Stories for Students

ultrasound education

The curious case of Marcus Brown

January 09, 2018, Chris Horn

Marcus Brown is a fictional high school student athlete whose medical history is the centerpiece of a teaching module in anatomy and biology courses at 20 middle and high schools that participated in a joint venture with USC’s School of Medicine and the College of Education. The project gives students an interesting case study that guides them through an exploration of various physiological conditions that might have contributed to the star athlete’s untimely death.

Capstone adulting series

Adulting 101

December 13, 2017, Jalesa Cooley

This semester, Capstone Scholars were offered an array of workshops that taught them valuable skills that are not offered in the typical classroom environment.

capstone scholars

Gateway to adventure

November 30, 2017, Jalesa Cooley

Whether heights, spiders or dark corners, we all have fears that need facing. Students in the Capstone Scholars program are encouraged to address their fears head-on and realize their potential through the Personal Challenge — a pillar of the Capstone experience that requires students to step out of their comfort zones and try something new.

Tatiana Kostova

Moore School trailblazer honored with Carolina Distinguished Professorship

November 30, 2017, Amanda Hernandez

For 21 years, Tatiana Kostova, Buck Mickel Chair and Professor of International Business at the University of South Carolina's Darla Moore School of Business, has been an integral part of the Moore School faculty. Her hard work and success with students have culminated this year with a Carolina Distinguished Professorship award.

The future of retailing

It's about to get personal

November 27, 2017, Allen Wallace

Imagine going shopping and having your phone or fitness tracker make product recommendations for you based on your breath or the current physical state of your body. It is not science fiction. It’s the future of retailing and health care digitization according to researchers at University of South Carolina’s College of Hospitality, Retail and Sport Management.

President Pastides

Think Twice UofSC

November 17, 2017, Jalesa Cooley

On a campus with almost 1,800 international students from 95 different counties, the University of South Carolina has supreme rankings when it comes to accommodating those from various backgrounds. While the environment is welcoming to all, a few students are taking the initiative to stop subtle acts of discrimination that often go unnoticed.

Dr. Grady

Doing big things together

November 13, 2017, Jalesa Cooley

It’s not every day that a simple interaction with a professor leads you to the Olympics, or even to finding a trusted mentor, but it is for students who are lucky enough to interact with John Grady. After 13 years at the University of South Carolina, these inspiring interactions have resulted in Grady being honored with the 2017 Outstanding Advocate for First-Year Students Award.

Dance preview

Creating the dancer

November 09, 2017, Page Ivey

Stacey Calvert has been a devotee of choreographer George Balanchine since she was a young dancer. “The choreography is brilliant; it’s beyond brilliant,” she says. "It’s super organic to dance. As a dancer, it makes perfect sense.” That is why Calvert has staged a Balanchine program every spring for the past 14 years as a dance professor at the University of South Carolina.

Karlye Denner

Undergraduate research opens door to opportunity

November 03, 2017, Jalesa Cooley

Pre-med sophomore Karlye Denner was working at a Columbia health clinic when she began to notice the high number of Latino patients who seemed at risk for diabetes. Intrigued, the Capstone Scholar from Closter, New Jersey, applied for a Magellan Apprentice Undergraduate Research Grant to conduct independent research on the issue.

Breathe Easier

Breathe easier

October 31, 2017, Chris Horn

Just because lung cancer patients are living longer and sometimes even cured of the disease, long-term survivors of the disease often cope with distressing symptoms such as shortness of breath, fatigue, depression and anxiety. Karen Kane McDonnell, a nursing professor in USC’s College of Nursing, plans to test an intervention to reduce their symptom burden.

Xiaoming Li

Fighting disease with data

October 25, 2017, Chris Horn

Without consistent medical supervision, HIV patients remain infectious and often have dire health outcomes. But two Arnold School of Public Health professors and an interdisciplinary team from the University of South Carolina have a plan to help reduce HIV infections in South Carolina and make medical care more responsive for those diagnosed with HIV/AIDS.

Lava flows in the Galapagos

Gamecocks in the Galápagos

October 16, 2017, Allen Wallace

For the second year in a row, UofSC is taking students to one of the rarest classrooms in the world: the Galapagos Islands. The cross-disciplinary study abroad program offers diverse lessons, but the overarching theme is sustainability.

Brandon Harrison in class

Advancing educational equity for African-American children

October 11, 2017, Kathryn McPhail

Rapping the words to the U.S. Constitution might seem odd — unless you’re a student in one of Brandon Harrison’s classes. Harrison, and other public school teachers, are collaborating with education professors here at Carolina to identify which methods work best when teaching African-American students.

hendrix

Garnet Apple Award winner: Leslie Hendrix

October 06, 2017, Megan Sexton

Leslie Hendrix, a first-generation college student who earned a bachelor’s degree in mathematics and a doctorate in statistics from the University of South Carolina, works to make sure the students in her classroom have the support and guidance they need to succeed. Hendrix was awarded the university’s Garnet Apple Award for Teaching Innovation this spring.

time travelers

Time travelers

October 03, 2017, Chris Horn

USC astronomy professor Steve Rodney and doctoral student Justin Roberts-Pierel are part of a NASA-funded project that could locate stellar explosions so far away that their light has taken more than 13 billion years to reach us. That means those stars exploded — give or take a few million years — near the dawn of time.

chamber music

Pushing musical boundaries

September 28, 2017, Peggy Binette

Pushing boundaries is intrinsic to music. That’s what audiences can expect in the Freeman Sundays @3 concert series, which merges traditional and contemporary classical music to create a bold, new way to experience world music.