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Department of Anthropology

GLD: Professional & Civic Engagement (PCE)

Spring 2022

 

ANTH 203.001 / Comparing Cultures Through Films

PLEASE SEE MASTER SCHEDULE FOR DAY, TIMES, AND LOCATION

Professor: Lori Donath

(3 credits)

Fulfills 3 hrs of the Cultural Requirement for the Anthropology

AND

GLD: Global Learning and Professional and Civic Engagement 

Course Readings:

Please go to the USC Bookstore to find what books you will need for this course:

https://sc.bncollege.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/TBWizardView?catalogId=10001&langId=-1&storeId=10052

Course Description:

In this course we will look at film critically not only to compare cultures as distinct groups of people but also to understand the social and cultural practices and processes that make up human life. We will attend to the ways that power is unevenly distributed among populations by critically "reading" popular, ethnographic, and (other) documentary films throughout a wide range of history. As well, we will consider the ways that people, including anthropologists, are able to see, interpret, and understand things quite differently, so that their contextualized perspectives render different, partial, and complementary representations of reality through the camera lens. A text and relevant published scholarly work will guide our discussion of the films and deepen our understanding of how people do human existence in similar and myriad ways. Beginning Week 2, students will stream films independently during the class meeting on which their group does not have discussion— using the Blackboard links provided by the professor, with the assistance of Christian Lear, University librarian. (Global Learning; Professional and Civic Engagement).

Learning Outcomes: Upon completion of Anth 203 students should be able to:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of the history of film as it relates to the field of anthropology;
  • Understand culture as a dynamic interplay of ideas people hold about their world and their social practices in the world;
  • Critically evaluate text, films, and other media, by employing anthropological perspectives that you will be introduced to in this course;
  • Demonstrate knowledge about the cross-cultural diversity of race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, kinship, class, migration, economic systems, healing, religion, and art, as well as the global complexity of these.

ANTH 212.001 / Food and Culture

PLEASE SEE MASTER SCHEDULE FOR DAY, TIMES, AND LOCATION

Professor: TBA

(3 credits)

Fulfills 3 hrs of the Cultural Requirement for Anthropology

AND

GLD: Professional and CIVIC Engagement and VSR CORE Requirement

OR

Fulfills the Inquiry Requirement for the DURT Track

AND

GLD: Professional and CIVIC Engagement and VSR CORE Requirement

OR

Social Science GSS (Global Citizenship & Multicultural Understanding) 

 Elective for Medical Anthropology Minor* 

*Cannot use for GSS Requirement if using for Medical Minor 

Course Readings:

Please go to the USC Bookstore to find what books you will need for this course:

https://sc.bncollege.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/TBWizardView?catalogId=10001&langId=-1&storeId=10052

Course Description: 

This course explores multiple dimensions of sociocultural life by considering human relationships with food, including the connection between diet and the human microbiome, taste and stratification, gendered and racialized divisions of labor, comfort and wellness in the economies of different societies, and environmental sustainability. From potlatch bans to settler colonialism to food deserts, we will consider food production and procurement, preparation, valuation, consumption, (and disposal)—as well as commodification and the construction of scarcity—and we will critically examine power and social inequality as it plays out in these contexts. We will also hear from participants within both institutionally and organically organized efforts in support of food justice. In teams, students will carry out an ethnographic assignment that documents the discourses and other practices related to food and will have multiple opportunities to take part in food exchanges and sampling with appropriate social distancing.


ANTH 234.001 / Caribbean Cultures

PLEASE SEE MASTER SCHEDULE FOR DAY, TIMES, AND LOCATION

Professor: Sherina Feliciano Santos

(3 credits)

Fulfills the Cultural Anthropology Course Requirement

AND

GLD: Global Learning; Professional and Civic Engagement 

Course Readings:

Please go to the USC Bookstore to find what books you will need for this course:

https://sc.bncollege.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/TBWizardView?catalogId=10001&langId=-1&storeId=10052

 Course Description:

This course focuses its study of the Caribbean on the effects of different scales of political and economic policies on the region’s cultural forms. While the course provides in depth case studies of the region’s generally Spanish-speaking countries: Cuba, Puerto Rico, and the Dominican Republic, it will also consider issues such as race, migration, politics, economics, and language across a number of countries in the English-speaking, French-speaking, and Dutch-speaking Caribbean.  While all of these countries have had very different political trajectories, they have in common their history as colonies as well as migrations within the region and to the US.


ANTH 371.001/Ethnography of Communication

PLEASE SEE MASTER SCHEDULE FOR DAY, TIMES, AND LOCATION

Professor: Sherina Feliciano-Santos

(3 credits)

Fulfills the Linguistic Requirement for the Anthropology Major and

Graduation with Leadership Distinction (GLD): Professional Civic Engagement

AND

Integrative Requirement (INT)

Course Readings:

Please go to the USC Bookstore to find what books you will need for this course:

https://sc.bncollege.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/TBWizardView?catalogId=10001&langId=-1&storeId=10052

Course Description:

This course will introduce students to the empirical study of language and communication in context.  Using a cross-cultural approach, students will explore how norms and expectations for what are considered appropriate ways of talking and interacting (including things like gaze, spatial organization, hand gestures, and bodily positioning for example) differ across social events and cultural locales.  In fact, we will consider how such norms and expectations might help us constitute “identities” and “communities.”  Additionally, students will familiarize themselves with ethnographic and analytical methods in the study of communication, which they will apply to a short research project.


Challenge the conventional. Create the exceptional. No Limits.

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