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School of Information Science

Fall 2022 Class Schedules

Updated June 28, 2022
Subject to change and updates. Check back often.


Campus Courses

If any section of a course is closed, contact Laura Thorp at thorp@mailbox.sc.edu.

BEFORE REGISTERING YOU MUST READ THE INFORMATION REGARDING  ALL COURSE REQUIREMENTS; see the Dynamic Schedule(available TBA).

TR 2:50-4:05 PM – Sloan 105 – Darin Freeburg

By the end of the semester students will be able to: Analyze how people create, find, and use data and information within communities and organizations; identify and discuss the basic concepts, theories, policies, and major trends of data and information science; critically assess physical, intellectual, and social barriers to data and information; discuss career opportunities in data and information science; examine social factors in the evaluation, acquisition, and implementation of data and information technology in communities and organizations.

Online Asynchronous - Jeff Salter

Comprehensive overview of responsive website development for information-intensive organizations. Examine the current tools and standards used in today’s field and learn how they function together in a modern web environment. Web development foundation focusing on content management and website design with an emphasis on today’s myriad of viewing devices and specific reference to the unique needs of information-intensive institutions.

TR 11:40am-12:55 PM – DAVIS 111 – Ryan Rucker

The ongoing rapid growth of online data due to the Internet and the widespread use of datasets have created an immense need for information storage and retrieval that is an interdisciplinary area focusing upon methodologies for extracting useful knowledge from data. This course provides a comprehensive overview of basic information storage and retrieval concepts, tools, and applications. Students will get knowledge about new techniques, applications, and tools for informatics purpose. In addition, students will develop a research project using open-source tools. They collect and analyze text data with respect to a research question in any field such as health, social science, medical, politics, and business.

TR 2:50-4:05 PM – DAVIS 209 – Elise Lewis

Overview of major types of research methods and techniques within the field of information science. Methods of data analysis, evaluation of published research, and ethical principles. Students will get hands-on experience with different types of data collection and analysis.

Section 001 – TR 10:05-11:20 AM – SJMC 321 – Valerie Byrd-Fort

Section J10 - Jed Dearybury - Online Asynchronous

A study of materials for children from birth through elementary school (age 13) with emphasis on the evaluation, selection, and use of those materials to meet the educational, cultural, and recreational needs of children.

TR 1:15-2:30 PM - WMBB 125 - Vanessa Kitzie

This course positions students as active agents that engage in responsive and responsible practices when perceiving and interpreting media. Students will work on their critical thinking skills as they gain a firm grasp of relevant history and practical knowledge about the news media; develop their understanding of digital participation and democratic citizenship; identify how systems of power and oppression influence what and how information is framed and disseminated; and understand how individuals and groups interpret media frames and arguments. This combined skillset will enable students to reflect on their own mediated practices and develop a comprehensive understanding of news literacy from technical, social, cultural, political, and economic perspectives.

TR 4:25-5:40 PM - DAVIS 209 - Ehsan Mohammadi

This course aims to foster your knowledge about theoretical insights and practical issues related to managing an organization. The course will also offer an overview of the development of theories and contemporary issues of management with a focus on the role of information and technology in modern organizations. 

MW 3:55-5:10 PM – SMWALT 305 – Darin Freeburg

The dawn of the knowledge economy meant that, instead of tangible things like land, iron, and machines, work would be driven by intangible ideas and skills. Yet, many businesses in America failed to update their management approach to account for this new raw material. SLIS 410 outlines how work has changed and what this means for both workers and management.  Students will work with a local company to study how knowledge is created, evaluated, shared, documented, and applied in ways that support the company’s mission and empower employees.

TR 10:05-11:20 AM - DAVIS 216 - Vanessa Kitzie

Does Tik Tok make you depressed? Is YouTube contributing to the spread of mis and disinformation? This class explores these questions and more by examining the design, uses, and effects of Information and Communications Technologies (ICTs). Students will apply this understanding to real-world issues like artificial intelligence and machine learning, digital privacy, and policy and regulation. They will work on a semester-long project in which they identify an ICT issue and propose social and technical (sociotechnical) solutions to address this issue.

Section 001 - MW 3:55-5:10 PM - DAVIS 111 - Jeff Salter

This course will provide the student with frameworks and best practices in worldwide cyber security education and information.  Students will collaborate with current cyber security experts, architects, and instructors to learn how to manage modern day cyber security risks.  Learning experiences will include Network Security, Cloud Security, and End Point and Mobile Security.  Students will receive full visibility and understanding of the Check Point Infinity Architecture.  Students will acquire essential cyber skills and earn the option to complete the Check Point certification process. 

Section 003 - TR 10:05-11:20 AM - DAVIS 111 - Gordon Jones

Blockchain is an information and communication management platform that facilitates immutable transactions between two or more parties using a network of independently distributed databases without common processors. Blockchain reduces or removes risk from organizational or business transactions by creating transparent decentralized ledgers thus lifting trust between parties. Blockchain is promising to disrupt industries, productions processes, applications and services in financial services, records management, healthcare, intellectual property management, hospitality, art industries, library and information services, supply chain management, service and product reviews, revenue collection and administration and many more. The applications are unlimited. This course introduces you to the blockchain technology, cryptocurrency, and decentralized networks with applications in various professional areas, businesses and industries.

Ehsan Mohammadi 

*This course is open to both undergraduate and graduate students.

This course aims to foster theoretical insights about information visualization. Students even with no technical background will learn the ways to prepare small and large-scale datasets for visual representations. This course is a project-based and students will map real datasets and understand the methods to interpret the visualizations. Nowadays, utilizing and making sense of data is an integral part of many professions. Hence, the ability to visualize information is a hot area that students across different disciplines need to develop their knowledge and skills. To create valuable, meaningful and innovative visualizations students need to have a solid understating of human and technological sides of mapping information. In other words, machines and human brains together can provide solutions to make better insights of information. This course provides an outline of trends in information visualization. Students will learn the current techniques to make meaningful topical, temporal and geospatial visualizations. Students will learn to use some tools such as The Science of Science (Sci2) Tool, VOSviewer, OpenRefine, Tableau, Gephi, and Plot.ly.

Ehsan Mohammadi 

*This course is open to both undergraduate and graduate students.

This course aims to foster theoretical insights about information visualization. Students even with no technical background will learn the ways to prepare small and large-scale datasets for visual representations. This course is a project-based and students will map real datasets and understand the methods to interpret the visualizations. Nowadays, utilizing and making sense of data is an integral part of many professions. Hence, the ability to visualize information is a hot area that students across different disciplines need to develop their knowledge and skills. To create valuable, meaningful and innovative visualizations students need to have a solid understating of human and technological sides of mapping information. In other words, machines and human brains together can provide solutions to make better insights of information. This course provides an outline of trends in information visualization. Students will learn the current techniques to make meaningful topical, temporal and geospatial visualizations. Students will learn to use some tools such as The Science of Science (Sci2) Tool, VOSviewer, OpenRefine, Tableau, Gephi, and Plot.ly.

Section J50, J91, J92 – Elise Lewis

Section J51, JB1, JB2 – Nicole Cooke

ISCI 701 is 3-credit hour course designed to provide students with the ability to communicate what it means to be a library or information professional in both historical and contemporary contexts; identify and examine issues and core values of the library and information professions including access, literacy and learning, information policy, collaboration, and service; formulate short-term and long-term plans for individual professional growth and development; and articulate a personal philosophy of culturally responsive professional behaviors and ethics. 

Mónica Colón-Aguirre                        

ISCI 704 is 3-credit hour course designed to provide students with the ability to apply evidence-based decision-making to complex leadership and project management issues; identify the steps of a needs assessment process and apply it to organizational challenges; identify various sources of revenue and select an appropriate budget model based on project needs and resource constraints; outline the process for acquiring and implementing technology resources; and assemble a variety of interpersonal managerial tools such as recruiting, hiring, orientation, evaluation, and facilitation of critical conversations.

Dick Kawooya

ISCI 705 is a 3-credit hour course designed to introduce students to the research process, methods, tools and techniques and their application to a wide range of problems and questions in different information environments. Emphasis is placed on application of research tools and methods to evaluation in information environments employing ethical research practices.

Section J50, J91, J92 - Susan Rathbun-Grubb

Section J51, JB1, JB2 - Feili Tu-Keefner

In this course we will explore the theory and ever-changing practice of information organization and access in information settings:  information seeking behavior, personal information management, digital curation and preservation, standards for cataloging and indexing materials and encoding metadata, linked data, accessibility standards, and bias in information systems.

Ryan Rucker

This course provides a comprehensive overview of data science basics and applications for communications. Students will get knowledge about the basic concepts, applications, and tools of data science for communication purposes. The course will also include basic theories and approaches in communications.

Michael Weisenburg

By the end of the semester, students will be able to use literature and resources related to archives and records to inform their thinking, and identify and solve problems; identify policies and procedures fundamental to the administration of records programs; discuss the archival functions of appraisal, representation, access, advocacy, and preservation; explain the impact of emerging standards and technologies on the practice of archivists and records professionals; advocate for the importance of archives and records to individuals, organizations and society; articulate professional, legal, and ethical concerns related to the administration of archives and records; explain the historical and emerging relationships between the archives and records professions.

Cynthia Johnson

Roles, functions, and organization of school library programs. Systematic program planning and evaluation, leadership, advocacy, and integration of the school library program into curriculum. The purpose of this course is to provide you with an introduction to the nature, role, functions, and management of school library programs. Emphasis is placed on systematic program development to help teachers, students, administrators, and others in the school community to “become effective users of ideas and information.” The focus of the course is on the building level professional and her/his roles and responsibilities to provide effective programs and services which are integrated into the school’s total educational program.

Ryan Rucker

This course enables students to contribute to the economic, social, and cultural progress of the community by preparing them for positions of responsibility in public libraries. This is done through examination of public library development, governance, service, and evaluation from an administrative viewpoint. It is designed to provoke critical thinking about the challenges that accompany the provision of public library service and cultivate an understanding of the ethical and operational decisions that typically confront those who provide these services.

TBA

This course enables students to contribute to the economic, social, and cultural progress of the community by preparing them for positions of responsibility in public libraries. This is done through examination of public library development, governance, service, and evaluation from an administrative viewpoint. It is designed to provoke critical thinking about the challenges that accompany the provision of public library service and cultivate an understanding of the ethical and operational decisions that typically confront those who provide these services.

Susan Rathbun-Grubb

We will focus on the ways in which catalogers create electronic records that describe and provide access to materials through OPACs (online public access catalogs). A primary focus on books in this course lays a foundation to which you can easily add the skills necessary to catalog non-book materials and perform other advanced cataloging duties. This is a practical course which will allow you to gain hands-on experience in cataloging that will also inform your practice as a librarian in general, regardless of your specialty. We will also step back from the detail work and look at the larger issues that impact resource description and access. It is my hope as your instructor that you will leave the course with practical skills, as well as a sense of what is currently happening in the cataloging community. You will learn via “hands-on” problem-solving, readings and other media, “case studies,” presentation, and discussion.

Lucy Green

The course is focused on the role of the school librarian in integrating the school library media program into a K-12 standards-based, inquiry-based curriculum including best practices, needs assessment, collaboration, instructional design, and resource provision. This course provides future school librarians with a broad understanding of their place within 21st Century pedagogical practice focusing on research skills (information literacy), collaborations with classroom teachers, and instructional technology.

Feili Tu-Keefner

SLIS 749 is designed to give health, communication, and information professionals the skills needed for evidence-based practice. It provides comprehensive coverage of essential health information and communication resources in various formats. The required skills for health information seeking and evaluation of health-related resources are also covered.

Clayton Copeland

An overview of the concept of literacy, an historical perspective of the literacy issue, a current perspective of the efforts to improve literacy through libraries, and ways in which librarians can become more effective providers and partners in the literacy movement, particularly through systematic program development. The challenges and consequences of illiteracy make the quality of life for too many far less than it can be; illiteracy is also a serious threat to our country's capability to compete in a global, information-based economy. Libraries and librarians in coalition with other educational and social agencies can play a deterministic role in helping to reduce the problem of illiteracy. One of the ways that this can be made possible is through systematic, cooperative program development and the use of literature as a foundation of basic literacy. This course will help provide a foundation, necessary skills, essential knowledge, and positive attitudes for information professionals. Each student will effect change in their communities through service learning and direct application of the concepts and skills studied throughout the course.

Section J50, J91, J92 - Valerie Byrd-Fort

In ISCI 756, students will learn about current children's materials, including print resources and digital resources. We focus on resources for school age children. A brief history of children's literature is covered as well as an overview of genres and classics. We focus on diversity in children's literature and current trends. Targeted audience for this course is students who want to be school librarians or youth service librarians in public libraries. 

Jenna Spiering

A study of materials for young adults (13-19) with emphasis on the process of evaluating them to meet the educational, cultural, and recreational needs of young adults. ISCI 757’s goal is to help students become familiar with a wide range of materials that meet the reading interests and educational, emotional, and recreational needs of young adults, ages 13 – 19, and to develop competence in using evaluative criteria in their selection.

Jesselyn Dreeszen Bowman               

This course provides: definition of terms and concepts currently associated with information technologies; instruction in the systematic identification, selection, use, and evaluation of technology resources for instruction and information services; management of technology; and the consideration of various theories of human cognition, perception, and communications related to information technology and the information transfer process. An emphasis is placed on the role of the library information professional as an instructional partner, manager, and coordinator of information that is currently available in the full range of information systems including public, commercial, and educational telecommunications (radio, TV, cable, Internet) and other local and global resources accessed via digital technologies.

TBA

The course will provide students with an opportunity to explore the nature of information agencies and their purposes, collections, collection policies and acquisition procedures. The purpose of this course is to provide students with a systematic method for managing the growth and development of collections and information resources in various information institutions. The primary themes covered by the course content center upon the following major concepts: · the importance of understanding users and communities · the necessity of reflective selection practices · the meaning of effective acquisition processes.

 

This course presents introductory concepts related to the creation, manipulation, and implementation of visual collections in various online environments. It identifies resources, procedures, and skills needed to successfully design, implement, manage digital image collections in a collaborative environment. More specifically, this course will allow students hands on experience with the management and curation of digital content within cultural heritage institutions. Major topics will include: creation of digital images, image metadata and retrieval, preservation, copyright, and expansion of the Archiving South Carolina Women project.

Ryan Rucker

Identification and evaluation of information networks in libraries and other information agencies. The nature of networks, including hardware and software applications. 

Nicole Cooke

This course is intended to help students conceptualize, critique, and reformulate social justice as an outcome while working towards a better understanding of how their social identities and systems of oppression contribute to and/or work against the social justice process. As a class we will focus on some of the fundamental issues of social justice and engage in dialogue and experiential activities that will extend our ability to empathize with and advocate for diverse and marginalized populations. Students will be challenged to think deeply the role social justice plays in their personal and professional lives and how that can be powerfully and effectively communicated to others.

Clayton Copeland

This course will offer an introduction to the process of selecting and evaluating materials for children and youth who are differently-abled, or who have disabilities. It will also offer an introduction to the process of planning and implementing programming for these populations. Special emphasis will be placed upon Universal Design and creating inclusive environments and service-learning opportunities. 

W 2:00-4:45pm – Kim Thompson

Seminar examining a range of issues, theories, and research questions that currently shape thinking and discourse in library and information science. Goal Statement
By the end of this course, students will be able to overview and critically analyze LIS research and theory, identify gaps in theory and research, propose theoretical interventions to address identified gaps, and exhibit an understanding of academic life both within and outside of the iSchool.

M 10:00 AM – 12:45 PM – Mónica Colón-Aguirre

Seminar exploring problems and issues in theory formulation and research methods, including quantitative, qualitative, and multi-method. We’re developing a coherent research agenda and we’re going to do it through a classic structure and a growing requirement for new faculty. The structure is the 5-chapter dissertation. The growing requirement is grant writing. The dissertation helps structure thinking about the research agenda. The proposal that you will be writing will demonstrate putting your agenda in action. In this process we’re going to examine the purpose of a research agenda, how your work fits into the larger field, methodologies of your work, communications out of your work and how to continuously evolve the agenda throughout your career.

 

Distributed Learning Courses

If any section of a course is closed, contact Laura Thorp at thorp@mailbox.sc.edu.

BEFORE REGISTERING YOU MUST READ THE INFORMATION REGARDING  ALL COURSE REQUIREMENTS (e.g., online sessions); see the Distributed Learning Course Guide (available TBA).

560 Information Visualization

683 News Literacy

701 Ethics, Values & Found Princ of LIS Profs

704 Leadership in Information Organizations

705 Research Design & Evaluation

706 Information Organization and Access

709 Fundamentals of Data and Digital Communications 

720 School Library Program Development

729 Academic Libraries

735 Metadata

742 Curricular Role of the School Librarian

752 Diversity in Libraries

753 Seminar in Information Services

755 Pop Mats & Prog for Adults

756 Children’s Materials

757 Young Adult Materials

760 Materials and Services for Latino Youth

761 Info Technologies in the School Lib Program

765 Planning Library Facilities

768 Problems in Library and Information Agency Administration

770 Design & Mgmt of Databases

776 Web Technologies for Info Specialists

794 School Librarian Internship

794 Internship in LIS

796 Independent Study in LIS

 


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