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The Dean's Dialogue

The Dean's Dialogue is what it suggests, a conversation. Charles Bierbauer shares his thoughts and writings on the world of communications, his more than 30 years as a journalist and a dozen as dean. But it's also our place for questions and comments from prospective students, parents and professionals.

Moving out, moving in

Moving out, moving in

It's been a long time coming. More than 1000 boxes have been moved. There's still work to be done. But we've moved out and in. And we've got the photos to prove it.

What's in a name?

What's in a name?

What are we? What we call ourselves? What others call us? What it says on or above the door? Dean Bierbauer discusses the college name change and how it reflects our role and mission.

The ultimate price of free speech

The ultimate price of free speech

Journalists did not need the atrocity of the attack on Charlie Hebdo in Paris to know that ours is a risky business. But it has made the rest of the world aware of the price of exercising free speech.

Questions and why we ask them

Questions and why we ask them

"I keep six honest serving-men, (They taught me all I knew); Their names are What and Why and When, And How and Where and Who." That's how Rudyard Kipling describes it. Get Dean Charles Bierbauer's modern-day translation.

Journalism still a viable career choice

Journalism still a viable career choice

Journalism school alumnus Jon Turner wrote a letter to the editor of The Daily Gamecock, USC's student newspaper. Turner described his five years of newsroom experience and his reasons for leaving. His prerogative. But he also summons all journalism students to join him in abandoning ship...

US-Russia Bilateral Presidential Commission

US-Russia Bilateral Presidential Commission

The US-Russia Bilateral Presidential Commission asked me, in part, to reflect on my time as a foreign correspondent here in Russia, then the Soviet Union, and how we -- our two countries and our journalists -- perceived the relationship.

Wonks, whistleblowers and watchdogs

Wonks, whistleblowers and watchdogs

Now that we've had some time to think about it, reaction to the U.S. government's role in monitoring and collecting our phone and online behavior seems to collect in two boxes. There's outrage: How dare they! And indifference: Whatever. Until we fully know what was done to whom and to what end, vigorous defense seems muted.