Stories for Faculty and Staff

Brianna Lewis, 2021 graduating senior

Most likely to succeed

April 13, 2021, Chris Horn

Brianna Lewis was voted “most likely to become a brain surgeon” in the first grade, and the Simpsonville, S.C.-native will soon begin earning the “Dr.” portion of that prediction. She’s headed to medical school this fall after wrapping up four years in the Honors College and two bachelor’s degrees — one in biology and another in experimental psychology.

Jotaka Eady

UofSC alumna uses politics, technology to elevate the 'underestimated'

April 01, 2021, Megan Sexton

Jotaka Eaddy, a 2001 political science graduate and the first Black woman elected as the university’s student body president, is the founder and CEO of a Washington-based social impact consulting firm specializing in strategy development, management consulting, public affairs and community engagement.

two female and one male student wearing masks

Curiosity, scientific research lead to prestigious award for UofSC students

March 31, 2021, Carol J.G.Ward

Research opportunities, passionate faculty mentors and the chance to explore diverse interests drew the University of South Carolina’s 2021 Goldwater Scholarship recipients to the Columbia campus. The prestigious scholarships are awarded annually to undergraduate STEM majors across the country who are interested in pursuing research careers in mathematics, natural sciences and engineering.

UofSC home to 60 ranked programs

UofSC med school leads nation for grads practicing in underserved areas

March 30, 2021, Megan Sexton

The School of Medicine Columbia is the top medical program in the country for graduates who are practicing in areas where there is a shortage of health care professionals, according to the latest U.S. News & World Report’s Best Graduate School rankings. The rankings also show that UofSC is now home to more than 60 nationally ranked programs.

A woman and a man make the Wakanda gesture. Man holds a photo of actor Chadwick Boseman.

Why Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month is really something to celebrate this year

March 25, 2021, Franklin G. Berger

Colorectal cancer remains a major source of cancer incidence and mortality worldwide. The American Cancer Society recently estimated that in 2021, there will be 149,500 new cases of colorectal cancer and 52,980 deaths in the U.S. alone. In The Conversation, Franklin G. Berger, professor emeritus in biological sciences, writes about two significant developments that could save lives.

photo of a bridge over a river with blue sky in the background

Concerts honor frontline workers, aim to strengthen community through music

March 23, 2021, Carol J.G. Ward

Celebrating Local Heroes with The Concert Truck, a series of 10 events performed aboard a mobile music venue will honor 10 frontline heroes with video vignettes that highlight personal stories of sacrifice and courage and live music composed and performed by music students and alumni.

Long term health care workers with patients

Resistance, innovation, improvisation: When governments fell short during COVID-19, long-term care workers stepped up

March 18, 2021, Robert Henry Cox, Daniel Dickson and Patrik Marier

Political science professor Robert Henry Cox and colleagues Daniel Dickson and Patrik Marier write for the Conversation about why long-term care workers are key intermediaries in the implementation of policies designed to both contain the spread of the coronavirus and maintain a sense of normalcy for care recipients.

Reggie, Connor and Ian Bain

3 brothers, 3 Goldwater Scholarships, 1 passion

March 15, 2021, Aïda Rogers and Chris Horn

Reggie, Connor and Ian Bain all double majored in mathematics and a field of science, they’re all alumni of the University of South Carolina’s Honors College (Ian graduates in May) and Carolina Scholars and each was named a Goldwater Scholar, which is considered the nation’s most prestigious undergraduate award for STEM majors.

man with red tie, black coat, baseball cap standing with granite marker

UofSC civil rights center unveils historical marker commemorating landmark protest

March 03, 2021, Carol J.G. Ward

The Center for Civil Rights History and Research at the University of South Carolina unveiled a historical marker on March 2 to commemorate the courage of hundreds of students who marched on the South Carolina State House 60 years ago. Many of the students were arrested, and the appeal of their convictions eventually was heard by the U.S. Supreme Court, leading to a legal precedent protecting the rights of protesters.

An artist's concept of NASA's Mars 2020 rover

UofSC chemistry professor works with NASA in search of Martian life

February 12, 2021, Bryan Gentry

NASA’s Mars 2020 Perseverance Rover will land on the Red Planet on Feb. 18 and begin to study rocks and soils in search for evidence of past Martian life, which might be anything from biogenic organic compounds to ancient fossils. University of South Carolina professor Mike Angel is one of hundreds of scientists who will work together to direct the rover.

artist rendering of mohammed dajani standing beside a railroad switching station

Dajani's cave

February 09, 2021, Craig Brandhorst

In 2014, Mohammed Dajani, longtime professor at Jerusalem’s al-Quds University, took 27 Palestinian college students to Auschwitz, the Nazi concentration near Krakow, Poland. He wanted them to confront the Holocaust, which he believes is downplayed in Palestinian schools, and to consider the complicated history of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict from multiple perspectives. The backlash would cost him his job and endanger his life. It would also embolden his commitment to reconciliation.

Maxcy Monument on the Historic Horseshoe with sunlight streaming through the trees.
Tim Smith outside Papa Jazz

UofSC alums help keep 5 Points alive

December 14, 2020, Craig Brandhorst

If you think Five Points is only a college bar district, think again. The village down the hill has drawn South Carolina students for more than a century, and not simply to celebrate. And for many who settle in the Capital City after graduation, Five Points remains an integral part of their lives, including Tim Smith, who turned his passion for music into a 40-year career buying and selling it.

A statue of the Virgin of Guadalupe, at the Basilica of Our Lady of Guadalupe, in Mexico City

The Virgin of Guadalupe is more than a religious icon in Mexico

December 11, 2020, Rebecca Janzen

Each year, as many as 10 million people travel to the shrine of Our Lady of Guadalupe in Mexico City, in what is believed to be the largest Catholic pilgrimage in the Americas. Due to COVID-19 concerns, the pilgrimage will instead be held online this year. Rebecca Janzen, assistant professor of Spanish and comparative literature, explains the significance of the pilgrimage for The Conversation.

Don McCallister inside Loose Lucy's

UofSC alums help keep 5 Points alive

December 10, 2020, Craig Brandhorst

If you think Five Points is only a college bar district, think again. The village down the hill has drawn South Carolina students for more than a century, and not simply to celebrate. And for many who settle in the Capital City after graduation, Five Points remains an integral part of their lives, including Don McCallister, whose business Loose Lucy's supports his creative outlets.

old gravestone for an enslaved person named Cicely

How history memorializes those who die from COVID-19 will reflect our values

December 03, 2020, Nicole S. Maskiell

As COVID-19 affects frontline workers and communities of color far more than other demographic groups, and protesters agitate for racial justice, American society is wrestling with its racial memory and judging which monuments and memorials deserve a place. In The Conversation, history professor Nicole S. Maskiell looks back at how a few marginalized and oppressed people who served on the front lines of prior epidemics have been treated and remembered.

A photo grid with headshots of the 9 students featured in a gallery highlighting stories of student resilience throughout the pandemic.

'Campus Conversations' reveal student resilience

November 27, 2020, Caleigh McDaniel

Students have have faced many challenges due to COVID-19, and their stories of resilience have become prominent topics in our weekly "Campus Conversations." Check out these students who have adapted to and overcome obstacles brought on by the pandemic.

UofSC NROTC battalion in white uniforms

Gamecock Battalion tops among Navy ROTC programs

October 27, 2020, Page Ivey

The University of South Carolina has the best Navy ROTC program in the country. That recognition comes as no surprise to the midshipmen and alumni of the program that began at Carolina in 1940. And it comes as the result of hard work by a team of staffers and the university’s support for it and other military-affiliated programs on campus.

woman sneezing

UofSC scientists model how the COVID-19 virus might travel, settle in indoor environments

October 15, 2020, Chris Horn

In this age of COVID-19 concerns, what’s the safest indoor environment? One without humans, of course. In a practical world the answer lies partly in understanding how the virus moves and where it lands in indoor spaces because air ow and surfaces are important routes for transmission of COVID-19.

A collage of headshots of 4 Gamecock Guides: Antonia Adams, Nathan Strong, Lindy Linbaugh and Bradley Barker

Students serve as Gamecock Guides through social media content creations

October 02, 2020, Caleigh McDaniel

Gamecock Guides are newly hired student employees that will soon become familiar faces on UofSC social media channels. The guides are working to create content that will amplify university messages, build virtual relationships that engage fellow students and serve as representatives of UofSC.