Stories for Alumni

President Pastides

Think Twice UofSC

November 17, 2017, Jalesa Cooley

On a campus with almost 1,800 international students from 95 different counties, the University of South Carolina has supreme rankings when it comes to accommodating those from various backgrounds. While the environment is welcoming to all, a few students are taking the initiative to stop subtle acts of discrimination that often go unnoticed.

Dr. Grady

Doing big things together

November 13, 2017, Jalesa Cooley

It’s not every day that a simple interaction with a professor leads you to the Olympics, or even to finding a trusted mentor, but it is for students who are lucky enough to interact with John Grady. After 13 years at the University of South Carolina, these inspiring interactions have resulted in Grady being honored with the 2017 Outstanding Advocate for First-Year Students Award.

Dance preview

Creating the dancer

November 09, 2017, Page Ivey

Stacey Calvert has been a devotee of choreographer George Balanchine since she was a young dancer. “The choreography is brilliant; it’s beyond brilliant,” she says. "It’s super organic to dance. As a dancer, it makes perfect sense.” That is why Calvert has staged a Balanchine program every spring for the past 14 years as a dance professor at the University of South Carolina.

Dr. Lawrence Hill

Creating opportunities

November 08, 2017, Megan Sexton

Lawrence Hill arrived in Columbia in the summer of 1977 as a student in the first-ever class at the University of South Carolina School of Medicine. Now, the Greenville urologist is making a gift to ensure other students will have the same opportunities to receive a top-rate medical education. His planned gifts of $3 million to the School of Medicine Columbia and $3 million to the School of Medicine Greenville will be used for scholarships.

Breathe Easier

Breathe easier

October 31, 2017, Chris Horn

Just because lung cancer patients are living longer and sometimes even cured of the disease, long-term survivors of the disease often cope with distressing symptoms such as shortness of breath, fatigue, depression and anxiety. Karen Kane McDonnell, a nursing professor in USC’s College of Nursing, plans to test an intervention to reduce their symptom burden.

First Lady Patricia Moore-Pastides holding her new book

Home on the Horseshoe

October 30, 2017, Megan Sexton

A new book by first lady Patricia Moore-Pastides shares what life is like inside one of the most recognizable buildings on campus. “At Home in the Heart of the Horseshoe: Life in the University of South Carolina President’s House,” offers a look at the first families and their memories of the home, along with some history of the house and photographs of the home and gardens. There are even a few recipes for entertaining and photos of floral arrangement designs.

Kandy Velázquez

Easing the pain

October 27, 2017, Alyssa Yancey

Inspired by the loss of her aunt to breast cancer, Kandy Velázquez decided to pursue research on how to ease pain. Velázquez, an alumna of the Arnold School of Public Health and a current post doctoral fellow in the School of Medicine, will receive nearly $1 million from the National Institutes of Health over the next five years to fund her research.

Xiaoming Li

Fighting disease with data

October 25, 2017, Chris Horn

Without consistent medical supervision, HIV patients remain infectious and often have dire health outcomes. But two Arnold School of Public Health professors and an interdisciplinary team from the University of South Carolina have a plan to help reduce HIV infections in South Carolina and make medical care more responsive for those diagnosed with HIV/AIDS.

Kristn Heyer

Immigration ethics

October 25, 2017, Mary-Kathryn Craft

Boston College theological ethics professor Kristin Heyer will deliver the 18th annual Cardinal Joseph Bernardin Lecture in Moral, Ethical and Religious Studies. Heyer says today’s immigration dialogue often has been framed in terms of crisis management alone, and she will explore how the scripture and Catholic social tradition can shape the debate.

Dr. Ross

A thousand passions, 1 heartbeat

October 20, 2017, Kathryn McPhail

University of South Carolina College of Education alumnus and Chapin High School principal, Akil Ross, was named the 2018 National Principal of the Year on Friday, October 20. The honor is the culmination of a passionate career as an educator that began just a few miles away from our campus 16 years ago.

Lava flows in the Galapagos

Gamecocks in the Galápagos

October 16, 2017, Allen Wallace

For the second year in a row, UofSC is taking students to one of the rarest classrooms in the world: the Galapagos Islands. The cross-disciplinary study abroad program offers diverse lessons, but the overarching theme is sustainability.

Brandon Harrison in class

Advancing educational equity for African-American children

October 11, 2017, Kathryn McPhail

Rapping the words to the U.S. Constitution might seem odd — unless you’re a student in one of Brandon Harrison’s classes. Harrison, and other public school teachers, are collaborating with education professors here at Carolina to identify which methods work best when teaching African-American students.

Kahlil Demonbreun

Destined to help

October 10, 2017, Melinda Waldrop

Kahlil Demonbreun always knew what he wanted to do, even if he couldn’t put an exact name to it. Demonbreun, the 2016 recipient of the University of South Carolina College of Nursing Alumni Award, grew up in Michigan surrounded by strong women whose influence led him down a somewhat unusual career path.

hendrix

Garnet Apple Award winner: Leslie Hendrix

October 06, 2017, Megan Sexton

Leslie Hendrix, a first-generation college student who earned a bachelor’s degree in mathematics and a doctorate in statistics from the University of South Carolina, works to make sure the students in her classroom have the support and guidance they need to succeed. Hendrix was awarded the university’s Garnet Apple Award for Teaching Innovation this spring.

time travelers

Time travelers

October 03, 2017, Chris Horn

USC astronomy professor Steve Rodney and doctoral student Justin Roberts-Pierel are part of a NASA-funded project that could locate stellar explosions so far away that their light has taken more than 13 billion years to reach us. That means those stars exploded — give or take a few million years — near the dawn of time.

Cockys Cockaboose

A roost fit for Cocky

October 02, 2017, Megan Sexton

During the years he roamed the sidelines as Cocky, Garrett Humphries was never able to take part in a beloved Carolina tradition, tailgating at Williams-Brice. He’s making up for it now – in style. Humphries owns a train car on the Cockaboose Railroad, allowing him to celebrate pre- and post-game in the shadow of the stadium.

chamber music

Pushing musical boundaries

September 28, 2017, Peggy Binette

Pushing boundaries is intrinsic to music. That’s what audiences can expect in the Freeman Sundays @3 concert series, which merges traditional and contemporary classical music to create a bold, new way to experience world music.

Choosing right, when all the choices are correct

September 25, 2017, John Brunelli

May 2017 graduates of the University of South Carolina College of Nursing set a new record on the National Council Licensure Examination, the standardized test used for the licensing of nurses in the U.S. The cohort of 158 nursing students earned a pass rate of 99.3 percent. The year-to-date average for the college is 98.3 percent. The national average is approximately 83.6 percent.

Binda in Senegal

From refugee to global education advocate

September 22, 2017, Kathryn McPhail

At just 6 years old, Noella “Binda” Niati was forced to flee her home in the Democratic Republic of Congo, amid intense violence and political upheaval. More than two decades later, she is headed back to Africa to study ways to encourage children, especially girls, to stay in school longer.

family fund

All in the family

September 20, 2017, Page Ivey

Since its inception in 1981, the Family Fund has generated more than $50 million for Carolina. Gifts through the Family Fund support groundbreaking research, strengthen programs and initiatives, recruit and develop world-class faculty and fund scholarships.

Emily Suski and Lisa Martin

Clinical approach

September 19, 2017, Chris Horn

The School of Law is launching two new legal clinics this academic year. A medicolegal clinic will team law students with medical students, medical residents and physicians to improve health outcomes for pediatric patients, while a domestic violence clinic will focus on protection, advocacy and community education.

advanced materials

Advancing SC workforce

September 19, 2017

The University of South Carolina has been preparing students for the workforce for generations. As the state has attracted more high-tech manufacturing operations, the need for more skilled workers has grown rapidly. The university can now increase its reach to help even more South Carolinians take advantage of these opportunities with a $20 million National Science Foundation grant.

State of the University 2017

Moving UofSC forward

September 12, 2017

The University of South Carolina has made great strides in the past year in its mission as the flagship university system for the state, but now is no time to be satisfied, President Harris Pastides told students, faculty and staff in his annual State of the University address on Tuesday.

Maxcy Monument on Horseshoe

UofSC continues to climb in latest U.S. News rankings

September 11, 2017, Jeff Stensland

Boosted by a growing reputation for academic excellence and research prowess, the University of South Carolina climbed several spots in the latest U.S. News and World Report’s latest undergraduate rankings publication released this week, now ranking 46th among all public institutions, and 25th among state flagships.

Cocky statue on campus

Get ready for a Cocky weekend

September 07, 2017, Megan Sexton

On Sept. 15, a 6-foot-5, 773-pound bronze statue of the beloved mascot will be dedicated in front of Davis College, just off Greene Street next to the Melton Observatory. Cocky is seated on a bench, with one hand raised high with a spurs-up sign. His other hand rests on a stack of books, a nod to Cocky’s role as a literacy leader around the state.