Recent Stories

meet and three

Fake news is real

February 14, 2017, Page Ivey

Fake news. You’ve heard about it, consumed it, probably even believed it — at least on occasion. But what is it? Why does it exist? How do we combat it and why can’t it just go away? USC Times invited two faculty members and an alumnus who serves as the attorney for the South Carolina Press Association to discuss one of the most vexing of 21st century media problems — the rampant spread of fake news, clickbait profiteering and outright propaganda.

mentoring

Lean on me

February 06, 2017

There’s no question that having a good mentor can help shape an individual’s career — especially in the field of law. That’s why the University of South Carolina School of Law has devoted substantial resources to take its mentoring program to a new level.

Year end review

Twenty-Sixteen: By the Letters

December 15, 2016, USC Times

A is for alphabet, at least according to USC Times. To help close out 2016, the University of South Carolina’s monthly magazine for faculty and staff devoted its entire December issue to the ABCs of 2016 — with each letter representing a different accomplishment, announcement or notable arrival from the past year.

tom_scott_sc_cyber

Can't hack this

October 31, 2016, Dan Cook

From bank accounts to presidential campaigns, it seems that nothing is off-limits for computer hackers these days. That's why SC Cyber — a statewide cybersecurity initiative housed in the Office of Economic Engagement — is working to improve our defenses and raise awareness about how cybersecurity issues impact all of us.

eboni nelson

Engineering equality

July 18, 2016

The legal profession has been called one of the least diverse in the country. And while countless attempts have been made within the legal industry to ameliorate the problem, University of South Carolina School of Law professor Eboni Nelson believes the key to real change starts with law schools.

buying a bride

Law professor explores history, future of mail-order marriages

July 11, 2016, Rob Schaller

“Without marriage, there could be no stable family units, no children, and no future. And without mail-order brides, one could argue, there might not be a United States of America. The entire colonial endeavor hinged on marriage,” says University of South Carolina law professor Marcia Yablon-Zug, whose new book, “Buying a Bride: An Engaging History of Mail-Order Matches,” traces the phenomenon as far back as our nation’s first permanent English settlement, Jamestown.

From left, Carolyn Morris, Christopher Church, Kristen Seay, Cynthia Flinn

Saving Elyse

June 14, 2016, Chris Horn

The Cold Case Project, an initiative in the Children’s Law Center, focuses on a select group of adolescents who have lingered in the S.C. foster system and are at risk for aging out of foster care without achieving legal permanency — that is, without a family. Partnering with DSS and the family courts, Cold Case staff find ways to reunite these at-risk foster children with responsible family members or to match them with a new family. With children’s lives at stake, giving up is not an option.

greener statue

Deconstructing Reconstruction

April 14, 2016, Peggy Binette

Reconstruction was the first chapter in America’s civil rights movement. And its influence on race relations continues across the country and on college campuses, although few may realize its connection. Now 150 years later, the University of South Carolina’s History Center and Historic Columbia hopes to deepen public understanding of Reconstruction’s history and racial legacy with a symposium April 21–22.

blogging

Academic bloggers share research with broader audience

March 28, 2016, Page Ivey

For researchers, little else is more gratifying than studying something that helps someone else — whether it’s finding a sustainable healthy diet, a better way to motivate workers 
or a way to make coursework more engaging. For some professors and researchers that means taking their scholarly work into the blogosphere, where they can reach not just others in their profession, but those who might learn from their work.

All rise

All rise

November 17, 2015, Craig Brandhorst

One Friday a month the University of South Carolina School of Law welcomes 40 of the youngest law students you’ll ever meet. Welcome to the law school’s Constitutional Scholars Pipeline Program, which pairs seventh and eight graders with USC law students who teach them about the law and coach them for a moot court.

law school equal justice

Professor tracks African laws affecting women

November 11, 2015

Hailed as a huge victory for women’s rights, the Supreme Court of Uganda made international headlines in August when it ruled the custom of refunding “bride price” unconstitutional. However, Aparna Polavarapu, a law professor and scholar with the University of South Carolina’s Rule of Law Collaborative, says changing that practice will be difficult.