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School of the Earth, Ocean and Environment


Faculty and Staff Directory

Neal Woods

Title: Associate Professor
Department: Earth Ocean and Environment, Political Science
College of Arts and Sciences
Email: woodsn@mailbox.sc.edu
Phone: 803-777-7359
Office: Gambrell, Room 309
Resources: Curriculum Vitae [pdf]
Department of Political Science

Bio

Neal Woods received his Ph.D. in 2003 from the University of Kentucky. He teaches courses on public policy and public administration.

Professor Woods’ research focuses on how political and administrative institutions affect policy outcomes, especially in the areas of environmental policy and regulation.  He has published over 30 articles on these topics.  His research has won best dissertation, best conference paper, and best journal article awards from the American Political Science Association. 

Research

Public policy (environmental policy, regulation), bureaucratic politics, federalism and intergovernmental relations, state politics

SelectedPublications

Woods, Neal D. and Ann O’M. Bowman.  2018.  “Collective Action and the Evolution of Intergovernmental Cooperation.”  Policy Studies Journal46:3 (August) 487-509.

Miller, Susan M., Christopher Witko, and Neal D. Woods. 2018. “How the Unorganized Mass Public (Sometimes) Wins in Regulatory Politics.”  Political Research Quarterly71:1 (March) 88-101.

Monogan, James E., David M. Konisky, and Neal D. Woods. 2017. “Gone With the Wind: Federalism and the Strategic Location of Air Polluters.”  American Journal of Political Science 61: 2 (April) 257-270.

Karch, Andrew, Sean C. Nicholson-Crotty, Neal D. Woods, and Ann O’M. Bowman. 2016.   “Policy Diffusion and the Pro-Innovation Bias.”  Political Research Quarterly69:1 (March) 83-95.

Woods, Neal D. 2015.  “Separation of Powers and the Politics of Administrative Rule Review.” State Politics and Policy Quarterly15:3 (September) 345-365.

Woods, Neal D.  2015.  “Regulatory Democracy Reconsidered: The Policy Impact of Public Participation Requirements.”  Journal of Public Administration Research and Theory25:2 (April) 571-596.