Stories for Alumni

claudia benitez nelson

Talking TEDx

April 30, 2018, Megan Sexton

In October, the university will host its first TEDx event. Like the parent TED conferences, which invite speakers to take the stage and present “ideas worth spreading,” TEDxUofSC will feature short, powerful talks on innovative ideas.

Mitzi Nagarkatti

Breakthrough Leader: Mitzi Nagarkatti

April 27, 2018, Chris Horn

When Mitzi Nagarkatti joined the School of Medicine as chair of pathology, microbiology and immunology in 2005, the department was bringing in about $600,000 a year in NIH funding, 81st among all such departments across the nation. The department now garners some $9.5 million per year in NIH grants (No. 17 in the country) and Nagarkatti continues to build research capacity not only in that unit but in the entire School of Medicine and across the university.

South Carolina Sunset

Building a healthier South Carolina

April 20, 2018, Alyssa Yancey

The staff of the SC Center for Rural and Primary Healthcare at the USC School of Medicine is working to improve access to care in rural South Carolina. Created with state funding in 2017, the center has a number of initiatives underway, including a loan program to encourage health profession students to practice in rural settings, research grant programs and partnerships helping put providers on the ground in critical need areas.

Parastoo Hashemi

Breakthrough Star: Parastoo Hashemi

April 20, 2018, Chris Horn

Parastoo Hashemi wants to know what's going on inside our heads — neurochemically speaking, that is — and she and her research team are well on their way toward figuring out how to do it. Her pioneering research on measuring neurochemical levels in the brain have far-reaching implications for treatment of depression and other neurological conditions such as Parkinson's disease.

President Harris Pastides, Dean Haemoon Oh, Huong Nguyen and Kendall Roth in Vietnam

Carolina changes the world

March 07, 2018, John Brunelli

The University of South Carolina is expanding its global reach in Southeast Asia. President Harris Pastides recently signed partnerships with three universities in Vietnam, which will allow for collaboration in teaching, research and service. Now, the Office of Study Abroad is sending a delegation of faculty and staff to the country over spring break to explore other opportunities for Carolina students.

Dr. Todd Crump

Committed to Care

February 26, 2018, Alyssa Yancey

Students, faculty members and alumni from the USC School of Medicine are making a difference in the Midlands by volunteering at two local free medical clinics. Students also work to support The Free Medical Clinic financially through the Black Tie White Coat Gala, an annual fundraising event.

Richard T. Greener

Larger than life

February 21, 2018, Chris Horn

Richard T. Greener’s larger-than-life story is one of academic achievement, professional success and civic service, played out mostly in the tumultuous years after the Civil War. It’s a story of firsts — in addition to being USC’s first black professor, Greener was also Harvard’s first black graduate and America’s first black diplomat to a country of white citizenry.

Caitlyn Jennings in Bolivia

Passport to success

February 19, 2018, Mary-Kathryn Craft

Global studies, one of the University of South Carolina’s newest and fastest growing majors, equips students to lead in our increasingly connected world. An interdisciplinary program housed in the College of Arts and Science, global studies is home to 125 undergraduates who focus on humanities paired with intensive language study and courses in professional schools.

mass

Peace be with you

January 31, 2018

One of the splendors of music is its power to inspire joy, acceptance and understanding among people of all backgrounds and beliefs. It is widely recognized that Leonard Bernstein’s dramatic "MASS: Theatre Piece for Singers, Players and Dancers" does just that, bringing to life diverse views on spirituality, self-reflection and personal responsibility through the musical means only one of America’s greatest composers could envision.

Freeze-dried crickets

Guess what's coming to dinner

January 25, 2018, Chris Horn

Insects are regularly consumed by an estimated 2 billion people, a practice that has its roots in culture and sometimes necessity. Law professor Marie Boyd studies the regulation of insects as food as part of her research on the Food and Drug Administration. She says insect-based food has a long way to go, both from a cultural and regulatory standpoint, in the U.S.

ultrasound education

The curious case of Marcus Brown

January 09, 2018, Chris Horn

Marcus Brown is a fictional high school student athlete whose medical history is the centerpiece of a teaching module in anatomy and biology courses at 20 middle and high schools that participated in a joint venture with USC’s School of Medicine and the College of Education. The project gives students an interesting case study that guides them through an exploration of various physiological conditions that might have contributed to the star athlete’s untimely death.

The future of retailing

It's about to get personal

November 27, 2017, Allen Wallace

Imagine going shopping and having your phone or fitness tracker make product recommendations for you based on your breath or the current physical state of your body. It is not science fiction. It’s the future of retailing and health care digitization according to researchers at University of South Carolina’s College of Hospitality, Retail and Sport Management.