Skip to Content

College of Nursing


Research

Research Teams

Cardiovascular Risk Reduction in Underserved Communities Research

Lead Investigator: Jeannette Andrews, Ph.D., RN, FAAN

Emphasis Area: Health Promotion & Risk Reduction

Scientific Purpose: Community engaged and patient centered partnership models that focus on cardiovascular risk reduction, primarily targeting smoking cessation interventions in underserved communities.  

Team Members:

Jeannette Andrews, Ph.D., RN, FAAN, Dean & Professor, College of Nursing

Dr. Martina Mueller, Ph.D., Medical University of South Carolina

Dr. Martha Tingen, Ph.D., Georgia Regents University


Healthcare Process Redesign Research

Lead Investigator: Rita Snyder, Ph.D., RN

Emphasis Area: Health Systems

Scientific Purpose: Create, implement and evaluate the impact of innovative methods and technologies, such as agent-based computer simulation modeling, to improve the research, evaluation, and practice surrounding the redesign risk of clinical care processes.

Center Core Experts:

Rita Snyder, Ph.D., RN, Professor and SmartState Endowed Chair in Health Informatics Quality and Safety Evaluation, and Director of the Healthcare Process Redesign Center

Kevin Bennett, Ph.D., Associate Professor, School of Medicine: Health Systems Research Expert

Bo Cai, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Arnold School of Public Health: Biostatistics and Statistical Modeling Expert

Nathan Huynh, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, College of Engineering and Computing, Civil and Environmental Engineering: Process Modeling and Computer Simulation Expert.

José Vidal, Ph.D., Associate Professor, College of Engineering and Computing, Computer Science and Engineering: Agent-Based Modeling and Computer Simulation Visualization Expert


Campus-Community Partnerships for Hispanic Health Research

Lead Investigator: DeAnne K. Hilfinger Messias, Ph.D., RN, FAAN

Emphasis Area: Vulnerable Populations

Scientific Purpose: Federally qualified health centers and other health care agencies serving the growing Latino immigrant population must provide culturally and linguistically appropriate services to meet the needs of this emerging patient population. At the same time, Hispanics with limited English proficiency must become proficient in accessing and utilizing the local health care systems. The incorporation of community health workers/health navigators/promotoras de salud into health education and outreach efforts is a key component of our research initiatives in South Carolina and the Texas-Mexico border.

Team Members:

DeAnne K. Hilfinger Messias, Ph.D., RN, FAAN, Professor, College of Nursing, community health

Patricia A. Sharpe, Ph.D., MPH, Research Professor, Arnold School of Public Health, Prevention Research Center, exercise science

Heather Brant, Ph.D., CHES, Associate Professor, Arnold School of Public Health, health promotion, education and behavior

Elizabeth Fore, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Idaho State University

Deborah Parra-Medina, Ph.D., MPH, Professor, University of Texas Health Sciences Center, San Antonio epidemiology and biostatistics

Edena G. Meetze, DrPH, Post-Doctoral Fellow, Arnold School of Public Health, health promotion, education, and behavior


Disaster Preparedness and Mass Casualty Research

Lead Investigator: Joan Culley, Ph.D., MS, MPH, RN, CWOCN

Emphasis Area: Health Systems

Data from our previous NIH/NLM funded study found that: 1) the local hospital emergency department (ED) received a surge of victims before any information related to the chemical exposure was available, resulting in confusion regarding the best triage methods, difficulty with the efficient processing of patients, and potentially under triaged victims that experienced latent systems after discharge; 2) none of the four triage systems studied is effective in establishing triage priority for victims exposed to chlorine, a toxic inhalation (TIH) chemical, leading to faulty decisions and misdiagnoses; and 3) there may be more sensitive assessments (e.g., oxygen saturation measured by pulse oximetry [SpO2])41 to identify priorities for care specific to TIH chemicals.

Purpose of current study:

To develop and test innovative informatics and computational modeling tools useful for the efficient processing of mass casualty victims in the ED and specific for TIH chemical exposures.

Team Members:

Dr. Joan Culley, Ph.D., MS, MPH, RN, CWOCN, Assistant Professor, College of Nursing

Dr. Erik Svendsen, Ph.D., MS, Associate Professor, Department of Environmental Health Sciences at Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine

Dr. Jean Craig, Ph.D., Data Warehouse Specialist and Biostatistician, Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC)

Dr. Abbas Tavakoli, DrPH, MPH, ME, Director, College of Nursing Statistics Laboratory

Dr. Homayoun Valafar, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Computer Science and Engineering University of South Carolina

Chris Finney, Program Manager, South Carolina Office of Research and Statistics


STORY (Sister Tell Others and Revive Yourself) – Treatment Adherence in African-American women with breast cancer research

Lead Investigator: Sue Heiney, Ph.D., RN, FAAN

Emphasis Area: Health Promotion and Risk Reduction

Scientific Purpose: The primary purpose of the research team is to understand the process of treatment adherence to breast cancer treatment in African American women.  The secondary purpose is to develop interventions to improve treatment adherence.

Team Members:

Sue Heiney, Ph.D., RN, FAAN, College of Nursing

Swann Arp Adams, Ph.D., MS, assistant professor, College of Nursing and Arnold School of Public Health

Abbas Tavakoli, DrPH, MPH, ME director, College of Nursing, statistics laboratory

Tisha Felder, Ph.D., Assistant Research Professor, College of Nursing and Arnold School of Public Health

Jada Quinn, DNP, APRN, FNP-BC, ACNP-BC Clinical Assistant Professor, College of Nursing

Ken Phelps, Ph.D., Dept of Neuropsychiatry, School of Medicine

Consultants:

Sally Weinrich, Ph.D., RN, FAAN, Medical College of Georgia


Breast cancer disparities in minority and underserved populations research

Lead Investigator: Swann Arp Adams, Ph.D., MS

Emphasis Area: Health Promotion and Risk Reduction

Scientific Purpose: The focus of the research team is to understand why African-American women are less likely to be diagnosed with breast cancer yet more likely to die from the disease.

Team Members:

Swann Arp Adams, Ph.D., MS, assistant professor, College of Nursing and Arnold School of Public Health

Sue Heiney, Ph.D., RN, FAAN, research professor and Dunn-Shealy professor of Nursing, College of Nursing

Daniela Friedman, MSc, Ph.D., assistant professor, Arnold School of Public Health 

Heather M Brandt, Ph.D., CHES, assistant professor, Arnold School of Public Health

James R. Hébert, ScD, professor, Arnold School of Public Health and Director, cancer prevention and control program

Leepao Khang, doctoral candidate, Arnold School of Public Health.