thank ] “ ~
 

374.3 (290.11)             another—— ^ ] ~ ——”
 

374.7 (290.15)             ^ — Thank ] “ — ~
 

374.8 (290.16)             tight—— ^ ] ~ ——”
 

*375.16 (291.7–8)       Nineteen ] Sixteen
 

378.8 (293.2)               eyes, did ] ~ ^ ~
 

378.16 (293.10)           certain——” ] ~ —”
 

380.10 (294.28)           animal, she ] ~ ^ ~
 

380.15 (294.33)           highlights ] high lights
 

*380.28 (295.7)           ^ Oh, ] “ ~ ,
 

380.30 (295.9)             away——^ ] ~ ——”
 

382.23 (296.27)           place ] palace Fitzgerald wrote place in MS and retained it in TSS and serial.  The alteration to palace was almost certainly the result of a typographical error.
 

382.7 (296.11–12)       ballerina!” ] ~ ! ^
 

383.4 (297.2)               voices; ] ~ ,
 

383.4 (297.3)               denials, ] ~ ;
 

383.33–384.1              Banner.  space break ¶They ] ~ . end of page¶ ~ The space break indicating

(297.30-31)                 a time shift is marked in MS and retained in the first and second TSS and serial.  The break was lost in the book page makeup.
 

*384.5 (297.34)           Menton ] Mentone
 

387.21 (300.8)             to——” ] ~ —”
 

389.31–32 (302.3–4)   receptacles ] receptables Fitzgerald wrote receptacles in MS, which was retained in TSS and serial.  The alteration to receptables resulted from a printer’s error.
 

*391.4 (302.15)           Oui. . . .” ] ~ ^ . . .”
 

391.28 (303.4)             Sibly-Biers ] Sibley-Biers
 

*392.7 (303.10)           Alpes-Maritimes ] ~ ^ ~
 

392.10 (303.12)           However, ] ~ ^
 

394.17, 21; 395.17      cartes d’identité ] Cartes d’Identité

(305.6, 10; 306.1)
 

394.23 (305.12)           countess ] Countess
 

394.29 (305.18)           companies—— ] ~ —
 

394.30 (305.19)           However, ] ~ ^
 

396.12 (306.28)           casino, ] Casino,
 

*397.7 (307.6)             Carlton ] Carleton
 

398.11 (308.3)             Under the arching trees, central in summer, ] stet The meaning of “central in summer” is unclear; but it presumably indicates that the branches of the trees on either side meet overhead, forming a summer canopy.  The phrase does not appear in MS or extant TS.  MS reads “under the arch of palms.” Dashiell queried “central in summer” in the serial galleys (1 March 1934); Fitzgerald’s response is unknown.
 

*398.19 (308.11)         ^ She’s ] “She’s
 

398.21 (308.13)           it—— ^ ] it——”
 

*398.31–32 (308.22   Donnez mois du gin et du siphon ] stet The correct French is Donnez-mois du

-23)                             gin et un siphon.
 

399.4 (308.27)             five years ] stet Barban’s desire for Nicole likely predated the 1925 opening of the novel.
 

399.16–17 (309.2)       the “Herald” and of the “Times” ] The ^ ~ ^ ~ ~ The ^ ~ ^
 

*399.20 (309.6)           ouste ] C; Ouste
 

399.29 (309.14)           en,” ] stet The comma is battered in the plate and appears as a period.
 

399.31 (309.15–16)     Rue de Saint-Ange ] Due ~ Saints ^ Anges
 

*399.31 (309.16)         four ] five
 

400.31 (310.10)           dupes ] stet This word refers to people who are easily imposed on; the context indicates that Fitzgerald meant victims.
 

400.34 (310.13)           half-cut ] ~ -washed See Tender, 398.4.
 

401.11 (310.24)           principle ] principal Correct usage requires principle.
 

*401.21 (310.33)         “I never did go in for making love to dry loins,” ] stet
 

403.5 (311.31)             beach ] C; Beach
 

*403.10 (312.3)           AP ] C; A & P For AP, the Associated Press, Fitzgerald wrote “A & P”— which is a chain of supermarkets.  Dashiell queried this reading in the serial galleys:  “It is true, I believe, that there is an Atlantic & Pacific Picture concern, but I am afraid the grocery chain has the call on the initials in the minds of most of the people” (1 March 1934).  Fitzgerald’s response is unknown.
 

404.29 (313.13)           not——” ] ~ —”
 

404.30 (313.14)           “Even ] “even
 

407.16 (315.4)             public-health ] ~ ^ ~
 

408.7 (315.14)             section ] C; Section

 

 


Fitzgerald Centenary Comments

This page updated December 6, 2003.
Copyright 2003, the Board of Trustees of the University of South Carolina.
URL http://www.sc.edu/fitzgerald/emendations.html