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Department of Anthropology

Scientific Literacy

Spring 2022

 

Anthropology 161.001-010 / Human Origins: An Intro to Biological Anthropology

TR / 11:40 – 12:55 / Currell 107

Professor: Carlina de la Cova

(4 credits)

Can be used as a Prerequisite in place of ANTH 101 within the Major & Minor

AND

Fulfills 4 hrs of the Carolina Core Requirements for the Scientific Literacy’s 8 hrs

 (CANNOT be used as a LAB credit for DURT. Labs must be 200-level and above.)

 (Note: This course can be used as a Prerequisite for the Anthropology Major and it can also be used for 4 hrs of the Carolina Core Requirements for the Science Literacy’s 8 credits at the same time. This course cannot be used to satisfy any credits for the Social Science GSS Carolina Core Requirement)

 Course Readings:

No required texts

 Course Description:

This four-credit course satisfies the College of Arts and Sciences requirement for a Lab Science Course.  It can also meet the Anthropology Major prerequisite requirement and the Anthropology Minor requirement in place of ANTH 101. Students should take either ANTH 101 or ANTH 161, and not take both courses due to some course overlap. The course is an introduction to the science of biological anthropology. Biological anthropology is a subfield of anthropology that emphasizes a focus on humanity and its origin from a biological perspective.  As a subfield of Anthropology, biological anthropology recognizes the complex interaction of biology and culture in the evolutionary development of the human species.  In this class we study the basic concepts and mechanisms of evolution and the evolutionary history of humankind from primate beginnings to anatomically and behaviorally modern Homo sapiens. The course is divided into 3 sections: 1) the science of anthropology and the models and mechanisms of human evolution; 2) modern human variation and adaptation, and our relationships to non-human primates; and 3) the origin, development, and dispersal of humans using evidence from the fossil record (paleoanthropology) and archaeological remains. Along the way, it illustrates the ways in which anthropologists learn about the past and how we can use our knowledge of the past to understand the present.  The weekly labs will address subjects including genetics, human variation, primate anatomy and behavior, human anatomy, fossil hominids, and archaeological dating techniques.


Anthropology 161.H01 / Human Origins: An Intro to Biological Anthropology

TR / 11:40 – 12:55 / Hamilton 143

 Lab: T / 1:15 – 2:45 / Hamilton 142

Professor: Kelly Goldberg

(4 credits)

FOR HONORS COLLEGE STUDENTS ONLY 

Can be used as a Prerequisite in place of ANTH 101 within the Major & Minor

AND

Fulfills 4 hrs of the Carolina Core Requirements for the Scientific Literacy’s 8 hrs

(CANNOT be used as a LAB credit for DURT. Labs must be 200-level and above.)

(Note: This course can be used as a Prerequisite for the Anthropology Major and it can also be used for 4 hrs of the Carolina Core Requirements for the Science Literacy’s 8 credits at the

same time. This course cannot be used to satisfy any credits for the Social Science GSS Carolina Core Requirement) 

Course Readings:

No required texts

 Course Description:

This four-credit course satisfies the College of Arts and Sciences requirement for a Lab Science Course.  It can also meet the Anthropology Major prerequisite requirement and the Anthropology Minor requirement in place of ANTH 101.  It meets for two one hour and fifteen-minute lectures and a required one and a half-hour lab.  Students should take either ANTH 101 or ANTH 161, and not take both courses due to some course overlap. The course is an introduction to the science of biological anthropology. Biological anthropology is a subfield of anthropology that emphasizes a focus on humanity and its origin from a biological perspective.  As a subfield of Anthropology, biological anthropology recognizes the complex interaction of biology and culture in the evolutionary development of the human species.  In this class we study the basic concepts and mechanisms of evolution and the evolutionary history of humankind from primate beginnings to anatomically and behaviorally modern Homo sapiens. The course is divided into 3 sections: 1) the science of anthropology and the models and mechanisms of human evolution; 2) modern human variation and adaptation, and our relationships to non-human primates; and 3) the origin, development, and dispersal of humans using evidence from the fossil record (paleoanthropology) and archaeological remains. Along the way, it illustrates the ways in which anthropologists learn about the past and how we can use our knowledge of the past to understand the present.  The weekly labs will address subjects including genetics, human variation, primate anatomy and behavior, human anatomy, fossil hominids, and archaeological dating techniques.


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