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College of Arts and Sciences


Faculty and Staff

Martine Jean

Title: Assistant Professor
Department: History
College of Arts and Sciences
E-mail: jeanM@mailbox.sc.edu
Phone: 803-777-4205
Office: Gambrell Hall, Room 228
Resources: Curriculum Vitae [pdf]


Curriculum Vitae
martine jean profile pic

Education

  • B.A. Brooklyn College, CUNY
  • Ph.D. Yale University

Bio

Martine Jean is an Assistant Professor of Latin American History at the University of South Carolina, Columbia. Her research explores the history of confinement and its intersection with slavery, poverty, and race-making in nineteenth-century Brazil as well as their implications for understanding mass incarceration, race, and citizenship in the post-emancipation period and the African Diaspora at-large. She is currently writing a book manuscript entitled "Routine Imprisonment, Race, and Citizenship in Nineteenth-Century Brazil, 1830-1890" on the Casa de Correção in Rio de Janeiro. The research examines how the routine imprisonment of slaves, free people of color, and free or liberated Africans tied race to penal practice which ultimately restricted the citizenship of free people of color in Imperial Brazil (1822-1889).  Her research is published in the peer reviewed journal Atlantic Studies: Global Currents entitled "A Storehouse of Prisoners: Rio de Janeiro's Correction House and the Birth of the Penitentiary in Brazil, 1830-1906," online, Oct. 24, 2016; in print: Vol, 14, issue 2, July 2017. A second article, "Worthy of Freedom: Abolitionist Discourse on Slavery, Freedom, and Imprisonment in Late Nineteenth-Century Brazil," is published from the Journal of Social History.

Current Activites

I teach Hist. 109 (Latin American Civilization) and Hist. 420 (Colonial Latin America) and also offer courses in the history of crime and punishment in the Atlantic World through Hist 493/497 (Punishment and Society in the Atlantic World) 

Publications

“A Storehouse of Prisoners: Rio de Janeiro’s Correction House (Casa de Correção) and the Birth of the Penitentiary in Brazil, 1830-1906”, Atlantic Studies: Global Currents, published online in October 2016; in print in vol 14, #2, 2017.

•Published: ‘Worthy of Freedom’: Abolitionist Discourse on Slavery, Freedom, and Imprisonment in Nineteenth-Century Brazil, Journal of Social History, published online on November 22, 2017.

•Forthcoming: Free Africans, Slaves, and Convict Labor in the Construction of Rio de Janeiro’s Correction House: Atlantic Labor Regimes and Confinement in Brazil’s Atlantic Port City,” International Review of Social History, in Special Issue # 27 on “Free and Unfree Labor in Atlantic and Indian Ocean Port Cities”, January 2019 scheduled to be simultaneously published in an edited volume by Cambridge University Press.

Routine Imprisonment, Race, and Citizenship in Nineteenth-Century Brazil, 1830-1890, Under Contract at the University of Texas Press