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Department of Anthropology

Archaeology

Spring 2022

ANTH 219.001 / Great Discoveries in Archaeology

PLEASE SEE MASTER SCHEDULE FOR DAY, TIMES, AND LOCATION

Professor: Joanna Casey

(3 credits)

Fulfills 3 hrs of the Archaeological Requirement for the Anthropology 

Course Readings:

None.  Weekly readings will be available

Course Description: 

This course is a romp through the world’s great archaeological discoveries with a view to making students literate in world archaeology.  For most people, the word archaeology conjures up images of pyramids, gold and faraway places, of civilizations lost and found and the swashbuckling adventurers who brought these finds to light.  This course shamelessly panders to popular perceptions of archaeology by introducing students to the well-known sites and artifacts that have shaped our view of the past from the advent of modern humans to the beginning of written records.  We will look at the causes and consequences of the developments in the human career, and also at the hoaxes, frauds and bad science that plague popular views of the human past.  By the end of this course, students will know what archaeologists know about how and why the big events in human prehistory occurred, will be able to identify the sites and artifacts that have captured the public imagination and shaped our thinking about the past and will be able to critically evaluate the way archaeological ideas and things are presented in the popular media.

Presentation:

Lectures, films, readings

Evaluation:
Mid term test, final exam, term paper, quizzes and response papers.


ANTH 320.001 / Archaeology Theory

PLEASE SEE MASTER SCHEDULE FOR DAY, TIMES, AND LOCATION

Professor: Joanna Casey

(3 credits)

Fulfills the Archaeological Requirement for the Anthropology Major

AND

Integrative Requirement (INT)

Course Readings:

None.  Weekly readings will be available

Course Description:

How do archaeologists figure out what happened in the past?   The artifacts they dig up provide clues, but how do archaeologists know what those clues mean?  This course is about the ideas that frame archaeological research. Those ideas have changed dramatically throughout the more than 100 years of archaeology’s history, determining the questions that archaeologists ask about the past, the kinds of material remains they search for, and the answers they find acceptable.  The past takes on different forms when peered at through different theoretical lenses, so how can we know what really happened in the past, and why does it matter?  While most archaeologists get interested in archaeology because of the artifacts and excavations, it is the ideas that make them continue.

Presentation:

Lectures, films, readings

Evaluation:
Participation in discussions, response papers, Assignments (4), Presentations


ANTH 536.001 / Public Archaeology

PLEASE SEE MASTER SCHEDULE FOR DAY, TIMES, AND LOCATION

Professor: Adam King

(3 credits)

Fulfills the Archaeological Requirement for the Anthropology Major

OR

Fulfills the 500-level(s) requirement(s) for the Major or for DURT

Course Readings:

Please go to the USC Bookstore to find what books you will need for this course:

https://sc.bncollege.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/TBWizardView?catalogId=10001&langId=-1&storeId=10052

Course Description:

Public archaeology is a varied field within the discipline of archaeology. As the name suggests, it involves archaeological practice, research, outreach, and planning designed specifically to meet the public good. Public archaeologists work for private consulting firms, state and federal agencies, non-governmental organizations, museums, and for Indigenous communities. A large portion of this course will focus on understanding the federal, state, and local laws and regulations that guide the practice of archaeology in the public interest. With that regulatory framework engaged, we will then focus on the various ways and various settings in which public archaeology is practiced. When possible, speakers working in various fields of public archaeology will be invited to bring their experiences and perspectives to the class.


ANTH 550.001 / Archaeological Laboratory Methods

PLEASE SEE MASTER SCHEDULE FOR DAY, TIMES, AND LOCATION

Professor: Eric Jones

(3 credits)

Fulfills the Archaeological Requirement for the Anthropology Major and

Graduation with Leadership Distinction (GLD): Research

OR

Fulfills the 500-level(s) requirement(s) for the Major or for DURT (Lab) and

Graduation with Leadership Distinction (GLD): Research 

Course Readings:

Please go to the USC Bookstore to find what books you will need for this course:

https://sc.bncollege.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/TBWizardView?catalogId=10001&langId=-1&storeId=10052

 Course Description:

This course covers basic laboratory methods in archaeology, focusing on Pre-contact and early Contact Native American material culture. Over the course of the semester, students will learn and apply methods for preserving, storing, and analyzing various types of archaeological remains, including lithics, ceramics, floral and faunal remains, and sediments. The primary goal is to familiarize students with a wide range of materials and methods to prepare them for professional archaeological work and/or more advanced graduate-level research. 

 


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