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College of Education


Project EEE: Explore, Engage, Educate: An African American Studies Summer Institute for Teachers

Project EEE is a five-day, field-based experience emphasizing African American culture and prominent historic sites in three regions of South Carolina: Midlands, Upstate and Low-Country. Thirty participants were selected for this institute from K-12 teachers and coordinators in the three regions of the state.

About the Institute

Project EEE is an intensive, field-based research experience sponsored by the Museum of Education and the Center for the Education and Equity of African American Students. Project EEE is also funded by a grant from the South Carolina Department of Education.

The project uses a 3-pronged instructional approach to deliver a dynamic, culturally-centered learning experience:

  • Explore: Participants will visit and explore historic sites to better understand the history and culture of African Americans in South Carolina.
  • Engage: Participants will engage with national and local scholars and experts in order to critically explore research and archival history data.
  • Educate: Participants will participate in collaborative design of standards-based instructional plans with the goal of advancing the ways that we teach and educate students in African American culture and history.

 

Institute Directors

 

Speakers, Presenters and Scholars

Evelyn Bethune, Ph.D.

Evelyn Bethune is the granddaughter of  Mary McLeod Bethune and CEO of The Bethune Publishing House, Inc. She is also the founder of MMB Institute, a mentoring and instructional foundation for young people of all ages. She is a published author, lecturer and motivational speaker working to expand knowledge of Mary McLeod Bethune and to ensure the continuation, growth and development of her legacy by encouraging and promoting education and community service in a variety of platforms. Bethune Publishing publishes books that are motivating, educational and visionary.

LaGarrett J. King, Ph.D.

LaGarrett J. King is an Assistant Professor of Social Studies Education at Clemson University. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Texas at Austin after an eight year teaching career in Georgia and Texas. His primary research interest examines how Black history is interpreted and taught in schools and society. He also researches critical theories of race, teacher education, and curriculum history.

Bobby Donaldson, Ph.D.

Bobby Donaldson is an Associate Professor of History at the University of South Carolina.  A scholar of southern history and African American life and culture in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, Donaldson’s research and writings explore African American intellectual thought, print culture, education and religion.  Additionally, he has served as a consultant for museum exhibitions, archival collections, oral history initiatives, documentary films, and historic preservation projects, including the renovation of the Booker T. Washington High School in downtown Columbia. In 2008, the Historic Columbia Foundation awarded Donaldson and his students the Helen Kohn Hennig Prize for their documentary project on the Ward One community in downtown Columbia. Currently, Donaldson leads the Center for Civil Rights History and Research, housed in the Hollings Special Collections Library. 

Minuette Floyd, Ph.D.

Minuette Floyd is a Professor of Visual Art and Design at the University of South Carolina. Her current research focuses on the continent of Africa, examining stereotypes and misconceptions. She is interested in curriculum taught by art educators and is currently meeting with and surveying focus groups across the state. This research will be conducted in additional states pending grant funding. She also continues to focus her research efforts on ethnographic methods and photography to document African American camp meeting traditions in both North and South Carolina.

Joyce Hansen

Joyce Hansen has been writing books and stories for children and young adults for over twenty years. Joyce was born and raised in New York City, the setting of her early contemporary novels. She grew up with two younger brothers and her parents in an extended family that included aunts, uncles, cousins and grandparents, all living nearby in the Morrisania section of the Bronx. Attending Bronx public schools, she graduated from Theodore Roosevelt High School in 1960. While working secretarial jobs during the day, Joyce attended Pace University in New York City at night, receiving a Bachelor of Arts degree. She then began her teaching career in the New York City public schools and earned a Master of Arts degree from New York University. She also taught writing and literature at Empire State College (State University of New York). Joyce’s first children’s book, The Gift-Giver, published in 1980, was inspired by her own Bronx childhood and by her students. She continued to teach and write until retiring from teaching in 1995. Joyce Hansen presently lives in South Carolina with her husband and writes full-time.

Andrea L’Hommedieu, M.L.I.S,

Andrea L’Hommedieu, M.L.I.S, is an Oral Historian for University Libraries at the University of South Carolina. She is skilled in interviewing, editing, social media engagement, digital scholarly exhibits, and oral history training. She is the recipient of three national awards from the Oral History Association for oral history projects deemed exceptional in quality and scholarly value.

Jannie Harriot

Jannie Harriot is the Vice Chairperson of the South Carolina African American Heritage Commission. Seeing black children disconnected from their heritage, Harriot set out to recognize and preserve the cultural richness and contributions of African Americans in South Carolina. To Harriot, the accomplishments of black ancestors can powerfully affect black children: “School children are able to identify with their heritage and the contributions of their ancestors and feel a sense of pride and self-esteem. This self-esteem transfers into more successful students on many levels.” Harriot has helped bring inspirational history to children through the South Carolina African American Heritage Commission, which identifies and promotes the preservation of historic sites, structures, buildings, and culture demonstrating the African American experience in South Carolina.

 

Goals and Smart Objectives for Project EEE

GOAL 1:  To provide a broad overview of African American culture.

Objectives

  1. By the end of the EEE Institute, participating teachers will submit at least one complete, approved (by organizers) lesson on African American culture that is aligned with South Carolina Academic Social Studies Standards for their respective grade level(s).
  2. By the end of the EEE Institute, participating teachers will submit an annotated list of at least 10 resources (e.g., books, experts, primary sources, films, exhibits) on African American culture that is appropriate for their grade level.

 

GOAL 2:  To provide knowledge and experiences on selected historic sites in the upstate, midlands, and low country regions of South Carolina. To engage participants in intensive experiences and field trips which provides a strong knowledge base on the history of African American culture, education, and spirituality.

Objectives

  1. On the last day of the EEE institute, participating teachers will complete an exam on African American culture, experiences and field trips (addressed during the institute) at 80% accuracy.
  2. By the end of the EEE Institute, participating teachers will submit at least one complete, approved (by organizers) lesson that is aligned with South Carolina Academic Social Studies Standards for their respective grade level(s) for a field trip related to content covered in the institute.
  3. By the end of the EEE Institute, participating teachers will have visited at least 15 historical sites.
  4. By the end of the EEE Institute, participating teachers will submit at least one complete, approved (by organizers) lesson that is aligned with South Carolina Academic Social Studies Standards for their respective grade level(s) on a historic site in South Carolina that was visited.

 

GOAL 3:  To present in-depth information and experiences about Rosenwald schools and the history of African American Education in South Carolina.

Objectives

  1. By the end of the EEE Institute, participating teachers will submit at least one complete, approved (by organizers) lesson that is aligned with South Carolina Academic Social Studies Standards for their respective grade level(s) on Rosenwald schools in South Carolina.
  2. On the last day of the EEE institute, participating teachers will complete an exam on the history of Rosenwald schools (addressed during the institute) at 80% accuracy.