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Arnold School of Public Health


Projects

Funded Research

ASHFoundation Clinical Research Grant 1/1/18-12/31/18
USC Office of the Vice President for Research 8/15/15-2/15/17

m-Eye Lab: Mobile Eyetracking Lab for Research with Special Populations
This project aims to develop infrastructure, via an ASPIRE-III grant, in the form of a mobile eyetracking lab that can be a shared resource among multiple research labs.  

Institute of Education Sciences 08/01/13-07/31/18

Developing an Online Tutor to Accelerate High School Vocabulary Acquisition
This project aims to iteratively develop and test the feasibility and effectiveness of a web-based platform for providing individualized, efficient vocabulary instruction to high school students to accelerate the growth of their vocabulary knowledge.

Related Award
USC VP for Research 01/01/2014-8/31/2014

Developing an efficient, valid, and reliable assessment of high school vocabulary.
Magellan Scholar Grant for Sheida Abdi. This study will compare a newly developed web based assessment with established measures of vocabulary in adolescents and young adults.

National Institutes of Health 07/01/13-06/31/16

Word Learning in Language and Reading Impairment Subgroups
The aims of this project are (1) to study phonological and semantic contributions to new word learning in children with SLI, dyslexia, both, or typical development, and (2) to clarify how early word learning difficulties among children with SLI may relate to later issues in reading development.

Central Carolina Community Foundation 06/01/13-05/31/14

Get Cocky and Read
(formerly "Get Ready to Read with Cocky")
This project examines the effects of two instructional programs for improving the language and literacy skills of preschool children at risk for reading difficulties. Additionally, the USC mascot, “Cocky,” promotes joint book reading and other habits to facilitate literacy and language development at home.

Additional Projects

Behavioral and ERP Measures of Language Skills in Subgroups of Skilled and Less Skilled Readers