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Darla Moore School of Business


International Business Curriculum

The Sonoco International Business Department provides students at the Darla Moore School of Business with unparalleled competence in conducting business across national boundaries and diverse cultures. Each track challenges undergraduate students' perspectives on global business and cultural interactions through dynamic teaching and hands-on exposure.

Degree Requirements: 122 Hours
Major Requirements: 61 Hours

 

Learning Outcomes

  • In-depth capacity in a functional area of business.
  • Strong understanding of the global dimensions of business.
  • Excellent communication skills in more than one language.
  • Appreciation of the impact of culture on the conduct of business.
  • Exposure to living in a second culture. 

Carolina Core/General Education Requirements

1. CMW: Carolina Core Effective, Engaged and Persuasive Communication: Writing (6 hours)


ARP: Carolina Core Analytical Reasoning and Problem-Solving (6-8 hours)


SCI: Carolina Core Scientific Literacy

  • Two approved Carolina Core Scientific Literacy courses including one laboratory course
  • GFL: Global Citizenship and Multicultural Understanding: Foreign Language (0-8 hours)

Students shall demonstrate in one foreign language the ability to comprehend the topic and the main ideas in written and, with the exception of Latin and Ancient Greek, spoken texts on familiar subjects. This ability can be demonstrated by achieving a score of two or better on a USC foreign language test. Those failing to do so much satisfactorily complete equivalent study of foreign language at USC.

GHS: Carolina Core Global Citizenship and Multicultural Understanding: Historical Thinking

Any approved Carolina Core History course
GSS: Carolina Core Global Citizenship and Multicultural Understanding: Social Sciences (3 hours)

Any approved Carolina Core Social Science course
AIU: Carolina Core Aesthetic and Interpretive Understanding (3 hours)

Any approved Carolina Core Aesthetic and Interpretive Understanding course
CMS: Carolina Core Effective, Engaged, and Persuasive Communication: Speech (3 hours)

Any approved Carolina Core Speech course
INF: Carolina Core Information Literacy (0-3 hours)

This requirement may be met in an overlay course that combines learning outcomes from two Carolina Core components
VSR: Carolina Core Values, Ethics and Social Responsibility (3 hours)

Any approved Carolina Core Values, Ethics, and Social Responsibility course. This requirement may be met in an overlay course that combines learning outcomes from two Carolina Core components.
Other Required General Education Courses for the Darla Moore School of Business (3-10 hours)

Additional DMSB general education courses may be required if student exempts the foreign language requirement and/or the student chooses coursework which can fulfill both stand-alone and overlay requirements of Carolina Core components (up to 10 hours).

Those credit hours must be replaced with elective credits (minimum of 6 credits). A third elective is required to reach graduation hours, and students are strongly encouraged to take a business section of UNIV 101 to fulfill this elective (3 credits).

Business Core

Internationalization Requirement

The program also requires nine hours of course work with international content that may be used to fulfill other degree requirements. Three hours must be taken from an approved list of courses offered by the Darla Moore School of Business which contain international business or international economics content. The following course options can also be used to satisfy the three credit hours of this requirement: approved course work containing international business or international economics content, taken at a semester abroad program; an approved Maymester or summer overseas course containing international business or international economics content; an approved internship course in international business wherein a student would obtain discipline-related work experience in a foreign country; or an approved service-learning component. Students may choose from one of the following options to complete the remaining six-hour requirement:

Language:

Two language courses at the 200 level or above
or

Electives:

Two approved courses with international content taken either inside or outside the Moore School of Business from a list available in the undergraduate office.

Communications

All Moore School students will take communications courses as part of the general education requirements.

Minor or Directed Course Work

Directed course work may be selected from a university-wide list of approved minors. The minor is normally a minimum of 18 hours of prescribed courses in one subject area. Students not selecting such a minor may submit an alternative program of study to satisfy the approved course work requirement. The proposed alternative program of study must be approved by the Undergraduate Program Executive Committee in coordination with the Undergraduate Division. All minor courses or courses approved as alternatives must be passed with a grade of C or better.

 

International Business Degree Options

The major in international business at the Moore School is a comprehensive, competitive program led by our renowned international business faculty. In addition to completing the university's Carolina Core general education courses, business core classes and the international business curriculum, students are required to double major in another business discipline and complete advanced foreign language courses. In addition, international business students complete at least one semester abroad through one of our partner exchanges at more than 30 of the top business schools worldwide.

Students can choose the Global International Business track or one of five International Cohort Program tracks.

Global International Business

Global Business: Students study at one of the most elite business schools in the world, giving them a strong understanding of global dimensions as well as depth capacity in a functional area of business.

Students spend at least one semester abroad at one of more than 50 locations throughout the world.

Year 1: Students spend their freshman year at the USC campus.

Year 2: During their sophomore year, students will continue their classes at the USC campus.

Year 3: Students begin their IB studies. During their second semester they will travel to study abroad in one of the 51 most elite business schools in the world.

Year 4: Students return to USC to complete their senior year.

Students must take at least four courses at the 300 level or above in one of the eight languages offered at USC.

Required Courses (9 Hours)

  • IBUS 310 - Globalization and Business

One functional course from the list above (3 Hours)
One thematic course from the list above (3 Hours)

Two Regional Courses (6 Hours)

IBUS 441 - Business in Latin America*
Select from:IBUS 442 - Business in Asia*
IBUS 443 - Business in Europe*
IBUS 444 - Business in Africa*
IBUS 490 - Specialized Study in International Business*

* Because one or more of these courses may not be offered on campus during the two years that a student may be taking major-level courses, these courses are most appropriate for study abroad.

CIFA (France) Cohort

Université Paris-Dauphine (UD): Business in France

USC students will study in France for two semesters and will spend a total of two years together with their UD counterparts.

Year 1: Students spend their freshman year at USC.

Year 2: Students continue their studies at USC, beginning their business classes.

Year 3: USC students travel to UD where they will meet their French counterparts. They will spend the year together traveling and studying in France.

Year 4: Both USC students and UD students move together back to USC to complete the year and graduate.

Students must reach high level French classes before studying abroad as most classes at UD are taught in French. Professional fluency is tested upon return. 

IBA (Chile) Cohort 

Universidad de Chile (UdC): Business in South America

Students spend two semesters studying in Santiago, Chile. They will spend a total of two years together with their Chilean counterparts.

Year 1: USC students spend their freshman year at USC.

Year 2: USC students continue their studies in Columbia. During their second semester, the UdC students will join the USC students to take their first IB class together.

Year 3: Both UdC and USC students stay at USC for the first semester, studying together. During the second semester, the entire cohort will relocate to Santiago, Chile, where they begin their studies at UdC.

Year 4: USC students finish the first semester of their senior year while at UdC, then return back to the U.S. to finish up their second semester and graduate.

Students must continuously take Spanish classes before leaving for Chile. While at the Universidad de Chile, classes will be taught in Spanish. Professional fluency will be tested upon return to the U.S.

IBCE (Hong Kong) Cohort 

Chinese University of Hong Kong (CUHK): Business in China

USC students spend a total of two years studying abroad. They will have a total of three years together with their Chinese cohort counterparts.

Year 1: USC students spend their freshman year at the USC campus. They then have the option of spending the summer in Hong Kong to participate in an intensive language program to assist in their learning of Mandarin.

Year 2: USC students will travel to Hong Kong to unite with their CUHK counterparts. During the summer, USC students are encouraged to stay in China to participate in additional study programs.

Year 3: They whole cohort comes together to study in South Carolina. They will take their first IB class together, Globalization and Business (IBUS 310).

Year 4: All IBCE students return to Hong Kong and remain there for the final year. USC students then have a choice of finishing up their final semester in China or at USC.

Students take intensive Mandarin classes to learn the language and have the opportunity to participate in summer language programs. Professional fluency in Mandarin is tested before graduation.

IBEA (Multi-Cultural) Cohort 

IBEA Cohort: Multicultural

ESSEC Business School (Singapore)

FGV-EBAPE (Brazil)

University of Mannheim (Germany)

Students will study abroad for three full semesters and will be together with their cohort counterparts for a total of two years.

Year 1: Our USC students enjoy their freshman year at USC.

Year 2: The first semester of their sophomore year, our students remain at USC before traveling to meet the rest of the cohort to complete their second semester in Mannheim.

Year 3: The entire cohort will come to USC to study together for one semester. During the second semester they will complete their studies at ESSEC's newly inaugurated campus in Singapore.

Year 4: The first semester of their senior year will be spent exploring and learning in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, before our USC students return to USC for their final semester.

Students must take at least four classes at 300 level or above in either German, French or Portuguese.

IBMENA (Egypt) Cohort 

American University in Cairo (AUC): Business in the Middle East and North America

Students will study a total of two years abroad and almost three years with their AUC cohort partners.

Year 1: USC students enjoy their freshman year at USC. They then will spend the summer in Egypt to participate in an Arabic language immersion program.

Year 2: USC students will travel to Egypt, where they will spend the year studying with their AUC cohort counterparts. During the summer they are encouraged to participate in language study programs to better their Arabic.

Year 3: The entire cohort will travel together back to the US, where they will continue their IB studies. Here they will take their first IB class together, Globalization and Business (IBUS 310).

Year 4: USC students will finish up their final year at the USC campus before graduating.

Students take intensive classes in Arabic and have the opportunity to participate in summer language programs. Professional fluency is tested before graduation.

 

Courses

The Sonoco Department of International Business at the Moore School has led the field of undergraduate education in creating progressive, thought-provoking, engaging courses that challenge students to think beyond their comfort zones. Each class exposes students to the vast complexities of our changing world and helps them develop the skills needed to make the best business decisions in environments of increasing globalization, great uncertainty and multiple points of view. To prepare them for courses in the international business major students are recommended to take a variety of internationally related Arts & Sciences courses from the Carolina Core. Download the International Business Course Guide [pdf].

 

Double Major

In addition to receiving a strong international business education, students are also required to complete a second major at the Moore School. This additional concentration helps them develop specific functional skills that enhance their effectiveness as business professionals. Download information on double majors [pdf].

 

Foreign Language Study

Language skills not only catapult the efficiency, insight and networking skills of a global professional to a higher level, but such proficiency also allows an individual to gain deeper insight into the culture, values and context of the people with whom they are working. In order to enhance this cross-cultural capability, international business students must complete several advanced-level courses in a foreign language (often resulting in a language minor). The languages available at USC include Arabic, Chinese, French, Italian, German, Japanese, Portuguese, Russian and Spanish.

 

Explore the World

The Moore School's strong international links have allowed us to develop partnerships with over 30 of the best business schools around the world. Every spring, juniors majoring in international business have the opportunity to study at one of these schools through our direct exchange programs. These partnerships allow students to build a network of global contacts with future business leaders around the world.