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Department of Anthropology

Cultural

Spring 2022

 

ANTH 203.001 / Comparing Cultures Through Films

PLEASE SEE MASTER SCHEDULE FOR DAY, TIMES, AND LOCATION

Professor: Lori Donath

(3 credits)

Fulfills 3 hrs of the Cultural Requirement for the Anthropology

AND

GLD: Global Learning and Professional and Civic Engagement 

Course Readings:

Please go to the USC Bookstore to find what books you will need for this course:

https://sc.bncollege.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/TBWizardView?catalogId=10001&langId=-1&storeId=10052

Course Description:

In this course we will look at film critically not only to compare cultures as distinct groups of people but also to understand the social and cultural practices and processes that make up human life. We will attend to the ways that power is unevenly distributed among populations by critically "reading" popular, ethnographic, and (other) documentary films throughout a wide range of history. As well, we will consider the ways that people, including anthropologists, are able to see, interpret, and understand things quite differently, so that their contextualized perspectives render different, partial, and complementary representations of reality through the camera lens. A text and relevant published scholarly work will guide our discussion of the films and deepen our understanding of how people do human existence in similar and myriad ways. Beginning Week 2, students will stream films independently during the class meeting on which their group does not have discussion— using the Blackboard links provided by the professor, with the assistance of Christian Lear, University librarian. (Global Learning; Professional and Civic Engagement).

Learning Outcomes: Upon completion of Anth 203 students should be able to:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of the history of film as it relates to the field of anthropology;
  • Understand culture as a dynamic interplay of ideas people hold about their world and their social practices in the world;
  • Critically evaluate text, films, and other media, by employing anthropological perspectives that you will be introduced to in this course;
  • Demonstrate knowledge about the cross-cultural diversity of race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, kinship, class, migration, economic systems, healing, religion, and art, as well as the global complexity of these.

ANTH 212.001 / Food and Culture

PLEASE SEE MASTER SCHEDULE FOR DAY, TIMES, AND LOCATION

Professor: Lori Donath

(3 credits)

Fulfills 3 hrs of the Cultural Requirement for Anthropology

AND

GLD: Professional and CIVIC Engagement and VSR CORE Requirement

OR

Fulfills the Inquiry Requirement for the DURT Track

AND

GLD: Professional and CIVIC Engagement and VSR CORE Requirement

OR

Social Science GSS (Global Citizenship & Multicultural Understanding) 

 Elective for Medical Anthropology Minor* 

*Cannot use for GSS Requirement if using for Medical Minor 

Course Readings:

Please go to the USC Bookstore to find what books you will need for this course:

https://sc.bncollege.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/TBWizardView?catalogId=10001&langId=-1&storeId=10052

Course Description: 

This course explores multiple dimensions of sociocultural life by considering human relationships with food, including the connection between diet and the human microbiome, taste and stratification, gendered and racialized divisions of labor, comfort and wellness in the economies of different societies, and environmental sustainability. From potlatch bans to settler colonialism to food deserts, we will consider food production and procurement, preparation, valuation, consumption, (and disposal)—as well as commodification and the construction of scarcity—and we will critically examine power and social inequality as it plays out in these contexts. We will also hear from participants within both institutionally and organically organized efforts in support of food justice. In teams, students will carry out an ethnographic assignment that documents the discourses and other practices related to food and will have multiple opportunities to take part in food exchanges and sampling with appropriate social distancing.


ANTH 216.001 / Violence and Peace

PLEASE SEE MASTER SCHEDULE FOR DAY, TIMES, AND LOCATION

Professor: Terrance Weik

(3 credits)

Fulfills 3 hrs of the Cultural Requirement for the Anthropology

AND

VSR CORE Requirement

Course Readings:

Please go to the USC Bookstore to find what books you will need for this course:

https://sc.bncollege.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/TBWizardView?catalogId=10001&langId=-1&storeId=10052

Course Description: 

This course examines violence and peace in current events, cultural practices, historical periods, and everyday experiences. The course analyzes the ethics shaping violence and peace-making strategies. Classroom discussions and lectures articulate various dimensions of harm and wellbeing. Course themes address the Values, Ethics, and Social Responsibility (VSR) Carolina Core component, including colonialism, environmental exploitation, bondage, mass extinctions, and racism.


ANTH 289.001 / Special Topics: Sanctuary and the Anthropology

Of Immigration Advocacy

PLEASE SEE MASTER SCHEDULE FOR DAY, TIMES, AND LOCATION

Professor: John Doering-White

(3 credits) 

Fulfills the Cultural Requirement for the Anthropology Major 

Course Readings:

Please go to the USC Bookstore to find what books you will need for this course:

https://sc.bncollege.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/TBWizardView?catalogId=10001&langId=-1&storeId=10052

Course Description:

In recent years, sanctuary has emerged as a political flashpoint for U.S. immigration politics. Where does the idea of sanctuary come from, what role has it played in immigrant advocacy work, and why is it so contentious? This course examines the social and intellectual roots of the contemporary sanctuary movement, including religious ethics of hospitality, the relationship between civil disobedience and democracy, and the influence of liberation theology in Latin America. We will read ethnographic studies, watch documentary films, and talk with people currently engaged in various forms of immigrant advocacy work. Ultimately, students will develop an understanding of key anthropological concepts and debates surrounding immigration, human rights, religion, and civil disobedience through the lens of sanctuary.


ANTH 353.001 / Anthropology of Law & Conflict

PLEASE SEE MASTER SCHEDULE FOR DAY, TIMES, AND LOCATION

Professor: Jonathan Leader

(3 credits)

Fulfills the Cultural Requirement for the Anthropology Major and

Graduation with Leadership Distinction (GLD): Global learning 

Course Readings:

Please go to the USC Bookstore to find what books you will need for this course:

https://sc.bncollege.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/TBWizardView?catalogId=10001&langId=-1&storeId=10052

Course Description:

The Anthropology of Law and Conflict provides a forum for considering the cultural and cross-cultural aspects of the social contracts implicit and explicit in formal and informal legal systems. We will discuss the relationship between individual and community rights in a variety of states, the situation of stateless peoples, and the construction of concepts such as citizenship, normalcy, and human rights. Violence will be discussed in relation to communal identities, legacies of colonialism and nationalism, economic inequality, and resurgent reactionary religious and enforced triumphalist secular systems. Students will learn to engage topics including universal rights, individual accountability, international law and conflict resolution through an ethnographic and applied lens.


ANTH 392.001 / Global Women’s Health

PLEASE SEE MASTER SCHEDULE FOR DAY, TIMES, AND LOCATION

Professor: Kathryn Luchok

(3 credits)

Cross-listed with WGST 392.001 

Meets with ANTH 3922.H10 and WGST 392.H10 – Honors College Only for the H10 Sections 

Fulfills the Cultural Requirement for the Anthropology Major 

Medical Minor Requirement

Course Readings:

Please go to the USC Bookstore to find what books you will need for this course:

https://sc.bncollege.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/TBWizardView?catalogId=10001&langId=-1&storeId=10052

Course Description:

This course examines health issues important in the lives of women around the world. The course will take a life cycle approach beginning with issues surrounding the birth of girl babies, continuing through the period of growth and development, adulthood, including family planning, pregnancy and lactation and ending with old age. Drawing on medical and applied anthropology perspectives, the course will cover the sociocultural landscape of women’s lives, including the forces that promote and hinder the health and well-being of women around the globe. Also examined are programs aimed at improving women’s lives world-wide. The goal of this course is to provide students with a clearer understanding of the female life cycle with a greater appreciation for the mental, physical and social health risks women face, as well as the resilience and strengths women bring, on a global scale.

This class will be of interest to students interested in global issues, culture and health and/or women’s health, including but not limited to those in Anthropology, Global Studies, WGST, Public Health, Nursing, Social Work, Education, Sociology, Political Science and Psychology.  It is a required course for the Medical Anthropology Minor.


ANTH 552.001 / Medical Anthropology

PLEASE SEE MASTER SCHEDULE FOR DAY, TIMES, AND LOCATION

Professor: David Simmons

(3 credits)

Fulfills the Cultural Requirement for the Anthropology Major and

Graduation with Leadership Distinction (GLD): Research

OR

Fulfills the 500-level(s) requirement(s) for the Major or for DURT and

Graduation with Leadership Distinction (GLD): Research 

Cross-listed with HPEB 552.001 

Meets with HPEB 552.H10 and ANTH 552.H10 – Honors College Only for the H10 Sections 

Medical Minor Requirement 

Course Readings:

Please go to the USC Bookstore to find what books you will need for this course:

https://sc.bncollege.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/TBWizardView?catalogId=10001&langId=-1&storeId=10052

Course Description:

This course introduces the field of medical anthropology, which is the study of human health, disease and healing from a cross-cultural perspective. The political economy of health as a result of modernization is a central focus. Topics covered include cross-cultural understandings of illness and healing, the social/cultural context of health and health interventions, and the impacts of emerging and re-emerging diseases such as AIDS, Ebola, and Tuberculosis on world health. The underlying theme of the course is the use of anthropological concepts and methods in domestic and international public health contexts.


ANTH 580.001 / Culture and Identity of the African Diaspora

PLEASE SEE MASTER SCHEDULE FOR DAY, TIMES, AND LOCATION

Professor: Terrance Weik

(3 credits)

Fulfills the Cultural Requirement for the Anthropology Major

AND

Graduation with Leadership Distinction (GLD): Global Learning and

Diversity and Social Advocacy

OR

Fulfills the 500-level(s) requirement(s) for the Major or for DURT

AND

Graduation with Leadership Distinction (GLD): Global Learning and

Diversity and Social Advocacy

Cross-listed with AFAM 580.001

Course Readings:

Please go to the USC Bookstore to find what books you will need for this course: https://sc.bncollege.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/TBWizardView?catalogId=10001&langId=- 1&storeId=10052

Course Description:

As the “birth place of humanity,” Africa is relevant to all humans as an important reference point for understanding historical human migration and geography. Africans have been on the move from antiquity to the present day, as merchants, pastoralists, healers, pilgrims, soldiers, enslaved laborers, and missionaries (among other roles). This course examines the experiences, material culture, and sociocultural processes involving people of African descent in order to understand the complexity and substance of the African Diaspora in Asia, the Americas, Europe, and Africa. Various forms of evidence, disciplinary approaches, and intellectual concepts will be surveyed in order to gain a better understanding of the African Diaspora. To this end, students will be introduced to theories dealing with culture, creolization, race, Africanism, heritage, representation, and ethnicity. Lectures, films, and texts constitute the main learning media.


ANTH 581.001 / Globalization and Cultural Questions

PLEASE SEE MASTER SCHEDULE FOR DAY, TIMES, AND LOCATION

Professor: David Kneas

(3 credits)

Fulfills the Cultural Requirement for the Anthropology Major

and INT (Integrative) Requirement.

Graduation with Leadership Distinction (GLD): Global Learning

OR

Fulfills the 500-level(s) requirement(s) for the Major or for DURT

and INT (Integrative) Requirement.

Graduation with Leadership Distinction (GLD): Global Learning

Cross-listed with GEOG 581.001

Course Readings:

Please go to the USC Bookstore to find what books you will need for this course: https://sc.bncollege.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/TBWizardView?catalogId=10001&langId=- 1&storeId=10052

Course Description:

This course examines cultural understandings of and responses to globalization, examining topics such as its history and theories, migration, economic integration and inequality, identity, social movements, and the environment.

 


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