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My FAMS

Information for current students, faculty, and staff of Film and Media Studies.

 

Major Changes for Fall 2018

We have updated the major. Current majors may continue under the old bulletin or switch to the 2018-19 requirements—ask your advisor.

  • FAMS 473 has been reimagined as FAMS 301: Media, Power, and Everyday Life.
  • A new course--FAMS 308: Global Media Industries--will be required for the revised major and is a prerequisite for industry studies courses, which will end in “8.” Look for “industries on the eights.”
  • Many courses previously offered as 500 level special topics will be offered as 300 level courses.
  • The elective distribution has been simplified. See bulletin for details.
  • FAMS/MART double majors should look for changes on the MART side. We made it easier to double.

 

Courses

The Undergraduate Bulletin lists requirements to major or minor in film and media studies. 700-level classes are open only to graduate students. Students concerned about time conflicts should read our screening policy.

 

2018 Fall
FAMS 110 Media Culture

Introduction to the critical study of film, video, photography, audio, and new media for non-majors. Carolina Core: AIU.
Professor Heidi Cooley
Now with break-out sections!
See Self-Service Carolina for sections/times
CRN 21257 ; cross-list: MART 110 (1V)

FAMS 240 Film and Media Analysis

Interpretation of film, television, and digital media, with particular attention to describing, analyzing, and writing arguments about the design of media works and their cultural impact. Carolina Core: AIU.

Section 01
Professor Kelly Wolf
MW 3:55 – 5:10 PM Screen: M 7:00-9:30 PM
CRN 21258

Section 02
Professor Evren Ozselcuk
TR 11:40 - 12:55 PM Screen: T 6:00 –8:30 PM
CRN  21259

Section H01 (Honors Only)
Professor Evren Ozselcuk
TR 10:05--11:20 AM Screen: T 6:00 –8:30 PM
CRN  21259

Section Y01
Professor Kelly Wolf
MW 5:30 – 6:45 PM Screen: M 7:00-9:30 PM
CRN 21260

FAMS 300 Film and Media History

Surveys the development of cinema and related media from the 1820s to the present. Attention to the relations among key technological, cultural, and industrial changes, their causes, and consequences. Carolina Core: GHS (CAS Global History).

Section 01
Professor Susan Courtney
MW 2:20—3:55 PM Screen: M 5:30 – 8:00 PM
CRN 21262

Section H01
Professor Mark Cooper
TR 11:40 AM - 12:55 PM Screen: T 6:00 –8:30 PM
CRN 21263

FAMS 308 Global Media Industries

Provides the foundation for the study of globalized film and media industries.
Note: This new course is a pre-req for new courses in the industries stream.
Professor Lauren Steimer
TR 2:50—4:05 PM
CRN 25039 ; cross-list: GLST 308

FAMS 310: Greece & Rome in Film & Popular Culture 

Representations of antiquity in cinema, television, and other contemporary media, with emphasis on Hollywood’s reception of Greek and Roman history.
Proferssor Hunter Gardner
TR 11:40-12:55
CRN 28966; meets with CLAS 305/HIST 305 (SR)

FAMS 332 American Television

Examination of American television as an industry, art form, medium of social representation, and set of viewer practices.
Pre- or Co-req FAMS 240 or FAMS 300
Professor Kelly Wolf
MW 2:20—3:35 PM Screen: T 6:00-8:30 PM
CRN 25040

FAMS 350 Introduction to Comics Studies

Scholarly study of the formal and aesthetic evolutions of graphic novels, comic books, and other related forms.
Professor Qiana Whitted
MW 9:40--10:55 AM
CRN 21453; cross-list: ENGL 350 (HL)

FAMS 363 Hong Kong Action Cinema

Survey of the transnational history of Hong Kong action cinema and introduction to critical approaches through which it has been studied. 
Pre- or Co-req: FAMS 240 or FAMS 300
Professor Lauren Steimer
TR 4:25—5:40 PM Screen: T 6:00-8:30 PM
CRN 25041

FAMS 381 History of S/EXperimental Film

Survey of key examples and tendencies in the history of experimental film. Considers how the personal and subjective aspect of film art has been used to explore sexuality and sexual identity.
Professor Susan Felleman
TR 1:45—4:05 PM (class meeting includes screening)
CRN 25141; meets with ARTH 390-002 and WGST 430-001 (AG)

FAMS 566 The South on Screen

Investigates the history of screen representations of the South and the mythologies of region, race, class, nation, gender, and sexuality they circulate.
Pre-req: FAMS 240 or consent of instructor
Professor Susan Courtney
MW 3:55-5:10 PM; Screen: M 5:30-8:00 PM
CRN22576; Meets with: ENGL 566.001 and SOST 500.002 (HZ)

FAMS 710 Research Methods for Applied Media Studies (Grad Only)

This course invites students to explore forms of applied media studies, including digital studies and digital humanities approaches, and assess their usefulness for enhancing and/or extending the reach of their own scholarship.
Professsor Heidi Cooley
W 1:10-3:40 PM
CRN 25043; Meets with: MART 701 (1W)

 

2018 Summer
FAMS 240 Film and Media Analysis

Interpretation of film, television, and digital media, with particular attention to describing, analyzing, and writing arguments about the design of media works and their cultural impact. Carolina Core: AIU.
Professor Mark Minett
Session 2 (6 weeks)
Now fully online!
See Self-Service Carolina for section details

FAMS 470: Gender, Sex, and Sexuality in Horror Films

Focuses on themes of heteronormativity, gender performance, and queer monstrosity through a survey of modern horror.
Professor Travis Wagner
Session 1 (3 weeks)
M,T,W,R 12:20--3:50 PM
CRN 74535; meets with: WGST 298 (DH)

FAMS 598 International Documentary Production

Offers a broad overview of, and deep immersion in, an international media market for documentary film and media at the 2018 Sheffield Documentary Film Festival in Sheffield, United Kingdom.
Professor Laura Kissel
June 5 – June  13
Students must apply through Study Abroad by March 1. Contact Professor Kissel:  laura@sc.edu

2018 Spring
FAMS 110.001 Media Culture

Professor Heidi Rae Cooley
TR 4:25-5:40 PM; Screening: T 6:00-8:30 PM 
Analyze and contextualize our image-saturated media culture; develop an descriptive vocabulary for images; explore key concepts in and theories of audio-visual media. Apply media analysis skills to the art of media production. 
AIU Aesthetic/Interpretive
CRN 51489 XLST MART 110.001 (AR)

FAMS 240 Introduction to Film and Media Studies

Interpretation of film, television, and digital media, with particular attention to describing, analyzing, and writing arguments about the design of media works and their cultural impact.
AIU Aesthetic/Interpretive

Section 001
Professor Mark Minett
MW 2:20-3:35 PM; Screening: M 5:30-7:30 PM
CRN 51409

Section 002
Professor Susan Courtney
TR 11:40-12:55 PM; Screening: T 6:00-8:30 PM
CRN 51601

Section 003
Professor Kelly Wolf 
MW 5:30-6:45 PM; Screening: M 7:00-9:30 PM
CRN  57004

Section H01 (Honors Only)
Professor Susan Felleman
MWF 12:00-12:50 PM; Screening: W 5:30-8:00 PM
CRN 51602

FAMS 300 Film and Media History

Survey the development of cinema and related media from the pyramids to the present, with an emphasis on mass media after the 1820s. Attend to the relations among key technological, cultural, and industrial changes, their causes, and consequences. Develop core skills in media history research and interpretation. Required for the major and minor in Film and Media Studies. 
GHS Global/History (non-US)

Section 001
Professor Kelly Wolf 
MW 3:55-5:10 PM; Screening: T 8:45-11:15 PM
CRN 54137

Section 002
Professor Susan Courtney
TR 4:25-5:40 PM; Screening: R 6:00-8:30PM
CRN 59151

Section H01 (Honors Only)
Professor Mark Cooper 
MWF 10:55-11:40 PM: Screening: W 7:00-9:30 PM
CRN 51650

FAMS 470.001 Middle East on Screen

Professor Evren Ozselcuk 
TR 10:05-11:20 AM; Screening: R 6:00-8:30 PM 
Contrast Hollywood representations of the Middle East with films actually made in and about Algeria, Egypt, Iran, Israel, Kurdistan, Lebanon, Morocco, Palestine, and Turkey. Explore, through cinema, some of the most vexed issues debated in and about the Middle East today: from questions of modernity to gender dynamics, from Islam in everyday life to popular culture, from war and conflict to global processes of power and representation.
Satisfies "Global" requirement for FAMS majors.
CRN 51603

FAMS 473.001 Film and Media Theory/Criticism: Media, Power & Everyday Life

Professor Lauren Steimer
TR 1:15-02:30 PM; No screening 
Foundational approaches to media as a means of defining and distributing social power in everyday life.
Required for the major and minor in Film and Media Studies. 
Prereq: FAMS 240 or permission of instructor.
CRN 51565

FAMS 510.001  Classical Hollywood Cinema

Professor Susan Felleman 
MW 2:20- 3:35 PM; M 5:30-8:00 PM
Explore Classical Hollywood Cinema with an emphasis on major directors and films. Discuss the industrial, aesthetic, and political features of the studio system and its production methods along with some historical and critical views of it. Consider key works exemplifying major narrative themes, genres, and historical trends.
Prereq: FAMS 300 or permission of instructor. 
INT Integrative
CRN 51584 Meets with MART 592 & ARTH 569 (AT)

FAMS 511.001 American Teen Film

Professor Lauren Steimer 
TR 2:50-4:05 PM; Screening: T 6:00-8:30 PM
Discover how the perceived spending power of adolescent consumers has informed the development of this film genre and explore shifts in its semantic and syntactic elements across the last fifty years. Explore the correlation between the over-population of teen films and shifts in the modes of film exhibition post-1948.
Prereq: FAMS 240 or permission of instructor.
INT Integrative

CRN 51576 Meets with MART 591.001 (AS)

FAMS 511.002 Critical Interactives: Ward One IV

Professors Heidi Rae Cooley and Duncan Buell 
TR 11:40-12:55 PM 
Join undergraduate and graduate students from computer science and the humanities to build interactive digital projects for the public. Continue development of a mobile application that presents the history of Ward One, a predominately African American community displaced by mid-century urban renewal. Work with former Ward One residents whose homes were razed in order to enable UoSC's expansion. 
Requires Permission of Instructor 
INT Integrative
CRN 54094 Meets with MART 591.002, CSCE 571.001 (AU)

FAMS 566.001 Superheroes across Media

Professor Mark Minett 
Class: MW 3:55-5:10 PM; Screening: M 7:45-10:15 PM 
Trace the aesthetic, cultural, technological, and industrial history of the superhero genre and superhero storytelling in comics, television, film, radio, and new media with an emphasis on the transmedia franchising and (re)iteration of iconic "comic book superheroes" such as Superman, Batman, Wonder Woman, Spider-Man, the X-Men, and the Avengers. 
Prereq: FAMS 240 or permission of instructor.
INT Integrative
CRN 51604 XLST ENGL 566 (D7)

2017 Fall
FAMS 110.001 Media Culture

Professor Laura Kissel
TR 4:25 PM - 5:40 PM; Screening: T 6:00 - 8:30 PM 
Analyze and contextualize our image-saturated media culture; develop a descriptive vocabulary for images; explore key concepts in and theories of audio-visual media. Apply media analysis skills to the art of media production. 
CC-AIU Aesthetic/Interpretive
CRN 22503 XLST MART 110.001 (LU)

FAMS 240 Introduction to Film and Media Studies

Closely analyze moving image media (including their sounds) and develop compelling written arguments about specific works. Required for the major and minor in Film and Media Studies. 
CC-AIU Aesthetic/Interpretive

Section 001
Professor Evren Ozselcuk
TR 11:40 - 12:55 AM; Screening: T 6:00 - 8:30 PM
CRN 22504

Section 002
Professor Evren Ozselcuk
TR 2:50 - 4:05 PM; Screening: T 6:00 - 8:30 PM
CRN22505

Section Y01
Professor Kelly Wolf
MW 3:55 - 5:10 PM; Screening 5:30 - 8:00 PM

CRN 22508
Section H01 (Honors Only) 

Professor Susan Felleman
TR 2:50 - 4:05 PM; Screening: T 6:00- 8:30 PM
CRN 22507

FAMS 300 Film and Media History

Survey the development of cinema and related media from the pyramids to the present, with an emphasis on mass media after the 1820s. Attend to the relations among key technological, cultural, and industrial changes, their causes and consequences. Develop core skills in media history research and interpretation. Required for the major and minor in Film and Media Studies.
CC-GHS Global/History (CAS non-US)

Section 001
Professor Mark Cooper
MWF 10:50-11:40 PM; Screening: M 5:30 - 8:00 PM
CRN 22508

Section H01 (Honors Only)
Professor Susan Courtney
TR 11:40-12:55 PM; Screening:W 5:30-7:25
CRN 22509

FAMS 350.001  Introduction to Comics Studies

Professor Mark Minett
MW 2:20 - 3:35 PM
Engage questions of formal design, industrial organization, historical development, cultural representation, legitimation, and audience practices. Explore a wide variety of periods, perspectives, and texts ranging from Donald Duck to Maus, The Dark Knight Returns to Fun HomeAkira to Astro Boy, Persepolis to Nimona, and Tales from the Crypt to The Walking Dead.
CRN22929 XlST ENGL 350.001 (F1) 

FAMS 470.001 Genre Studies: Mediating Race

Professor Susan Courtney
TR 2:50 - 4:05 PM; Screening:W 7:40-9:40 PM
Develop and explore key questions about race, justice, and media in the era of #BlackLivesMatter and President Trump. Analyze viral cell phone videos of police brutality and the increased visibility of white nationalism, and related histories of race at the movies and on TV—from The Birth of a Nation (1915) to The Cosby Show (1984-1992), The Wire (2002-2008), and Moonlight (2016)—to consider where we are now, how we got here, and strategies for moving forward.
CRN 25557 Meets with ENGL 439.001, AFAM 398.004 (53)

FAMS 470.002 Genre Studies: Screening China: Cinema and Nation

Professor Krista Van Fleit
TR 11:40 AM - 12:50 PM; Screening:M 6:00-8:30 PM
Explore the cinematic history of modern China. Examine how changes in cinematic representation coincide with differing representations of the nation. Interpret how filmmakers use different genres to portray China and its changing society from melodramas of cosomoplitan Shanghai in the 1920s to Maoist muscials, Fifth Generation art house fare, and more recent martial arts epics. 
CRN 27755 Meets with CHIN 355.001

FAMS 511.001 Topics in Film and Media: Tarantino 

Professors Lauren Steimer and Julie Hubbert
TR 1:15 to 2:30 PM; Screening T 6:00-9:00 PM
Explore the auteur theory via an analysis of the film and television work of Quentin Tarantino, a writer and as a director whose “distinct” style has been informed by an amalgam of national cinemas, film movements, “low” genres, and musical repertoires. Examine Tarantino’s work as well as the films that influenced each production, with a special emphasis on music and soundtracks.
Prereq: FAMS 240 or permission of instructor. 
CC-INT Integrative
CRN 22511 XLST MART591.001 (F2)

FAMS 511.H01 Topics in Film and Media: Complex Television

Professor Mark Minett
MW 3:55-5:10 PM; Screening M 5:30-8:00 PM
Explore "complex" or "quality" television as a set of television practices engaged in by producers and audiences and made possible by a confluence of industrial, technological, and cultural factors. Pursue questions of form, authorship, and legitimation. Emphasizes television from the last 20-25 years, but students will also be introduced to previous eras of quality television. 
Prereq: FAMS 240 or permission of instructor. 
CC-INT Integrative
CRN 25558 XLST MART 591.H01 (LW)

FAMS 555.001 Documentary Film and Media Studies

Professor Heidi Cooley
TR 11:40 - 12:55 PM
Examine the history and theory of documentary film and media. Consider questions of evidence, truth, and reality, as well as how documentary media incite emotion to leverage claims and mobilize action. Explore interactive documentaries (i-Docs), mobile-mentaries, VR platforms, and animated documentaries in addition to traditional documentary modes.
Prereq: FAMS 240 or permission of instructor
CC-INT Integrative
CRN 25007 XLST MART 595.001 

FAMS 598.001 Hong Kong Action Cinema

Professor Lauren Steimer
TR 4:25-5:40 PM; Screening: R 6:00 - 8:30 PM
Explore the transnational history of Hong Kong action cinema from its humble Shanghai beginnings to the Hollywood appropriation of both the martial arts aesthetic and the labor-power necessary to produce it. Engage a range of critical and theoretical approaches, from notions of national cinema to transnational cult audience reception.
Prereq: FAMS 240 or permission of instructor. 
GLD Global Learning and CC-INT Integrative
CRN 25006 XLST MART 594.001 (LV)

2017 Summer
FAMS 110.001 Media Culture

Professor Laura Kissel
May 8-25, M-R 3:30-6:40 PM
Analyze and contextualize our image-saturated media culture; develop an descriptive vocabulary for images; explore key concepts in and theories of audio-visual media. Apply media analysis skills to the art of media production. 
CC-AIU Aesthetic/Interpretive
CRN 77744 XLST MART 110.001

FAMS 240.001 Introduction to Film and Media Studies

Professor Mark Minett
May 8-25, M-R 12:00-3:10 PM
Closely analyze moving image media (including their sounds) and develop compelling written arguments about specific works. Required for the major and minor in Film and Media Studies.
CC-AIU Aesthetic/Interpretive
CRN 77754

2017 Spring
FAMS 110.001 Media Culture (= MART 110.001)

Professor Lauren Steimer 
Class: TR 4:25 PM - 5:40 PM; Screening: T 6:00 - 8:30 PM 
Analyze and contextualize our image-saturated media culture; develop an descriptive vocabulary for images; explore key concepts in and theories of audio-visual media. Apply media analysis skills to the art of media production. 
AIU Aesthetic/Interpretive

FAMS 240 Introduction to Film and Media Studies

Closely analyze moving image media (including their sounds) and develop compelling written arguments about specific works. Required for the major and minor in Film and Media Studies. 
AIU Aesthetic/Interpretive

Section 001
Professor Evren Ozselcuk 
Class: TR 10:05 - 11:20 AM; Screening: T 6:00 - 8:30 PM

Section 002
Professor Evren Ozselcuk
Class: TR 1:15 - 2:30 PM; Screening: T 6:00 - 8:30 PM

Section E01
Professor Kelly Wolf 
Class: MW 6:00 - 7:15 PM; Screening: M 7:30 - 10:00 PM

Section H01 (Honors Only)
Professor Susan Courtney 
Class: TR 1:15 - 2:30 PM; Screening: T 4:25 - 6:55 PM

FAMS 300 Film and Media History

Survey the development of cinema and related media from the pyramids to the present, with an emphasis on mass media after the 1820s. Attend to the relations among key technological, cultural, and industrial changes, their causes, and consequences. Develop core skills in media history research and interpretation. Required for the major and minor in Film and Media Studies. 
GHS Global/History(non-US)

Section 001
Professor Kelly Wolf 
Class: MW 3:55 - 5:10 PM; Screening: T 5:30 - 8:00 PM

Section H01 (Honors Only)
Professor Mark Cooper 
Class: MWF 10:50-11:40 PM: Screening: W 5:30 - 8:00 PM

FAMS 470.001 Genre Studies: American Television (= ENGL 439.001)

Professor Mark Minett 
Class: MW 3:55 - 5:10 PM; Screening: M 5:30 - 8:00 PM 
Survey the complex and changing features of American television from networks to Netflix, from Sesame Street to soap operas to The Sopranos, and from live-tweeting Pretty Little Liars to binge-viewing Breaking Bad. Prepare to examine American television, past and present, from multiple perspectives: as an industry, as an art form, as a representation of society and identity, and as a set of practices engaged in by viewers.

FAMS 470.002 Genre Studies: Middle Eastern Cinema [CANCELED]

Professor Evren Ozselcuk 
Class: MW 03:55 - 5:10 PM; Screening: M 5:30 - 5:10 PM 
Survey films from the Middle East and North Africa and explore the socio-political contexts in which they have been produced. Analyze film form and content in light of various theoretical frameworks, including postcolonial, feminist, and psychoanalytical. Examine modernity, religion and secularism, constructions of femininity/masculinity, political conflict, and occupied territories. Investigate global processes of power and representation.

FAMS 470 Genre Studies: The Period Film (= ARTH 390.003)

Professor Susan Felleman 
Class: MW 3:55 - 5:10 PM; Screening: W 5:30 - 8:00 PM 
In tandem with the Columbia Museum of Art's "CUT!: Costume and the Cinema" exhibition, explore how and to what ends films evoke historical periods. Consider subgeneres including historical films, literary adaptations, and biopics, examine scholarship on the "heritage film" and "costume drama," and investigate the preproduction work of research, production of settings and costumes, and issues of style, stardom, and reception.

FAMS 473.001 Film and Media Theory/Criticism: Media, Power & Everyday Life (= ENGL 473.001, MART 591.001)

Professor Heidi Rae Cooley 
Class: TR 1:15 - 02:30 PM; No screening 
Media captivates us. But what might we mean by "media"? And how might we evaluate its power in our everyday lives? Consider several broadly influential answers to these questions culled from the past century of research. In the end, be able to defend one. Required for the major and minor in Film and Media Studies. 
Prereq: FAMS 240 or permission of instructor.

FAMS 510.001 The History of Experimental Film ( = ARTH 569.001/MART592.001)

Professor Susan Felleman 
Class: MW 12:00 - 02:00 PM (includes screening) 
Discover a parallel history of film created by artists who have seen and explored possibilities other than the dominant (illusionistic narrative) in the medium. Survey some of the most important currents in that history, from abstraction, poetry and radical revolt in avant-garde practices of the 1920s to psychodrama, cameraless film, experiments in animation and collage, Underground, Structuralist and found footage film, and more. 
Prereq: FAMS 300 or permission of instructor. 
INT Integrative

FAMS 511.001 Critical Interactives: Ward One III (= MART 591.002, CSCE 571.001/H01)

Professors Heidi Rae Cooley and Duncan Buell 
Class: TR 4:25 - 05:40 PM 
Join undergraduate and graduate students from computer science and the humanities to build interactive digital projects for the public. Continue development of a mobile application that presents the history of Ward One, a predominately African American community displaced by mid-century urban renewal. Work with former Ward One residents whose homes were razed in order to enable UoSC's expansion. 
Requires Permission of Instructor 
INT Integrative

FAMS 566.001 Superheroes across Media (= ENGL566.001)

Professor Mark Minett 
Class: MW 2:20 - 3:35 PM; Screening: M 7:05 - 9:35 PM 
Trace the aesthetic, cultural, technological, and industrial history of the superhero genre and superhero storytelling in comics, television, film, radio, and new media with an emphasis on the transmedia franchising and (re)iteration of iconic "comic book superheroes" such as Superman, Batman, Wonder Woman, Spider-Man, the X-Men, and the Avengers. 
INT Integrative

FAMS 598.001 British Television ( = MART 594.001)

Professor Lauren Steimer 
Class: TR 2:50 - 4:05 PM; Screening: T 6:00 - 8:30 PM 
Examine the industrial structures, network histories, production cultures, and regulation contexts of contemporary (Post-OFCOM) British television via analysis of the diverse state-owned and commercial platforms for public service broadcasting (e.g. The BBC, ITV, and Channel 4). 
Prereq: FAMS 240 or permission of instructor. 
GLD Global Learning and INT Integrative

FAMS 710.00 Advanced Topics: Race and Media ( = ENGL 765.001)

Professor Susan Courtney 
Class: R 4:25 - 7:10 PM; Screening: T 7:35 -10:05 PM 
Consider critical, historical, and theoretical methods for studying race in media studies, with emphasis on U.S. screen media. Engage the current national conversation sparked by viral cell phone videos, as well as scholarship on film, television, and digital media—including popular "classics" and a history of counter-media from Within Our Gates to The Wire. Opportunities for archival research in USC's Moving Image Research Collections. 
OPEN TO GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY

2016 Fall
A complete list of Film and Media Studies (FAMS) course offerings for Fall 2016 can also be viewed on USC's Master Schedule under the new designator FAMS.NOTE: 500 level courses have either FAMS 240 or FAMS 300 as a pre-requisite, see below. 

FAMS 110  Media Culture

Satisifies Carolina Core AIU
Professor Laura Kissel
Class: Tuesday and Thursday 4:25 PM - 5:40 PM
Screening: Tuesday  6 - 8 PM
An introduction to the study of media forms: photography, advertising, film, television, and new media. Students learn how to analyze, comprehend, and contextualize our image-saturated media culture; acquire an analytical/theoretical vocabulary for images; and gain an understanding of key concepts in and theories of visual media. The course also offers students the chance to apply their newfound skill set for media analysis to the art of media production of both sound and image. 

FAMS 240  Introduction to Film and Media Studies

Satisifies Carolina Core GHS, College of Arts and Sciences Global History 

Introduction to the critical study of film and media. Students will closely analyze moving images and develop written arguments about film and media. This course is required for the major and minor in Film and Media Studies.

Section 001:  Professor Mark Minett
Class: M and W 3:55 - 5:10 
Screening: M 5:50 - 7:50 PM

Section 002:  Professor Lauren Steimer
Class:  T and TH 2:50 - 4:05 
Screening:  W 5:30 - 7:30 PM

Section E01:  Professor Kelly Wolf
Class: M and W 5:30 - 6:45 
Screening:  M 7:00 - 9:00 PM

Section H01 (Honors College only):  Professor Susan Felleman
Class: T and TH 2:50 - 4:05
Screening: T 6:00 - 8:00 PM

 
FAMS 300  Film and Media History 

Satisifies Carolina Core AIU
Surveys the development of cinema and related media from antiquity to the present, emphasizing the twentieth century. Considers key technological, cultural, and industrial changes, their interrelation, causes, and consequences. Builds historical research skills. 
Section 001:  Professor Kelly Wolf
Class: T and TH 1:15 - 2:30
Screening: W 7:05 - 9:05 PM
Section H01 (Honors College only):  Professor Susan Courtney
Class: T and TH 11:40 - 12:55
Screening: T 6:30 - 8:30 PM

FAMS 350  Introduction to Comic Studies

Professor Mark Minett
Class: M and W 2:20 - 3:35
cross listed with ENGL 350
This course functions as an introduction to the study of comics, preparing students to engage with questions of formal design, industrial organization, historical development, cultural representation, legitimation, and audience practices. A wide variety of periods, perspectives, and texts will be explored, with readings ranging from Donald Duck to Maus, from The Dark Knight Returnsto Fun Home, from Akira to Astro Boy, from Persepolis to Nimona, and from Tales from the Crypt to The Walking Dead.  

FAMS 510  Media Industries (prereq: FAMS 300)

Professor Mark Cooper
Class: T and TH 10:05 - 11:20 AM
Do low budgets inspire creativity? How do policies shaping global trade affect media where you live? This course considers a recent outpouring of scholarship that engages such questions. Insights gleaned from this scholarship will allow students to stage original research projects on local media industries.  

FAMS 511  Action Heroines (prereq: FAMS 240)

Professor Lauren Steimer
Class:  T and TH 4:25 - 5:40 
Screening: Tuesday 6:30 - 8:30  OR  Sunday 2:00 - 4:00 PM   (Attend the screening of your choice.)
cross listed with MART 591
Fighting female protagonists date back to the earliest cinematic examples of the action genre in Asia, Europe, and the United States. This course considers the many permutations of the international action heroine in both film and television. This course is concerned with material issues connected to the action heroine: economies of stardom, reception contexts, labor practices, and regimes of bodily training. 

FAMS 566  The South on Screen (prereq: FAMS 240)

Professor Susan Courtney
Class: T and TH 2:50 - 4:05
Screening: Tuesday 4:25 - 6:25 OR Sunday 4:05 - 6:05 PM  (Attend the screening of your choice.)
cross listed with ENGL 566 and SOST 405
Paying close attention to what the South has looked and sounded like on screens large and small (at the movies, on TV, etc.) in the last century, this course asks: What histories and mythologies of region, race, class, nation, gender, and sexuality circulate in the history of the South on screen? And what can this media history teach us about not only the South we live in now, but also the U.S. as a whole? What—and how—have popular screen Souths (marketed to the nation and the world), as well as more independent visions, invited us to remember and forget, to feel and not feel, about our collective past? And what lessons might we draw from this history for the present and the future? Works studied may include: Django Unchained, Deliverance, To Kill a Mockingbird, Gone With the Wind, Daughters of the Dust, and Sherman’s March: A Meditation on the Possibility of Romantic Love in the South in an Era of Nuclear Weapons Proliferation, among others.

2016 Summer
FILM 110 Media Culture

Professor Laura Kissel
Class: Monday thru Friday, 12:05 - 2:05 PM
May 30 - June 23
An introduction to the study of media forms: photography, film, television, and new media. Students learn how to analyze, comprehend, and contextualize our image-saturated media culture; acquire an analytical/theoretical vocabulary for images; and gain an understanding of key concepts in and theories of visual media. The course also offers students the chance to apply their newfound skill set for media analysis to the art of media production of both sound and image.

2016 Spring

A complete list of Film and Media Studies course offerings for Spring 2016 can also be viewed on USC's Master Schedule. 

NOTE: FILM 240 is a pre-requisite for 500 level courses. 

FILM 110 Media Culture

Professor Lauren Steimer
Class: Tuesday and Thursday 4:25 PM - 5:40 PM
Screening: Tuesday  6 - 8 PM
An introduction to the study of media forms: photography, advertising, film, television, and new media. Students learn how to analyze, comprehend, and contextualize our image-saturated media culture; acquire an analytical/theoretical vocabulary for images; and gain an understanding of key concepts in and theories of visual media. The course also offers students the chance to apply their newfound skill set for media analysis to the art of media production of both sound and image. 

FILM 240.001 Introduction to Film and Media Studies

Professor Susan Courtney
Class: Tuesday and Thursday 10:05 - 11:20 AM
Screening: Tuesday  4:25 - 6:25 PM
Introduction to the critical study of film and media. Students will closely analyze moving images and develop written arguments about film and media. This course is required for the major and minor in Film and Media Studies. 

FILM 240.002 Introduction to Film and Media Studies

Professor Susan Courtney
Class: Tuesday and Thursday 1:15 - 2:30 PM
Screening: Tuesday  4:25 - 6:25 PM
Introduction to the critical study of film and media. Students will closely analyze moving images and develop written arguments about film and media. This course is required for the major and minor in Film and Media Studies. 

FILM 240.003 Introduction to Film and Media Studies

Professor Sue Felleman
Class: Tuesday and Thursday 2:50 - 4:05 PM
Screening: Tuesday  6:00 - 8:00 PM
Introduction to the critical study of film and media. Students will closely analyze moving images and develop written arguments about film and media. This course is required for the major and minor in Film and Media Studies. 

FILM 240 H01 Introduction to Film and Media Studies  HONORS SECTION

Professor Mark Minett
Class: Monday and Wednesday 2:20 - 3:35 PM
Screening: Mondays 7:05 - 9:05 PM 
Introduction to the critical study of film and media. Students will closely analyze moving images and develop written arguements about film and media. This course is required for the major and minor in Film and Media Studies. 

FILM 300 Film and Media History and FILM 300-H01 (Honors section)

Professor Mark Cooper
Class: Monday and Wednesday 3:55 - 5:10 PM
Screening: Wednesdays 5:30 - 7:30 PMSurveys the development of cinema and related media from the 1820s to the present, Attention to the relations among key technological, cultural, and industrial changes, their causes, and consequences. 

FILM 470 Genre Studies:  AMERICAN TELEVISION

Professor Mark Minett
Class: Monday and Wednesday 3:55 - 5:10 PM 
MEETS WITH ENGL 439
American television has never been as popular, as prestigious, as plentiful, or as pertinent to understanding American media culture. This course will prepare students to examine American television, past and present, from multiple perspectives: as an industry, as an art form, as a representation of society and identity, and as a set of practices engaged in by viewers. From networks to Netflix, from Sesame Street to soap operas to The Sopranos, and from live-tweeting Pretty Little Liars to binge-viewing Breaking Bad, this course will survey the complex and constantly changing features of American television.


FILM 473 Film and Media Theory and Criticism: MEDIA, POWER AND EVERYDAY LIFE

Professor Mark Cooper
Class: Monday and Wednesday 2:20 - 3:35 PM
Screening: Mondays  5:30 - 7:30 PM 
cross listed with ENGL 473
Media captivates us. But what might we mean by "media"? And how might we evaluate its power in our everyday lives? This course will consider several possible answers to these questions. In the end, each student will be able to defend one. 

FILM 510.001 THE BLOCKBUSTER

Professor Lauren Steimer
Class: Tuesday and Thursday 2:50 - 4:05 PM
Screening: Tuesdays 6:00 - 8:00 PM
cross listed with MART 592
This course examines the history of the blockbuster film via an analysis of marketing tactics, exhibition strategies, financing options, and distribution patterns. Topics addressed in this class include: product placement, audience research, marketing: trailers, posters, tie-ins, soundtrack and score design, release patterns, casting considerations, and the tendency of producers to green light “pre-sold” properties. This course necessitates knowledge of film terminology but the approach to the films screened is more inclined to an analysis of films as products than toward formal analytics.   

FILM 510.002  MUSIC AND THE HOLLYWOOD FILM

Professor Julie Hubbert
Class: Tuesday and Thursday 1:15 - 2:30 PM
Screening: Wednesdays 7:30 - 9:30 PM
cross listed with:  MART 592 
This course will examine the use of music in sound film from the early 1930s to the present day.  It will cover the work of major film composers (Steiner, Herrmann, Williams, and Zimmer) and important structural trends from orchestral scoring to pop compilations.  It will also consider music’s relationship to other elements on the film soundtrack, and the synergies film music has generated between the music recording industry, music videos and games. 

FILM 511.001  WARD ONE II 

Professor Heidi Rae Cooley
Class: Thursdays 4:25 - 7:10 PM
cross listed with and/or meets with MART 795A.001, MART 591.002, CSCE 571.001, CSCE 790.004
This is an interdisciplinary course that merges theory and practice to consider how interactive digital applications can be applied to the concerns of public history. This course will continue the development of a mobile location-aware application that draws attention to the history of racial politics that made space for Greek Village, the Strom Thurmond Wellness Center, and the Koger Center.  

FILM 511.002   FEMINISM, ART AND MEDIA

Professor Susan Felleman
Class: Tuesday and Thursday 11:40 - 12:55 PM
screening: Mondays 7:30 - 9:30 PM
cross listed and/or meets with ARTH 590, MART 591 and WGST 598
This course introduces basic issues for feminism and feminist theory in art and media through reading and viewing around case studies in the history of fine arts, photography, film and video. Participants will read intensively (2-3 readings per week) and work to understand and articulate feminist critical debates and developments.  

FILM 555 Documentary Film and Media Studies: "Intelligence Work"

Professor Heidi Rae Cooley 
Class: Tuesday and Thursday 1:15 - 2:30 PM
screening: Wednesdays 7:35 - 9:35 PM (the screening time is shared with MART 571B Documentary Production)
cross listed with MART 595
This course invites students to consider the history and theories of documentary film and media in terms of the “intelligence work” (Kahana) they perform. It asks students to consider both (1) how documentary media objects (e.g., films, video, interactive modes of presentation) invite public engagement in the issues they present and (2) how such engagement is mobilized through the very technologies that serve to distract critical engagement. 

2015 Fall
 A complete list of Film and Media Studies course offerings for Fall 2015 can also be viewed on USC's Master Schedule.  
FILM 110 Media Culture

Professor Laura Kissel
Class: Tuesday and Thursday 4:25 PM - 5:40 PM
Screening: Tuesday  6 - 8 PM
An introduction to the study of media forms: photography, advertising, film, television, and new media. Students learn how to analyze, comprehend, and contextualize our image-saturated media culture; acquire an analytical/theoretical vocabulary for images; and gain an understanding of key concepts in and theories of visual media. The course also offers students the chance to apply their newfound skill set for media analysis to the art of media production of both sound and image.

FILM 240.001 Introduction to Film and Media Studies

Professor Susan Courtney
Class: Tuesday and Thursday 10:05 - 11:20 AM
Screening: Tuesday  4:25 - 6:25 PM
Introduction to the critical study of film and media. Students will closely analyze moving images and develop written arguments about film and media. This course is required for the major and minor in Film and Media Studies.

FILM 240 H01 Introduction to Film and Media Studies  HONORS SECTION

Professor Mark Minett
Class: Monday and Wednesday 3:55 - 5:10 PM
Screening: Mondays 5:30 - 7:30 PM 
Introduction to the critical study of film and media. Students will closely analyze moving images and develop written arguements about film and media. This course is required for the major and minor in Film and Media Studies. 

FILM 240.E01 Introduction to Film and Media Studies

Professor  Evren Ozselcuk
Class: Tuesday and Thursday 6:00-7:15PM
Screening: Thursdays 7:35-9:35PM
Introduction to the critical study of film and media. Students will closely analyze moving images and develop written arguements about film and media. This course is required for the major and minor in Film and Media Studies. 

FILM 300 Film and Media History

Professor Mark Cooper
Class: Tuesday and Thursday 1:15 - 2:30 PM
Screening: Thursdays 6 - 8 PM
Surveys the development of cinema and related media from the 1820s to the present, Attention to the relations among key technological, cultural, and industrial changes, their causes, and consequences.

FILM 510.001  History of Experimental Film

Professor Susan Felleman
Class: Tuesday and Thursday 4:25 - 6:40 PM  (includes screening time)
cross listed with ARTH 569 and MART 592
From almost the beginning of cinema, there has been a parallel history: that of film art created by painters and sculptors, poets and critics, composers, experimentalists, philosophers, and others who have seen and explored possibilities other than the dominant (illusionistic narrative) in the medium of film. This course surveys some of the most important currents in that history, including cubist and other avant-garde practices of the 1920s; Impressionist, Expressionist, Dada and Surrealist cinemas; psychodramas, cameraless films, experiments in animation and collage, neo-Dada, pop, Structuralist film, and more.

FILM 511-001  Introduction to Game Studies

Professor Heidi Rae Cooley
Class: Tuesday and Thursday 10:05 - 11:20
Screening: Wednesdays 5:30 - 7:30 PM 
cross listed with MART 591.001
Invites students to think critically about games and game-play. Prepares students to approach games as historical and cultural objects. Helps students to understand how games and gameplay function socially to shape how people think about themselves, others, and the world around them.

FILM 511-002  Stardom, Celebrity, and Performance

Professor Kelly Wolf
Class: Monday and Wednesday 6 - 7:15 PM
Screening: Wednesday 7:30 - 9:30 PM
cross listed with MART 591.002
This course will explore the forms and functions of stardom and celebrity as a phenomenon of both production and consumption that operates both onscreen and off. We will be looking at the manner in which a variety of performers from film, television, and new media can be seen not only as highly skilled workers operating within specialized fields but also as cultural icons channeling viewer identification and forms of fandom. The course will also trace the roles that industry economics, technological development, and socio-cultural change have played in the emergence of individual performers, various acting and training methodologies, modes of studio promotion, and patterns of exhibition. Students will learn to recognize the specificities that characterize types of stardom and celebrity operating across multiple media forms and through different performance strategies.

FILM 566.001  Mediating Ferguson USA: 1915-2015

Professor Susan Courtney
Class: Tuesday and Thursday 1:15 - 2:30 PM
Screening: Tuesday 6:30 - 8:30 PM 
cross listed with ENGL 566-001
This course considers race, justice, and popular U.S. film and media in the 20th and 21st centuries. But it is a history for the present. We’ll begin with the recent national conversation about incidents in which white law enforcement officers have killed unarmed African American men and boys: Michael Brown, Eric Garner, Tamir Rice, Trayvon Martin, Oscar Grant, Kejieme Powell and others. First, we’ll study media related to these cases--from viral cell phone videos to Fruitvale Station (2013)--to develop key questions for the course. With those in mind, and drawing upon scholarship on media formations of race and related forms of identity and power (e.g., gender, sexuality, social class), we’ll then consider what the history of race and justice at the movies and on TV--from D.W. Griffith’s The Birth of a Nation (1915)to HBO’s The Wire (2002-08)--might have to teach us about where we are now, how we got here, and strategies for moving forward. 

FILM 566.002  Superheroes Across Media

Professor Mark Minett
Class: Monday and Wednesday 2:20 - 3:35 PM
Screening: Mondays 7:30 - 9:30 PM 
cross listed with ENGL 566-002
Traces the aesthetic, cultural, technological, and industrial history of the superhero genre and superhero storytelling in comics, television, film, radio, and new media. Primary focus is placed on examining the transmedia franchising and (re)iteration of iconic “comic book superheroes” such as Superman, Batman, Wonder Woman, Spider-Man, the X-Men, and the Avengers. 

FILM 710  Media/Archives

Professor Mark Cooper
Class: Wednesday 2:20 - 4:50 PM
cross listed with ENGL 765 and HIST 700
This class explores the role of the archives in determining how media (past, present, and future) are understood and practiced. We will ask how, to what ends, and for whom, is knowledge produced by means of archives? The course will emphasize the recent outpouring of scholarship on this question in Film and Media Studies but will also engage foundational arguments from philosophy, history, and library and information science. Regardless of discipline, graduate students will discover how the unique archival resources of the University’s Moving Image Research Collections can supplement their programs of research and/or creative activity. Students interested in “film” will be invited to reconsider what that term means. Students interested in metadata will be asked to revise the division of labor that creates it. Students interested in historical evidence will encounter powerfully supplemental new kinds of it. Student interest in ontology will touch archival things. 

2015 Summer
FILM 566.001 TOPICS: THE MATING GAME IN CLASSIC HOLLYWOOD MOVIES                  

Professor Larry Rhu
Summer B                                                                                                                      
MTWRF 1:15-3:15, TR 3:30-5:30 
This course studies comedies and melodramas from the first three decades of the sound era and their more recent inheritors, like Groundhog DayMoonstruckHigh FidelityThe Eternal Sunshine of a Spotless Mind, and Far From Heaven. Films will be analyzed in terms of features that define them as comedies, melodramas, and thrillers, and in terms of their preoccupation with relations between the sexes. In light of these American "talkies," what constitutes a genuine marriage or makes such an alliance impossible? Do such questions require public and/or private responses? Besides those mentioned above, films will include It Happened One NightThe Lady EveHis Girl FridayThe Philadelphia StoryAdam’s RibStella DallasGaslightNow, VoyagerLetter from an Unknown WomanVertigo, and North by Northwest. Some films will be analyzed in tandem with literary texts and film criticism. Grades will be based on regular journal entries and a final exam. Graduate students will be expected to read additional theoretical essays and to write a longer and more substantive final research paper.

2015 Spring
FILM 110/MART 110:  Media Culture [Carolina Core:  AIU]

Professor Heidi R. Cooley
Class:  Tuesday and Thursday  4:25 – 5:40 PM
Screening: Tuesdays  6:00 – 8:00 PM


Introduces non-majors to the critical study of a range of media forms (e.g., film, video, photography, new media).

FILM 240:  Introduction to Film and Media Studies [Carolina Core:  AIU]

See master schedule for multiple times and instructors
Introduction to the critical study of film and media. Students develop analytical skills with which to closely analyze, verbally and in writing, the formal elements (e.g., editing, cinematography, sound) through which audiovisual media communicate. Students also deploy these skills to consider key critical concepts in film and media studies. Designed for majors, minors and anyone else who wants to develop analytical tools for interrogating audiovisual media as well as argumentative writing skills.

FILM 300:  Film and Media History [Carolina Core:  GHS]

See master schedule for multiple times and instructors, including NEW Honor's Section.
Surveys the development of cinema and related media from the 1820s to the present.  Attention to the relations among key technological, cultural, and industrial changes, their causes, and consequences.

FILM 473:  Film and Media Theory and Criticism

Professor Lauren Steimer
Class:  Monday and Wednesday  2:20 – 3:55 PM
Screening: Thursdays  6:00 – 8:00 PM


To help us understand what screen culture is and has been, and what people have imagined it could be, this course studies the rich history of critical and theoretical writings about film and related media from the 1910s to the present. These offer a diverse body of modern thought (informed by semiotics, Marxism, feminism, critical race studies, technology studies, and more) and a rich repertoire of analytical tools. We'll closely read the written texts; analyze moving images (e.g., films, TV, websites) through the lenses they offer and use the moving images in turn to reflect upon, refine, and expand the theories we read.

FILM 511.001/MART 595B.001:  Special Topics in Film and Media Studies - The American Teen Film

Professor Lauren Steimer
Class:  Monday and Wednesday  3:55 – 5:10 PM
Screening: Mondays  5:30 – 7:30 PM


The growth of “teen culture” in America in the Post-War era can be directly linked to the perceived spending power of adolescent consumers.  Teen consumers have been one of the most sought-after audiences for the Hollywood film industry for the last 50 years.  The course examines shifts in the semantic and syntactic elements of the American teen film genre across the last fifty years.  One particular area that this course contends with is the correlation between the over-population of teen films and shifts in modes of exhibition post-1948.

FILM 511.002/ARTH 539/MART 595C:  Special Topics in Film and Media Studies - Art and Cinema

Professor Susan Felleman
Class:  Tuesday and Thursday  11:40 – 12:55 PM
Screening: Mondays  7:30 – 9:30 PM


An advanced course about intermediality: the various ways cinema and the other visual arts have intersected, interacted and related to another from the period of protocinema to the present. Topics addressed will include artists’ films and avant-garde cinema, animated film, the art film, art in film, film in art, art documentaries, artist biopics, and art history and mise-en-scène. The course involves intensive reading in art and film history, theory and aesthetics. Students are expected to engage in critical reading, thinking and discussion, regular writing assignments, to research and deliver a short presentation, and to collaborate on a creative/scholarly project.

FILM 566.001/ENGL 566.001:  Special Topics in U.S. Film and Media - Hollywood in the 1950s and 1960s

Professor Susan Courtney
Class:  Tuesday and Thursday  4:25 – 5:40 PM
Screening: Tuesdays  6:00 – 8:00 PM


This course examines two significant decades of rupture and change, at the movies and in U.S. culture at large.  Provocative combinations of change and convention are particularly evident in Hollywood cinema in these decades, registered by the eruption of contemporary conflicts in plots and characters, but also by subtle and dramatic transformations of “classical Hollywood” style itself.  It considers ruptures of both kinds, social and aesthetic, and how they interact in this period of American cinema.

FILM 566.002/ENGL 566.002:  Alfred Hitchcock:  Gender, Sexuality, and Representation

Professor David Greven
Class:  Tuesday and Thursday  1:15 – 2:30 PM
Screening: Wednesdays  7:00 – 9:00 PM


This course examines several key works of Alfred Hitchcock, one of the most important directors in film history, paying close attention to the recurring motifs and concerns in his body of work.  This course examines Hitchcock’s cinematic art, focusing on the intersection between his complex aesthetics and his controversial representation of gender roles & sexuality.  

MART 595A/CSCE 590 - Critical Initiatives: Ward One

Professor Heidi R. Cooley
Class: Tuesday and Thursday 1:15 - 2:30 PM
This is an interdisciplinary course that merges theory and practice to consider how interactive digital applications can be applied to the concerns of public history. This course will develop prototypes for (1) a mobile application and (2) an interactive website that draw attention to the history of racial politics that made space for Greek Village, the Strom Thurmond Wellness Center, and the Koger Center.

2014 Fall
FILM 110/MART 110:  Media Culture [Carolina Core: AIU]

Professor Laura Kissel
Class:  Tuesday and Thursday 4:25 PM – 5:40 PM
Screenings:  Tuesday 5:55 PM – 7:55 PM
Introduces non-majors to the critical study of a range of media forms (e.g., film, video, photography, new media).

FILM 240:  Introduction to Film and Media Studies  [Carolina Core: AIU]

See master schedule for multiple times and instructors, including NEW Honor’s Section.
Introduction to the critical study of film and media. Students develop analytical skills with which to closely analyze, verbally and in writing, the formal elements (e.g., editing, cinematography, sound) through which audiovisual media communicate. Students also deploy these skills to consider key critical concepts in film and media studies. Designed for majors, minors and anyone else who wants to develop analytical tools for interrogating audiovisual media as well as argumentative writing skills.

FILM 510/ARTH 539/MART 595B.003:  Media Art History

Professor Susan Felleman
Class:  Tuesday and Thursday 1:15 PM – 2:30 PM
This seminar style course will be a collaborative experiment in reading, research, writing and presentation. Together, we will construct a historical sketch and timeline of media arts that parallels the more dominant mass media history. Each participant will prepare an introductory lecture and bibliography on a development in media art history, identifying the technological, social and aesthetic origins of media when they were new, surveying major artistic innovations, and tracking the history and context of those media with brief occasional updates throughout the semester, as others introduce new/er media. The effect will be an illuminating, fun acceleration and intensification of media, art and culture.

FILM 511.001/MART 595B.001:  Tarantino

Professors Lauren Steimer and Julie Hubbert
Class:  Tuesday and Thursday 2:50 PM – 4:05 PM
Screenings:  Wednesday 7:00 PM – 9:00 PM
Introduces students to the auteur theory via an analysis of the film and television work of Quentin Tarantino as a writer and as a director. Tarantino’s “distinct” style is informed by an amalgam of national cinemas, film movements, “low” genres and musical repertoires. The course examines Tarantino’s work as well as the films that influenced each production, with a special emphasis on music and soundtracks. 

FILM 511.002/MART 595A:  Surveillance

Professor Heidi Rae Cooley
Class:  Monday and Wednesday 2:20 PM – 3:35 PM
Ours is a society committed to surveillance. Not only have we grown accustomed to and accepting of surveillance, but in many instances we consent and even devote ourselves to it. This course asks: “Why?” To arrive at an answer, students will read theoretical, fictional and popular texts, as well as explore media objects (e.g., play Portal, screen films such as The Conversation and watch episodes of Big Brother). They will participate in a self-monitoring activity and a Mass Observation experiment. At the end of term, they will publish to a class-oriented online forum at The New Everyday.

FILM 566.001/MART 595B.002/ARTH 390:  Classical Hollywood Cinema

Professor Susan Felleman
Class:  Tuesday and Thursday 4:25 PM – 5:40 PM
Screenings:  Mondays 5:30 PM – 7:30 PM
Introduces the classical Hollywood cinema of the sound era, some major directors and films, the industrial workings, aesthetic and political aspects of the studio system and its production methods, along with some historical and critical views of it. Organized into units that consider groupings of classical Hollywood films around narrative, generic and/or historical themes.  

FILM 598/MART 595D:  Hong Kong Action Cinema

Professor Lauren Steimer
Class:  Tuesday and Thursday 6:00 PM – 7:15 PM
Screenings:  Tuesdays 7:30 PM – 9:30 PM
Addresses the transnational history of Hong Kong action cinema from its humble Shanghai beginnings to the Hollywood appropriation of both the martial arts aesthetic and the labor-power necessary to produce it. Also introduces students to a range of critical and theoretical approaches, from notions of national cinema to transnational cult audience reception.

MART 701:  Media Research Methods: Theory and Practice

Professor Heidi Rae Cooley
Class:  Monday and Wednesday 3:55 PM – 5:10 PM
This is a course for students interested in critical media practice and study. It approaches issues of research and method in the context of media arts (and related) practice and critical media studies. It emphasizes that practice is always an ongoing articulation of a scholar/practitioner, other people and things, a set of tools/technologies and media, and a history of practice. Readings and discussions focus on how cultural, social and political assumptions underpin, for example, the selection of a topic, a problem or a line of inquiry; the ways in which research is conducted across a variety of contexts; how one defines source material (digital assets, moving images, etc.); how one imagines an audience; and what medium or mode one chooses to convey this research. Ultimately, students will develop a critical reflexivity about their own thinking and practice in order to articulate more fully their intellectual agenda.