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Department of Anthropology

700-Level

Spring 2022

 

ANTH 706.001 / Engendering Global Capitalism

PLEASE SEE MASTER SCHEDULE FOR DAY, TIMES, AND LOCATION

Professor: Drucilla Barker

(3 credits)

Cross-listed with WGST 706.001 

Course Readings:

Please go to the USC Bookstore to find what books you will need for this course:

https://sc.bncollege.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/TBWizardView?catalogId=10001&langId=-1&storeId=10052

Course Description:

This is a graduate interdisciplinary seminar in feminist economic anthropology. The first part of the course examines the ways that debt, reciprocity, and redistribution structure social hierarchies. It critiques the notion that women and children are the property of men and examines the lasting influence of this notion. The second part examines the origins of capitalism through the lens of primary accumulation and the witch trials in Europe in the late 15th century to the late 18th century centuries. The third part covers contemporary financial crises and includes an ethnography of the effects of microfinance on poor women in Bangladesh. The fourth part concludes with an exploration of precarious livelihoods and environments in this age of ecological destruction and globalization.


ANTH 730.001 / Cultural Theory Through Ethnography

PLEASE SEE MASTER SCHEDULE FOR DAY, TIMES, AND LOCATION

Professor: Monica Barra

(3 credits)

Course Readings:

Please go to the USC Bookstore to find what books you will need for this course:

https://sc.bncollege.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/TBWizardView?catalogId=10001&langId=-1&storeId=10052

Course description:

This seminar examines the relationship between contemporary anthropological theory and ethnography.  It is required for cultural anthropology students. Graduate students in other disciplines are welcome to the seminar.  The seminar focuses equally on the craft of ethnographic inquiry and how this is connected to contemporary theoretical questions emerging from the field of cultural anthropology and cognate disciplines. We consider, in particular, how ethnographers grapple with subjectivity, situated knowledge, and questions of accountability and authority in ethnographic writing. In turn, we will examine how these questions about the method/craft of ethnography come to bear on the development of anthropology’s contemporary theorization of a variety of topics, including: race, inequality, environmental politics, indigeneity, political economy, health and medicine, human rights, violence, migration, gender and sexuality, and other contemporary topics in cultural anthropology.


ANTH 748.001 / Introduction to Linguistic Anthropology

PLEASE SEE MASTER SCHEDULE FOR DAY, TIMES, AND LOCATION

Professor: Jennifer Reynolds

(3 credits)

Cross-listed LING 748.001 

Course Readings:

Please go to the USC Bookstore to find what books you will need for this course:

https://sc.bncollege.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/TBWizardView?catalogId=10001&langId=-1&storeId=10052

 Course description:

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the emergence of linguistic anthropology as one of the four core sub-fields within Anthropology, its relationship(s) to sociolinguistics, (critical) discourse analysis, and conversation analysis.  Emphasis will be placed on the scholarly contributions that this tradition has made to social theory as well as theories of language and discourse.

Course Presentation:

Seminar format driven by student led presentations of prescribed readings on a particular topic.

Audience:

Graduate students in linguistics, anthropology, education, and other related fields interested in the social scientific examination of language in context.


ANTH 751.001 / Archaeological Research Design & Analysis

PLEASE SEE MASTER SCHEDULE FOR DAY, TIMES, AND LOCATION

Professor: Steve Smith

(3 credits)

Course Readings:

Articles on Blackboard

Course Description:

How archaeologists know what they know. The application of the scientific method in archaeology.  Creating and designing research problems in archaeological studies. Integrating theory and methodology. Formulation and testing of hypotheses. Methodological issues in theory, field work, and laboratory analysis. Evaluating results and publishing.


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