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Darla Moore School of Business


Moore School international business student takes on the globe

December 6, 2016

Stefanie Feltwell, fourth-year international business and economics Honors student, grew up in Texas. And New York. And Germany. She’s a military kid, so she got a taste of travel early and realized she wanted more. Since coming to USC, she’s been in three study abroad programs and done two internships abroad — a short-term program in Japan, a language immersion program in France, a summer program in the Dominican Republic, a semester abroad in Morocco and a summer internship in Munich, Germany. In the spring semester, she’ll be leaving again to go to Washington, D.C., for the Honors College Washington Semester.

“When you move around so much, you get antsy staying in one place, so I like to move around and explore and see different cultures,” Feltwell said.

The Washington native was first interested in the Moore School because of its international business and study abroad programs. In her time here, she has also demonstrated her dedication to serving others. Through her work with Student Government, she helped start Carolina Closet, Walk Home Cocky and Gamecock Pantry. She was also part of Gamecock Triathlon Club, where she mentored other students as a coach for a year.

Because of her experience abroad, she decided to apply for an international scholarship from Zonta International, a professional organization dedicated to “empowering women worldwide through service and advocacy.” Feltwell was one of 12 students to win the $7,000 scholarship.

“Gaining the study abroad and internship experience necessary for a career in international affairs can be very costly, and the Zonta Scholarship has made opportunities such as the Washington Semester Program next semester a reality for me,” she said. “It will also contribute to my goal to earn a master's degree by decreasing the financial burden of graduate school.”

Of the places she has been, Feltwell said her favorite place was the Dominican Republic because the people loved to dance, made great food and were overall very open and loving.

“They really know how to have fun,” she said.

After she graduates, Feltwell doesn’t plan to stop moving. She wants to go into international relations with a focus on global economic and social development.

By Madeleine Vath