University 101 Programs




Take the Risky Out of Frisky

Presentation Abstract
"Take the Risky Out of Frisky" is an interactive presentation facilitated by Changing Carolina Peer Leaders and Healthy Campus Initiatives. Through group dialogue and self-reflection, we provide students with medically-accurate information on sexual health, including methods of protection and contraception, STIs and HIV, getting tested and tips for relationship communication and risk reduction. Students will leave with knowledge of campus and surrounding community resources and information to set the stage for capacity building. A laptop, projector and dry erase board will be required.

University 101 Learning Outcomes

II a) Identify and use appropriate campus resources and engage in opportunities that contribute to their learning within and beyond the classroom.

This presentation will discuss and provide information about appropriate campus and community resources and services, which support sexual health, relationship communication and general well-being/wellness. Facilitators will also provide students with information about how to be involved with Changing Carolina Peer Leaders.

III c) Examine and develop strategies that promote wellbeing and explain how wellness impacts their academic and personal success.

Sexual health and personal relationships are underlying issues and stressors of student's well-being and academic performance. Through discussions and activities in this presentation, students will be provided with insight to how they can help themselves and others and hopefully set the stage for students having the ability to synthesize and apply the presented information as they apply to their own lives and relationships.


Presentation Learning Outcomes
Presentation Outline:
50 minutes
Prep: Load PPT, prep materials for activities (scenarios, risk continuum cards, condom demonstrations), and Resource Cards.
NOTE: All below script information is also on the presenter’s notes in the PPT.
I. Introduction – 2 minutes
Slide 1: Take The Risky Out Of Frisky
Hi everyone and welcome to ____________. I am _________ and this is ____________. We are from Changing Carolina Peer Leaders, part of Student Health Services. We are excited to be talking with you today about getting Frisky!

II. Slide 2: Before We Get Started…
Some of the information we discuss today may be uncomfortable or challenge your upbringing, culture, experiences or beliefs. It is your choice to participate in the activities. We encourage you to keep an open mind. Even if you feel the information does not directly impact you, it may help you help a friend, and teach you how to access campus resources. If you have additional questions/concerns after this presentation, please contact COORDINATOR’s NAME & CONTACT INFO.
NOTE: Also on PPT slide. PPT Slide is slightly different from script above to read more smoothly.

III. Slide 3: What You’ll Learn
Today we’ll discuss facts about types of sex, how to do it safer, communicate in relationships and where to go to get tested or talk with someone.

IV. Breaking the Ice – 5 minutes
Slide 4: Breaking The Ice
Sex Slang
Purpose: To consider how differences in language (using different terms or using slang) can impact communication between sexual partners.
Peer Leader Instructions:
• Explain to the students that you will write a word on the board, and ask them to come up with slang terms for it.
• Write “knee” on the board. Ask the class to provide any slang terms. Most classes will have trouble coming up with very many slang terms for this word.
• Write all of the other words on the board (penis, vagina, and sex). Divide the class into 3 groups and assign each group to one of the words. Tell students you will give them 1 minute to come up with as many slang words as they can for their assigned term. Make sure to keep time, so you keep the presentation moving. After 1 minute, ask them to share the slang words they came up with.
• Write the slang terms under the appropriate category on the board. For some words you may want to use stars/asterisks when you write it on the board. Follow the lead of the class and use your best judgment. (If someone says, “the c word,” this is a sign they would probably feel more comfortable if you censored the word when you write it on the board.)
• After all slang terms are on the board, start a conversation by asking:
o How can using slang impact our communication with potential partners?
• Use examples to show how using slang when talking about sex can make it difficult to communicate what we want or understand what someone else wants.
o Can you put your anaconda in my beaver for a quickie?
o Can I put my wood in your bearded clam and get lucky?
• Make sure you highlight these main points:
o Slang isn’t understood by everyone in the same way.
o People have personal preferences about the words they use to talk about their body parts.
o Communicating with a partner about sex has to be direct and leave no room for interpretation.

V. Discussion: The Basics – 10 minutes
Slide 5: The Basics
Presenter leads discussion: Let’s cover the basics.
a. Ask the following questions:
i. What are the 3 types of sex?
A: Oral, Anal, Vaginal
ii. 2. What type/s puts you at risk for pregnancy? STIs? HIV?
A: Pregnancy = Vaginal, STIs and HIV = all 3
NOTE: The riskiest types of sex is unprotected anal or vaginal sex. WHY? There is a large surface area of mucosal tissue in the vagina and anus.
iii. Can you be at risk for other STIs without having one of these types of sex?
A: Yes! Herpes and Genital Warts in particular may be passed through mutual masturbation and skin-to-skin contact. Penetrative intercourse is not required.

VI. Slide 6: Is It Sex? Is It Safe?
The 3 types of sex are Oral, Anal and Vaginal.
Vaginal sex is required for pregnancy to occur
All 3 can transmit STIs although the highest risk is unprotected vaginal or anal sex
Some STI’s do not need penetrative sex to be transmitted.

VII. Slide 7: STI’s Quickie (with Bacterial and Parasites)
Let’s look at the general classifications of STIs.
Examples of Bacterial STIs include: Chlamydia, gonorrhea, syphilis, vaginosis and can be treated with a course of antibiotics. Take your antibiotics as prescribed and finish your pack because that’s how you truly know your infection is treated! Once you’ve taken your medicine correctly, you are “cured” for this time, but can still get the infection again if you have unprotected sex with someone who is infected.
• Chlamydia: most commonly reported STI in the United States, can cause permanent damage to the female reproductive system if left untreated.
• Gonorrhea: has developed resistance to the antibiotic drugs prescribed for treatment but is typically easily cured with medication. Gonorrhea can cause serious health issues in both women AND men when left untreated.
• Syphilis: Causes long-term complications if not treated correctly, symptoms are divided in to stages. STI is spread through direct contact with a syphilis sore. Sores can be painless and are often mistaken for symptoms from other diseases, hence the nickname, “the great imitator.”
• Vaginosis: most common vaginal infection in women ages 15-44, linked to an imbalance of “good” and “harmful” bacteria in the vagina, can increase your chance of getting an STI.
Yes there are bugs that can also cause infections!
• Trichomoniasis (aka Trich or the Itch) is an infection caused by a microscopic protozoan. It’s easily treated with medication, and is spread through mutual masturbation, intercourse and sharing sex toys.
• Pubic Lice (aka Crabs), scabies and bed bugs are other fun critters that you can get through sexual contact and/or having fun in a place where they reside (i.e. a couch or bed). They are also easily treated with medication.
• Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID): a complication seen in women when an STD/STI is left untreated can result in sterility in women, can be treated with ease when diagnosed early.
• Molluscum Contagiosum: viral skin infection, produces benign raised lesions/bumps, usually painless. Bumps can last over months or years.
• Zika Virus: Typically transmitted to humans by mosquitoes BUT can be sexually transmitted. Unprotected vaginal, anal, or oral sex and sharing sex toys are possible modes of transmission, an effective barrier is recommended to prevent transmission. http://www.cdc.gov/zika/hc-providers/clinical-guidance/sexualtransmission.html


VIII. Slide 8: STI’s Quickie (with Viral and HIV 101)
Examples of Viral STIs’ include: HIV, HPV (the virus that causes genital warts), Herpes, and Hepatitis. There are vaccines for some (HPV) and treatments vary from medications to lifestyle changes. Once you have these, you have it for life, however our body can keep outbreaks and the virus under control with healthy lifestyle and medication.
• Human Papillomavirus (HPV): most common STI, many different types. Some types lead to health problems: genital warts and cancers.
• Herpes: caused by two types of viruses, can be transmitted even when a visible sore is not present. HSV type 1=Cold Sores, HSV type 2=genital sores. Important to keep in mind that HSV-1 can be spread from the mouth to the genitals through oral sex.
• Hepatitis: means inflammation of the liver, most common types are A, B, and C. Hepatitis B is typically an acute/short-term illness. Hepatitis C can be acute/short term also but more often becomes a long term/chronic infection.
SOURCE: https://www.cdc.gov/std/
HIV 101
HIV is the virus that causes the syndrome AIDS. HIV is transmitted by direct exposure (i.e. unprotected sex) by 4 body fluids.

Blood, Breast Milk, Semen, Vaginal Secretions

It IS NOT transmitted through saliva, urine, tears or sweat. You cannot get HIV from using a workout machine after another person, or shaking hands, or wiping their tears.

HIV is easy to test for, rapid tests take anywhere from 1 to 30 minutes depending on the test being used. We can use your saliva or your blood to test for HIV. The test looks for antibodies in your immune system against the HIV virus. This tells if you have been exposed and need follow-up testing.

It’s important to get tested regularly if you have multiple partner or an “oops”. It can take a couple months for your body to recognize HIV and mount an immune response against it. Getting yourself tested is important! Tests vary by the STI and may require blood, urine, a pelvic exam and pap smear, physical exam or a combination.

Contact our Sexual Health Office with questions on what test/s you may need. We do testing on campus and also in the community. **Plug that the laboratory prices, while not free, are typically cheaper than many other facilities. Refer to resource card and community resources.


IX. Slide 9: Scenario Activity
Purpose: To engage students in critical thinking about STIs, symptoms, and treatment options
Time: 10 minutes
Instructions:
Divide the classroom into three groups and give each group a scenario to discuss. Allow 3 minutes for each group to answer the questions. Click on the first picture to display the scenario. Allow a representative from the group to read aloud the scenario and then answer the questions.
1st picture: Janet felt weird…
Answers: Chlamydia/Gonorrhea. Yes her partner could be at risk and should be tested as well. Oral/Anal/Vaginal
2nd picture: Tom has been noticing…
Answers: Herpes. Herpes and Genital Warts can be spread through skin-to-skin contact. He needs to go to either a campus or community resource and get tested for Herpes.
3rd picture: Regina has been having…
Answers: Regina may be positive for HIV. PrEP is pre-exposure prophylaxis. It is used to prevent HIV and has been proven to be 90% effective when used properly. A pill taken once a day in conjunction with condom use can provide 100% prevention for HIV.
*HIV 101 INFORMATION*
Most commonly contracted by unprotected anal or vaginal sex or sharing needles
Rapid testing = 1 minute – 30 minutes
It can take up to 3-6 months after a potential exposure to test positive
Recommendation is to get tested every 3-6 months if multiple partners, more frequently if not using protection, every year if mutually monogamous

X. Slide 10: Risk Activity

Rate the Risk
Materials Needed:
Sexual Activity/Behavior cards (12 total)

Purpose: To address risk associated with a variety of sexual activities/behaviors and apply risk reduction strategies.
Time: 15 minutes
Instructions:
Use to the sexual activity/behavior cards for presenter notes and points to highlight throughout the activity.
For this activity, risk means something with a potentially negative consequence.
Designate one side of the room to represent no risk and the other side represent high risk. Hold each card up for the students to see, and read aloud the activity/behavior listed on the front of the card. Ask students to move to where they think the activity/behavior on the card falls along the risk continuum.
When students have had time to go to pick where to stand, ask them questions that get them talking:
What kind of risk are you thinking about when you decided where to stand on the continuum for this sexual activity/behavior?
How would someone reduce their risk for this sexual activity/behavior?

XI. Slide 11: How well does birth control work?
 Highlight birth control methods from least effective to most effective. Note that some methods have the same level of effectiveness (example: the IUD and the Implant are both 99% effective).
 A few notes to keep in mind:
• Most methods are hard to use perfectly, so effectiveness refers to typical use, not perfect use.
• Effectiveness here refers for pregnancy prevention, not STI prevention.
• For birth control that requires a doctor’s visit or a prescription, the cost can vary based insurance. Many (but not all) insurance plans will offer these methods with no out-of-pocket cost.

XII. Safer sex, better sex – 10-12 minutes
Slide 12: Safer Sex, Better Sex
Good communication is one key better sex, knowing how to use protection is the other. So Keep Cocky Covered!

Male Condom Correct Order:
1. Male Condom Available (check expiration date)
2. Male gets an erection
3. Remove condom from package
4. “Pinch an Inch” at tip of condom
5. Roll condom down to base of penis
6. Intercourse takes place
7. Male ejaculates
8. Male holds rim of condom at base of penis
9. Remove penis from partner
10. Throw away in trash can


Female Condom Correct Order:
1. Female condom is available (check expiration date)
2. Open package at notches
3. Squeeze the inner ring at the closed end with thumb and middle finger
4. Spread the lips of the vagina
5. Insert the Female Condom like a tampon
6. With index finger, push inner ring past pubic bone
7. Guide the penis into the vagina
8. Intercourse
9. Squeeze and twist the outer ring to and pull out gently
10. Throw away in trash can
Presenter demonstrates how to correctly put on and remove the male condom, describing importance of each step

Ask for volunteers, pass out cards with steps for putting on a male condom. Have volunteers get themselves in correct order. Once in correct order, have each read their card. Adjust order as needed.
Presenter demonstrates how to correctly put on and remove the male condom, describing importance of each step

Ask: How effective is this condom if used correctly each time?
A: 85-90%

Presenter demonstrates how to correctly put on and remove the female condom, describing importance of each step

Ask: Can this be used with a male condom?
A: No

Ask: Can this be used for anal sex too?
A: Yes, if you remove the inner ring.

Presenter shows dental dam and describes its use for oral-anal or oral-vaginal stimulation.

Ask: Does this prevent pregnancy?
A: No, only condoms provide protection against both STIs/HIV and pregnancy. Birth Control (contraception) provides protection against pregnancy only

Ask: Are there any materials that can make a condom less effective?
A: Yes, OIL based lubricants contain ingredients that can break down latex, making them more susceptible to breaks and tears.

You can get condoms, dental dams and other protection in the Sexual Health Office at no charge.

XIII. Slide 14: Please Share Information…
Review the campus resources on the handout. Note the sexual health office can discuss contraception/birth control options.

Highlight testing information on resource handout.

XIV. Closing and Evaluations – 3-5 minutes
Thank you for participating today! Please take a couple minutes to complete our evaluation form.
If anyone has questions about becoming a Changing Carolina Peer Leader, and being trained to do presentations like these, please email us, visit the website or talk with one of us after class.

Thank you and have a great day!
Pass out & collect evaluation forms

Additional Information:
This presentation will discuss and provide information about appropriate campus and community resources and services, which support sexual health, relationship communication and general well-being/wellness. Facilitators will also provide students with information about how to be involved with Changing Carolina Peer Leaders.
Sexual health and personal relationships are underlying issues and stressors of student's well-being and academic performance. Through discussions and activities in this presentation, students will be provided with insight to how they can help themselves and others and hopefully set the stage for students having the ability to synthesize and apply the presented information as they apply to their own lives and relationships.
Changing Carolina Peer Leaders apply to become a peer, if accepted, take a semester long course in Spring to learn program planning, health education information and presentation basics. The Fall’s amended retreat outline (group training with the additional of an option for 1:1 follow up) to learn the content, techniques and skills associated with the U101 presentation they wish to present (Sexual health, Stand Up Carolina, Stress, Healthy Gamecock, Healthy Relationships) successful and will continue. A mentoring peer feature is currently being explored, potentially, veteran/well versed peers will be paired with new peers to provide yet another opportunity for peers to get structured, reliable feedback and guidance. Peers will only be allowed to present solo upon successful completion of training and a shadowing experience. Professional staff, in addition to GA’s will also continue to evaluate peer facilitation skills during class. Facilitators will include primarily peer leaders, along with Graduate Assistants (back up) and Professional staff (ONLY if necessary).

Presentation Outline
I. Presenters Introduction – 1-2 minutes

II. Breaking the Ice – 1-2 minutes
a. Presenters will lead the class in saying together 5 medically-accurate words associated with sexual behavior that are commonly replaced with slang terms

III. Discussion: The Basics – 10 minutes
a. This discussion will discuss the basics of sex, such as the 3 types of sex, and risks for pregnancy, STI's, HIV

IV. Group Activity: In or Out? – 10 minutes
a. This activity is in the theme of Project Runway (Project Condom on our campus). Behaviors/stereotypes/misconceptions will be shown on the PPT slides with student in class determining if they are “In or Out” by holding up cards provided at beginning of class. Facilitate discussion of why each is “In or Out”

V. Tips for Talking – 5 minutes
a. Discuss the difficulties of talking about sex, and provide resources for tips on how to discuss sex

VI. Safer sex, better sex – 10-12 minutes
a. Discuss the importance of good communication, discuss the process of putting on a condom, demonstrate this process for both male and female condoms, and ask questions regarding the uses of condoms

VII. Closing Thoughts & Campus Resources – 5 minutes
a. Provide closing thoughts that safer sex IS better sex, and close with discussion on what they have learned today
b. Discuss the resources provided on campus and in this presentation

VIII. Evaluations – 3-5 minutes

Thank you for participating today! Please take a couple minutes to complete our evaluation form.
If anyone has questions about becoming a Changing Carolina Peer Leader, and being trained to do presentations like these, please email us, visit the website or talk with one of us after class.

Thank you and have a great day!
Pass out & collect evaluation forms

Additional Information:
This presentation will discuss and provide information about appropriate campus and community resources and services, which support sexual health, relationship communication and general well-being/wellness. Facilitators will also provide students with information about how to be involved with Changing Carolina Peer Leaders.
Sexual health and personal relationships are underlying issues and stressors of student's well-being and academic performance. Through discussions and activities in this presentation, students will be provided with insight to how they can help themselves and others and hopefully set the stage for students having the ability to synthesize and apply the presented information as they apply to their own lives and relationships.
Changing Carolina Peer Leaders apply to become a peer, if accepted, take a semester long course in Spring to learn program planning, health education information and presentation basics. The Fall’s amended retreat outline (group training with the additional of an option for 1:1 follow up) to learn the content, techniques and skills associated with the U101 presentation they wish to present (Sexual health, Stand Up Carolina, Stress, Healthy Gamecock, Healthy Relationships) successful and will continue. A mentoring peer feature is currently being explored, potentially, veteran/well versed peers will be paired with new peers to provide yet another opportunity for peers to get structured, reliable feedback and guidance. Peers will only be allowed to present solo upon successful completion of training and a shadowing experience. Professional staff, in addition to GA’s will also continue to evaluate peer facilitation skills during class. Facilitators will include primarily peer leaders, along with Graduate Assistants (back up) and Professional staff (ONLY if necessary).

Presentation Length
50 minutes;

Presenter Training
Changing Carolina Peer Leaders apply to become a peer, if accepted, take a semester long course in Spring to learn program planning, health education information and presentation basics. The Fall’s amended retreat outline (group training with the additional of an option for 1:1 follow up) to learn the content, techniques and skills associated with the U101 presentation they wish to present (Sexual health, Stand Up Carolina, Stress, Healthy Gamecock, Healthy Relationships) successful and will continue. A mentoring peer feature is currently being explored, potentially, veteran/well versed peers will be paired with new peers to provide yet another opportunity for peers to get structured, reliable feedback and guidance. Peers will only be allowed to present solo upon successful completion of training and a shadowing experience. Professional staff, in addition to GA’s will also continue to evaluate peer facilitation skills during class. Facilitators will include primarily peer leaders, along with Graduate Assistants (back up) and Professional staff (ONLY if necessary).