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Department of English Language and Literature


Authors

Elizabeth Strout

Elizabeth Strout

An unforgettable cast of small-town characters copes with love and loss in the most recent book by bestselling author Elizabeth Strout. Recalling her Pulitzer-winning work Olive Kitteridge in its richness, structure, and complexity, Anything Is Possible explores the whole range of human emotion through the intimate dramas of people struggling to understand themselves and others.

Michael Crummey

Michael Crummey

For twelve generations, the inhabitants of a remote island in Newfoundland have lived and died together. Now they are facing resettlement, and each has been offered a generous compensation package blocked by one hold out: Moses Sweetland. Written by one of Canada’s most charming and beloved writers—himself a Newfie—Sweetland is a wistful eulogy for a dying way of life.

Timothy Donnelly

Timothy Donnelly

It’s not often that a poet is named the “it poet” by Entertainment Weekly and also praised by the great John Ashbery, who said of Timothy Donnelly’s most decorated book, “This is an extraordinary collection—the poetry of the future, here, today.”  The second collection by Columbia University professor and poetry editor of Boston ReviewCloud Corporation explores the possibilities of language—by way of a traditional and abiding faith in poetry—to illuminate personal, political, and social contingency.

Margaret Wilkerson Sexton

Margaret Wilkerson Sexton

Celebrated for its rich characters as well as its author’s deep knowledge of the city she writes about, A Kind of Freedom follows three generations of a Crescent City family as its members navigate the World War II years, the 1980s, and the post-Katrina present. When selecting this book as an Editor’s Choice, the New York Times Book Review wrote, “This luminous and assured first novel shines an unflinching, compassionate light on three generations of a black family in New Orleans, emphasizing endurance more than damage…. The force of this naturalistic vision is disquieting; it is also moving. One could say that it has the disenchanting optimism of the blues."