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Darla Moore School of Business


From marketing success to motherhood

April 08, 2016

For 15 years, Kim Buckner Land (’98, MBA ’02) served as marketing director for a group of New York Times newspapers in the North and South Carolina markets. With the future of the newspaper industry uncertain, Land was looking for something more fulfilling.

In August 2015, she began putting her experience in marketing to work in the classroom. Land took the position of marketing professor at the Johnson College of Business and Economics at USC Upstate.

“The opportunity to use my professional experience to get students excited about marketing was exciting” says Land. “The most rewarding experience so far was having a student decide to change her major to marketing after falling in love with the material in my class.”

After giving birth to her daughter, Land saw a positive shift in her priorities.

“I want people to recognize that you can be successful professionally and fulfilled personally,” says Land. “I want young women to know that they can flourish in a business setting without sacrificing their family. It’s important to always put your faith and your family first – by working smarter, you can excel in your career without it consuming your life.”

Land has not let motherhood slow her down. Her dedication to her work is one small reason why she will be awarded the Distinguished Young Alumna Award at the 32nd Annual Business Leaders Dinner. This award is presented to alumni, less than 40 years of age, with outstanding achievements in business, academia, government, or not-for-profit organizations and/or outstanding service to the business school.

Aside from volunteering her time at various non-profit organizations including the United Way, SAFE Homes and the Junior League of Spartanburg, Land has also been recognized as a Direct Marketing News “40 Under 40” recipient in 2014.

“Having my professional work and achievements recognized nationally along with such an elite group of honorees from Fortune 500 companies was humbling,” she says.

By Jessika Markland