2014 Stories

As a Gamecock, my commitment has No Limits.

As a Gamecock, my commitment has No Limits.

After his great-grandmother death, Wilyem Cain was angry and negative. But that all changed after he started volunteering at the local Boys and Girls Club. The University of South Carolina political science major found his calling and is serving as a role model to area kids. Now Cain is planning a future committed to children's advocacy and public service so that he can catch them if they fall.

No Limits: Providing hope and healing

No Limits: Providing hope and healing

Life can be hard in Columbia's poorest neighborhoods. But Toriah Caldwell and her colleagues at the USC's Children and Family Healthcare Center, a nurse-run medical practice, haven't left. The center serves as an important alternative to emergency room care and is the medical home for many in the surrounding neighborhood.

No Limits: Professor documents changing South

No Limits: Professor documents changing South

Kathleen Robbins, professor of photography, is documenting changes taking place in the Mississippi Delta. Once the Land of Cotton, the fluffy boils are being replaced by corn and soybean and the lifestyle associated with the former "king" crop.Description

As a Gamecock, my strength has No Limits.

As a Gamecock, my strength has No Limits.

The severe headache, the numbness in his side and the loss of balance were the start of Mark Cox's toughest battle. But the former military officer faced the challenge with the support of loved ones and the expertise of Julius Fridriksson, a leading stroke rehabilitation researcher.

VIDEO: Researcher helps autism families

VIDEO: Researcher helps autism families

Researcher Robert Hock helps families cope with the stresses of raising a child with autism. Hock says treatment begins and ends with the family who will take care of the child long after therapy ends.

Body mechanics

Body mechanics

South Carolina is in the thick of states with folks that are too thick around the waist, ranking in the top five for obesity rates nationally. But the Palmetto State also has some innovative researchers, such as Sue Lessner in the School of Medicine, working to mitigate the risks of extra pounds and other factors that put the state in the heart of what's called the "stroke belt."

Walk, Chad, walk

Walk, Chad, walk

All the things most of us take for granted -- walking, eating, breathing -- Chad Shelton lost the ability to do in the space of a week. The 48-year-old library specialist at the School of Medicine contracted a rare autoimmune disorder, Guillain-Barré syndrome, in January that short-circuited his nervous system and put him in the hospital on a ventilator for months.

Bringing language to life

Bringing language to life

If Andrew Rajca is speaking a mile a minute, you know you have found a subject he is passionate about. Typically, it has something to do with Latin America, the languages, the culture and the art. Rajca teaches Spanish and Portuguese at the University of South Carolina and is director of the Portuguese program, reviving it as a minor.

How to make it in film, TV

How to make it in film, TV

This week when comic book fans take over part of San Diego for the annual ComicCon, one University of South Carolina alumnus will be brining it to the masses. That's because Blake Garris works for Marvel Comics, running parts of the comic company's website, including live streaming and creating videos from the famous comic convention.

Professor says teaching is a privilege

Professor says teaching is a privilege

Maryah Fram has a book in her office that she invites students to write in before they graduate, saying what they are going to do to make the world a better place. It's just one of the ways she connects with her students. A social work professor, Fram's focus is social policy and teaching the graduate-level class for students to apply what they've learned to real-life situations.

Education of a teacher

Education of a teacher

Push and pull have helped move Odell Glenn through a wide-ranging career in engineering. He has pushed to follow his passions, he has been pulled in unexpected directions, and he finds himself at the University of South Carolina as a late-career doctoral candidate. He says he wouldn't have changed the journey in any way.

Not easy being green

Not easy being green

When Melissa Pilgrim's undergraduate students suit up for research, they don't reach for white lab coats and safety glasses. Instead, they don waders, battery-powered headlamps and lots of bug spray before heading into damp woodlands after dusk.

40 years and counting: Business school veteran makes another move

40 years and counting: Business school veteran makes another move

Julia Witherspoon is a sucker for something new: a new opportunity, a new responsibility, a new center or even a new building. New has oddly been a theme of her nearly 40-year career with the Darla Moore School of Business. This month, she has experienced new once more as the faculty and staff of the business school have begun moving into their new home at Assembly and Greene streets.

Stemming the tide of cancer

Stemming the tide of cancer

Curing cancer, not just putting a patient in remission. That's what Hexin Chen and other researchers are trying to make possible with the new cancer stem cell approach to oncology.

No Limits: Shelbretta Ball finds a new way to be on the team

No Limits: Shelbretta Ball finds a new way to be on the team

Basketball has been a part of Shelbretta "Brett" Ball's life since she was 5 years old. Even before she scored any points for the Gamecocks, a medical condition put her on the bench. But she's still on the team and contributing in a new way.

Serbia on his mind

Serbia on his mind

When Philip Mattox walked across Carolina's commencement stage this past May, his dream was to somehow forge a career in Serbia -- a country he's grown to embrace after traveling there as a student, meeting its people and studying Balkan history and culture. A week later, parts of his adopted country were underwater.

Nothing to hide

Nothing to hide

Aisha Haynes overcame a stuttering affliction on her way to a doctorate in curriculum instruction and a position at UofSC's Center for Teaching Excellence as an instructional designer.

The world's biggest field

The world's biggest field

For the last few weeks, Brazil has been at the center of the world's attention as the best soccer players from across the globe compete for the ultimate trophy. Amidst the fans and excitement, the cheers and the tears, two University of South Carolina students reached the pinnacle of their college experience at this year's World Cup.

String Project finds harmony in community

String Project finds harmony in community

Hearing a child's first draw of a bow across the strings of a violin can make your ears bleed, but for University of South Carolina graduate student Katie Holaway, it is music to her ears.

Antibiotics, infants and food allergy

Antibiotics, infants and food allergy

Food allergies in children are becoming more common, and antibiotics might be part of the problem. Pharmacy researcher Bryan Love led a team that showed antibiotic exposure in infants is associated with increased likelihood of later diagnosis of food allergy.

Capstone adventures to Peru for Maymester

Capstone adventures to Peru for Maymester

Less than a month into her job as assistant principal for the Capstone Scholars program, Erin Wilson was asked to take a group of students to Peru. The trip was inspiring, rewarding and a little scary at times, but well worth it, she says.

Home again

Home again

U.S. Secret Service agent Pat Keegan has set foot on nearly every continent, chasing counterfeiters, investigating fraud and protecting major U.S. political leaders. But he calls his latest assignment as assistant special agent in charge of the Columbia, S.C., field office one of the best of his 25-year federal career.

A house undivided

A house undivided

Mount Vernon has captured the American imagination for centuries. Now University of South Carolina professor Lydia Brandt is researching how and why.

Ironing out details of the carbon cycle

Ironing out details of the carbon cycle

Iron is an essential element in all living creatures, and its availability in seawater can have a profound effect on phytoplankton growth and, consequently, the Earth's carbon cycle. In the journal Nature, Seth John and Tim Conway have just published an assessment of the various sources of dissolved iron in the north Atlantic Ocean.

Children looking for a home

Children looking for a home

An estimated 100,000 children, mostly from Central American countries, will pour over the border between the U.S. and Mexico this year. They will be alone, frightened, hungry and exhausted from their journey that exposed them to dangers unimaginable to most American children. But for them and their families, the risk of making the trip alone or in small groups is less than remaining in their home countries.

Seeking quality care, everywhere

Seeking quality care, everywhere

Just a year and a half after arriving at the University of South Carolina, Jan Eberth has already found success in bringing attention to places where health care disparities are the greatest.

Last out, first in

Last out, first in

You could define Steven Gantt with "firsts" and "lasts" -- first in his family to graduate college, first to travel extensively outside of South Carolina, last of nine children. But here is the word Gantt uses to define himself -- family.

Cocky for a Reason

Cocky for a Reason

James Armstrong III will look back on his undergraduate experience a little different than most. His view, in and out of costume, is what propels him forward towards his goals. He was Cocky for a reason. Literally.

A full experience

A full experience

Sheimaliz Glover's dream just came true and the recent graduate credits her time at the University of South Carolina to setting her on her way to becoming an ambassador and working in the foreign service.

Mosquito math

Mosquito math

University of South Carolina Beaufort professor Kasia Pawelek uses mathematical models to predict mosquito population growth and measure the effectiveness of Beaufort County's mosquito control program.

Finding cyber solutions

Finding cyber solutions

Cutting an experiment's time from 3 months to 3 days is every researcher's dream. Phil Moore and his team in Research Cyberinfrastructure did just that for a Carolina scientist running a computer simulation, and they're looking for opportunities to achieve similar success all over campus.

I love ya, tomorrow!

I love ya, tomorrow!

For Cameron Mitchell Bell, the sun will come out in September. That's when the musical theater performer hits the road with the 2014-15 national Broadway tour of "Annie."

Leaping into a new career direction

Leaping into a new career direction

After a few years of following a career path, Karissa Lindsay reached back to her high school dreams of fashion design. She's leaping with both feet towards full-time ownership of her company and line, based in Houston, Texas.

Material support

Material support

Jochen Lauterbach and Jason Hattrick-Simpers are integrating experimental and theoretical approaches with big-data management in materials science, helping spur even quicker commercialization of the stuff that makes just about everything useful work.

Words for the world

Words for the world

Laura Griner's never been to Afghanistan. She doesn't speak Dari or Pashto but the University of South Carolina graduate is hoping to bring a little peace to the country, one children's book at a time.

The secret garden, revealed

The secret garden, revealed

There's just one drawback to the Nature Classroom nestled behind the University of South Carolina's Children's Center. The Eden-like space is open only to kids and teachers from the Children's Center -- oldsters have to admire the picturesque preserve from behind a fence

Making a name for UofSC in children's literature

Making a name for UofSC in children's literature

Putting together an international conference that draws the world's foremost authorities on children's literature is a daunting task, but no more so than creating in just a few years an interdisciplinary program at the University of South Carolina that is recognized by those same authorities as "legit."

A summer to remember

A summer to remember

Susan Zhang, a UofSC School of Music graduate, performs as part of the 12th Annual Southeastern Piano Festival that starts this Sunday, June 15, and continues next week at various locations in Columbia.

How many fish in the sea?

How many fish in the sea?

University of South Carolina Aiken associate professor of biology and geology Virginia Shervette traveled to Puerto Rico in May to research coral reef fish populations through a collaboration with the Puerto Rico Department of Natural and Environmental Resources. Her efforts will help the federal government set fishing guidelines that promote sustainable populations of grouper, snapper, porgy and triggerfish.

Freeze-drying allergens

Freeze-drying allergens

Engineering professor Mike Matthews' career is ranging far beyond the confines of academia, and asthma sufferers everywhere can be thankful for that.

Probing the past

Probing the past

When she was very young, Monica Bowman would pore over the pages of her dad's history textbooks from college, intrigued at first by the pictures and, later, by the accompanying stories. It's no surprise, then, that she's majoring in history as an undergraduate at Carolina -- and delving into the story of an historical figure from the Palmetto State's past.

No Mickey Mouse class

No Mickey Mouse class

Scott Smith's HRSM Maymester class on theme park management featured a week in Florida where students visited a range of parks and got the inside scoop from park managers about what it takes to succeed in the multibillion dollar industry.

Research keeps many eyes on the coastline

Research keeps many eyes on the coastline

Families huddled together in Lincoln High School in McClellanville, S.C., nearly 25 years ago as Hurricane Hugo lashed the small fishing town. About an hour into the storm, folks noticed water coming into the building -- not rainwater but tidal surge that accompanied the Category 4 storm.

When every minute counts

When every minute counts

Telemedicine technology is helping more stroke patients get quick and effective treatment. Souvik Sen, endowed chair of the SmartState Stroke Center of Economic Excellence, has led the collaboration between the School of Medicine and Palmetto Health Richland in implementing a neurological assessment system with a wide geographic reach.

History, hoops and happiness

History, hoops and happiness

Tiye Gordon, a Ph.D. student in Carolina's history department, has found coaching youth league basketball to be the perfect counterweight to the stress of pursuing a doctoral degree.

Alumni recognize Dear Old Professor

Alumni recognize Dear Old Professor

Dozens of former students and co-workers honored longtime engineering professor Mike Meadows recently with the establishment of the Mike Meadows Civil Engineering Endowment Fund. The fund, supported by former students and colleagues, will provide undergraduate scholarships for students majoring in civil engineering at Carolina.

Carolina rugby on the rise

Carolina rugby on the rise

Carolina's rugby team won the 2014 Southeastern Collegiate Conference Rugby Championship in April, but for the players and coaching staff, the camaraderie of the sport is as important as the competition.

Medieval identity theft

Medieval identity theft

Freshman Carl Garris, junior Aaron Sanders and professor Scott Gwara are using synchrotron data they collected this spring to help piece together a research puzzle involving the university's 13th-century Breslauer pocket Bible, English monasteries, Henry VIII and a medieval individual bent on obscuring the Bible's origins.

Art imitating academic life

Art imitating academic life

Hundreds of novels, short stories and a long list of movies have been produced, which depict some aspect of college life, real or imagined. That trove of literature and celluloid gets a closer look this June in "Higher Education in Fiction and Film," a summer session course taught by University of South Carolina education professor Christian Anderson.

Connecting to community

Connecting to community

Gerald Davis Jr. works with some of the most vulnerable people in Columbia and does it all on top of taking classes at the University of South Carolina. But his real passion lies with opening doors at the university to connect the community to campus.

Athletic director Tanner reflects on year of 'outstanding moments'

Athletic director Tanner reflects on year of 'outstanding moments'

Ray Tanner enjoyed unprecedented success as the Gamecock head baseball coach and this past year -- his second as athletic director -- saw even more success. The football team has won 11 games three years in a row, the women's basketball team made the Sweet 16 round of the NCAA tournament and the equestrian team won its second-straight Southeastern Conference title and came in second in the national championship. We caught up with Tanner to ask about the year that was 2013-14.

Don't let the superbugs bite

Don't let the superbugs bite

Studying the effects of antibiotic resistant microbes is more than just research to Sean Norman. Hospitalized as a child from exposure at his family's farm, he is dedicated to educating the public how to reduce superbugs from forming and spreading.

Student becomes mental health advocate

Student becomes mental health advocate

When Margaret Kramer was a sophomore in high school, she developed an eating disorder that took over her life. Her own experience has led her to study marketing and health promotion at the University of South Carolina, where she will be a senior in the fall, and to become an advocate for mental health awareness and alleviating the struggle of millions of Americans who suffer from eating disorders.

A grad student's life, interrupted

A grad student's life, interrupted

On a sunny afternoon this past January, Sandy Tanner was a master's student with one semester to go, packing for a trip to the beach with her family. Three minutes later, she was packed into an ambulance and rushed to the hospital.

Pat Conroy: 'My papers belong here'

Pat Conroy: 'My papers belong here'

In the early 1970s, Pat Conroy took a poetry class with James Dickey at the University of South Carolina. "I thought he was the greatest poet that ever lived," Conroy says. "He changed my life." The notebook the budding author used for that class is now back at the university as part of Conroy's archive that will be housed alongside collections of Ernest Hemingway and F. Scott Fitzgerald.

UofSC alum lands big story, big prize

UofSC alum lands big story, big prize

University of South Carolina alumnus and current Tampa Bay Times reporter Michael LaForgia and fellow reporter Will Hobson won the 2014 Pulitzer Prize for local reporting in April. Their series of articles about Tampa-area slumlords who took advantage of a dysfunctional public agency while providing the homeless with substandard housing led to the agency's closure.

Managing risk

Managing risk

Brian Hann, the university's risk and loss control manager, has joined an elite group of professionals across the country. Hann has completed coursework and certification as a Chartered Property and Casualty Underwriter, a designation obtained by only a small percentage of executives in the insurance and risk management industry.

Getting America moving

Getting America moving

Americans' lack of physical activity is saddling the country with a heavy public health burden. Russ Pate's research is aimed at getting America moving again, and he focuses on the problem where it starts -- in children.

Leading with distinction

Leading with distinction

For years, University of South Carolina students have dedicated hundreds of hours to community service, worked as peer leaders, studied abroad and completed research as undergraduates. Now, 93 of these students will make up the first class to graduate with leadership distinction.

At face value

At face value

Whenever Yan Tong has a conversation with someone or watches a movie, she finds herself making mental note of everyone's facial expressions. That's because her research on affective computing involves cataloging facial expressions with the goal of programming computers to recognize certain emotions.

VIDEO: A Carolina

VIDEO: A Carolina "Girl On the Run"

Senior Sara Burns is a "Girl On the Run." That describes the accounting major so well that it's the title of her first country music album.

Students passionate about teaching underserved children across America

Students passionate about teaching underserved children across America

For students who are looking to give back to the community while gaining valuable on-the-job experience, there are programs like Teach for America that exist. Two very different students will soon find themselves in similar situations, teaching in underserved schools in Charlotte.

No Limits: UofSC employee's perseverance culminates in degree

No Limits: UofSC employee's perseverance culminates in degree

Michelle Knight's 18-year journey to a college degree has redefined the life of this University of South Carolina employee and forever changed those she loved. Michelle admits that she didn't take her first attempt at college seriously. But after her children started school, she realized that education was the pathway to success. And she needed to set an example.

VIDEO: Aloha Carolina!

VIDEO: Aloha Carolina!

Senior Lenny Swinton is preparing to say Aloha to Carolina. He leaves soon after graduation for Hawaii where he will start his career in hospitality management.

VIDEO: Students' favorite professor wins U101 award

VIDEO: Students' favorite professor wins U101 award

David DeWeil is the associate principal of Capstone Scholars. Along with speaking to prospective students and working to improve the Capstone program, DeWeil teaches University 101 - a first-year experience class that helps students transition into college. He is this year's recipient of the University 101 teaching award.

A piece of the puzzle

A piece of the puzzle

If you've ever worked on a 500-piece jigsaw puzzle, you know the frustration of putting it together, one piece at a time, as the big picture slowly takes shape. Rekha Patel likens her teaching style to coaching those who are assembling a puzzle -- in this case, the big picture of biochemistry.

A man of many talents

A man of many talents

A native of St. George, S.C., Chase Mizzell has been a high-profile fixture on the University of South Carolina campus since he arrived as a bow-tied freshman. He has served as student body president and vice president, the Mic Man at Carolina football games and was most recently one of three graduating seniors to receive the university's highest undergraduate honor, the Algernon Sydney Sullivan Award.

Chalkboard Champions

Chalkboard Champions

The University of South Carolina has long been at the forefront in educating S.C.'s K-12 teachers and principals, so it's no surprise that some of the Palmetto State's best have a garnet-and-black lineage.

VIDEO: Preserving film history at the UofSC

VIDEO: Preserving film history at the UofSC

In this digital age, it's very simple to shoot a movie on your cell phone and with two clicks--post it to the web. In fact, every minute of the day, a hundred hours of video are uploaded to YouTube. It's a little more labor intensive for archivists at USC's Moving Images Research Collection who spend hours documenting and converting old film into a digital format, all in the name of preserving history.

Sullivan award winner ready to take flight

Sullivan award winner ready to take flight

Anna Hawkins thinks she will be terrified the first time she straps into the cockpit of a Navy plane, but she has a well documented history of not letting fear slow her down. A member of the University of South Carolina's Naval Reserve Officer Training Corps, Hawkins has climbed Mount Fuji, parachuted out of an airplane and spent two months backpacking through Europe with her best friend. Hawkins is one of three graduating seniors to receive the university's highest undergraduate honor, the Algernon Sydney Sullivan Award.

Reflections guide Carolina experience

Reflections guide Carolina experience

Reflecting on how experiences have enhanced her academic and leadership abilities have helped guide Caroline Hendricks on her undergraduate path. The senior will move on to medical school at the Medical University of South Carolina with the prestigious Steven N. Swanger award in hand.

Majoring in service, leadership

Majoring in service, leadership

Cassandra Staton credits her work with Dance Marathon and the University 101 peer mentoring program with her decision to pursue a career in educational psychology.

Becoming a leader, getting ahead

Becoming a leader, getting ahead

A few years ago Thomas Landzert decided to step up and become a leader, something he wasn't preparing to do as a sophomore. In May, he will be among the first crop of students to graduate with leadership distinction.

Coming full circle

Coming full circle

Kristmar Muldrow grew up in an artistic household but here at the University of South Carolina, she's been able to discover what being an artist really means. Growing up with a graphic designer mother and an architect dad meant Muldrow, a junior studio art major, never had a shortage of art supplies. These days, though, she's using more digital skills to create her works.

'Sue my car, not me'

'Sue my car, not me'

It might seem like a flight of fantasy -- a car that could actually drive you to work (or your child to soccer practice) all by itself -- but the technology is being tested and its advent on roadways is all but inevitable. The question now is determining who will be blamed when a self-driving car causes an accident.

Helping Carolina women stand strong

Helping Carolina women stand strong

When Skye Klink studies abroad in Prague this fall, she wants to be prepared. Having studied abroad in Spain last summer, she knows the ups and downs of settling into another culture. This semester Klink decided to prepare for her upcoming trip by enrolling in a for-credit self-defense class taught by professors Ed Carney and Shannon Henry from Surviving Assault and Standing Strong (SASS), a local self-defense organization for women.

PMBA: Learning business part-time while working full-time

PMBA: Learning business part-time while working full-time

The university's new chief financial officer says her liberal arts degree taught her how to think, but her PMBA gave her the business skills that got her where she is today. Leslie Brunelli is one of thousands of graduates of the 40-year-old program designed to train professionals for the executive suite without interrupting their careers.

New SGA President takes office

New SGA President takes office

New student body President Lindsay Richardson wants to help the University of South Carolina grow and to create more services that can improve students' daily lives, such as an umbrella checkout program for those caught unprepared on a rainy day.

Chemistry up close

Chemistry up close

A chemistry show is a great way to reach K-12 students about science. Chemistry professor Linda Shimizu and University of South Carolina students put on a show that makes learning fun for kids of all ages.

Three new things

Three new things

The internal auditing department at the University of South Carolina has a new name, a new approach to how it does business and a new executive director to make it happen.

VIDEO: Using all your senses to learn botany

VIDEO: Using all your senses to learn botany

The glare from fluorescent lights and the squeak from chalk on a board are the sights and sounds most students experience, but some biology students are finding a classroom experience filled with bright sunlight and chirping birds.

VIDEO: UofSC dedicates garden to commemorate desegregation

VIDEO: UofSC dedicates garden to commemorate desegregation

A garden adjacent the Osborne Administration Building was dedicated in honor of the three students who integrated the university in 1963. The ceremony was part of the yearlong events to commemorate the 50th anniversary of desegregation.

No Limits: Young teacher determined to make a difference

No Limits: Young teacher determined to make a difference

Justin Dunham is always moving. A former high school athlete, he's conditioned to make quick turns, think on his feet and motivate. One minute he's in the front of the classroom, the next he's in the back. A few seconds later, he's tossing a football to a kid anxious to give an answer. Justin's Earth Science classes spin with energy, and the kids don't miss a beat.

Personal loss inspires student to help

Personal loss inspires student to help

Maranda Rosier fights to bring awareness to the issue of suicide. Her goal is to erase the negative stigma that comes along with it. This year's Out of the Darkness Suicide Prevention Walk is her first step.

Doorway to opportunity

Doorway to opportunity

It was hardly on her mind when Julian Greer arrived at South Carolina. But it has helped her polish her public speaking skills, expand her social circle, get to know professors outside of the classroom and chart her future. It has even put some spending money in her pocket.

Topiary artist honors past, shapes future

Topiary artist honors past, shapes future

Topiary artist Pearl Fryar has cultivated three young junipers to represent the three students who desegregated the University of South Carolina 50 years ago. The son of a North Carolina sharecropper, Fryar knows what it means to seek a better life. "If you had told me 50 years ago that one day I would be asked to do this sculpture, I would have thought I'd lost my mind. This is huge and shows how far we've come."

Taking the helm: Students learn sailing, leadership

Taking the helm: Students learn sailing, leadership

Call it the Best. Classroom. Ever. Basic Keelboat Sailing teaches students to safely skipper or crew a 25-foot boat on sheltered water in moderate weather. But they also learn how to captain a boat with a crew of their peers and that leadership experience goes with them into the real world.

Artist's lens on an undersea world

Artist's lens on an undersea world

Few of us will ever scuba dive in the Dutch Caribbean, but there's almost no need to if you can spend a few moments gazing at Katie Boatman's paintings.

Business researcher investigates what motivates us

Business researcher investigates what motivates us

You could say Anthony Nyberg is a people person. He wants to know what makes them work and, maybe more importantly, what makes them quit. An associate professor of management in the Darla Moore School of Business, Nyberg earned his doctorate degree after working a decade in financial services, including starting and growing his own firm. During his time in the business world, he found his biggest issues had little to do with finance.

Town and Country

Town and Country

Ben Muldrow got his first taste of marketing and branding at Carolina when he was president of Carolina Productions, the student group that recruits speakers and entertainers to campus. He's now a marketing executive who has coached hundreds of towns across the country on how to put their best foot forward.

Leading in style

Leading in style

Through her involvement with the UofSC Fashion Board, president Brittany Terry is devoted to celebrating and promoting the fashion industry. Fashion Week 2014 successfully began Monday, March 31, with a doggie fashion show and will end Thursday, April 3, with a finale fashion show.

Illuminating history

Illuminating history

Adam Glenn is a freshman chemical engineering major working with some of South Carolina's most valuable humanities artifacts, illuminated manuscripts from the 15th century. His Magellan Scholar research project combines scientific lab work with historical scholarship.

Good smile, good health

Good smile, good health

Senior Andrea Eggleston wants to be a dentist, but not just one for the well-heeled. Working for three years with people who often can't afford dental care has opened her eyes to often-overlooked populations in the community, and public service is now the focus of her career.

Professor discovers Columbia through community service

Professor discovers Columbia through community service

Michael Gibbs Hill didn't get involved with community service as a college student. Mentoring local children was something he discovered when he came to the University of South Carolina in 2007 as a faculty member. Now, as a Big Brother with Big Brothers Big Sisters of Greater Columbia, he thinks more Gamecocks should get involved.

Finding a place in the world

Finding a place in the world

Andrew Kovtun is spending his second semester abroad in Paris and has two international gigs lined up for this summer. He also is hoping to spend next year in Europe learning Czech, which may postpone his graduation from the University of South Carolina, where he is triple-majoring in international business, economics and marketing with minors in French and Russian.

2014 Outstanding Woman of the Year

2014 Outstanding Woman of the Year

Emily Learner wants to improve people's lives, whether it is helping children understand the importance of physical activity, helping discover a possible treatment for muscular dystrophy or helping society discard gender stereotypes. For all her work and commitment to service, Lerner has been named 2014's Outstanding Woman of the Year at the University of South Carolina.

'It's got to be a passion'

'It's got to be a passion'

If you had known him several years ago, it might have been all too easy to picture Davontae Singleton becoming a high school dropout. But Singleton, an English and secondary education major and now an Honors College student, has thrived, not merely survived, in the college environment.

Student leads, embodies Carolinian Creed

Student leads, embodies Carolinian Creed

Corrin La Bella refuses to miss out on the diversity the University of South Carolina has to offer.. The sophomore is involved in all facets of Gamecock life. With a double major in global supply chain management and finance, and a minor in wellness studies, the aspiring lawyer insists of being active in her community.

'They have nobody'

'They have nobody'

Ronald Bradley thought his background in school counseling might be useful in wartorn Afghanistan and Iraq. He was right.

A two-wheeled solution

A two-wheeled solution

If you're under stress and need more exercise, Outdoor Recreation's bike shop has the cure. And it just might help address parking and air pollution problems, too. Whether you become a full-fledged bike commuter or opt to simply start riding a bike from one place on campus to another, the bike shop has your back. A team of student technicians there can provide free labor and advice to keep a bike tuned up.

Building a successful acting career, 1 step at a time

Building a successful acting career, 1 step at a time

University of South Carolina alumnus and successful actor Mike Colter says he thinks people are born actors, but he admits, that doesn't guarantee success. "You study to free the talents you have," Colter says "But there's no one-plus-one-equals-two formula that creates a successful actor."

Gamecocks of a feather run together

Gamecocks of a feather run together

Gearing up to run any distance with no support can be a daunting experience. Campus Wellness has the answer with a program that incorporates a goal, social media support and plans for runners of any level. So there's no reason not to go from zero to 5k.

Social media 2.0

Social media 2.0

Rubeyes is the brainchild of Joshua and Paul Norris, who have been working nonstop on their smart phone app in hopes that it will become a game-changer by improving the way people connect through social media.

Smile, be happy, UofSC

Smile, be happy, UofSC

Hayley Geis wants to make you smile. If she had her way, the freshman would have everyone on campus smiling. Something she wants to go viral on campus as she starts a Random Acts of Kindness organization.

Law students tackle tax returns - for free

Law students tackle tax returns - for free

Got your 1099? Your W-2? How about railroad benefits? Do you know on which line you report your scholarships or retirement income or how to determine your earned income eligibility? Luckily, we've got some pretty smart students for that. The University of South Carolina School of Law has provided free basic assistance with federal and state tax returns to folks through the Internal Revenue Service's Volunteer Income Tax Assistance Program for 23 years.

Recognizing poverty, redefining the American dream

Recognizing poverty, redefining the American dream

The concept of the American dream has changed over the years and poverty in America is more pervasive than many of us think. Social work professor Kirk Foster co-authored the new book "Chasing the American Dream," which explores the subject in the hope of sparking a new conversation about economic opportunity.

Standing up to stress, for the body and mind

Standing up to stress, for the body and mind

Standing up to stress helps prevent both depression and cardiovascular disease, ailments that face new lines of attack from the laboratory of Susan Wood, an assistant professor in the School of Medicine. Her research might engender ways to promote resilience to stress - in part by controlling signs of inflammation in the brain - and avoid the ailments that mismanaged stress can bring about.

In it for the long haul

In it for the long haul

For Anna Battiata, long-distance running is more than a passion. It's a sport that took her on a two-year journey of nonstop training and inspired the focus of her current graduate studies.

Taking a break abroad

Taking a break abroad

This spring break, while many students take a breather from classes, some Gamecocks will be getting hands-on health care experience, helping rural villagers and getting a taste for world travel. The service-learning trip to Belize promises to be a life-changing experience for the 24 students.

Engineering students hope to stay dry in concrete canoe

Engineering students hope to stay dry in concrete canoe

Courtney Wheeler rattles off the ingredients of a lightweight concrete mixture like someone reciting a treasured family recipe. She knows the amounts, what each ingredient does and why it works to create a structure light enough to float with four people in it, but sturdy enough to hold those people. An Air Force Reservist, Wheeler's know-how and leadership skills made her a natural captain for the College of Engineering and Computing's entry in this year's Concrete Canoe Competition.

VIDEO: UofSC math master shares his genius with students

VIDEO: UofSC math master shares his genius with students

The University of South Carolina's College of Education has launched a campaign to recruit more math and science teachers. Using a grant from the Duke Energy Foundation, the Department of Instruction and Teacher Education will use the funds to recruit, place and train teachers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics--commonly called "STEM" education. Keenan High School math teacher Anthony Myers is a graduate of the program, and gets an "A" from his students on how he runs his class.

Science fairs in America

Science fairs in America

Science fairs in the United States have a long and storied history, one that reflects trends and attitudes in the larger American culture. They also embody the spirit of childhood imagination and ingenuity. Graduate student Sarah Scripps' dissertation-in-progress, "Science Fairs before Sputnik," puts that history under the microscope.

Rush order: Egyptian pottery to go

Rush order: Egyptian pottery to go

What's a ceramics professor got to do with a TV show about pharaohs and sorcerers? OK, she's not actually in the show, but Virginia Scotchie and her former student, Bri Kinard, can take credit for some of the props when the TV drama "Hieroglyph" that premiers this fall.

Music junky, disc jockey

Music junky, disc jockey

For two hours every Tuesday, Gabriel Crawford is a jazz master, sharing his love of the genre with listeners on WUSC. He prepares for his weekly show - "Swing Swang Swung" - the way a professor prepares for class.

Nursing student maps unusual career path

Nursing student maps unusual career path

Nursing student Ben Thomas knew only that he wanted a degree from the University of South Carolina. What he charted out in his four years here is a unique path to becoming a physician that starts first with a nursing degree and includes a few years working as a critical care nurse.

Journalism students challenged to compete

Journalism students challenged to compete

Five public relations seniors take on the unique opportunity of researching, creating and implementing a corporate public relations campaign for a national client as part of the School of Journalism and Mass Communication's Bateman Team.

Dancing all night - for the kids

Dancing all night - for the kids

Taylor Dietrich discovered her love for Dance Marathon as a freshman. At first, it was just a booth during the annual Student Organization Fair, but an illness and hospital visit led Dietrich to see firsthand how important the University of South Carolina's student-run philanthropy event is to Palmetto Health Children's Hospital.

Reconstructing the Reconstruction: Historic home gets new life

Reconstructing the Reconstruction: Historic home gets new life

University of South Carolina history professors and students worked with members of Historic Columbia to shape the vision for the newly reopened Woodrow Wilson Family Home. Displays in the Columbia museum shine light on the 28th president's adolescence and offer insights into the pivotal era of Reconstruction.

Q&A with Ali Herlong, group exercise instructor

Q&A with Ali Herlong, group exercise instructor

Looking for something new this year? Try group exercise classes at the Strom Thurmond Fitness and Wellness Center. Ali Herlong, a junior advertising major with a minor in hotel, restaurant and tourism management, teaches Zumba at 8:30 a.m., Monday and Wednesday, and Bodypump at 7:15 p.m. Wednesday.

Making the lab work for the world outside

Making the lab work for the world outside

Google, nitrogen dioxide, the Navajo Nation and graphene: For senior electrical engineering major Hani Gomez, they're all part of harnessing the laboratory to make the world a better place.

The science of addiction

The science of addiction

The title of psychology professor Steven Harrod's undergraduate course, Drug Use and Effects, tends to pique students' interest. What they encounter is a course that deals with complex neurochemistry and the ethical complexities of drug laws, treatment and enforcement.

Sharing girl power

Sharing girl power

Priyanka Juneja has always had a passion for women empowerment issues, and early this summer, she decided to channel that passion into something bigger -- a way to help people face-to-face. Her student organization, Girls for Tomorrow, hosts workshops for middle school girls.

Q&A with President Harris Pastides on Leadership Dialogue

Q&A with President Harris Pastides on Leadership Dialogue

The President's Leadership Dialogue is in its third year and welcomes civil rights-era Freedom Rider Diane Nash for a conversation with USC President Harris Pastides. The president answered a few questions for us about the dialogue and what he hopes to see come from the event and the university's Leadership Initiative.

Flavor profile: George Kessler

Flavor profile: George Kessler

Alumnus George Kessler traveled to Urbino, Italy, on a study abroad program as an undergraduate and fell in love with all things Italian, from the language to the culture to the food. After a career in the restaurant and travel industries, Kessler and his wife, Monica, returned to Columbia two years ago to open Il Giorgione, an intimate restaurant specializing in the types of authentic Italian fare Kessler fell in love with 35 years ago as a student.

From Cambodia to Carolina: Engineering safer buildings for all budgets

From Cambodia to Carolina: Engineering safer buildings for all budgets

Senior Narong Phal has witnessed the same problem in two very different parts of the globe: buildings that can't stand up to rare but powerful natural events. He hopes his undergraduate research at USC can help bring safer structures to his native Cambodia, the U.S. and many nations in between.

USC's 'no impact man'

USC's 'no impact man'

Not just anyone can tend to hogs, chickens and goats in the morning and incorporate that experience into a classroom lecture later the same day. But Joe Jones, the new faculty principal of the Green Quad residence Hall, does it all the time.

Tradition meets romance on the Horseshoe

Tradition meets romance on the Horseshoe

At USC, the historic Horseshoe has been witness to the beginnings of many love stories. It's no surprise that some choose this special spot as the perfect place to get down on one knee.

The nonprofit next door

The nonprofit next door

Students in the College of HRSM often land cool jobs and internships across the country. But 20 students in the college are getting a closer look this semester at opportunities close to home: nonprofit performing arts and entertainment organizations in Columbia.

Building the Future, plus cake!

Building the Future, plus cake!

To commemorate 50 years since the desegregation of the University of South Carolina, the university has invited a panel of successful African-American alumni to discuss their experiences on campus and inspire the next generation.

Alum aims for Olympics

Alum aims for Olympics

When the American athletes parade through the Olympic village in Sochi, Russia, this week, you won't find any Gamecocks on the teams. Stephen Garbett hopes that won't be the case in 2018 in South Korea. The 2010 sport and entertainment management alumnus and skeleton competitor has been training day and night for the games since 2012.

Stargazers find time -- and space

Stargazers find time -- and space

Alumni Sam and John Drew have bonded over a mutual interest in astronomy their whole lives. Now, they are taking their hobby to the next level.

Program helps students with personal finances

Program helps students with personal finances

For many students, college is a time to make new friends, find a career path and discover interests and passions. It also can be a difficult time for managing money and staying financially stable. One out of three college students experience financial stress each year. But the University of South Carolina's Student Success Center helps Gamecocks keep that financial stress in check with its Financial Literacy Program.

Helping guide a thousand Magellan voyages

Helping guide a thousand Magellan voyages

Julie Morris had a difficult time when she pursued research as an undergraduate at Michigan State. But the lessons learned from the experience have added to her effectiveness as the director of the Office of Undergraduate Research, which is poised to award its 1,000th Magellan Scholar grant this semester.

Finding the light switch in the dark

Finding the light switch in the dark

As a life coach and psychologist, Lisabeth Saunders Medlock knows exactly what to say to people who have experienced life-changing trauma. Nearly four years ago, she began repeating those words to herself after a freak accident.

Alumnus reflects on 50 years with 'J-school'

Alumnus reflects on 50 years with 'J-school'

Henry Price has seen a lot of changes at the University of South Carolina's School of Journalism and Mass Communications. He has been a student, a graduate student, an alumnus, a faculty member and even an interim dean. This week, the school will celebrate a big milestone as it begins construction on its new, 21st century home. But Price, who retired in 2002 as a distinguished professor emeritus, has a lot to say about where the school has been.

VIDEO: A ball is a thing of beauty to a USC ceramics class

VIDEO: A ball is a thing of beauty to a USC ceramics class

USC ceramics students turn a class project into a work of art for all to enjoy. A collection of spherical sculptures in varying sizes has been erected on the McMaster Art College's front lawn, calling attention to the creative minds at work behind the brick walls.

Mapping an effective earthquake response

Mapping an effective earthquake response

Erin Derrick's seismology research in geologist Jim Knapp's laboratory is providing essential information for planning the emergency response to an earthquake near Charleston. If anything like the magnitude-7 temblor of 1886 strikes again, public safety officials need to take into account a fault line she has identified under Interstate 26, the major transportation artery in the area.

Meet Peter Brews

Meet Peter Brews

Peter Brews, the Darla Moore School of Business' new dean, plans to be 'all ears' in his first few weeks on the job, listening and assessing before announcing any new initiatives for the university's internationally ranked business school.

Meet & Three: a second helping

Meet & Three: a second helping

Alumnus and Free Times editor Dan Cook, media historian Kathy Roberts Forde and student journalist Austin Price discussed the future of print media for the debut installment of USC Times' new roundtable discussion, Meet & Three.

Into the stacks: Professor introduces students to rare collections

Into the stacks: Professor introduces students to rare collections

John Knox first set out to write his dissertation on British romantic literature. He didn't expect rare books and manuscripts in the University Libraries' collections to influence his studies. Then he came across USC Libraries' G. Ross Roy Collection of Scottish Literature, considered the largest collection outside the United Kingdom, while conducting research on narrative poems.

Healthy snacks, healthy kids

Healthy snacks, healthy kids

After-school programs have been tasked with providing children healthier snacks, but budgetary concerns can make that hard to do. Arnold School of Public health professor Michael Beets has stepped up with a plan that pairs such programs with local grocery stores to make healthier snacks more affordable.

A student of the sea

A student of the sea

Sophomore Charlotte Eckmann's summer of marine fieldwork is just one step along the way toward a career in marine science. From the bay scallop to marine bacteria, her research experiences are giving her what she needs to pursue a doctoral degree and establish a laboratory of her own.

No second chances

No second chances

Of all the threats afflicting children in South Carolina, one is more prevalent than diabetes, autism, sickle cell and even pediatric cancer. It is child abuse and neglect, and Olga Rosa has made it her mission to better identify and treat the thousands of little ones in South Carolina who become victims every year.

Jody Pritt welcomes international students to the Gamecock family

Jody Pritt welcomes international students to the Gamecock family

International Student Services director Jody Pritt helps students from around the world feel at home at South Carolina. She hopes their good experiences will bring even more international students here to study and learn more about the university, the state and the U.S. She calls it "person-to-person diplomacy."

Meet Mike Vinson, problem-solver

Meet Mike Vinson, problem-solver

Mike Vinson joined South Carolina this summer as the employee relations manager for the entire university system. His office handles many employee issues including monitoring the Employee Performance Management System, coordinating Employee Assistance Program services and mediating workplace disputes.

Science in art preservation

Science in art preservation

Brianna Cassidy enjoys taking on challenges in two fields that many see as worlds apart: science and art. And as a graduate student at South Carolina, she has found a way to contribute to both.

25 Arrive: Carolinians share 25 years at USC

25 Arrive: Carolinians share 25 years at USC

Celebrating its 25th year of publication, USC Times is featuring in its January edition 25 faculty and staff members who joined the university in the past 25 years. USC Times writers asked the faculty and staff featured in "25 Arrive" about their impressions of the campus when they arrived, their accomplishments in the years since and any advice they might proffer to future faculty and staff.

To serve and protect

To serve and protect

Allan Bolin's first goal when he's on duty is to keep Carolina students, faculty and staff safe and secure. It's a goal he has been working toward since before he graduated from USC in 2010. As a patrol sergeant with the USC Police Department, Bolin and his team handle all incidents on campus - fire alarms, burglaries, auto break-ins.

Measuring champions

Measuring champions

A geography professor and a team of volunteers are taking the most comprehensive survey of champion trees in the Congaree National Park in nearly 20 years.

Matters of the heart

Matters of the heart

Heart failure affects more people than all cancers combined. Now a research program on cardiovascular biomarkers led by Francis Spinale is paving the way for personalized treatment of heart disease.

HSSC finding strength in numbers

HSSC finding strength in numbers

Health Sciences South Carolina, a consortium in which USC plays an integral role, is pioneering the use of S.C. health data to define best practices for a range of health conditions.

UofSC becomes tobacco-free campus in 2014

UofSC becomes tobacco-free campus in 2014

Starting Jan. 1, the Columbia campus is tobacco-free. That means all tobacco use is banned on all university property. Campus Wellness is offering students, faculty and staff a range of resources to quit smoking or manage tobacco cravings while on campus.