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Presenter Name(s) Mentor Name(s) Abstract Title Session Time / Location Poster Number / Oral Presentation Time
Henson, Marie Blauvelt, Alex How Do We Improve Health Maintenance For Patients With Little Access to Resources?
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Abstract Text

Has healthcare access truly expanded to the people? Overwhelming evidence indicates many are still unable to afford health insurance in the U.S. contradicting the government’s claims that anyone can access it. In a small non-profit medical clinic in Wake County, NC, whose mission is to provide free healthcare to these overlooked populations, I spent nearly 200 hours discovering the real meaning of healthcare access and the interdependent relationship between socioeconomic status and quality of health. I saw how rarely patients showed up to appointments or chose to opt out of the free services made available to them. In order to understand why someone would do this, you have to take into account their financial backgrounds, their family history, and their present lifestyles. Additional information from the medical team members also helped me conclude my final recommendations. Through various observations and conversations (community surveys, staff meetings, and interviews with community members and doctors) I constructed three proposals that could help improve health maintenance. These include: provide free health education classes, create a shuttle system for travel to nearby health facilities, and mandate “pro bono” for healthcare providers. I learned a great deal about the complexities of running a non-profit clinic whether it be the massive language barrier and the patient’s poor understanding of their health quality. This project had a significant impact on the way I view my role as a nurse and a citizen in this community – it was an proactive experience allowing me to discover ways to bridge a community.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 181
Burger, Jamie McIver, Kerry Participation in Sedentary Behaviors During the Transition From Elementary to Middle School
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Abstract Text

Extensive research shows the negative health effects of decreased physical activity (PA) and increased sedentary behavior (SB) in children. There has been little research into the types of SB’s youth participate in and how those behaviors change over time. Understanding these changes will help researchers and practitioners develop interventions that may alleviate the trend for increased SB as children age. PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to examine the differences in SB by activity type, gender, and county in a cohort of children as they transition from elementary to middle school. METHODS: Fifth-grade students from 2 diverse school districts were recruited for the study. Each student was measured once per year in their 5th, 6th, and 7th grade years. Participants completed a self-reported PA recall indicating their participation in specific activities throughout the past 5 days. Participants answered additional questions about the context of the behaviors. Repeated measures ANOVA were used to determine differences in the percent of children reporting SBs by gender and district, over time. RESULTS: Complete data were available for 585 students, 44.3% male and 48% from district 1 and 52% from district 2. Overall, regardless of county or gender, participation in video games, reading, and watching TV/movies decreased over time. Homework participation from students in district 1 decreased (90.7 to 82.3%), while in district 2 participation increased (59.3 to 78.3%), p=0.0155. There were no significant differences in the prevalence of participating in SBs by gender, but there were decreases in SB over time for both genders (non-significant). CONCLUSION: Time spent reading, playing video games, and watching TV or movies decreases from 5th to 6th to 7th grade. Given the decrease in reported participation in these SBs, additional research is needed on the SBs that are contributing to increased time in SB as children get older.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 85
Streeter, Lauren Randel, Allison Does Music/Art Effect Children with Autism Differently Across Age?
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Abstract Text

A surveillance study, according to the CDC's Autism and Developmental Disabilities Monitoring (ADDM) Network, identified 1 in 68 children (1 in 42 boys and 1 in 189 girls) as having autism spectrum disorder (ASD). About 1 in 6 children in the United States had a developmental disability in 2006-2008, ranging from mild disabilities such as speech and language impairments to serious developmental disabilities, such as intellectual disabilities, cerebral palsy, and autism. Therefore, the number of special needs students present in a music educator’s classroom are rising. As more teachers are coming into contact with these students, more research is recently being developed. So far the majority of studies are music therapy based in one on one settings. So results are different from what is found in group classroom settings. This research uses oriented goals to seek the enhancement of social skills and enjoyment in children diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder or Developmental Disorders, through the use of group-led music and art activities. The results from this study will help to improve the study design for future study so we can learn how music and art effects youth with developmental disabilities.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 93
Clark, Abbye Sanasi-Bhola, Kamla
Weissman, Sharon
Al-Hasan, Majdi
Derrick, Caroline
Vertebral Osteomyelitis: A predictive model for oral antibiotics
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Abstract Text

Background: Vertebral osteomyelitis (VO) is an infection of the vertebral column and surrounding structures. In up to 1/3 of cases a causative organism is not identified, forcing the use of broad spectrum empiric intravenous therapy. Research continues for oral empiric therapy, specifically for gram negative (GN) organisms. The objective was to identify predictors of resistant pathogens causing VO, examine the oral options for GN infections, and formulate a Palmetto Health-specific antibiotic protocol for culture negative VO using a predictive tool. Methods: This is a retrospective medical chart review of adults (≈18 years) diagnosed with VO from 08/01/2010-08/31/2015 at Palmetto Health. Inclusion criteria were based on radiography findings, microbiologic results, and clinical symptoms. Data collection included comorbidities, location, microorganisms with susceptibilities, surgical inventions, presence of hardware, and antibiotic history. Descriptive statistical methods were used for preliminary analysis. Results: 150 subjects were identified. The mean age was 61 years with a male predominance (61%, 91/150) and an average BMI of 29. Comorbid conditions included diabetes mellitus (46%, 69/150), hemodialysis use (13%, 20/150) and tobacco use (22%, 33/150). Recent bacteremia was found in 32/150 (21%) subjects; methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) predominated (13/32, 41%), followed by methicillin susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (8/32, 25%) and Streptococcus spp. (16%). Thirty-seven subjects had recent related injury or vertebral surgery, and 14/150 had prior hardware placement. Bone, disc, or adjacent tissue cultures were done in 86% of subjects (129/150) with 40% (52/129) of those having >1 sample taken. Lumbar (92/150, 61%) and thoracic (47/150, 31%) regions were the most common sites. An adjacent abscess was found in 75% of subjects (113/150). 43% (4/14) of subjects with prior hardware required device removal. Only 24% (36/150) of subjects had culture negative VO. 132 organisms were cultured. 84% (111/132) were gram positive (GP) with the majority being Staphylococcus (44 methicillin-susceptible and 40 methicillin resistant) and Streptococcus spp. Of the 13 Enterobacteriaceae, none were carbapenem resistant, 10/13 were ceftriaxone susceptible, and 8/13 were ciprofloxacin susceptible. Of the subjects with hardware, 6/14 (43%) developed infection with methicillin resistant Staphylococcus spp. Conclusion: The majority of the VO subjects had GP bacteria isolated with a high incidence of methicillin resistance. Vancomycin and a narrow spectrum GN antibiotic (such as ceftriaxone) may be the most appropriate empiric therapy for culture negative VO. There were too few GN isolates to make a conclusion on their resistance predictors or safe oral therapy. Data collection is ongoing.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Lexington Meeting Room A
Time: 1:00 pm
Walters, Nicolette Hunter, Stuart The Comfort Zone
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Abstract Text

I have learned that stepping outside of your comfort zone is an essential first step for any type of growth, and is the most positive choice you can make over and over for yourself in college. My presentation will focus on the Professional and Civic experiences I had during my undergraduate experience, and how they have changed who I am, the opportunities I will have in the future, and my opinion on how best to maximize your time and talents.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Alumni Center - Conference Room Main Floor 3
Time: 10:45-10:55am
Culy, Daniel
Patel, Chet
Kingery, Redding
Cook, Thomas
Brown, Heather
Global Health Experience Among Applicants to Emergency Medicine Residency Programs
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Abstract Text

BACKGROUND Global Health (GH) activity among residents training in the United States (US) has increased significantly in the past decade. To date there have been no attempts to quantify participation in GH among applicants to Emergency Medicine (EM) programs. OBJECTIVES Quantify GH participation for US medical students applying to two EM residency programs, and compare GH participation to other common activities listed on applications for EM residency training. METHODS Electronic Residency Application Service (ERAS) applications for US medical students applying to two EM residency programs during the 2016 match were analyzed for participation in the following activities prior to and/or during medical school: GH, EM research, GH research, emergency medical services (EMS), and working as an EM scribe. RESULTS A total of 1080 applications were reviewed. Thirty-seven percent of all applicants participated in at least one of the activities. Participation in global health (31%) was more than twice as common as the next highest activity, EM research (15%). EMS (11%), work as a scribe (7%), and GH research (4%) were less prevalent. Female applicants were more likely to participate in GH prior to applying for EM residency training than males (39% to 28%). There were only small gender differences with regard to participation in the other activities. Comparisons of applicants by program site were unremarkable. Applicants that interviewed had modestly higher levels of participation in all activities compared to those applicants that were not interviewed. CONCLUSION Medical school applicants to EM training programs commonly participate in GH activities. Participation in GH is more than twice as prevalent as EMS, research, or work as an EM scribe.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 385
Lunsford, Rachel Moreno, Nina The Immersion Process: Cross-Cultural Language Learning
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Abstract Text

This study seeks to analyze the effects of motivation, awareness, and the immersion process through study abroad on foreign language production. Three participants were analyzed, two of which studied abroad and one who did not (my control case). Two of the three participants lacked the variable of awareness, measured as perception and reflection on language learning development, while only one participant (Participant M) who studied abroad in both Costa Rica and Spain, was made aware of her own learning process via a language learner’s journal and monthly recorded conversations. By studying abroad in two Spanish-speaking countries, Participant M self-reported the effects of cross-cultural language learning. The results of the study showed a greater increase in Spanish fluency as measured by improvements in grammar and speed of response by the two participants who studied abroad compared to the participant who did not go abroad. Although all three participants scored high in a motivation scale, and therefore, it would be predicted that all three would score high in the willingness to communicate (WTC) index, only the two participants who studied abroad exhibited more confidence in their Spanish-speaking abilities and were more likely to engage in conversation than the participant in the classroom setting. The results seem to indicated that students who study abroad are more likely to maintain and improve their Spanish than students who are taught solely in a classroom setting.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Alumni Center - Conference Room Main Floor 1
Time: 11:15-11:25am
McGovern, Leah Weidner, John The Effect of System Contaminants on Fuel Cell Performance
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Abstract Text

A polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) is an electrochemical device that produces electricity and water from the reactions of hydrogen (H2) and oxygen (O2). Balance of plant materials (BOP) used in fuel cell systems can produce contaminants that have the potential to reduce the durability and performance of a PEMFC. Via an accelerated aging procedure, the contaminants from the BOP structural material polyamide (PA) were leached out and studied. Of the organics, inorganics, and ions found in the PA leachate solution, caprolactam and sulfate (SO42-) were chosen for further study. Several in situ diagnostic tests, such as polarization curves (VIR), cyclic voltammetry (CV), and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), were performed to determine if caprolactam or SO42- compounds had a negative and irreversible effect on fuel cell performance. The results indicate that caprolactam causes a non recoverable decrease in fuel cell performance, SO42- seems to have no effect, and the mixture of the two contaminants causes a smaller decrease in fuel cell performance than caprolactam alone. There is also an indication that the negative effects of caprolactam on cell performance overwhelm the effects of SO42- when the two contaminants are infused as a mixture. Due to the significant impact caprolactam has on PEMFC performance, it may be necessary to replace the PA material with a different structural plastic to mitigate the caprolactam contaminants effect on fuel cell performance.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 54
Wei, Judy Mumbower, Stacey Text Analytics Methods Using Job Ads Data
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Abstract Text

Use Job Ads data from Handshake to analyze any trends between type of job, employer preferences, location, major(s), and skills and qualifications.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Richland Meeting Room C
Time: 11:15-11:25am
Gates, Justin Jones, Joe Litter Along Southeast Georgia's Coast
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Anthropogenic litter is an issue that has plagued many beaches for years. The purpose of this project was to collect litter that accumulated along a 2.5km stretch of coastline on Saint Simons Island, Georgia over the course of 10 weeks. The collected litter was sorted into ten distinct categories: Styrofoam products, sheet plastic, other plastic products, aluminum cans/bottles, paper products, metal products, glass bottles, monofilament, cigarette butts, and other. After being collected and sorted into categories, the litter was then tallied and weighed. During the project, over 6,200 individual pieces of litter were collected, weighing in at approximately 70 kilograms.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 146
Zhang, Yao WHAT MAKES INFORMATION STRATEGIC? AN EXAMINATION OF ACCESS TO INFORMATION RESOURCES FOR ENTREPRENEURS AND BUSINESS PERFORMANCE
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The purpose of this study is to explore the nature of the relationship between the access to and use of information resources of entrepreneurs and their business performance. The survival and competence of organizations relies heavily on their recognition of information as important strategic resource. Entrepreneurs, specifically, face a constantly changing environment and are in a disadvantaged competitive position in finance and experience compared with large companies. Access to, and use of information resources, will help them improve their business performance. This study collects both qualitative and quantitative data, investigating the entrepreneurs’ business performance and their behaviour in accessing and using information resources. The qualitative data is applied to explore the technology incubator consultants’ understanding of business performance indicators for entrepreneurial businesses. For the quantitative data collection, entrepreneurs are selected from technology incubators in the U. S to participate in a questionnaire survey. Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) is used to process and analyze the data reflecting the business performance, access to information resources, and use of information resources. A preliminary Access-Performance model and a Use-Performance model are presented. The results indicate that the use of information resources has a positive influence on the performance of entrepreneurial businesses. No strong relationship is revealed between the access to information resources and business performance. However, there is a high probability that the entrepreneurs have other information resource accesses options than those covered in the original model.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 357
Boesch, Brandon Knuuttila, Tarja Scientific Representation and Human Action
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Abstract Text

There are a large number of pragmatic accounts of scientific representation, which give an irreducible place to the intentions, actions, and activities of a scientist in explaining the nature of representation in science. While I think pragmatic accounts of scientific representation have much to recommend for themselves, very little has been said about what in particular is meant by the terms action, intention, or activity. The nature of agency which is an essential component of the pragmatic account of representation is, for the most part, unexplained. In my dissertation, I turn to the philosophy of action to better ground, explain, and expand upon the already existing pragmatic accounts of scientific representation.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Columbia Ballroom B
Time: 10:45
Freiter, Meaghan Adams, Morgan Analysis of Time in Therapeutic Range (TTR) and Antiplatelet Dose Correlation to GI Bleeding in Patients with Continuous Flow Left Ventricular Assist Device (LVAD) Support
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Abstract Text

A left ventricular assist device (LVAD) is a mechanical heart pump that supports and prolongs life in patients with end-stage, NYHA Class IV heart failure with reduced ejection fraction. LVADs are implanted as either destination therapy (DT) or bridge-to-transplant (BTT) therapy. Long-term dual anticoagulation with warfarin and aspirin is recommended to prevent thrombotic events in these patients. Anticoagulation is not without risk in these patients. Approximately 30% of LVAD patients nationally report bleeding events each year, with gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding accounting for the majority of events. Patients typically receive warfarin therapy with a target international normalized ratio (INR) goal of 2.0 to 3.0 along as well as aspirin 81 to 325 mg based on the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation (ISHLT) guidelines. The gold standard for monitoring warfarin therapy is time in therapeutic range (TTR) calculated using the Rosendaal method. The purpose of this study is to determine whether TTR and aspirin dose are predictive of GI bleeding in these patients. Complications include reduced heart transplant potential, decreased mortality, and overall decreased quality of life. We hypothesize that lower TTR and higher aspirin doses will be predictive of gastrointestinal bleeding events. This study has been submitted to the Palmetto Health IRB for approval. This retrospective chart review will include data from all patients cared for by the LVAD clinic at the Palmetto Health Advanced Heart Health Center from January 1, 2015 to December 31, 2016. Patients will be excluded from the study if they do not have a defined INR goal or if they are not on warfarin at the time of the bleeding event. Data collected will include patient demographics (including age, gender, and ethnicity), INR results, and aspirin dose. Date of implantation and date of bleed will be used to calculate TTR prior to bleeding event and time with LVAD prior to bleeding event. Severity of bleeds will be stratified by the hemoglobin levels, hospitalization requirement, transfusion requirement, and number of units transfused. The INR and aspirin dose will be correlated to the frequency and severity of GI bleed events.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 141
Sparks, Joshua Wang, Xuewen Chronic Moderate Sleep Restriction Abolishes the Changes in Substrate Utilization at Rest Induced by Calorie Restriction Weight Loss
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Abstract Text

INTRODUCTION: Metabolic regulation plays an important role in maintaining overall health. It is well-known that even modest weight loss can induce beneficial changes in metabolism. The importance of sleep in metabolic regulation is increasingly recognized; however, it is unknown whether chronic sleep restriction, a popular phenomenon, affects the metabolic effects of weight loss on metabolism. HYPOTHESIS: It was hypothesized that a calorie restriction (CR) only intervention will create a greater shift from carbohydrate to fat utilization at rest and after consumption of glucose when compared to a combined calorie and sleep restriction (CR+SR) intervention. METHODS: Nineteen sedentary, overweight individuals were randomized into an 8-week CR group (n = 7; age = 45.4 ± 3.7 years) or CR+SR group (n = 12; age = 46.2 ± 6.3 years). The CR was restricting daily caloric intake to 95% of each individual’s measured resting metabolic rate. SR for the CR+SR group was up to 90 minutes reduction from their regular sleep duration for 5 days each week, and ad libitum sleep on the other 2 days. Indirect calorimetry was used to determine energy expenditure (EE) and substrate utilization at rest and during a 2-hour oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) with 75g glucose, prior to randomization and after completion of intervention. RESULTS: A significant decrease in body weight in both the CR (~5.1 %, p<0.05) and CR+SR (~3.9 %, p<0.01) with similar degree between groups (p>0.05) was noticed. However, only the CR showed a significant increase in fat substrate utilization (65.1 ± 11 % to 76.1 ± 10.4 %, p<0.001) and a significant decrease in carbohydrate substrate utilization (35.3 ± 11.1 % to 24.2 ± 10.4 %, p<0.001) at rest following the intervention. No observable changes in EE or substrate utilization were detected during the OGTT. CONCLUSION: There were shifts to greater fat and less carbohydrate substrate utilization at rest after CR. The addition of SR abolished these shifts in substrate utilization with similar weight loss. The results support a portion of the hypothesis as that these changes occurred during resting and no observable changes were noted during the OGTT. Thus, adequate sleep may aid in favorable shifts to a more efficient metabolic state with weight loss.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 424
Alhamadani, Yasir Yoon, Yeomin Sonocatalytic removal of ibuprofen and sulfamethoxazole in the presence of different fly ash sources
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Abstract Text

We examined the feasibility of using two types of fly ash (an industrial waste from thermal power plants) as a low-cost catalyst to enhance the ultrasonic (US) degradation of ibuprofen (IBP) and sulfamethoxazole (SMX). Two fly ashes, Belews Creek fly ash (BFA), from a power station in North Carolina, and Wateree Station fly ash (WFA), from a power station in South Carolina, were used. The results showed that >99% removal of IBP and SMX was achieved within 30 and 60 min of sonication, respectively, at 580 kHz and pH 3.5. Furthermore, the removal of IBP and SMX achieved, in terms of frequency, was in the order 580 kHz > 1000 kHz > 28 kHz, and in terms of pH, was in the order of pH 3.5 > pH 7 > pH 9.5. WFA showed significant enhancement in the removal of IBP and SMX, which reached >99% removal within 20 and 50 min, respectively, at 580 kHz and pH 3.5. This was presumably because WFA contains more silicon dioxide than BFA, which can enhance the formation of OH• radicals during sonication. Additionally, WFA has finer particles than BFA, which can increase the adsorption capacity in removing IBP and SMX. The sonocatalytic degradation of IBP and SMX fitted pseudo first-order rate kinetics and the synergistic indices of all the reactions were determined to compare the efficiency of the fly ashes. Overall, the findings have shown that WFA combined with US has the potential for treating organic pollutants, such as IBP and SMX, in water and wastewater.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Columbia Ballroom A
Time: 2:05
Brazendale, Keith Beets, Michael Children's Obesogenic Behaviors During Summer versus School
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Background: Evidence consistently shows U.S. children gain 3-5 times more weight during summer vacation (~2.5 months) compared to the 9 month school year. Few studies have used a within-person design to examine children’s obesogenic behaviors during summer and how these compare to school. The purpose of this study is to examine within-child differences in 4 obesogenic behaviors (physical activity (PA), sedentary/screen-time, diet, and sleep) during school versus summer. Methods: Using a repeated-measures within-subjects design, children (n=55 mean age=8.2 years; 57% female; 37% overweight/obese) wore accelerometers on the non-dominant wrist for 24hr/d over 9 consecutive days during school and summer of 2016 to capture PA, sedentary time, and sleep. Parents completed a daily diary to report bed/wake times, diet (food/beverage questionnaire), and screen-time of their child each day. Mixed effect models, conducted 2016, compared summer and school behaviors. All models included age, sex, and weight-status as covariates. Results: Children spent more time sedentary (69 vs. 67% of time), less time in light PA (25 vs. 23% of time), had higher screen-time (242 vs. 123 min/day), slept longer (428 vs. 413 mins/day), and consumed more sugar-based foods (6 days vs. 2.5 days/week) and fruit (7 days vs. 4.7 days/week) during summer compared to school (p<0.05). Conclusion: Initial evidence suggests children are displaying multiple unfavorable obesogenic behaviors during summer compared to school that may contribute to the accelerated weight gain observed during summer. Longitudinal evidence with larger, more diverse samples of children is necessary to identify specific behavioral targets for interventions during summer.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Columbia Ballroom C
Time: 10:25
Swartz, Tracey Kalaignanam, Kartik
Jayachandran, Satish
The Impact of on CMO Tenure on Brand Assets and Cost of Capital: Insights from Business to Consumer Industries
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This paper investigates the performance effects of CMO tenure. The authors develop a conceptual model linking the impact of CMO tenure to a firms’ cost of capital through its impact on brand value. By synthesizing insights from field interviews, the authors posit that the impact of CMO tenure on brand value will be moderated by prior CEO-CMO work overlap, CEO prior marketing experience and CEO general ability. The predictions are tested using data on 126 public US-based firms between 2004 and 2013. The findings suggest that longer CMO tenure results in higher brand value. Further, longer CMO tenure reduces cost of capital through its impact on brand value. The authors also find that the impact of CMO tenure on brand value is strengthened when the CEO has prior marketing experience as well as when the CEO and CMO have prior work overlap. This supports prior literature which suggests shared mental models among the top management team is beneficial. CEO general ability weakens the relationship between CMO tenure and brand value, suggesting that CMOs may need to work harder at opening the lines of communication to avoid butting heads with CEOs, resulting in negative consequences to the brand.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 293
Sellick, Gary Holton, Woody Black Skin, Red Coats; The Carolina Corps and the Evolution of Military Policy in the British Caribbean
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Abstract Text

In 1782, a unit of runaway slaves were created that would change the history of the British military forever. Looking at this unit, the Carolina Corps, within the broader context of the British military in the Age of Revolutions, shows the roles that the regiment played in protecting the British Caribbean, which included tracking the same sort of runaway slaves that they had once been. It will discuss the rights given to these men, and show the attitudes towards the unit of the white men who officered them. In short, my project will explore the changing racial attitudes of the British military in the Caribbean while telling the story of a unique group of men that helped to change the structure of the organization in the region forever.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Columbia Ballroom B
Time: 11:00
Feys, Roel Khushf, George The Tragedy of the Health Care Commons
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Health care expenditures are on the rise across the Western world. The increase in costs, which is bound to exacerbate over the next decades as populations age, leads to worries about the efficient, equitable, and sustainable management of health care resources. Many of these concerns center upon the most suitable governance model for health care, often depicted as a choice between the institutions of state and market. But what if there was an institutional "third way?" In my research, I look at commons institutions as an alternative approach to governing scarce health care resources.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Columbia Ballroom B
Time: 11:15
Boyd, Cameron Harrison, Theresa Putting on my Hardhat, Safety Glasses, Earplugs, and Coveralls
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Abstract Text

After my sophomore and junior years while at USC, I had the opportunity to work with a Fortune 100 company as an engineering intern in both production and reliability. Performance Materials and Technologies is sector within Honeywell that focuses on providing specialty products such as refrigerants, nuclear fuel, and medicine packaging for various customers. My two internships were centered on meeting production goals and maintaining a mechanical integrity program. In both of these industry experiences, I had the pleasure to meet and network with chemical, mechanical, electrical, and civil engineers as well as operators. I collected data for railcar and truck unload times as well as creating a P&ID for a boiler system through team efforts. Through these experiences, I wanted to see my classroom learning in action and how I can use my personal knowledge to impact the chemical industry in a positive manner. The learning curve was steep but in each internship, I understood what a day in the shoes of an engineer looks like. I applied my technical skills and learned how to use SAP, AUTOCAD, and Uniformance. The Honeywell culture and values fit me especially pertaining to the Honeywell Operating System. The confirmation of my major choice out of high school was answered and I knew this was for me from the start. Participating and networking in these internships led me to ultimately accept a position within Honeywell as an engineer who will have the opportunity to rotate to different plants for a three year stint.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Alumni Center - Ballroom 1B
Time: 1:15-1:25pm
Kraft, Elizabeth Harrison, Theresa Finding My Way Through Philanthropy
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In today's society, people have a variety of views on what a Greek organization represents. However, once a person is a part of an organization they have a new concept of what it means to them. To me, my time in Delta Zeta has been centered around philanthropy. From the spring semester of my freshman year to the fall semester of my junior year, I was the philanthropy chair of my sorority. Our philanthropy is centered around speech and hearing disabilities. I chose to become the philanthropy chair as I wanted to challenge what people conceive sororities to be and I wanted my experience to be meaningful. I wanted to continue to do philanthropic work like I did in high school, but I also wanted the opportunity to motivate others to serve to the best of their abilities. Through this experience, I learned a lot about the importance of working together to create change and being open to other's ideas and personality types as well. I am excited to share this experience with others because when working in a group, we can make a much bigger impact. For example, in the 2015 calendar year, our sorority raised over $80,000 in donations for the Starkey Hearing Foundation. As a result of my experiences, I will continue to look for opportunities to participate in non-profit work throughout my life in order to give as much as I can and never forget to be thankful for my many blessings.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Alumni Center - Ballroom 2
Time: 1:30-1:40pm
Chalfant, Carolyn Brookshire, Cathy From Pen to Performance: Little Fishmaid
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Abstract Text

Ever since high school, I’ve been involved in children’s theatre. Before beginning my creative project, which was directing and producing an original children’s play called Little Fishmaid, I had already begun to diversify my experiences in theatre from primarily acting to crewing, set design, costuming, lighting, and more. Little Fishmaid renewed my familiarity with these fields and also allowed me the experiences of directing, producing, and playwriting. With the production, I wanted to explore topics such as feminism and the environment, try my hand at creating a comedy that would be family-friendly, practice leadership skills that I had obtained thus far in my activities at USC, understand how the many pieces of theatre work together while experimenting with a low-to-no budget production, and generally gain experience in new areas of theatre. Despite budgetary challenges, I also wanted to do something I loved for a greater cause, and was able to give about $500 to the charitable organization Curing Kids Cancer by production’s end. As a prospective professional artist, I understand in much greater detail what is involved in developing a play from an idea to a show that audiences pay to see, and I believe I am better prepared to communicate and exist in a professional theatre environment. I am grateful for USC’s support in this critical component of my education.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Richland Meeting Room A
Time: 2:15-2:25pm
Nielson, Samuel Mills, Amy
Nagel, Caroline
Beaches and Muslim Belonging in France: Liberty, Equality, But Not the Burkini!
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Muslims and Islam often face the ire of both French society and the French state, with the notion that Islam and Muslims do not “belong” in the state. The spate of high-profile terror attacks in the past two years, most recently in the beach city of Nice, spurred aggressive measures by local French politicians in beach resort towns to remove Islamic images from the French cultural landscape. The image under attack? The “burkini,” a swimsuit that covers the whole body except the face, the hands, and the feet, while being light enough for swimming. Mayors around France banned the image and threatened women violating it with a fine. But Muslim women did not accept this ban without a fight. Multiple legal challenges ensued. One of them resulted in a decision by France’s highest administrative court that overturned the ban in one town. Drawing on Marco Antonsich’s framework for analyzing belonging, this paper focuses on the language used by France’s highest administrative court in overturning one city’s ban, as well as language used by French political leaders in supporting the bans, to examine the message of belonging being conveyed to Muslims in the country.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Columbia Ballroom B
Time: 10:55
Swiecki, Allison Hancock, C. Nathan
DeLaurier, April
Application of Tol2-based Activation Tag Constructs for Zebrafish Mutagenesis
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Transposable elements are segments of DNA that can move from one region to another within the genome. The Tol2 transposon from Medaka fish has successfully been used for transgenesis, integrating foreign DNA, into a wide variety of vertebrates. Our goal is to develop Tol2 into a mutagenesis tool for gene discovery. Mutagenesis by transposon insertion, called transposon tagging, enables the discovery and analysis of gene function by causing mutations. Activation tagging, a type transposon tagging, is when a strong enhancer is positioned within the transposon. Activation tagging is used to learn about the function of genes by inducing overexpression. This is significant because many genes may otherwise be hard to study because of lethality or redundancy. Activation tagging has never been used for zebrafish, but is commonly used for gene discovery in plants. Zebrafish can serve as vertebrate development models, therefore activation tagging within zebrafish allows for the discovery of genes that are important for vertebrate development. A Tol2-based activation tag, with a h2afx promoter sequence inserted in the middle of Tol2 terminal inverted repeats (TIRs), was engineered using various molecular biology techniques (PCR, digestion, and sequence analysis). Additionally, a DNA construct encoding Tol2 transposase, which will allow transposition of the activation tag to occur, was produced. The integration of both constructs into zebrafish embryos is performed to measure transposition rates and look for altered gene function. To develop more active constructs for zebrafish mutagenesis, yeast transposition studies are also being performed in order to identify methods to increase transposition rates.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 17
Piperato, Sarah Forthofer, Melinda A Population-Based Study of Body Mass Index and Physical Activity Disparities Among Sexual Minority Identified Women
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Sexual minority identified (SMI) women may exhibit higher rates of obesity than heterosexual identified women, though the underlying reasons for this disparity are unclear. The purpose of this study is to examine differences in body mass index and physical activity between SMI and heterosexual identified (HSI) women. This study utilizes data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2007-2014. The total study population included 6,797 women, 6,342 HSI women and 455 SMI women. We assessed differences between sexual identity groups for four outcomes: body mass index, moderate physical activity, vigorous physical activity and meeting physical activity recommendations. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to determine differences in outcomes by sexual identity. SMI women were more likely to be obese compared to HSI women (OR= 1.81, 95% CI 1.23, 2.65). No significant differences were observed between sexual identity groups for moderate physical activity, vigorous physical activity or meeting physical activity recommendations (p=0.8154, p=0.3622, p=0.5925, respectively). SMI women had a higher prevalence of obesity compared to HSI women. These disparities between sexual identity groups do not appear to be attributable to differences in physical activity. Additional health-related mechanisms need to be studied to gain a greater understanding of this health disparity.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 316
DeMello, Madison Reciprocal Relationship between Sedentary Behavior and Mood in Young Adults.
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Introduction: With the increasing development of technology, a variety of leisure activities are spent in sedentary or seated behavior. Numerous associations between sedentary behavior and mental health outcomes such as mood have been reported, however none have looked at the reciprocal relationship between mood and sedentary time. The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship of sedentary behavior with mood among young adults. Methods: A sample of 430 adults (49.3% male) between the ages of 21-35 provided valid objective activity data in addition to an assessment of their wellbeing in a year-long observational study. For the purpose of this study, sedentary behavior is defined as less than 1.5 METS and was measured using a SenseWear mini-armband. The armband was worn for a period of 10 days (compliance of 7 days), with at least 21 hours of verifiable wear time per day. In addition, participants’ mood status and quality of life were assessed by the Profile of Mood State (POMS). Specifically, this study used the Total Mood Disturbance (TMD) score from the POMS questionnaire to assess mood. Assessments of sedentary behavior were conducted at baseline and then quarterly for one year duration, while assessments of mood and health status were conducted at baseline and one year. Results: A cross-lagged, autoregressive clustered model was used to examine simultaneous changes over time in both mood and sedentary behavior allowing for both clustering and adjustment of covariates over time. Data suggests that TMD score decreased significantly over one year, suggesting improvement in mood (p=0.01). Furthermore, there were positive associations between sedentary time and TMD; this association increased over time (p=0.001). Specifically, higher sedentary time was associated with more distress and this association intensified over time. Mean sedentary time remained stable over the course of the study (p=0.29). However, higher TMD scores (more distress) were associated with greater mean sedentary time (p=.03), and this association remained stable over the study period (p=0.51). Taken together, results suggest significant reciprocal associations (cross-lagged effects) between mood and sedentary time, with the stronger predictive associations of mood on sedentary time. Discussion: These results indicate a reciprocal relationship between mood and sedentary time, that is a decrease in sedentary time should improve mood status, likewise, an improved mood may decrease time spent sedentary. However, the stronger association is mood status predicting time spent sedentary in young adults. By identifying predictors of seated behavior, researchers can better understand ways to reduce time spent sedentary.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 360
Keeney, Madeline Moreno, Nina Leadership Distinction in Global Learning
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Leadership Distinction in Global Learning

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 195
Geiser, Ryan Moss, Melissa
Chastain, Shelby
Regulation of Alzheimer's Disease Associated mRNA Expression by Green Tea Catechins and Black Tea Theaflavins
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Alzheimer's disease (AD) affects 46 million people worldwide with its incidence is expecting to reach 131 million by 2050. The amyloid cascade hypothesis states that amyloid-β (Aβ) protein forms aggregates that induce nerve damage and deterioration. Aβ monomers originate from the proteolytic cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) via sequential β-secretase-1 (BACE1) and γ-secretase cleavage. The presence of Aβ can lead to an upregulation of both APP and BACE1 mRNA expression, resulting in a feed-forward mechanism for the amyloidogenic cleavage of APP. Alternately, APP cleavage by sequential α-secretase and γ-secretase prevents the amyloidogenic cleavage of APP, presenting a potential therapeutic target. This study utilizes SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells to determine whether catechins, including epicatechin (EC), epigallocatechin (EGC), epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), and theaflavins, including theaflavin (TF), theaflavin monogallate (TFG), could reduce Aβ-induced upregulation of key AD-associated mRNAs, as well as the ability of these compounds to stimulate mRNA expression of putative α-secretases, ADAM9 and ADAM10. When cells were treated with oligomers made in the presence of compounds, all catechins examined reduced Aβ oligomer-induced expression of BACE1 mRNA, and EGCG reduced Aβ oligomer-induced expression APP mRNA. Additionally, oligomers modified by EGC and EGCG upregulated ADAM10 mRNA expression. When cells were treated instead with native oligomers and antioxidant-capable concentrations of compounds, EGC reduced Aβ-induced APP mRNA expression, while EC reduced Aβ-induced mRNA BACE1 expression. These results indicate that both anti-aggregation and antioxidant characteristics of catechins may alter mRNA expression to reduce feed-forward mechanisms and promote non-amyloidogenic processing of APP.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 26
Benjamin, Jazmine Hancock, C. Nathan Determining the Sequences Involved in mPing Transposition
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Transposable elements (TEs) are segments of DNA that are mobilized from one location to another within a genome, often creating mutations. The TE we study is a 430 base pair element called mPing, which requires three components to be mobilized: transposase proteins (TPase and ORF1), terminal inverted repeats (TIRs) located at its extreme ends, and target site duplications (TSDs) flanking the element. The transposase proteins bind to the TIRs and TSDs of the transposable element to form the transposition complex. A mutant version of mPing, called mmPing20, was discovered from a mutagenesis strategy and has a nearly 1.5x higher transposition rate than that of mPing, suggesting that some or all of the seven base pair changes to the middle of the element function to promote transposition. The goal of this project is to identify the TIR sequences required for mPing transposition as well as determine which of mmPing20’s base changes are responsible for its increased transposition. ADE2 reporter constructs containing mutant and control elements were assayed in yeast to determine the transposition rates. We found that for mPing, all TIR bases are not equally necessary for transposition to occur. Highly conserved bases are more critical to the formation of the transposition complex. We expect that mmPing20 transposition rates will be adversely affected after mutation of any of its transposition promoting base pairs. Combined, these results assist in providing a clearer picture of the role of the TIR and internal sequences in formation of the active transposition complex necessary for mPing transposition.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Alumni Center - Ballroom 3
Time: 10:45-10:55am
Finnell, Julie Wood, Susan The role of estradiol on social stress induced depressive-like behavior and neuroinflammation in females
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It has long been established that repeated exposure to social stress can lead to the development of psychosocial disorders, such as depression. Strikingly, women are more sensitive to stress-related disorders, such as depression compared to men. This enhanced stress sensitivity in females begins at the onset of puberty and ends during menopause, suggesting that ovarian hormones could be a large contributing factor to this phenomenon. However, the mechanism by which ovarian hormones could be driving this enhanced stress sensitivity is unknown. Using a modified social defeat paradigm which consists of a rat bearing witness to an aggressive social defeat encounter, we have previously shown that witness stress produces depressive-like anhedonia and enhanced pressor and tachycardic responses selectively in intact cycling females while females that are ovariectomized (OVX) are resistant, making this an ideal model to study mechanisms of stress susceptibility in females. We recently demonstrated that neuroinflammation is crucial in the development of depressive-like anhedonia in socially stressed males. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of estradiol on social stress-induced neuroinflammation within the central amygdala (CeA) witness stressed females. Study 1 determined the differential neuroinflammatory consequences of witness stress in intact cycling vs. OVX females. Much like our behavioral data suggests, intact cycling females show enhanced neuroinflammation in the CeA compared to OVX females. In order to determine the discrete role of estradiol in these neuroinflammatory responses to stress, study 2 determined cytokine levels in OVX females that received estradiol or placebo replacement. While estradiol replacement did not result in the emergence of stress-induced depressive-like anhedonia, it did promote anxiety-like behavior as evidenced by increased burying during witness stress exposure. Based on this enhanced anxiety-like response, we predict concomitant increases in neuroinflammation within the CeA, a brain region known to contribute to behavioral stress responses. Therefore, the current study suggests that ovarian hormones, potentially estradiol, may mediate enhanced stress sensitivity in females by promoting stress-induced inflammation in critical brain regions involved in the behavioral stress response, providing novel therapeutic targets to study female stress resiliency and susceptibility.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 289
Smith, Nicole Caulder, Celeste
Mohorn, Phillip
Caulder, Elisabeth
Berganini, Alyssa
Appropriateness of Empiric Antibiotic Therapy for Discharged Emergency Department Patients.
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Purpose: The practice of antimicrobial stewardship can be defined as optimizing clinical outcomes while working to minimize the consequences of antimicrobial therapy such as resistance and superinfection.1,2 The emergency department (ED) is not always included among antimicrobial stewardship program (ASP) initiatives. The primary purpose of this study is to determine the percentage of appropriate empiric antimicrobial therapy for discharged ED patients for pre-specified infections: community acquired pneumonia (CAP), sexually transmitted infection (STI), skin and soft tissue infection (SSTI), and urinary tract infection (UTI). Methods: Patients who presented to the ED were identified by the corresponding ICD-9 codes used for the diagnosis of CAP, STI, SSTI and UTI during the study period. Data was collected from the electronic medical record and managed using REDCap, an online data management tool. Results: The major infection type seen in the ED was SSTI at 93%. At ED discharge, 87% of patients received antimicrobial therapy. Upon ED discharge, 58% of the antimicrobial agents were appropriate based on guidelines, culture data and dosing. Thirty percent of the antimicrobial agents were not appropriate and 12% of patients did not receive antibiotics. The main reason for inappropriate therapy was inappropriate agent (79.2%) and of the inappropriate agent, 88% was too broad spectrum. Conclusions: Antimicrobial agents prescribed to discharged ED patients was inappropriate 30% of the time. By including the ED in stewardship initiatives, there could possibly be an increase in antimicrobial therapy prescribed and a decrease in readmissions due to infectious causes. References: 1. Aquisitio N. Antimicrobial stewardship in the emergency department. J Pharm Pract. 2011;24:196 – 202. 2. Delliti TH, Owens RC ,McGowan JE Jr,et.al.Infectious diseases society of America and the society for healthcare epidemiology of America guidelines for developing an institutional program to enhance antimicrobial stewardship. Clin Infect Dis. 2007;44(2):159-177.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 147
Hirschhorn, Rebecca Yeargin, Susan Epidemiology of injuries requiring emergency transport among college and high school student-athletes
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Co-authors: Dompier TP†, Wasserman EB†, Kay MC‡, Clifton DR§, Kerr ZY‡: †Datalys Center for Sports Injury Research and Prevention, Inc, Indianapolis, IN, ‡The University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, §The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH Context: There is a lack of research regarding the epidemiology of emergency transport incidents (ETI) of sports-related injuries in high school and collegiate settings. Objective: To determine frequency and type of ETI as a result of athletic participation. Design: Descriptive epidemiological study. Setting: National Athletic Treatment, Injury and Outcomes Network (2011/12-2013/14) and National Collegiate Athletic Association Injury Surveillance Program (2009/10-2014/15) in 25 male and female sports. Patients or Other Participants: High school and collegiate student-athletes. Interventions: ETI data were collected by athletic trainers (AT) who attended each practice and game. ATs also collected data on athlete-exposures (AEs) as defined by one athlete participating in one practice or game. Main Outcome Measures: Injury frequencies, injury proportion ratios (IPR), and injury rates per 10,000 AEs with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were reported. For each ETI, the body part, final diagnosis and injury mechanism were reported by the documenting AT. Results: A total of 339 ETIs were reported over 2,105 college team-seasons and 146 over 1,845 high school team-seasons. ETIs represented 1.02% and 0.31% of all injuries, respectively. Women’s ice hockey had the highest ETI rate at 1.28/10,000 AE (95% CI: 0.71-1.86) of all collegiate sports; however, football had the highest number of ETI (n=121). In high school, football had the highest rate at 0.80/10,000 AE (95% CI: 0.64-0.97) and the highest number (n=89). Head/face injuries were the most frequently transported injuries in college (n=71, 20.9%) and high school (n=33, 22.6%) across all sports. This differs from collegiate football which most frequently transported neck injuries (n=26, 21.5%). The proportion of trunk injuries requiring emergency transportation was higher in college than high school (IPR = 9.56; 95% CI: 1.27-71.76). Heat-related events accounted for 5.6% (n=19) and 4.1% (n=6) of ETIs in college and high school, respectively. Strain was the leading diagnosis in college (n=23, 14.7%). Fractures were the leading diagnosis in high school, accounting for 24% (n=35) of emergency transports. Player contact was the leading mechanism of injury in all collegiate (41.6%) and high school (54.8%) sports. Conclusions: Women’s ice hockey had the highest rate, whereas football had the highest number of ETI in college. Football had the highest rate and number of ETI in high school. ATs should maintain a high level of emergency preparedness when working with these sports. Injuries to the head, neck and face, including concussions, are the most frequently transported across competition levels. ATs need to have the appropriate equipment and protocols in place to handle the most common injuries. Strains were the leading diagnosis in college, which are not considered an emergent condition. Future research should examine differences between field and hospital diagnosis to help improve prehospital care and decrease the likelihood of unnecessary emergency transports.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Columbia Ballroom C
Time: 1:05
B.H. Eliot, Lewis Childs, Matt Abolitionism, Enslavement, and the Stateless of the Nineteenth-Century Atlantic World
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This project explores the mid-nineteenth century black Atlantic World. This period was one of turbulence as European empires competed politically, ideologically, and morally over terrain, labor, and bodies during the Age of Emancipation. I examine the Atlantic Africans who experienced these clashes, demonstrating the stateless reality of black Atlantic life.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Columbia Ballroom B
Time: 10:20
Chalfant, Carolyn Blauvelt, Alex
Harrison, Theresa
Britt, David
Getting Civically Engaged for Theatrical Reasons
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As a theater major, my life is incredibly busy, especially any time I am in a show. Performing theatre majors currently in shows are in the theatre around 20-28 hours per week. Despite the time commitment, I genuinely love acting, and lately directing and writing too. But for much of my college career, I’ve usually put my shows aside, to learn some important skills in my extracurriculars. Being a very shy person coming into college, I wanted to get leadership experience and build my confidence in dealing with people. After a great experience with my Capstone Ambassadors my first semester, I became a Capstone Ambassador, and later Vice President of Social Affairs on the Capstone Programming Council. Pausing acting, I stage managed three shows. All of these experiences helped me to understand the technical ins and outs and the intrapersonal skills necessary to lead something. Later on, artistic talent not completely forgotten and managerial skills newly strengthened, I directed and produced my first original show, and had an amazing time. From April 7th-9th, I will be directing another show. Neither artistically fulfilling experience would have happened without my choosing Graduation with Leadership Distinction in Professional and Civic Engagement. In this presentation, I will briefly discuss some of my core experiences from Graduation with Leadership Distinction. Then you’ll see a scene from my most recent production, performed by two high school aged actors.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Richland Meeting Room A
Time: 2:00-2:10pm
Donevant, Sara Culley, Joan Developing an Evidence-Based Mobile Application for Chemical Triage
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Background/Significance: Mobile health applications (mHealth apps) are one of the fastest expanding areas of healthcare with over 165,000 mHealth apps available. It is essential mHealth apps incorporate evidence-based practice to optimize patient outcomes. The team of Validating Triage for Chemical Mass Casualty Incidents – A First Step (R01LM011648-01A1) proposed to develop an evidence-based mobile triage app for chemical mass casualties. Purpose: The purpose of the grant was to create a mobile triage app to: 1) quickly identify patients exposed to chlorine; and 2) accurately, precisely, and efficiently triage and process patients exposed to improve outcomes. The team used the medical data from the Graniteville, SC chlorine incident to isolate the signs and symptoms of a chlorine exposure, which served as the foundation of the mobile triage app. Methods: The team used a methodical approach to develop an evidence-based mHealth app. The multi-faceted approach included: 1) abstracting the medical records from a local hospital who treated patients from the Graniteville incident; 2) analyzing the data to identify signs and symptoms of chlorine gas exposure; 3) developing an algorithm using the signs and symptoms; 4) testing the sensitivity and specificity of the algorithm; 5) revising the algorithm based upon the testing; 6) creating the triage mobile app in collaboration with computer engineers and human-computer experts; 7) allowing end-users to assess the mobile triage app; and 8) simulating a mass casualty incident to test the mobile triage app. Results: This process ensured the evidence directed the development of the mobile triage app. The result was an evidence-based mobile triage app that accurately identified patients exposed to chlorine. Conclusion/Implications: As mHealth continues to grow it is essential the evidence direct the development of the mobile apps to improve patient outcomes. This methodical approach demonstrates how the evidence may guide the development of evidence-based mHealth.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Columbia Ballroom C
Time: 11:00
Watkins, Katherine Torres, Myriam Experiences of Latinos during the 2015 Flooding in South Carolina
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Latinos tend to be particularly vulnerable to the dangers posed by natural disasters for reasons including cultural distrust of authority, language barriers, lack of access to relief services, and fear of seeking relief services for immigration-related issues. We conducted this observational study primarily to investigate the efficacy of South Carolina’s emergency services as they relate to serving Latinos in order to identify areas that need improvement. Secondarily, we sought to better understand the experiences of Latinos in emergency scenarios. We surveyed 100 members of the Latino population in Columbia, SC, the capital city devastated by an unprecedented flood in 2015. During in-person interviews, respondents answered questions about their experiences before, during, and after the flood. Most respondents, 64%, emigrated from Mexico and the average education level amongst them all was 9 total years of education. Three out of four respondents reported that they did not know what to do when the threat of flooding became evident. The same proportion of individuals reported not becoming aware of the possibility of a flood until less than 24 hours before the storm. We found that 57% of respondents felt that they were treated worse than others in their area. The services that participants cited as functioning best were relief offered by churches, the police/firefighters/military, water distribution, and volunteers/non-profits. FEMA and lack of communication available, both in general and in Spanish, were services cited as needing improvement. These successes and shortcomings should be taken into consideration in preparedness for future disaster relief efforts.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Carolina Meeting Room A
Time: 10:30-10:40am
Olson, Lindamarie Hock, Robert Exploring help-seeking and stigma related to autism spectrum disorder among parents in India
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Early identification and treatment of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a pressing global concern, and parent help-seeking is critical first step towards this goal. At the present time, little is known about ASD-related help-seeking outside of Western countries. To address this gap, the current study examines help-seeking among parents of young children in India. Within Indian culture, disability is often seen as a tragedy. Social exclusion and familial isolation are common, and there is a spiritual belief that a disabled child is a curse from God (Ravindran and Myers, 2012; Dhar, 2009). The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between ASD-related help-seeking and dimensions of stigma among parents of young children in India.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 216
Eason, Michael Decker, Scott Predicting Cognitive Deficits in Children using EEG
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Electroencephalography (EEG) is a non-invaisve, relatively inexpensive and easily implementable neuroimaging device used in research and clinical practice. It can provide measurements with superior temporal quality, sample rate being 256 sample per second. The current study aims to use EEG activity recorded at a resting-state to identify patterns of cognitive ability in children.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 77
Eddy, Sarah Faupel, Chrissie Iceland Isolation: The Effect of Technology on a Study Abroad Experience
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My project focuses on how technology can effect a study abroad experience. I researched this by studying abroad on a Maymester to Iceland for two weeks with fellow peers from the University of South Carolina. I decided to research technology because my generation is more addicted to their technology than ever before. I was intrigued to see how technology could have an impact on an opportunity to immerse in a new culture, whether it would be beneficial or detrimental to have technology on a study abroad trip. In order to collect data, I observed my fellow peer’s technology usage daily as well as administered surveys throughout the trip. This way I obtained both qualitative and quantitative data to analyze. My quantitative and qualitative results were contradicting, my observations showed that technology hindered student’s ability to socialize and completely immerse in a new culture while the majority of students reported technology as having a positive impact on their trip. These results however could be due in part to the generations impression that technology is always positive and they refuse to acknowledge the detrimental effects technology is having on their lives. This project impacts not only students but all technology users. It challenges them to think about how they are using their technology and what they are missing out on when they do.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 153
Ramsey, Tam Menke, Brandon
Iverson, Shawn
Patel, Rakesh
Natural Killer Cell Lymphoma
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ABSTRACT: Natural Killer Cell lymphoma Presenter: Tam Ramsey - MS3 Mentors: Brandon Menke, MD; Shawn Iverson, DO; Rakesh Patel, MD Natural killer (NK)/T-cell lymphoma is a rare malignancy accounting for less than 1 percent of all lymphomas in North America and Europe. The nasal type involves the nose and sinuses with possible orbital extension. Ocular manifestations are infrequently reported. However, if orbital extension does occur, it may be the first sign of disease and presented as orbital cellulitis that does not improve with adequate antibiotics. Imaging are nonspecific. Histologically, NKTL shows polymorphic inflammatory infiltrate with angiodestruction. However, in early stage, atypical cells are scarce and obscured by inflammatory cells recruited from tumor secreting cytokines, which can lead to misdiagnosis of inflammatory process and infection. We report a case of NK/T cell lymphoma with rare ocular manifestation that was initially confused with orbital cellulitis and chronic sinusitis due to multiple negative biopsies. A 92-year-old female presented with right eye vision loss, and ipsilateral orbital swelling for four weeks. MRI demonstrated right intra-orbital extension to the orbital apex causing optic nerve and medial rectus muscle impingement. Workups for infection and vasculitis were negative. Multiple biopsies with histopathology and flow cytology were unrevealing for malignancy. Patient failed to improve on antibiotics and steroids. Five months after the initial presentation, patient presented with the same complaint; however, the orbital mass had grown in size and involved the maxillary sinus and contralateral side. Re-biopsy revealed positive CD 56 for NK lymphoma.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Lexington Meeting Room A
Time: 10:15 am
Jiang, Yanping Li, Xiaoming
Qiao, Shan
The Impact of Bullying Victimization on the Cortisol Circadian Rhythm among Children Affected by Parental HIV/AIDS
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Bullying victimization is associated with a range of poor developmental outcomes among children. One of the promising mechanisms underlying these effects is stress physiology. In the current study, we investigated the relationship between bullying victimization and activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis as assessed through repeatedly measuring salivary cortisol in a sample of 645 children affected by parental HIV/AIDS. Results from the three-level multilevel model indicated that bullying victimization was related to lower cortisol levels at awakening and blunted cortisol slopes. The magnitude of this relationship, however, varied by genders. For girls, bullying victimization was related to lower cortisol at awakening and blunted cortisol slopes, whereas for boys, bullying victimization was not significantly related to activity of HPA axis. These findings highlight the importance of considering the effect of bullying victimization on child development, especially for some vulnerable populations. Bullying victimization may act as a significant source of chronic stress in children’s daily life, which contributes to the alternations in the HPA axis, resulting children at high risk of developing psychopathology and disease.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Columbia Ballroom C
Time: 1:00
Desjardins, Brittaney Freedman, Dan Describing the Impact of the Midlands Mediation Center on the Midlands Community
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This presentation will highlight the Midlands Mediation Center, a non-profit organization that provides low-cost mediation services to the Midlands community. This organization offers a variety of assistance, events, and activities to support the delivery of effective mediation protocols. Examples of these activities include the following programs: A Taste of Mediation, Conflict=Opportunity Project, as well as multiple trainings. What I will demonstrate are the benefits of participating in the organization’s programs, and the positive impact that the organization’s resources have on our community, including the ability to mediate in Magistrate’s Court for lower court costs, less wait times, and a decreased docket schedule.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 160
Waterman, Katherine Hunter, Stuart The Benefits of Benefits
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During the summer of 2016, I interned at Benefitfocus in Charleston, South Carolina. My job was in the Human Resources department specifically dealing with benefits offered at the company. I was able to learn detailed information, not only about benefits that the company offered to their associates, but also about how benefits work and who is able to qualify for what. I had to reconcile monthly bills and create a monthly benefits newsletter that informed employees on any updates regarding benefits. I was able to shadow exit interviews and eventually was able to conduct part of one myself. These tasks may seem minimal, but they were extremely significant to me. I was able to work as a real associate, not just an intern. I can use and apply the skills that I learned throughout the summer. This internship was so rewarding because it gave me hands on experience in a field that I eventually want to work in. Being in the HR department at Benefitfocus really opened my eyes to how many different and interesting areas that I could go into. I want to do more schooling after I graduate, but eventually I hope that I will be able to go back to Benefitfocus full time.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 276
Morgan, Myesha Swan, Suzanne Frequency of Bystander Behaviors Among College Men and Women in Sororities and Fraternities
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Previous studies indicate that the higher the exposure to alcohol the greater the chance for sexual victimization and violence. Students who are members of sororities or fraternities often have a greater exposure to situations involving alcohol consumption which increases their risk for being victims of sexual assault. However, prior research fails to address how this high risk population addresses and protects themselves from sexual assault and violence. The current study assessed the frequency with which male and female members of sororities and fraternities intervened in situations involving the overconsumption of alcohol, addressing offensive language, and situations where sexual victimization or intimate partner violence had occurred. These frequencies were compared to the frequencies of non-member students. The data suggests that females in sororities engaged in more prosocial bystander behaviors than did females who were non-members. Men who were in fraternities also engaged in more bystander behaviors than men who were not in fraternities. Women reported communicating more about behaviors to reduce risks of sexual assault and dating violence than did men, and women in sororities endorsed doing this more than any other group in our analysis. Members of sororities and fraternities reported more bystander behaviors in situations concerning hazardous drinking than did those not involved in those organizations (for e.g., making sure someone got home safely, and expressing concern when someone was talking about how they got wasted).The findings of this study will supplement the development of victimization interventions due to the specification of particular bystander behaviors students frequently use in high-risk situations. In conclusion, these results suggest that a strength of fraternity and sorority members is the relatively high frequency with which they engage in prosocial bystander behavior. Implications for research will be discussed.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 94
Wieczorek, Crystal Freedman, Daniel Providing services to at-risk youth: Westwood High School Social Work
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This presentation is an overview of my experiences in Richland 2 School District at Westwood High school interning under a school social worker. There are 1,315 students that attend Westwood High school with varying needs and resources. As such, a social worker will provide a variety of services including assistance through McKinney-Vento Act, Backpacks program, grant writing, and therapeutic groups. What this presentation will display are the positive impacts these services have on at-risk youth, as well as recommendations for improving service delivery and implementation.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 154
Atiya, Huda Ramsdell, Ann The Laterality of Breast Cancer Metastasis and the Microenvironment
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In breast cancer patients, metastasis in distant organs is the main cause of death and therapeutic failure. However, there currently are no available therapies that can eradicate distant metastases. Toward this end, my research goal is to identify regulators of breast cancer metastasis. Studies have shown that the microenvironment plays a critical role in breast tumor progression, including development of metastases. Moreover, there is a recent study that showed that right side breast tumors have greater metastatic activity compared to left breast tumors. Thus, we hypothesize that there are left-right (L-R) differences in the mammary microenvironment that promote L-R differences in tumor progression and/or metastasis. To test this, we used a triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) mouse model in which a metastatic carcinoma cell line, 4T1, was injected into the left or right mammary glands of adult female mice. Our result showed that tumors formed on both sides with equivalent growth rates. However, left versus right tumors had significantly different metastatic behavior, with 83.3% of right tumors generating lung metastasis, compared to only 33.3% of left tumors generating lung metastasis. Moreover, among all mice bearing lung metastases, the size and number of lesions were higher in the right tumor group. To begin to determine the basis for L-R differences in tumor metastasis, we investigated if left versus right tumor cells disseminated to the lungs. Results indicated that tumors from either side had comparable dissemination. We next investigated histology of the primary tumors, which showed that right tumors have greater local invasion and collagen deposition, which are indicators of increased tumor aggression. We also are investigating tumor-associated macrophages, which are the most abundant leukocyte population in mammary tumors and which play a crucial role in breast tumor metastasis. Consistent with increased aggression of right side tumors, our results show that right tumors also had more tumor-associated macrophages compared to the left tumors. Collectively, our results demonstrate for the first time that the L-R mammary microenvironments are significantly different in supporting breast cancer metastasis. To determine basis for this L-R difference, future studies will include RNA-Seq analysis on the left versus right normal mammary microenvironments and left versus right tumors in order to identify genes and pathways that differentially regulate the breast cancer metastatic cascade.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Columbia Ballroom A
Time: 1:35
Harris, Eboni Hilfinger Messias, DeAnne Examining Rest Practices among African American Women in South Carolina
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BACKGROUND: Social, cultural, and environmental factors contribute to obesity and obesity-related disease among African American women. There is evidence that African American women’s value of and perceived need for rest impacts their level of participation in physical activity, yet little is known about actual perceptions and practices of rest. Understanding African American woman’s perceptions and daily patterns of rest is important for designing culturally appropriate interventions that increase physical activity and decrease health disparities. METHOD: The aim of this research was to uncover practices and perceptions of rest among African American women in an urban setting in South Carolina, employing the Photovoice method. The eight participants ranged in age from 30 to 59. At Session 1, each participant received a digital camera and instructions on taking photos that represented what rest meant to her and how, where she rested. In subsequent group meetings, each participant shared her photos of personal rest practices, settings, and meanings, using the PHOTO discussion method. A modified ethnonursing framework guided analysis of data from images, transcripts, and field notes. RESULTS: Participants’ representations of rest focused on spirituality, relaxation, and seeking stress-free environments. Photos depicted devotional text, restful environments, and activities (e.g., taking a bubble bath, having a massage). Participants depicted rest both as associated with engaging in physical activity (i.e. taking a walk) and conversely, with not being physically active (i.e. having a meal; reading). Personal stress, environmental conditions, and making a conscious effort to rest were among the factors participants identified as influencing their ability to obtain needed rest. DISCUSSION: Engaging these urban, southern African American women through Photovoice methodology resulted in the elicitation of rich descriptions of their perceptions and practices of rest. Interventions with this population often focus on physical activity and exercise rather than personal self- care. These results suggest that a focus on self-care activities, which include both rest and exercise, may be a promising approach to developing new strategies and refining existing interventions aimed at enhancing personal health and quality of life through physical activity promotion. among this population.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Columbia Ballroom C
Time: 10:55
Ma, Kyunghee Pitner, Ronald Acculturation Stress, Social Support, and Depression among International Graduate Students from Collectivist Cultures
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Introduction Depression is one of the major health concerns for international students, and studies have shown a direct link between acculturation stress and depression. Students from collectivist cultures are more susceptible to depression due to familial expectations of academic achievement, cultural emphasis on internal regulation, and distrust regarding mental health services. In this context of adjustment, social support is known to lessen the negative impact of acculturation stress. There is, however, a paucity of literature examining this important issue. Therefore, this study explored the relationship between acculturation stress and depression among international students from collectivist cultures studying in the U.S. and examined the role that social support plays in this relationship. Methods The sample was drawn from first-year international graduate students enrolled in degree programs at the University of South Carolina. Hofstede’s study was used to determine collectivist countries. Participants were categorized into three groups: Chinese, Indian, and Other. An online survey was administered, and consisted of demographics and psychosocial measures (i.e., Acculturation Stress Scale for International Students, CES-D, and Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support). A total of 74 students (Chinese: n=32, Indian: n=23, and Other: n = 19) participated in the study. Results ANOVA tests revealed no significant differences in the average level of acculturation stress, social support, and depression across three groups. There was a positive correlation between length of U.S. residence and acculturation stress (r = .249, p < .05) and between acculturation stress and depression (r = .640, p < .01), and a negative correlation between perceived comfort with spoken English and acculturation stress (r = -.278, p < .05) and between social support satisfaction and acculturation stress (r = -.252, p < .05). Multiple regression analysis indicated that, collectively, the key variables in the study (i.e., length of U.S. residence, prior education in the U.S., perceived comfort with spoken English, communication with host nationals, funding sufficiency, financial concerns, social support, and acculturation stress) were significantly associated with depression among participants [F(9, 63) = 6.22, p < .0001, adjR2 =.40]. There was a main effect for acculturation stress (= .66, p < .0001), which accounted for 31% of the overall variance. Discussion The findings suggest that acculturation stress among international students from collectivist cultures increased as their stay in the U.S. lengthened. This may be because they are under cultural pressure to succeed academically, and this internalized pressure likely increases as they advance in their education. Social support was not a strong predictor of depression. Implications for university services and programs targeting international students will be presented.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Columbia Ballroom B
Time: 10:50
Chiang, Chia-Chun Niehaus, Greg How Statutory Reserve Regulation Influences Life insurers’ asset allocations in low-interest-rate environment?
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Understanding how insurance companies manage their enormous assets in different economic environments is important to policyholders, regulatory authorities, and owners of insurance companies. From 2001 to 2011, the total assets of US life insurers increased from $3,181billion to $5,493 billion. However, the 10-year constant maturity Treasury rate declined from about 6.5% in 2000 to 3.4% at the end of 2011. This low-interest-rate environment arouses concerns of the insurance companies and regulatory authorities because the low-interest rates could jeopardize insurers’ ability to fulfill their commitments to policyholders. Given over one-third of outstanding investment-grade bonds are estimated to belong to insurance companies (Schultz, 2001), the failure of insurance companies not only influences the policy holders, but also the other financial market participants. Inspired by the previous research, we study how the statutory reserve regulation influences the asset allocations of life insurance companies in a low-interest-rate environment.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Columbia Ballroom B
Time: 1:00
Friendly, Christopher Palmer, Christine
Truman, Samantha
The Associations Between Physical and Psychological Abuse and Health-Risk Behaviors in Heterosexual, College-Aged Males
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Physical and psychological abuse in heterosexual, college-aged males is a rising public health issue. One area that is largely unexplored is the association between health-risk behaviors and abused males. Recent research suggests that abused females exhibit key health-risk behaviors. Moreover, other research identifies common health-risk behaviors exhibited in young adult males. This study explores the associations between health-risk behaviors and physical or psychological abuse utilizing survey research methods with heterosexual males (n = 187) at a large southeastern university. We identified significant odds ratios between experiencing an abuse factor and engaging in corresponding health-risk behaviors. We compared the found associations with previous research including common health-risk behaviors observed in non-abused, young adult males and to female abuse victims’ health behaviors. We found not only multiple similarities in our comparison but also identified health behaviors not present in previous research, specifically self-harm and binge or restrictive eating. The associations found in this study suggest that abused males may react to their abuse differently than their female counterparts. Though further research is needed, this study suggests potential areas for health promotion intervention with abused males.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Richland Meeting Room C
Time: 1:30-1:40pm
Payero, Lisette Hancock, C. Nathan Determining the role of homologous recombination in replicative transposition of mPing
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Transposable elements are mobile segments of DNA that make up a large portion of plant genomes. Class II transposable elements use a “cut and paste” mechanism in which the element is excised and reinserted elsewhere in the genome, making them powerful agents in genome evolution. One of these elements, mPing has high transposition activity and despite the fact that mPing utilizes a “cut and paste” mechanism, its copy number has been shown to increase over generations, suggesting the presence of a replicative transposition mechanism. This experiment will test if homologous recombination (HR) repair, a mechanism in which homologous sequences from elsewhere are used to repair double strand breaks, repairs mPing excision sites with an mPing containing homologous sequence. We measured repair of mPing excision sites in yeast using a reporter system in which mPing disrupts the ADE2 gene, preventing cell growth until excision of mPing and subsequent repair of the ADE2 gene. Previous results showed that ADE2 restoration was higher in haploid cells than in diploid cells, suggesting that HR repair may be occurring in the diploids. To confirm the role of HR repair, we are performing transposition assays in HR deficient strains created by knocking out the rad51 gene. We predict that in the absence of HR repair we will see equal restoration of ADE2 function in the haploid and diploid strains. If we can confirm that HR repair is occurring, we will attempt to directly identify cases of replicative transposition by analyzing mPing copy number in our strains.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 18
Beguelin, Paul Bizimis, Michael Hf isotope systematics of rejuvenated Hawaiian magmas
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Rejuvenated stage lavas represent the final stage of Hawaiian volcanism, following the shield, and post-shield stages after a hiatus of 1-2 Ma. These alkalic lavas have more depleted isotopic compositions compared to previous stages [1] (87Sr/86Sr = 0.7032 instead of 0.7037) and plot outside of the mixing hyperbola described by the shield tholeiites in Pb-Hf or Nd-Pb isotopic space [2], implying a change in the magma source between shield and rejuvenated stage, as the volcano moves away from the center of the plume. We present new Hf isotope data on 34 previously characterized [3] submarine and subaerial lavas from the islands of Kauai and Niihau (all stages), and Hf-Nd-Sr-Pb measurements on twelve submarine rejuvenated lavas from the North Arch chain, NE of Kauai. In εNd-εHf space, all rejuvenated lavas from Niihau, Kauai, Kaula, Oahu, Maui, Molokai, North Arch have more radiogenic composition than shield stage lavas and converge around εHf ~14 +/- 1 and εNd ~ 6 to 9, with North Arch showing the most radiogenic values at εNd ~9. Kauai lavas from the shield, post-shield and rejuvenated stages form a continuous array with a slope of ~1.3, between KEA type compositions and a depleted endmember similar to North Arch sources. Conversely, Niihau rejuvenated lavas have more radiogenic εHf (~14 vs. 11) for a given εNd (6-9) than the shield building stages (shield, late-shield, post-shield) which overlap KEA type shield lavas [2]. This offset points to a shift in the source composition late in the volcanism. This relatively radiogenic Hf composition has been recognized previously in pyroxenites from Oahu and Kaula, and peridotites xenoliths from Oahu, and has been attributed to a recycled lithosphere component integral to the Hawaiian hot spot [1]. There is no systematic shift in Hf isotopes of rejuvenated magmas across the Hawaiian swell from Kaula Island to the North Arch field for over 350 km, implying a relatively homogenous rejuvenated source over a large distance, and with distance from the plume center. [1] Bizimis et al. (2013) G3 14, 4458-4478. [2] Blichert-Toft et al. (1999) Science 285, 879-882. [3] Cousens & Clague (2015) J. of Pet., egv045.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Columbia Ballroom A
Time: 10:25
Warden, Deborah Estrada, Robin Nurse leaders: Social processes of becoming
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Background: Nursing is an autonomous practice discipline, and in most hospitals and health care facilities, nurses occupy high-level directorships and executive roles. Succession planning and development of leaders are crucial requirements for long-term organizational stability. Providing high-quality, well-prepared candidates for these positions is critical for the discipline of nursing to remain an important advocate for patient care. The purpose of this study is to describe the development experiences of nurses who are managers, directors and executives. Approach: This study is a qualitative descriptive study using grounded theory data analysis techniques. Five interviews were initially conducted for this study, and an additional five interviews were reviewed for secondary analysis and comparison. Results: While all the participants moved into formal leadership at different points in their career trajectories, there were similarities in their experiences regarding their changing roles and identities. The social processes involved in their development into leaders are those of Being Called, Being Called Out, and Becoming. Through this process, the nurse transcends being an occupant of a position and embraces the identity of a formal leader. Throughout these stages, the nurse receives preparation from individual knowledge-bearers and from formal opportunities for learning. Conclusion: Early identification of potential formal leaders is crucial in guiding the next generation of nurse leaders and in effective succession planning for organizational stability. Understanding the social processes involved in growing nurse leaders essential for providing opportunities for identification, practice, and identity integration.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 342
Janvrin, Kittridge Lomicka, Lara Communications Ethics in Exploring Ireland's Past
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Studying abroad during the spring semester of my sophomore year at Griffith College in Dublin, Ireland allowed me to expand my view of international journalistic practices. I focused on media and research ethics as well as Irish history. Over the course of the semester, I traveled to seven different countries, which provided me experience navigating and communicating with the unfamiliar. It also led me to plan a return trip to Ireland a year later, during which I interviewed lead oral historians. My time abroad changed my perceptions of international conflict and the people involved in civil struggles; I learned the importance of recording stories not only from the popularized or media-heavy side. Through flexible perceptions, I was able to form connections with people both on my study abroad program and who were from a different generation and had been involved in important areas of Irish history. In the future, I plan to use the skills I have developed in terms of planning trips to help in organizing events and focusing on details in the field of public relations.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 153
Ullman, Kathryn Hunter, Stuart Bienvenido to New Experiences
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In January 2016, I left my comfort zone and headed to Barcelona, Spain to spend a semester studying and exploring new cultures. I decided I wanted to get more out of my experience and fully immerse myself into the city. I had the opportunity to volunteer at Jovellanos Primary School throughout my semester in Barcelona, working every week with a classroom of six-year-old students eager to learn the English language. The days I spent volunteering were some of the most rewarding moments of my abroad experience. I created “lesson plans” and topics that I would discuss with the Spanish students. I made slideshows including pictures of my family, my home state, and maps so they could understand where I was coming from. It was so humbling to see the students get so involved and be so interested in American culture. To see how proud they were when they could say a sentence in English was something I will never forget. The English professor encouraged us to speak in only English, so with me not being a fluent Spanish speaker and only knowing basic Spanish phrases, it was nice to be able to speak in my own language and have the young students be learning from me at the same time. Not only did they learn from me, but I also learned immensely from them and this experience. It brought me out of my comfort zone and gave me the confidence to engage myself as much as possible while abroad. I also had the opportunity to travel to twelve European countries and more than 30 cities. My experiences allowed me to develop a global mindset, both personally and professionally, within and outside the classroom. I realized the importance of making my own assumptions about the world, and appreciating other cultures and others around me. I have reflected on my global experiences and the impact they have made on me and know that I can adapt and thrive in an unfamiliar environment in the future. Global learning has had an incredible impact on me, and I strongly believe that any student would benefit from a study abroad experience.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 182
Ferster, Brady Bulusu, Subra Estimation of Salt Flux and Transport in the Southern Ocean
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Sea surface salinity (SSS) derived from the multi-satellite missions, NASA’s Aquarius/SAC-D, ESA’s Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS), and NASA’s Soil Moisture Active and Passive (SMAP), are used to estimate surface salt fluxes in the Southern Ocean (SO). To examine the satellites accuracy, we validate these products against Argo salinity. Correlation coefficients as high as 0.94 and Root Mean Square Difference (RMSD) and standard deviation of 0.23 psu (Aquarius) suggest that the satellite derived salinity can be used within the SO at higher spatial resolution. Surface salt flux calculations produce statistically similar estimations between the satellites, with anomalies resulting in changing the surface dynamics (buoyancy frequency). Depth-integrated salt and volume transports using Simple Ocean Data Assimilation (SODA) reanalysis are used to investigate the role of salt flux variation. The mean Drake Passage volume transport was calculated to be 143.3 0.2 Sv. Average inter-basin zonal salt transport is found to be > 5000 106 kg s-1 eastward, where mean Indian (566 106 kg s-1) and Atlantic (106 106 kg s-1) basins transport salt southward and the Pacific basin (589 106 kg s-1) transports salt northward. Seasonal variations in salt and volume transports suggest a net sink and source seasonally. Our results suggest that changes in salinity and salt transports are a major component of the SO warming. Based on these results, the use of satellite-derived salinity may prove to be a useful resource for observing salinity and surface salt fluxes within the SO.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Columbia Ballroom A
Time: 11:15
Trott, Corinne Bulusu, Subra Variability in the Somali Current and Eddies during the Southwest Monsoon Regime
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The semiannually reversing Somali Current (SC) is considerably turbulent partly due to the impacts of its three strongest anticyclonic circulations: the Great Whirl (GW), the Socotra Eddy (SE), and the Southern Gyre (SG), which all display interannual variability in location, shape, radial velocity, and amplitude due to the effects of upper-level mixing with surrounding eddies. Previous studies have been unable to fully explain the variation and formation mechanisms of the discrete high-amplitude (of above 20 cm) eddies in the western Arabian Sea. We have used satellite observations from 1993 to the present to analyze the upper-level mixing dynamics of the SC and eddies to discover that strong and normal intensity monsoon seasons are more conducive to a higher number of high-amplitude anticyclones. Increased Ekman pumping strengthens coastal upwelling off Somalia and the upwelled colder waters undergo mixing by the GW anticyclonic circulation and by a series of eddy dipoles (SE and other high-amplitude eddies) that extend into the open ocean of the Arabian Sea. Our investigation also reveals that latitudinal location of the SG has no relationship with the strength of the monsoon.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Columbia Ballroom A
Time: 11:20
Patel, Yogin Chen, Hexin Role of miR-489 in mammary gland development and Her2 mediated tumorigenesis
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HER2 overexpression is linked with poor prognosis and outcome in breast cancer. In our previous study, we have found miR-489 was specifically down regulated by HER2 overexpression. Restoration of miR-489 in multiple breast cancer cell lines significantly inhibited cell growth in vitro and decreased tumor growth in xenograft mice. To study role of miR-489 in Her2 mediated tumorigenesis, for the first time we generated MMTV-miR-489 transgenic mice, which overexpress miR-489 specifically in mammary gland. Our qRT-PCR data has confirmed transgenic mice have significantly more miR-489 expression than FVB mice. Our western blot data has confirmed DEK and PTPN11 both are going down significantly with overexpression of miR-489. DEK has been previously demonstrated as miR-489 target. Our western blot data reveled both miR-489 target DEK and PTPN11 are going down in transgenic mice. To find out whether miR-489 has any role in mammary gland development, mammary gland whole mount was performed from FVB and MMTV-miR-489 mice at different age. Mammary gland from MMTV-miR-489 mice demonstrated reduction in growth at early age and also our immunohistochemistry staining has demonstrated significantly reduction in Ki-67 positive cells in MMTV-miR-489 mammary gland at 6 early age. However, we also have found no significant effect on weight of litters of MMTV-miR-489 female since after 8-week, mammary gland able to recover growth. To find out effect of miR-489 overexpression on Her2 mediated tumorigenesis, we generated double transgenic mice MMTV-Her2/miR-489 by crossing MMTV-miR-489 mice with MMTV-Her2 mice. We have observed significant delay in tumor onset and reduced tumor growth in MMTV-Her2/ miR-489 mice compare to MMTV-Her2 mice. Also, we have observed less number of metastatic site in lung by performing H and E staining of lung. Our IHC data showed reduction in PTPN11 and DEK in miR-489 overexpress mammary tumor. Overall, our results indicated miR-489 overexpression suppresses mammary gland development at early age, reduced mammary tumorigenesis and decrease lung metastasis by targeting PTPN11 and DEK.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 291
Soni, Mithil Chen, Hexin microRNA-489 inhibits autophagy and sensitizes breast cancer cells to doxorubicin
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Over the past decade, numerous studies have shown that miRNAs can control several key biological processes such as cell cycle, apoptosis, differentiation and stem cell regulation. Hence, dysregulation of such microRNAs (miRNAs) play a key role in cancer initiation, progression and metastasis. Our lab and several other studies have demonstrated miR-489 as a tumor suppressor miRNA in breast cancer. We have established a double-negative feedback loop between miR-489 and the HER2-SHP2-MAPK signaling. To further understand role of miR-489 in breast cancer, we performed microarray analysis and used target predication tools. These analysis revealed autophagy as one of the pathway affected by miR-489. By western blot and RT-PCR, we found that miR-489 inhibits autophagy by downregulating multiple genes involved in the pathway such as ULK1, ATG4A and LAPTM4B. Through confocal microscopy using mCherry-EGFP-LC3B tandem repeat, we demonstrated that miR-489 specifically affects maturation step of the autophagy. We then investigated role of autophagy in miR-489 mediated tumor suppression. Since, autophagy has been linked with chemo-resistance and cancer stem cells, we suspected that these might be a mechanism by which miR-489 mediated autophagy inhibition could render tumor growth. Using flow cytometry we found that miR-489 over-expression indeed reduces cancer stem cell population as measured by CD24low CD44high population, ALDEFLOUR positive population and mammosphere assay. We then studied if miR-489 can sensitize resistant breast cancer cell line by inhibiting autophagy. Indeed, we found that miR-489 over expression can sensitize multiple breast cancer cell line to doxorubicin. Mechanistically, we found that miR-489 mediated downregulation of lysosomal transmembrane protein LAPTM4B causes lysosomal membrane permeabilization. This leads to redistribution of doxorubicin and increased penetration into the nucleus thereby increasing sensitivity of the drug. Together, our results indicate that miR-489 inhibits breast cancer by affecting multiple processes such as autophagy, drug resistance and cancer stem cells. Hence, it could serve as a novel biomarker for diagnosis or a potential therapeutic intervention in breast cancer.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 338
Burns, Jessica Bulusu, Subrahmanyam Tropical cyclone activity over the Southwest Tropical Indian Ocean
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The Southwest Tropical Indian Ocean (SWTIO) is a key region for air-sea interaction. Tropical cyclones (TCs) regularly form over the SWTIO and subsurface ocean variability influences the cyclogenesis of this region. Tropical cyclone days for this region span from November through April, and peak in January and February during austral summer. Past research provides evidence for more tropical cyclone days over the SWTIO during austral summer (December–June) with a deep thermocline ridge than in austral summer with a shallow thermocline ridge. We have analyzed the Argo temperature data and HYbrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM) outputs while focusing on the austral summer of 2012/2013 (a positive Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) year and neutral El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) year) when seven named tropical cyclones developed over the SWTIO region. This study reveals that the climatic events like the IOD and ENSO influence the cyclonic activity and number of TC days over the SWTIO. We ascertain that the IOD events have linkages with the Barrier Layer Thickness (BLT) in the SWTIO region through propagating Rossby waves, and further show that the BLT variability influences the cyclonic activity in this region.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Columbia Ballroom A
Time: 1:50
Fuller, Clay Hsieh, John The Economic Foundations of Authoritarian Rule
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10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 324
Pensa, S. Katherine den Ouden, Dirk Name Game: Single subject training studies
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Stroke may cause language difficulties that have a devastating effect on the quality of life of those involved. Increasing language function after a stroke is one important aspect of rehabilitation. Regaining control over speech motor plans may be served by repetitive articulatory training. Most patients only have limited access to therapy with a clinician after the first year post-stroke. Having a computer-based program for repetitive training of speech production allow patients to continue therapy independently, or as a supplement to clinician-based therapy. Computer applications for speech and language comprehension are available, but programs for practicing speech production with feedback are not. The proposed study aims to use speech recognition software that has shown promising results in preliminary studies. This program allows speakers to train single-word production in a motivating game environment. Previous studies have shown that “overlearning” skills in a drill-based therapy benefits cognitive skill acquisition and maintenance. Due to time limits, overlearning is not typically a part of therapy. Having a computer program that allows individuals to practice correct speech output allows for a continuation of this drill-based therapy, without the need for clinician supervision or feedback. This project trained two participants with a video-game-based program aimed at improving accuracy and timing of single-word speech production. The video game involves repetitive, drill-like training of object naming, masked by a game setting. Integrated speech recognition software allows for immediate and trial-specific feedback on lexical and rhythmic accuracy to the participant in the form of points scored in the game, to enhance motivation and facilitate autonomous use of the training method. In a pilot study, the method has been tested in a group of speakers with apraxia of speech and aphasia, with varying levels of success. This means that more information is needed about optimal levels of practice intensity, as well as about individual patient characteristics that may affect training outcome. This study investigated whether an intensive video-game-based training program (2 hrs/day, 4 days/week, 3 weeks) yields better results than a shorter, less intense training program studied previously in a group of speakers with apraxia of speech and aphasia (1hr/day, 4 days/week, 2 weeks). The single-subject format allows for more extensive testing to include outcome measures reflecting quality of life and connected speech, as well as detailed monitoring of daily progress.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 335
McCombs, Alexandria Hiscox, April
Wang, Cuizhen
An empirical modeling approach to estimating regional scale net ecosystem exchange in maize and soybean fields in the US corn belt
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It is important to understand the carbon dynamics at the ecosystem scale to provide a more detailed understanding of the mechanisms driving the carbon cycle at a regional scale. Numerous measurements have been collected that remotely sense the earth’s surface via satellite, and have potential to provide information about carbon dynamics at regional scales. Research conducted by other scientists have sought to model the underlying physics of carbon dynamics between the ecosystem and the atmosphere, although one major weakness is that many of these models generalize diverse ecosystems into a single category. For instance, all agricultural land covers are considered equivalent. This generalization can lead to large discrepancies between in-situ carbon measurements and remotely sensed carbon values in areas with varying crop types. Here we present an empirical model, which addresses this inaccuracy. More specifically, we focus on modeling net ecosystem exchange (NEE) at regional scales in maize and soybean fields by comparing ground based NEE observations with MODIS and Landsat surface reflectance observations. The surface reflectance bands that best explained the variance in ground-based NEE observations were identified using a quadratic and linear regression analysis. A stepwise regression analysis was conducted to determine the best combination of surface reflectance observations in addition to the meteorological variables included in the analysis, which include air temperature and vapor pressure deficit. This new methodology provides a better way to predict carbon dynamics in maize and soybean fields with greater spatial resolution and higher precision, and confirms the hypothesis that NEE in agricultural fields needs to be modeled by crop type.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 283
O'Hara, Stephen Sklaroff, Lauren The United Nations, Hollywood, and Televising the End of the World
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Television as a vehicle for peace in the 1960s. Adlai Stevenson, U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, laid out this vision in November 1963 before an intimate group of Oscar-winning writers, producers, and directors. He hoped that Hollywood’s best might create provocative, dramatic television specials to foster among Americans a spirit of order and stability. Stevenson initiated a call-to-arms merging the glitz and glamour of Hollywood, the burgeoning power of the television industry, and faith in popular culture as a counter to domestic and international turmoil during the 1960s. This paper examines the Telsun Foundation, which produced for the United Nations four dramatic television specials on ABC from 1964-66, beginning with Rod Serling’s cautionary nuclear annihilation parable, “Carol for Another Christmas.” The paper uses archival research in the Stevenson, U.N., and Serling papers, as well as newspapers, trade magazines, correspondence, and scripts, to examine 1960s television drama, the context for Telsun’s formation, the ideological and dramatic content of its programs, and audience responses. Recent work on the 1960s and television has examined television’s social power, how network news and primetime entertainment slowly produced works that shaped attitudes on civil rights. This paper examines Telsun as an international extension of television and society, a ground-breaking but flawed experiment to harness Hollywood and television toward a social and global good amidst escalations in the Cold War and Vietnam. Telsun ultimately failed not in its misunderstanding of television, but its audiences, who expected the allegorical subtlety and nuance of contemporary television dramas.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Columbia Ballroom B
Time: 10:25
Ghate, Pankaj Identifying Novel Interactors of RAB3GAP1 to understand mechanisms behind Warburg Micro Syndrome
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Warburg micro syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive genetic disorder associated with severe intellectual disability, postnatal microcephaly, agenesis of the corpus callosum, and microphthalmia. Over 40% of the WARBM cases are associated with mutations in RAB3GAP1 (RAB3 GTPase activating protein 1). RAB3GAP1 is the catalytic subunit of the heterodimeric RAB3GAP complex of RAB3 protein. Previous work has reported a role for RAB3GAP1 in synaptic transmission and plasticity. However, in vivo murine models deficient for RAB3GAP1 do not recapitulate the anatomical brain or eye phenotypes associated with human Warburg micro syndrome. We hypothesize that in humans the deleterious effect of RAB3GAP1 mutations might result from species-specific differential functions of RAB3GAP1 and/or its interacting partners. To begin to test this hypothesis, we first used a mass spectrometry approach to identify novel interactors of RAB3GAP1 in human cells. Candidate proteins identified by mass spectroscopy were further analyzed using coimmunoprecipitation approaches in human embryonic stem cell (hESC) derived cortical neurons. We present here the identification and characterization of two novel interacting partners of RAB3GAP1 in hESC derived cortical neurons. Pathway analysis of RAB3GAP1 interacting proteins highlight membrane trafficking, axon formation and neuronal morphogenesis as major biological processes represented. These preliminary studies suggest that in humans RAB3GAP1 might also regulate neurite formation during human brain development.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 362
Ramsey, Tam Navarro, Fernando Renal myxoma
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Myxomas are rare mesenchymal tumors that are most commonly found in the heart and skin. Renal myxomas are extremely rare, having only been documented in medical literature 14 times. Our case is a 55 year old woman who presented to our clinic after a 1.7 cm right renal mass was incidentally found on abdominal CT. Further evaluation with contrast enhanced MRI showed a 1.8 x 1.1 cm mass that appeared to arise from the medial cortex of the superior pole of the right kidney. As the imaging was concerning for renal cell carcinoma, the patient underwent a partial nephrectomy. Microscopic examination showed fragments of well circumscribed tumor arising from the renal capsule. The tumor demonstrated polygonal to spindle shaped cells in a granular eosinophilic cytoplasm. Immunohistochemical staining for CD-10, Desmin, HMB-45, and Pankeratin were all negative. Presenter: Tam Ramsey Mentor: Fernando Navarro

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 379
Sibley, Ivy Anderson, Christian Sustainability in Higher Education
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The aim of this presentation is to give insight on how to create a sustainable campus by providing the best practices of campus sustainability for colleges and universities. We compare the literature on the best evidence-based practices of sustainability at institutions of higher education in the United States (U.S.) and in Iceland to show how to be more sustainable. The purpose of presenting examples from the U.S. and Iceland is to highlight the sustainable practices before the presenters study abroad in Iceland. Institutions that aim to create lasting and holistic improvements for greater sustainability should focus on three areas: economic, social, and environmental changes. Sustainable development refers to strategically meeting needs of the present while being conscious of the future. With the objective of creating sustainable change that includes these three fundamentals at higher education institutions, all major stakeholders at the institution must be involved in pursuing the goal of sustainability. Implementing sustainable development through improving campus structures, implementing sustainable practices in student organizations and training of staff members, and incorporating sustainability into all areas of education at a university are tangible and measurable ways to achieve campus sustainability.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 319
young, tyra anderson, christian Sustainability in Higher Education
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Abstract Text

The aim of this presentation is to give insight on how to create a sustainable campus by providing the best practices of campus sustainability for colleges and universities. We compare the literature on the best evidence-based practices of sustainability at institutions of higher education in the United States (U.S.) and in Iceland to show how to be more sustainable. The purpose of presenting examples from the U.S. and Iceland is to highlight the sustainable practices before the presenters study abroad in Iceland. Institutions that aim to create lasting and holistic improvements for greater sustainability should focus on three areas: economic, social, and environmental changes. Sustainable development refers to strategically meeting needs of the present while being conscious of the future. With the objective of creating sustainable change that includes these three fundamentals at higher education institutions, all major stakeholders at the institution must be involved in pursuing the goal of sustainability. Implementing sustainable development through improving campus structures, implementing sustainable practices in student organizations and training of staff members, and incorporating sustainability into all areas of education at a university are tangible and measurable ways to achieve campus sustainability.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 323
Taylor Jr, Scott DiPietro, Robin
So, Kevin
Pop-Up Dining Experiences: Increasing Experiential Value and Relationship Quality
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The purpose of this study was to assess the relationships between experiential value-relationship quality, and relationship quality-behavioral intentions within the context of the growing pop-up restaurant industry (pop-ups). The current study also assessed the moderating roles of generation, variety seeking behavior and involvement regarding dining out. Results indicated that the experiential value of pop-ups is leading to increased levels of relationship quality, as reflected in satisfaction and trust toward pop-ups, and this is leading to an increase in behavioral intentions, specifically intention to spread positive WOM, return intentions and an increased WTP for a meal at a pop-up. Furthermore, significant differences were found between groups based on generation, variety seeking and involvement. Findings are discussed in terms of both academic and practitioner implications.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Columbia Ballroom B
Time: 11:05
Fargalla, Mary Easley, Elizabeth
Sellhorst, Sarah
Difference in average daily step count between male and female college -age students
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A sedentary lifestyle has been associated with a variety of lifestyles. Previous studies have shown that physical inactivity is higher in females and that college-aged students have inadequate levels of physical activity. Although increased health risks have been identified in students that live off-campus, there are no known studies that have examined physical activity of students on a two-year commuter campus. Purpose: To determine if a difference in steps per day exists between male and female full-time traditional-aged college students (18-25yr) at a small rural commuter campus. Methods: Subjects were asked to wear an accelerometer (Actigraph GT3X, Pensacola FL) around their waists at the anterior axillary line of the right hip during all waking hours for seven consecutive days. An independent sample t-test was used to determine whether a difference existed in average daily step count in men and women (IBM SPSS Version 24). Results: There was a significant difference in average daily step count between men (n=29; 7876.00 ± 3200.18 steps/day) and women (n=37; 6313.42 ± 2751.01 steps/day), p = 0.037. Conclusion: These results support the previous studies on college-aged students showing that women averaged less daily activity than their male counterparts. This is even more concerning considering that the women were classified into the low active category based on their average number of steps. Furthermore, the data showed that both sexes are failing to achieve activity levels recommended by established guidelines. Supported by a Research and Productive Scholarship Grant from USC Lancaster.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 127
Miskin, Arianna Camp, Lisa Connecting Leadership and Medicine: Experiences of a Volunteer
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When you tell people that you're a pre-medical student who wants to help people, they tend to access their schemas surrounding the "less fortunate", which involves either low SES Americans or citizens of an underdeveloped country. Although I have been lucky enough to volunteer medically in both settings (at a Free Medical Clinic located in Columbia, SC and at a pop-up clinic in Jamaica), I realized that helping others expanded beyond the scope of just those in need. By being a Carolinian, I was able to be a U101 Peer Leader for two years, a member of the Student Government, and had many other experiences that allowed me to volunteer my time and help others at various points in their life. These experiences have not only taught me vital skills and lessons, but have also led me to the next step in my life: joining Americorps City Year. My experiences in volunteerism through the University of South Carolina have made me a better future physician, a better thinker, a better philanthropist and a better-informed citizen of the world.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Congaree Meeting Room A
Time: 10:15-10:25am
Seder, Caroline Camp, Lisa Mind, Body, Soul: Researching and Understanding the Whole
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As a Public Health major, I never expected to find my true niche in the field of psychology. During my senior year at the University of South Carolina, I had the opportunity to work at both the Parenting and Family Research Center and the Psychology Services Center. At the Parenting and Family Research Center, I worked in two separate labs: under Dr. Prinz and Dr. Flory. In Dr. Prinz’s lab, I worked as a behavioral coder. Through this experience, I learned that compartmentalization and confidentiality are what research is centered around. As a coder, I was blinded to what the study is about and faced challenges of being compartmentalized. As a whole, this experience helped me develop and refine my skills as a researcher. Additionally, I worked in Dr. Flory’s lab as a research assistant. In this position I was responsible for data collection for the CDC funded project the “Project to Learn About Youth.” Over the course of this experience I realized that Public Health and Psychology are fields that coexist. Along with these two experiences I was lucky enough to have the opportunity as an Assistant Child Care Clinician at the Psychology Services center. During this experience I learned the importance of the developing child and how vulnerable development can be at certain stages in life. These experiences have helped me understand where my passions lie and where I want to go in the future with my career.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 100
Brown, Krishnan Norris, LeAnn
Love, Bryan
Clinical Impact of Prescription Medication Quantity on Grip Strength
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Purpose Hand grip strength has been widely used as a practical and reliable measurement for evaluating age-related changes and alterations in biological functions. The use of specific medications, including cardiovascular agents, have been associated with reduced grip strength. Studies have also found that grip strength is inversely related to polypharmacy, the concurrent use of five or more medications. Additional research is necessary to determine whether the association between grip strength and other medication classes is generalizable. Methods This study examined associations between prescription medication count and grip strength among 5,197 patients, aged 18 years and older who participated in the 2011–2012 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). Prescription medication use was self reported and collected by a trained interviewer. Baseline demographic information was collected and evaluated including age, gender, medications history, and prescription count. Muscle strength was assessed using the Takei digital grip strength dynamometer. Combined grip strength was calculated by totaling the best reading from each hand. Multiple linear regression models were used to examine the association between combined grip strength and the number of medications used, with and without an adjustment for gender, age, height, and arm circumference. Results The average age of the NHANES patients was 45.9 years. The mean height was 175.8 cm for men and 162.1 cm for women. Mean combined grip strength, measured in kilograms, was higher among men than women (89.8 kg vs. 56.4 kg; p < 0.001). Men and women reported an average of 1.57 and 2.06 prescriptions, respectively (p < 0.001). In both unadjusted and adjusted models, there was a linear decline in combined grip strength associated with increasing number of medications (p < 0.001). Conclusion Increasing quantity of prescription medications is associated with reduced grip strength independent of age, gender, height, and arm circumference. Additional studies are needed to clarify if reduced grip strength is directly due to medication use or another underlying process.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 148
Patel, Neema Kelly, Michy Identifying which subcellular compartments in the brain express PDE9A and how that expression changes with age
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Phosphodiesterases (PDEs) are a super family of enzymes that degrade cyclic nucleotides (cAMP and cGMP), intracellular signaling molecules critical for brain function. Among the PDE family, PDE9 has the highest affinity for cGMP and, thus, is a potential therapeutic target of interest. To better understand this potential, we characterized the subcellular localization of PDE9A in the brain and how PDE9A expression/localization changes with age. We show that PDE9 mRNA and protein are expressed significantly higher in cerebellum versus hippocampus, with particular enrichment in the Purkinje cell layer. In both hippocampus and cerebellum, we reliably detect the previously reported PDE9A5 isoform, but also detected two new PDE9 isoforms in the brain: PDE9X? (~120kDa) and PDE9X?? (~100kDa). Biochemical fractionation shows that all PDE9 isoforms localize to the nucleus and are significantly enriched in membrane vs. cytosolic. This subcellular compartmentalization is consistent with the fact that PDE9 regulates pools of cGMP that are downstream of particulate, but not soluble, guanylyl cyclases. Interestingly, the relative enrichment of PDE9 in nuclear versus membrane fractions significantly differs as a function of isoform, brain region, and age. Not only does the subcellular compartmentalization of PDE9A5 dramatically shift between postnatal days(PD) 7-28 from membrane to nucleus, but expression of both PDE9 mRNA and protein significantly decrease during this time period. PDE9 localization and expression patterns stabilize after PD 28. Together, these data suggest PDE9 is localized to preferentially regulated nuclear and membrane proximal pools of cGMP, and its role in brain function dramatically changes during early postnatal life.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 114
Penna, Elliott Lloyd, Jim Epicardial Fat Necrosis A unique cause of Chest Pain
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Introduction: Chest pain is the second most common chief complaint presenting to the Emergency Department, accounting for six million annual visits. (1) Chest pain may present as a manifestation of a disease process from any number of different etiologies including heart, lungs, pleura, esophagus, stomach, musculoskeletal, or psychiatric. Although it is imperative that life threatening causes be considered during any ED visit, more than 50% of patients who present with chest pain will leave without a definitive diagnosis. (2) There are times when a rare yet important cause will be determined. This is one of these cases. The Case: A 33-year old male with no significant medical history presented with chest pain. It started suddenly the morning of his visit, localized under his left nipple, radiated laterally, was dull in quality, aggravated by deep inspiration and supine position, and improved with leaning forward. He denied any other symptoms, recent illness, or trauma. The physical exam revealed a fit young man who was slightly tachycardic and tachypneic. He was in a moderate amount of discomfort, but no other physical findings were impactful including the examination of the chest. The EKG showed sinus tachycardia, but no PR depression or ST elevation. Labs including CBC, BMP, and troponin were all within normal limits. Chest X-ray was unrevealing. CT angiography demonstrated mediastinal fat stranding of the left epicardial region. The diagnosis? Epicardial fat necrosis. Background: Epicardial fat is adipose tissue found in all individuals, layering the atrioventricular and intraventricular grooves of the heart. Not surprisingly, it is found more extensively in obese patients. (1) Epicardial fat necrosis has been reported in the literature only 25 times since it was first described in 1957. (2) Although the cause is unknown some proposed mechanisms include torsion of the epicardial fat leading to ischemic necrosis or increased thoracic pressure leading to hemorrhagic necrosis. (3) Trauma and obesity are suggested as predisposing factors. (4) The majority of patients seem to present with left sided chest pain in a previously healthy individual that was relatively sudden and severe in onset. (5) Although initially identified and described after surgical exploration, today diagnosis has been described in several cases based on CT findings. The CT will show an encapsulated fatty lesion with inflammatory changes such as fat stranding or pericardial wall thickening. (5) Treatment is conservative management, often with NSAIDS for pain control, but may ultimately require surgical intervention.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 384
Shealy, Stephanie Maxwell, Whitney Impact of a Birkman Method® Intervention on Pharmacy Preceptor and Faculty Self-Awareness and Self-Confidence
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Objectives: To determine the change in self-awareness and self-confidence among preceptor and faculty members at the South Carolina College of Pharmacy (SCCP) upon implementation of a Birkman Method® assessment and training. Method: SCCP rotation preceptors and faculty members were recruited to participate in the Birkman Method® intervention. The intervention involved completing a pre-intervention survey, taking the Birkman Method® assessment, reviewing the results, attending a 2-hour live training from a certified Birkman training consultant and completing a post-intervention survey. The pre- and post-surveys were identical with the exception of a question that referred to future utilization of results. The pre- and post-surveys were compared for each participant to determine changes in self-confidence and self-perception accuracy. Results: Both groups had statistically significant increases in self-perception accuracy, which was used as a surrogate for self-awareness changes. With a maximum self-perception accuracy score of 6 points, faculty members experienced an increase in self-perception accuracy an average of 1.20 points (p = 0.0020) and preceptors experienced an average increase of 1.77 points (p<0.0001). Implications: The Implementation of the Birkman Method® program at South Carolina College of Pharmacy facilitated increases in self-awareness among faculty and preceptors. Further analysis will determine longitudinal effects, but these results provide promising indications that through the implementation of a standardized personal development program, PharmD programs can create a culture among students, faculty, and preceptors that is dedicated to increasing self-awareness.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 132
Wagner, Travis Marsh, Allison
Foster, Kirk
The Queer Cola Oral History and Digital Archive Project
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Co-author: Joshua Whitfield The Queer Cola Oral History and Digital Archive Project (QCOHDAP) creates a community-born and community-curated digital archive and oral history collection that chronicles, reflects and celebrates the experiences of the LGBTQ+ community of South Carolina. Focused on building a collection that is digital in nature, the project aims to create an ever evolving, updating and technologically forward looking space to match a community whose identity remains in flux. The project aims to gives voice, agency and chances to build an alternative history to those persons whose identities remain excluded within queer histories. Specifically, this project pushes against the emergence of a “new homonormativity” (Duggan, 2002) which posits certain queer persons within inclusivity rhetorics (specifically upper class, white, gay, cisgender men) by promising them “the possibility” of equality within heteronormative, capitalist discourses, always at the exclusion of other members of the LGBTQ+ community (p. 179). The QCOHDAP expressly works against a neoliberal coopting of groups and instead aims to examine those groups not included in current constructions of Southern queer history. This project looks towards queer spaces within Columbia that remain underserved, underrepresented and, frankly speaking, marginalized by prominent organizations and figures in Columbia’s LGBTQ+ community. The groups QCOHDAP aims to serve include, but are not limited to: Columbia’s queer youth, queers of color, trans college students and homeless/lower class queers. QCOHDAP operates within logics of community archiving, which unlike institutional archives, embrace their inability to adhere to ‘best practices’ and, alternatively, treat the act of saving histor(ies) as one mired in frenzy and actualities of failure. This means that QCODHA reconceptualizes how a digital repository of oral histories and documents looks, while knowing it can never wholly be a complete account of queer history. Thus, the QCODHA works towards a queering of archival logics. More specifically, the project accepts that it must purposefully regulate access as potential donors/subjects whose identities, while important, carry with them social stigmatization outside of the hallowed comforts of an accepting archive.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 334
Conner, Allie Stratmann, Johannes Does sensitivity to FACs result in higher resistance against herbivory?
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Nicotiana sylvestris, N. knightiana, N. tabacum and N. benthamiana are members of the tobacco family, two of which have displayed sensitivity to fatty acid-amino acid conjugates (FAC's) present in the salivary secretions of herbivorous insects, including the tobacco hornworm, Manduca sexta. We have determined through mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) assays that N. benthamiana and N. tabacum, but not N. sylvestris and N. knightiana, have MAPK activity when exposed to FAC's and we will test the hypothesis that FAC- sensitive species are better defended against herbivory. M. sexta larvae on N. benthamiana and N. tabacum are expected to be smaller with a higher rate of mortality due to the plants' ability to detect FAC's as danger signals and then produce anti-digestive proteins that inhibit growth. Inversely, we expect M. sexta larvae on N. sylvestris and N. knightiana to grow faster and have a lower rate of mortality as they lack sensitivity to FACs and thus a means to induce a defense response.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 1
Natterstad, Anna Brandt, Heather Evaluating Community Partnerships to address Cancer Health Disparities in Faith- Based Settings
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Addressing cancer disparities in African-American communities requires developing and maintaining community-academic partnerships to support initiatives. As part of a larger community-based participatory research (CBPR) project, this study examined lay health educators' (LHEs) experiences regarding maintenance and expansion of a community-academic partnership. The Wilder Collaboration Factors Inventory was adapted and administered to 35 LHEs involved in community education efforts. Survey respondents rated the organizational capacity of the community-academic partnership positively. Items addressing the composition of partners were rated less favorably. Results illustrated several strengths of the partnership, possibly related to the CBPR approach, and the need to consider expanding partnership membership.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 94
Jenkins, Laura Karthikeyan, Mythreye Betaglycan Regulation of Wnt/β-catenin Signaling in Ovarian Cancer
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Due to the significant gaps in our understanding of mechanisms controlling tumor-promoting signaling pathways, ovarian cancer remains the most lethal of all female reproductive system cancers and the fifth leading cause of death among US women. Over the past few decades, overactive Wnt signaling has been linked to the formation of multiple cancers, including ovarian cancer, making identification of molecules regulating Wnt signaling crucial to the development of cancer treatment strategies. Betaglycan, a widely expressed cell surface receptor, can exist with or without its glycosaminoglycan (GAG) sugar chain attachments (heparan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate) and has demonstrated roles in regulating cancer biology. The goal of my thesis project is to define the specific role of betaglycan and its GAG chains on Wnt signaling in ovarian cancer. Recently, I have shown that betaglycan regulates Wnt signaling by controlling Wnt availability through its GAG chains. My findings also reveal opposing functions for the heparan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate chains of betaglycan and suggest that Wnt interactions with betaglycan’s heparan chains result in inhibition of Wnt signaling, while betaglycan’s chondroitin chains promote Wnt signaling. These studies identify a novel, dual role for betaglycan and define a key requirement for the balance between chondroitin sulfate and heparan sulfate chains in dictating cell signals. The next steps of my project include stably expressing betaglycan lacking either its heparan, chondroitin or both GAG chains in ovarian cancer cells and then delineating the effects of modified betaglycan on ovarian cancer progression. I will test the hypothesis that heparan-betaglycan suppresses tumor progression while chondroitin-betaglycan enhances tumor progression, in part, through changes in Wnt signaling. Upon completion of my project, I expect to define the specific roles of heparan and chondroitin modified Betaglycan in regulating Wnt activity and ovarian cancer, which will be relevant to human health as it will broaden our current knowledge of ovarian cancer development.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Columbia Ballroom A
Time: 10:50
Desai, Shivali
Aucoin, Claire
Flory, Kate Developing Research Skills and Experience with the Project to Learn about Youth
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Psychological research is critical to understanding not only human behavior and sensory perception, but also mental illness and how those afflicted are affected by it in their daily lives. As students, we were intrigued by psychological research and the various processes involved. Therefore, after receiving funding from the Exploration Scholar Grants from the Honors College, we joined Dr. Kate Flory’s lab in order to better understand these processes and to gain valuable skills for our future. We began working on the second stage of the Project to Learn about Youth, a project funded by the CDC which explores the prevalence of mental health disorders among children in grades K-12 in a large community sample. Since August 2016, we have been actively involved in data processing and analysis of numerous surveys, data collection while meeting with participants of all ages, and participant recruitment. Throughout our time on the project, we have learned how to practice confidentiality and how to follow specific protocols. We have also improved our skills in effective communication, teamwork, and professionalism. This project has not only helped countless individuals in the community, but also has helped us immensely by introducing us to the unique processes of research with human subjects. Our presentation will discuss the overview of the project and its current progress, our experiences with this project and what we have gained from our time.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 62
Aveldanes, Martin Augustine, Jennifer
Pfeffer, Carla
Are the Parents Alright? Time in Self-Care in Same-Sex and Different Sex Two-Parent Families with Children
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While research on the wellbeing of children in same-sex families has proliferated over the past decade, little to no research has focused on the impact that parenthood has on the gay and lesbian parents raising these children. This study, thus, aims to provide greater knowledge of the wellbeing of parents in same-sex families while also stimulating greater research efforts devoted to this important issue. As part of these efforts, we investigate the question of whether the time loss associated with caring for children has a greater impact on the amount of time gay and lesbian parents spend in self-care activities (e.g., sleep, socializing) linked to wellbeing than it does for parents in heterosexual relationships. Using data from the American Time Use Surveys (2003-2015) and a nationally representative sample, we find preliminary evidence that gay fathers suffer greater losses in time in self-care than fathers in heterosexual families, but lesbian mothers suffer fewer losses in self-care than mothers in heterosexual families.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Carolina Meeting Room B
Time: 10:45-10:55am
Sharma, Neha Sanasi, Kamla Pelvic Osteomyelitis in the Presence of Decubitus Ulcers: A Predictive Model for Resistant Organisms
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Background: Pelvic osteomyelitis secondary to decubitus ulcers (PODU) occurs in 1/3 of patients with stage IV decubitus ulcers. Diagnosis and management is challenging as imaging and cultures may be inconclusive with no defined standard of care. Antibiotics serve as adjuvant therapy and oral options depend on risk factors for resistance and local susceptibility. The objectives of this study were to formulate an institution specific antibiotic protocol, to examine potential oral antibiotics or a vancomycin free regimen, and to identify predictors of resistant pathogens. Methods: A retrospective medical record review of hospitalized-patients, ≈18 years with PODU from 8/2005-8/2015 at Palmetto Health in Columbia, SC was performed. Evidence of PODU was defined as two of the following: clinical signs, radiographic evidence and positive cultures. Variables collected included: demographics, comorbidities, location of osteomyelitis, microorganisms isolated and susceptibilities, radiographic findings, type of surgical intervention, length of stay, current/past antimicrobial therapy, and prior cultures. Descriptive statistical methods were used for preliminary analysis. Results: Seventy-five subjects with PODU were included with a mean age of 53 and male predominance (64%). The most common co-morbid condition was diabetes (23, 31%). Risk factors for ulcer were paraplegia (45, 60%), and previous stroke (17, 23%). Most subjects had a grade IV ulcer (59, 79%) with sacral (27, 36%) or ischial (26, 34%) osteomyelitis. Of the subjects, 17 (23%) had prior positive blood cultures. A prior pseudomonas positive culture was found in 24/75 (32%) and all patients with current pseudomonas were in this group. Forty-nine (65%) had taken antibiotics within a year. Seventy-three subjects (97%) had superficial cultures, 61 (81%) had blood cultures, and 37 (49%) had bone/deep tissue cultures. There was polymicrobial growth in 25 subjects (33%). Gram positive cocci (GPC) (53/98) were the most common isolates, with 18/53 (34%) coagulase negative staphylococcus (CONS) and 12/35 (23%) methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA). The most common gram-negative rods (42/98) were P. aeruginosa, 9/42 (22%) and E. coli, 8 /42 (19%). Of the enterobacteriaceae, 74% (17/23) were susceptible to ciprofloxacin, 91% (21/23) to carbapenems, and 91% (21/23) to ceftriaxone. 67% (6/9) of the pseudomonas isolates were susceptible to both ciprofloxacin and carbapenems. Conclusion: Males with underlying paraplegia or stroke were most frequently encountered. The majority of organisms isolated were CONS, MRSA, P. aeruginosa, and E. coli. Prior positive culture with P. aeruginosa was a predictor of P. aeruginosa PODU. Preliminary data supports vancomycin and anti-pseudomonal agents in addition to anaerobic coverage.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Lexington Meeting Room A
Time: 1:15 pm
Spraker, Jeff Thompson, Raymond International Survey Of Stand Up Paddle Boarding
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Stand up paddle (SUP) boarding is a relatively new sport that combines surfing with paddle sports. Though several websites and books have been published about SUP, there is very little empirical evidence published about SUP. PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to assess the participation characteristics of SUP boarders and whether these characteristics vary by gender. METHODS: An electronic survey was administered through SurveyMonkey. Participants were recruited through SUP clubs and organizations worldwide. Data were analyzed by Chi Square. An alpha of ≤.05 was considered significant. RESULTS: Out of 611 respondents, 576 men and women (48.8% vs 51.2%) completed questions regarding SUP participation. While SUP participation was not different between men and women by age, more men reported ≈6 yrs of SUP activity than women (29.2 vs 15.6%, p<.05). More men reported ≈10 months of SUP activity per year than women (61.7% vs 41.5%, p<.05). Men tended to report more miles paddled per month than women (chi sq = 13.38, p=.037). Women were more likely to report formal training in SUP technique (63.9 vs 52.9%, p<.05) as well as fewer SUP-related injuries than men (50.5 vs 64.6%, p<.05). A trend was observed for more men to compete in SUP races while women were more likely to participate in recreational and fitness SUP activities (p=.058). CONCLUSION: The greater number of injuries reported by men may be explained by greater total training volume for competition and lower probability of proper technique. This work is partially supported by a grant from the University of South Carolina Magellan Scholar Program

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 134
Liddle, Julia Hunter, Stuart Orientation to Life
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During the summer of 2016, I was a team leader (TL) for the Office of New Student Orientation and learned so much about how to be a significant leader. The Office of New Student Orientation is an office on campus that focuses on acclimating new students as well as their parents and guests to the University of South Carolina. As a team leader, I was responsible for a group of the fifty orientation leaders, as well as making the program work logistically. I made sure that everyone had what they needed, and were in the correct places at the correct times. Becoming a team leader was an easy decision for me because I had enjoyed my experience as an orientation leader during the previous summer. Through this experience I had the opportunity to make connections with current and incoming students, as well as professionals on campus. I also gave a presentation at the Southern Regional Orientation Workshop on conflict management. Through my involvement with the Office of New Student Orientation, I have become very confident in my leadership and teamwork skills. As an accounting major with an interest in audit, working on teams is imperative, and the skills I gained as a team leader are extremely transferrable. I hope to use these techniques in my accounting internship next summer.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 214
Cannizzo, Zachary Griffen, Blaine Changes in spatial behavior patterns by mangrove tree crabs following climate-induced range shift into novel habitat
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Climate-mediated range shifts into eco-evolutionary novel habitats have the potential to alter the ecology and behavior of shifting species. Of particular concern are behaviors which impact the ecology and life history of these species. Behaviors that control the spatial patterns of habitat use may be particularly important. We examined site fidelity and foraging foray behavior of the mangrove tree crab (Aratus pisonii) in its historic mangrove habitat and the recently colonized eco-evolutionary novel saltmarsh. Aratus pisonii exhibited both strong site fidelity to individual trees and a foraging pattern wherein the frequency of forays increased as their distances decreased in the mangrove but displayed neither behavior in the saltmarsh. Chemical cues from feces appear to be the mechanism behind site fidelity and may suggest the mechanism for the loss of this behavior in the saltmarsh where substrate is regularly submerged, potentially preventing establishment of such cues. The loss of site fidelity may affect the foraging and predation risk of A. pisonii in the saltmarsh leading to a shift in its ecology and bioenergetics. As more species shift into eco-evolutionary novel habitats, it is important to understand how this colonization may affect their life history, behavior, and ecology in indirect ways.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 363
Stoltz, Lindsey Stephenson, Kathryn Technology Talk: Improving resident and nurse communication with electronically updated patient assignment floor lists
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Physicians and nurses are arguably the most important health care providers in the inpatient setting. Communication between these two parties is the key to achieving the best patient care possible. An opportunity to improve this communication arose at Palmetto Health USC Medical Group Children’s Hospital when it was realized that nurses and residents were having difficulty readily identifying who was taking care of which patients and contacting one another throughout the day. Every morning, a hand written list was provided to each floor’s nurses’ station listing the resident assignments and their pager numbers. However, this list often had inaccuracies and was not updated again until the next morning. This lead to multiple incorrect pages to residents each day because the nurses could not tell who was responsible for the care of which patients. These floor lists were also time consuming for the residents to make each morning. Additionally, residents were not provided with a list of nursing assignments for the day so they had to either call the unit secretaries or go to that particular nurses’ station to find out nursing assignments for the day. Therefore, the floor lists were re-formatted onto a Word document and then placed on a shared computer drive that all nurses and residents had access to (phase 1). Due to difficulty with more than one person accessing the floor lists simultaneously, the lists were then created using Google Docs (phase 2). The aim of this QI project was to allow for more efficient and effective communication between residents and nurses by decreasing incorrect pages to residents and decreasing the amount of time it took for the night team residents to make the floor lists before morning check-out. Each phase showed an improvement in both of these measures. When comparing pre-intervention data with the final post-intervention data from phase 2, the number of incorrect pages received by residents decreased by a total of 68.8% and the length of time the night team spent making the floor lists decreased by a total of 66.4%. Equally as important, the results of the satisfaction surveys showed that 58% of residents, nurses, and nurse managers were very satisfied with the new lists and 34% were satisfied.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 409
Rampaul, Marlon
Edun, Babatunde
Weissman, Sharon
Weissman, Sharon Cost Effectiveness Analysis of Early vs. Late Diagnosis of HIV-Infected Patients in South Carolina
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Background: Early HIV diagnosis, and engagement in care leads to improved survival, decreased morbidity and fewer HIV transmissions. This would be expected to lead to a reduction in the lifetime cost of care. Yet, previous studies in South Carolina (SC) have shown that >40% of HIV diagnoses occur late (CD4 <200 at diagnosis). The aim of this study is to determine the impact of early vs. late diagnosis on the lifetime cost of care. Methods: SC HIV reporting system (eHARS) data were used for this analysis. This analysis includes individuals with a new diagnosis of HIV in SC from 2013-2015. The first CD4 reported to eHARS was used to categorize early versus late diagnosis. Late HIV diagnosis was defined as an initial CD4 count ≤ 200, early as an initial CD4 >500. A previously validated simulation model was used to determine the lifetime cost of care (LCC) and quality adjusted life-years (QALYs). Comparisons were made between late and early HIV diagnosis. The Incremental Cost Effectiveness Ratio (ICER) which is a measure of cost effectiveness based on QALYs saved was also determined. Previous studies suggest that an intervention is cost effective if the ICER is < $100 000. Results: From 2013 – 2015, 1,958 persons were diagnosed with HIV in SC. The overall LCC was $569,633,352.75 ($290,926/person). CD4 ≤200 at diagnosis was associated with 7.95 lost QALYs versus 4.45 lost QALYs with initial CD4 >500. Additional life expectancy was 30.7 years for those with initial CD4 ≤200 versus 38.1 years with initial CD4 >500. The ICER was calculated to be $44 112 which indicates that early diagnosis was cost effective. Conclusion: Although individuals with higher initial CD4 counts had a higher LCC the ICER showed that early diagnosis was cost effective based on QALYs gained. This should be further augmented by the lower lifetime HIV transmission and higher life expectancy. Increased efforts to increase early testing will improve overall QALY and decrease HIV transmission leading to downstream cost savings.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 390
Puckett, Daniel Schwartz, Amanda Variability in Research Findings on the Effectiveness of Test Suites
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Code coverage criteria are commonly used to determine the adequacy of a test suite. However, studies investigating code coverage and fault-finding capabilities have mixed results. Some studies have shown generating test suites to satisfy coverage criteria has a positive effect on finding faults, while other studies do not. These mixed results indicate there are unknown factors that affect the ability of test suites satisfying coverage criteria to find faults. In order to improve the fault-finding capabilities of test suites, it is essential to understand what factors are causing these mixed results. Our research investigated one possible source of variation in the results observed: fault type. Specifically, we studied 45 different types of faults and evaluated how effectively test suites with high coverage percentages were able to detect each type of fault. In our research we identify four particular types of faults that, with statistical significance, were found less frequently than other faults. We also identify two fault types that were found more frequently. The results of our study advance the understanding of the relationship between code coverage and fault- finding effectiveness and provide specific areas to target in future research to improve the effectiveness of automated test suites.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 87
Whetstone, Adam Carnes, Laura Educational Access and Juvenile Delinquency: A preventative program
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As I experienced my Graduation with Leadership Distinction journey, it became apparent that I am passionate about serving underprivileged youth within my community. Throughout my coursework, at USC Lancaster, I have learned the correlation between access to adequate education and juvenile delinquency. I have merged my interest and my education to create a plan to address educational opportunities among underprivileged youth in an effort to lower rates of juvenile delinquencies in Lancaster, South Carolina. This plan is a collaboration between USC Lancaster and the Lancaster County School District. I will highlight the importance of this plan along with my recommend solutions, and a detailed plan for implementation.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 165
Halligan, Mary Crosby-Quinatoa, Gina
McLeod, Angela
Adlof, Suzanne
Systematic Review of the Effectiveness of Family Literacy Interventions for Children from Cultural and Linguistic Minority Backgrounds
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Gina Crosby-Quinatoa Angela McLeod Suzanne Adlof National testing data indicates that African American and Hispanic/Latino children represent a considerable percentage of children who are below proficient in reading in fourth grade (NAEP, 2014). Some evidence suggests that differences in the frequency and quality of literacy experiences prior to school entry may explain some of the differences in school literacy outcomes. Family literacy interventions are aimed at helping parents build upon home literacy practices to prepare their children to meet school literacy standards. Two meta-analyses have provided evidence that family literacy interventions have small to moderate effects on children’s literacy skills (Manz et al., 2010; van Steensel et al., 2011). However, important limitations of this research include underrepresentation of minority populations and limited attention paid to cultural and linguistic factors in the design of the interventions. The purpose of this study was to re-evaluate the evidence base for the effectiveness of family literacy interventions with cultural and linguistic minorities since the previously cited meta-analyses. Specifically, we examined the extent to which cultural and linguistic minorities are represented in family literacy intervention studies as well as the effects of family literacy interventions on the literacy skills of children in these populations. We are conducting a systematic review and meta-analysis of peer-reviewed family literacy intervention studies that were published between March 2008 and April 2015. Fifty-two articles met the inclusion criteria for the meta-analysis and an additional twenty-five articles were included in the systematic review. This poster will describe the representation of cultural and linguistic minorities in recent studies of family literacy interventions and report average effect sizes on language and literacy outcome variables observed across studies. Implications for educational practice will be discussed.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 329
Zhang, Qingfeng Wang, Hui Insights on Plasmon-Driven Oxidative Coupling of Thiophenol-Derivates: Evidence on Steady-State Active Oxygen Species
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Plasmonics is a newly emerging field that has profound impact on energy storage and conversion, sub-wavelength light manipulation, photothermal cancer therapy, and ultrasensitive biomolecular sensing. It has been recently observed that the localized surface plasmon resonance supported by metallic nanostructures plays a crucial role in driving or enhancing a series of interesting chemical or photochemical reactions on metallic nanoparticle surfaces, though the detailed mechanisms of these plasmon-mediated reactions are still poorly understood and under intense debate. Therefore, it is imperative to gain quantitative insights into the kinetics and underlying pathways of these plasmon-driven photoreactions to fully understanding the obstacles that might limit the wide applications of plasmonic nanostructures as high-performance photocatalysts. In this poster presentation, I will talk about our latest progress on developing quantitative understanding of the kinetics and underlying pathways of plasmon-driven oxidative coupling of thiophenol-derivates. We used single-particle surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) to precisely monitor, in real time, the plasmon-driven photoreaction kinetics at the molecule-nanoparticle interfaces. A unique hybrid nanostructure composed of a SiO2 bead decorated with Ag nanocubes was used as a plasmonically addressable substrate for SERS measurement. The plasmon-driven oxidative coupling of 4-aminothiophenol was chosen as a model reaction to explore the effects of local electromagnetic field enhancement, concentration of oxygen species, molecular structure of thiophenol-derivates, thermal annealing, and photothermal processes, on the plasmon-driven photoreactions. A steady-state kinetics model of active molecular oxygen species in guiding the plasmon-driven oxidative coupling of thiophenol-derivates was proposed, in which the activation of surface adsorbed thiophenol-derivates was found to be the rate-limiting step during the overall photocatalytic reaction.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 304
Kule, Ann Wilson, Troy Growing Local: An Anthropological Case Study of Civic Agriculture in the Central Savannah River Basin
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This research project analyzes organic and local farming in the Central Savannah River basin from the perspective of both the farmer and the consumer. Interviews of eight local and organic farmer/vendors were conducted as well as a cohesive survey of Aiken Organics, an online farmer’s market. Data was collected and analyzed and then presented in a way that includes both the farmers and consumers perspectives on organic, local, and sustainable agriculture. The field work for this anthropological study lasted for over a year and a half from June 2015 to April 2017. It consisted of working closely with the eight farmer/vendors as well as the consumers of their produce through Aiken Organics.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 9
Freshwater, Lauren Jackson, Moryah Going Global: Creating Cultural Cognizance
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As a triple major in International Business, Marketing and Management, my time at the University of South Carolina along with my international experiences have developed my global mindset and prepared me for future success as an international businesswoman. The summer after my sophomore year, I embarked on my first independent journey to Europe, where I took an intensive French language course in Aix-en-Provence, France. Although I had traveled to Europe before as a child, this experience allowed me to dive deeper into my cultural awareness; I lived with a French host family and spent my time outside of the classroom exploring the beautiful city and cultural roots of France. This increase of cultural cognizance was further solidified when I studied abroad a second time on exchange at Université Paris-Dauphine in the spring semester of my junior year. By learning in multi-cultural classrooms, interacting daily with locals, and traveling throughout Europe, I was able to truly put the different cultural frameworks and international business perspectives that I had learned to practice. Through these experiences, I’ve had the opportunity to learn from and about a variety of cultures and develop friendships with people from all over the world. More importantly, I realized how essential it is to truly understand other cultures, especially through the lenses of marketing and management. What I learned both inside and outside the classroom has allowed me to growth personally and professionally, which has ultimately led to my pursuit of graduation with Leadership Distinction in Global Learning.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Alumni Center - Ballroom 2
Time: 1:00-1:10pm
Hayes, Kristen Jackson, Moryah Small Towns and Big Dreams: How Higher Education Shaped My Future
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Kristen Hayes, Accounting – Senior Emerging from a small southern town to a large and diverse university challenged me in ways that I never would have imagined. The move was not far, but the culture of a University was something that neither I nor my family had ever experienced before. I learned practical business concepts such as budgeting and valuable lessons on the importance of communication and ethics. These insights have helped shaped me in my personal and professional life by connecting my classroom experiences with my involvement on campus and work experience. I gained a deeper understanding of the importance of my generation in the work force and how to overcome the upcoming challenges that are associated with the rise in the need for accountants. This knowledge will challenge me further to step out of my comfort zone again to use my skills in my professional work.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 193
Davis-Martin, Haley Jackson, Moryah The Journey to Leadership
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Throughout my undergraduate experience, I have tried to take advantage of the opportunities to learn how to be a leader offered by the University of South Carolina. I have held various leadership positions such as the President of Alpha Lambda Delta and a University 101 Peer Leader. I have also participated in leadership training programs offered by the Leadership and Service Center. Each time I tried a new form of leadership I always learned something new. Slowly I began to realize that leadership isn’t something you can just learn and easily implement; it’s a journey. In order to be a good leader, I have had to learn when to step aside and let others take the wheel and when to step up myself and give a project direction. I have had triumphs and failures that have all helped me learn and grow into the leader I am now. As an anthropology major I have learned the importance on embracing the diversity around me and the importance of leaving a legacy I can be proud of. These ideas have helped me grow as a leader and actively work hard to make sure I collaborate with those around me and make sure I try to leave USC having made it, even slightly, better than when I first came here. I intend to take these lessons and use them to prepare, execute, and revolutionize education at all levels.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Congaree Meeting Room B
Time: 11:15-11:25am
Capell, Will Kelly, Michy Identification of intramolecular signals controlling PDE11A4 subcellular compartmentalization
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Bipolar Disorder and Alzheimer’s disease are associated with cyclic nucleotide signaling deficits in specific subcellular compartments, namely the cytosolic—but not membrane—fractions. Thus, to adequately treat these disorders, it may be necessary to restore cyclic nucleotide signaling in a compartment-specific manner. Phosphodiesterases (PDEs) play an important role in maintaining the integrity of cyclic nucleotide microdomains by acting on select pools of substrate. PDE11A4 in brain is expressed almost exclusively in the hippocampal formation, a brain region implicated in the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder and Alzheimer’s disease, and PDE11A4 is enriched in the cytosolic versus soluble membrane fraction of hippocampal neurons. Here, we identify intramolecular signals that control the subcellular trafficking of PDE11A4 between these two fractions in the hopes of identifying novel ways to therapeutically target this enzyme in a compartment-specific manner. When expressed in either COS-1 or HEK293T cells, mouse GFP-PDE11A4 (WT) and human PDE11A4 are distributed throughout the cytoplasm and in sphere-shaped “puncta” representative of organelles, as indicated by transmission electron microscopy. These puncta are not golgi, and do not colocalize with lysosome, autophagosome, nor degradation organelle markers. Nevertheless, live-imaging shows smaller PDE11A4 puncta moving within the cell and fusing with larger puncta. Phosphomimic mutations of serine 117 (S117D) and S124D increase trafficking of PDE11A4 into these puncta, while S162D and disruption of homodimerization block this trafficking. Interestingly, S117D and S124D appear to synergize, as S117D/S124D double mutants potentiate PDE11A4 aggregation relative to S117D or S124D; whereas, S162D is able to completely block the effect of S117D/S124. Biochemical fractionation shows that S162D and disruption of homodimerization shift PDE11A4 from the membrane to the cytosol; whereas, S117D/S124D shifts PDE11A4 from the cytosol to the membrane. In line with with these effects, we consistently find PDE11A4 phosphorylated at S162 (pS162) in the cytosol; whereas, pS117/pS124 is in both the cytosol and membrane. Further, immunocytochemistry labeling of mouse WT and human PDE11A4 shows pS117 in cytosol and in puncta. Consistent with the fact that phosphomimic mutations of 117 and 124 synergize functionally, pS117 is decreased in the phosphoresistant S124A mutant and is increased in the phosphomimic S124D mutation, and phosphorylation of S124 is similarly changed in response to the phosphoresistant/mimic status of S117. We find no consistent phosphorylation interactions between S162 and S117/S124; however, disrupting homodimerization decreases pS162. Importantly, we observe phosphorylation of 117, 124, and 162 in vivo in mouse hippocampus. These studies are the first to identify intramolecular signals that control the subcellular compartmentalization of PDE11A4, and may point to novel mechanisms by which we can therapeutically target this enzyme in a compartment-specific manner.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Alumni Center - Ballroom 1A
Time: 11:00-11:10am
Fallin, James Taylor, Jeter Rapunzel Syndrome - A Grimm Case of the Pediatric Hairball
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Introduction Complaints of abdominal pain and vomiting are a common presentation in pediatric emergency medicine. Although most cases represent fairly benign conditions, one must always be on guard for the occasional serious surgical problem. Pediatric patients represent a unique population where a through history must be obtained from multiple sources. Case Presentation A 9 year old female child with a history of beta-thalassemia presented to the Emergency Department with complaints of intermittent abdominal pain. Over the past month these symptoms had increased in frequency with accompanied nausea and vomiting. The week prior she had been diagnosed with gastroenteritis, but she continued to be symptomatic despite ondansetron therapy. Because of her lingering symptoms abdominal radiographs were obtained revealing a potential mass in the left upper quadrant of her abdomen. Follow-up radiographic studies with contrast revealed evidence of a gastric bezoar. Pediatric surgery was consulted and she underwent an emergent laparotomy. Outcome Intraoperatively the patient had successful removal of a large trichobezoar (22.7 cm x 3.8 cm x 3.5 cm) from the stomach and duodenum. Interviews of extended family members revealed a remote history of trichophagia prior to age five with the observation of hair in her stools. Even after psychiatric intervention the patient never acknowledged eating her hair. Discussion This case represents an extremely rare intestinal condition called Rapunzel syndrome named after the long-haired girl in the fairy tail by the Brothers Grimm. This trichobezoar (hairball) is the result of trichophagia (Ingesting hair) due to trichotillomania (hair-pulling disorder). Rapunzel syndrome actually involves extension of the bezoar into the duodenum. It is an uncommon diagnosis in children with less than 40 cases reported. Because the human GI tract is unable to digest human hair, the trichobezoar usually has to be treated surgically. Also these patients should undergo psychiatric treatment. Undiagnosed, this can lead to severe complications including intussusception, ulceration, perforation, and even pancreatitis. Although trichobezoars are rare, this case demonstrates the importance of thorough history taking, and the need to pursue any abnormalities that do not mesh with a more common diagnoses.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 378
Strickland, Courtney Fogerty, Daniel The contribution of visual cue synchrony to recognition of interrupted natural and vocoded speech
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Currently, it is unclear how well individuals are able to integrate visual cues with a temporally degraded auditory signal to support the recognition of speech in adverse listening conditions. This experiment furthered our understanding of the importance of visual speech cues and how the temporal properties of this modality facilitate processing and perceptually filling-in missing temporal information. This study determined how temporal synchrony of visual speech information affects understanding of interrupted sentences. Two groups of listeners were tested that heard either normal or cochlear implant simulated (i.e., vocoded) speech. Each listener group completed three conditions: interrupted auditory-only speech, auditory speech with video presented synchronously with the auditory interruptions, and auditory speech with video presented asynchronously with the interrupted auditory signal. Participants verbally repeated the sentence after each stimulus. Results demonstrated no significant difference between performance on synchronous and asynchronous audio-visual conditions. However, a significant benefit of visual information was observed in both conditions, particularly for the vocoded listener group. The high contextual predictability of these sentences, in addition to near ceiling performance for the normal speech group, may have reduced the potential effect of visual temporal synchrony. In conclusion, it may be important to study factors such as the predictability of the sentences and the intelligibility of the normal condition to determine how they influence the contribution of asynchronous or synchronous multimodal cues for speech recognition.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 115
Vaughan, Bryana Lowell, Randy Piedmont Physic Garden: Renewing Community Connections
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In researching internship opportunities for Graduation with Leadership Distinction with my advisor, Dr. Randy Lowell, we came across an internship at Piedmont Physic Garden. This seemed perfect for me because it would involve planning events and writing various assignments, which began on January 10, 2017. Piedmont Physic Garden is a nonprofit botanical garden in Union, SC. The family of Dr. Paul K. Switzer, a physician who practiced in Union for almost 60 years, founded the garden in 2014. Piedmont Physic Garden is modeled after London’s Chelsea Physic Garden, founded in 1673. Chelsea Physic Garden plays a significant role in educating over 5,000 school children a year and retaining one of the largest medicinal plant displays in the world. The goal of both the Piedmont Physic Garden and Chelsea Physic Garden is to educate individuals on gardening, healthy lifestyle, and to create a beautiful environment for the community to enjoy. My role at Piedmont Physic Garden is to assist with any given assignment. For the most part, I create newsletters, blogs, articles, agreements, and a variety of other publications. I am also involved with event planning and gardening. My internship at Piedmont Physic Garden has been educational and life changing. I look forward to elaborating on how my work at the garden has positively affected my communication skills, connections with the community, and importance of educating others. I have benefited from this experience tremendously, both personally and professionally, as I continue to develop as a leader.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 179
Moffitt, Casey Wood, Susan Investigating the role of the locus coeruleus-noradrenergic system during social stress on neuroinflammation and resulting changes in serotonin
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Repeated exposure to social stress is known to result in the emergence of depression. While depression is associated with dysregulation of norepinephrine (NE) and serotonin (5-HT), the mechanism by which this occurs remains unknown. We have previously determined that a history of social stress enhances neuroinflammation in stress sensitive brain regions, proving causal to a depressive-like phenotype in socially stressed rats. A growing body of evidence suggests that NE is capable of altering proinflammatory cytokine release (ie. IL-1β) in the brain. Therefore, there were three major goals of this study: 1) to determine if a history of social defeat produced a sensitized neuroinflammatory response to a subsequent stressor within the serotonergic dorsal raphe (DR); 2) because IL-1β is capable of decreasing 5-HT synthesis, we sought to determine whether changes in IL-β in the DR were related to changes in 5-HT synthesis and 3) rats were treated with DSP-4 (400μg/rat, icv), a selective retrograde NE neurotoxin that reduces NE levels in LC target regions (ie., DR), to determine the role of NE on stress-induced IL-1β levels in the DR and relative 5-HT expression. Our initial studies identified sensitized stress-induced proinflammatory cytokine expression in the brains of socially defeated rats compared with rats with a history of control. Furthermore, DSP-4 significantly increased stress-induced proinflammatory cytokines in the central amygdala a prominent LC target and induced anhedonia in the 2-bottle choice sucrose preference test, regardless of stress history. This suggests that LC-NE has inhibitory control over neuroinflammation in its target regions, including the DR. Since inflammation is known to increase the enzymatic activity of indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), resulting in a shift from 5-HT synthesis to the production of kynurenine (Kyn), stress-induced inflammation in the DR is likely associated with a concomitant increase in IDO activity and a reduction of 5-HT. Together these data suggest that LC-NE activity may suppress neuroinflammatory drive under conditions of stress and that impaired LC-NE firing may serve as a mechanistic link between stress-induced neuroinflammation, dysfunction in the 5-HT system, and expression of depressive-like behaviors. These studies seek to identify mechanisms involved in stress susceptibility, in order to reveal novel targets useful in the treatment of stress-related psychosocial disorders.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 107
Brown, Joseph Moorefield-Lang, Heather
Shaw, George
Are Librarians Still Important?
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Technological advancement has increased significantly over the past 30 years and there is an increasing amount of digital natives that are comfortable with technology; many are trained from a young age to find information on their own. As a result, there is a wide spread trend to move sources and information from print to electronic. This has caused people to consider if libraries and librarians, which are often associated with print books, are still relevant. The objective of this study is to determine whether or not school libraries and librarians are still relevant to students even with their increased reliance on technology. To research this, a survey consisting of seven closed-ended questions and 5 open-ended questions has been given to school librarians in the state of South Carolina in order to find out whether they believe school libraries and librarians are still relevant to students and the school system and why. The conclusion will be presented at the poster showing.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 133
Rizor, Elizabeth Stewart, Jill Resting-state functional connectivity differs based on level of motor function in individuals post-stroke.
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Functional MRI (fMRI) is often used to determine resting-state functional connectivity (RsFC), an indicator of brain activity between two regions. Currently, it is not known if RsFC differs based on level of motor function after stroke. The objective of this study was to determine if RsFC between motor and sensory brain regions differed between individuals with different levels of arm function and if these values correlated with motor status. Sixty-three individuals with left-hemisphere stroke underwent fMRI and performed three measures of hand function: Box and Blocks (BBT) test, Grip Strength, and Stroke Impact Scale (SIS). BBT performance was used to separate the participants into three functional groups: Low, Moderate, and High. A one-way MANOVA and LSD Post Hoc test was performed to determine if RsFC differed between the three groups. A Pearson’s correlation test was performed to determine if mean connectivity values correlated with motor function (principal component of the three behavioral tests). Interhemispheric connectivity and ipsilesional connectivity differed between groups (p<0.05), with the Low function group showing decreased interhemispheric and increased ipsilesional connectivity compared to the High function group. Mean interhemispheric connectivity significantly correlated with motor function across all groups (r=.447; p=.000), while mean contralesional connectivity only significantly correlated with motor function in the Low group (r=.770; p=.002). These results suggest that interhemispheric and ipsilesional RsFC differ based on level of arm motor function. They also suggest that those who are more severely impaired may have compensatory activity in the contralesional hemisphere to support arm function.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 120
Burdet, Kevin Lanz, Tobias Humanitarian and Environmental Policy in Geneva Switzerland
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As a junior abroad in Switzerland, Geneva, I was involved in a program focused on multilateral diplomacy and international relations, taught through guest speakers from organizations like the UN, Doctors without Borders, and the World Trade Organization and from local Geneva universities. We also visited the European Commission in Brussels and the OECD and UNESCO in Paris. Throughout hearing these speakers, we created three essays; one was a topic on Swiss culture, where I interviewed locals on the canton relations between Genevois and Vaudois. In the second, I interviewed policymakers and professors on the geopolitical conflict of energy in Europe, and my capstone research was a case study on women's local conservation governance in rural Cambodia. I did this program because it would give insight into the functioning of international organizations, allow me to network in Europe, and grow in my comprehension of diplomacy, energy policy, and women's empowerment. Beyond learning from speakers and research, I gained deep insight into regional topics through fellow international colleagues. A few insights were on Western African energy infrastructure, political struggles of Eritrea, and non-state nations' rights. These insights all were pertinent in understanding global politics beyond a western viewpoint, and valuable for my goal to work with international policy. This experience was professionally significant as it showed me the abilities of law in formulating change for the environment. I am now seeking conservation policy and environmental law internships before applying for law school to become a global environmental lawyer.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Richland Meeting Room C
Time: 10:15-10:25am
O'Flaherty, Andrew Geidel, Gwen Effect of Outdoor Classrooms on Student Performance in Classes at the University of South Carolina
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The goal of this project is to assess students’ performance in traditional classrooms versus an alternative learning environment. We compare student performance based on the criteria of attendance, engagement, motivation, and emotional well-being in the two different classroom environments. To understand if alternative academic environments affect student performance, we simulated an outdoor classroom at Green Quad in the Sustainable Carolina Farm and Gardens. Four classes participated in the study, which is around 70 students. Classes utilized the outdoor classroom for a consecutive 3 class periods to allow the students to adapt to the environment. Surveys were given to the students once in their inside classroom and once in the outdoor classroom. By assessing the impact of an outdoor classroom on USC students’ achievement, our study will provide a foundation for understanding the implications of alternative environments on student development. If results show that alternative classrooms enhance student performance, we hope to provide evidence that there is potential in creating an outdoor classroom environment on campus.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 147
Martone, Lena Wade-Woolley, Lesly Reading Through the Ears: How McGurk Effects Reflect Reading History
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This project investigates whether audiovisual integration problems, as reflected in a reduced McGurk effect, are evident in adults with a childhood history of reading difficulty compared to those with typical reading development.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 422
Riddle, Philip Fan, Daping Quantification of tumor-associated macrophage proliferation using BrdU
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Breast cancer is the most prevalent cancer and the second leading cause of cancer-related mortality among women with 246,660 new cases and 40,450 deaths in 2016. This disease represents a great challenge to clinicians due to its multiple subtypes with varying etiologies, pathologies, prognoses, and treatments. Breast tumors have been shown to have a large population of macrophages, which are the most abundant tumor-infiltrating immune cell. High levels of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) have been associated with poor outcomes. The sources of TAMs are currently being debated. Proliferation of resident mammary tissue macrophages and those macrophages recruited from circulation are speculated to be important sources. However, the direct observation of macrophage proliferation in breast tumors is scarce. This study is aimed at directly quantifying the proliferation of TAMs in breast tumors and examining whether a Chinese herb-derived compound, emodin, can inhibit TAM proliferation in breast tumors. In order to quantify TAM proliferation, we used BrdU, a nucleoside analog of thymidine specific for S phase of the cell cycle, to label the proliferating cells. For the in vitro experiment, flow cytometry revealed 5.7% of the TAMs (F4/80 positive) were BrdU positive (proliferating). For the in vivo experiment, wild type C57Bl/6 mice were inoculated with breast cancer cells and then were further treated with emodin or vehicle. Flow cytometry of TAMs revealed 4.0% BrdU positive in wild type vehicle control group tumors, and 3.2% BrdU positive in emodin treated wild type mice tumors. This study suggests that BrdU could be used to measure TAM proliferation in tumors, and that emodin may suppress breast cancer development by inhibiting tumor-associated macrophage proliferation.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 373
Chase, Holly Patel, Jay Effect of Arch Height Index with ACL Reconstruction Patients
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The medial longitudinal arch (MLA) is the primary arch of focus when fitting shoes in athletic populations. A collapsed MLA will induce pronation of the foot and increase load transfer through kinetic chain to the knee causing internal rotation and knee-flexion, and increased risk of ACL tear. To determine the relationship of arch height index (AHI) in patients who have experienced an ACL tear. Thirty-eight male and female patients (23.8 ± 5.2 yrs., 175.99 ± 8.46 cm., 76.47 ± 15.46 kg.) volunteered and were categorized as Controls (uninjured) or ACL (prior ACL tear). Participants completed the following 6 total bilateral measurements: Foot length, truncated foot length and arch height, all weight- bearing. AHI was calculated using the previously stated measurements. Differences between groups were assessed by paired samples t-test and descriptive statistics assessed the relationship between variables. There was a significant difference in the AHI in the control and ACL groups (.386±.044 vs. .369±.048, p=.01). Interestingly, 57.9% of patients who suffered an ACL tear were males and 57.9% suffered from a non-contact injury. The findings demonstrate a relationship between arch height and ACL tear, indicating that certain foot architecture may increase risk of ACL tear.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 149
Troxell, Brooke Green, Jessica The effect of displayed emotion on cue gaze time with human and nonhuman faces
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The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect displayed emotion has on target identification when both direct and averted gaze are used. Previous studies have shown that gaze direction can be used to shift visual attention (Frischen et al, 2007, Psychological Bulletin). The shift in attention is thought to reflect a socially evolved automatic response used to orient oneself to the same object that other people are looking at (Adams et al, 2010, Journal of Experimental Social Psychology). Since it is hypothesized that perceived gaze direction is a socially evolved cue, and emotions are also a vital part of human societal interactions, we wanted to see if different emotions, not just fear, have an influence on the shifting of visual attention and the pathways that the information is processed. Additionally, we are examining whether human faces and nonhuman faces have a consistent effect on the shifting of attention through whether they produce the same patterns of response times. Response times will also be compared to the amount of text and instant messages sent and received and the frequency with which they use emoticons. Some neurological and psychiatric disorders, such as autism, have characteristic symptoms that involve not being able to interpret social cues and emotions on other faces (Jong et al, 2008, Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychology). Understanding how facial and emotional information is processed in the brain by non-autistic people, could produce cures or therapies to aid autistic persons in social functioning, which is a main part of human function and survival.   Works Cited Adams, Reginald B., Kristin Pauker, and Max Weisbuch. "Looking the Other Way: The Role of Gaze Direction in the Cross-race Memory Effect." Journal of Experimental Social Psychology 46.2 (2010): 478-81. Web. Frischen, Alexandra, Andrew P. Bayliss, and Steven P. Tipper. "Gaze Cueing of Attention: Visual Attention, Social Cognition, and Individual Differences." Psychological Bulletin133.4 (2007): 694-724. Web. Jong, Maartje Cathelijne De, Herman Van Engeland, and Chantal Kemner. "Attentional Effects of Gaze Shifts Are Influenced by Emotion and Spatial Frequency, but Not in Autism." Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry 47.4 (2008): 443-54. Web.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 101
Al-Ghezi, Zinah Nagarkatti, Mitzi
Nagarkatti, Prakash
Combination of cannabinoids, Δ9- tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD), ameliorate experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis by promoting cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in activated T cells through miRNA signaling pathways.
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Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic and disabling disorder of the central nervous system (CNS) characterized by breakdown in the blood- brain barrier and demyelination. Finding a cure for MS remains challenging, and most treatments involve the use of immunosuppressive drugs that have toxicity. The marijuana plant, Cannabis sativa produces phytocannabinoids that relieve nausea, pain, and inflammation. In the current study, we investigated the effects of using a combination of the psychotropic Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and non-psychoactive cannabidiol (CBD) on the regulation of activated T-cells during the development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a murine model of MS. We demonstrated that administration of THC+CBD ten days after EAE induction was effective at ameliorating the disease, including inflammation and CNS cellular infiltration. MicroRNA microarray analysis revealed altered miRNA profile in brain infiltrating CD4+ T cells following THC+CBD treatment of EAE mice. In addition, mice treated with THC+CBD showed decreased levels of brain- infiltrating CD4+ T cells, pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin17( IL-17) and interferon-gamma (INF-γ) and increase in the levels of brain -infiltrating Forkhead box protein P3(FoxP3)+ CD4+ T cells and anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin 10(IL-10). Further evidence indicated that THC+CBD treatment significantly downregulated several miRNAs (miR-21a-5p,miR-155-5p, miR-146a-5p) in brain CD4+ T cells that target genes associated with cell cycle arrest (Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1B (CDKN1B) and Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A (CDKN2A) and apoptosis Bcl-2-like protein (BCL2L11). Collectively, these studies demonstrate that THC+CBD treatment leads to the amelioration of EAE development by suppressing T cell responses through the induction of select miRNAs that control cell cycle progression and mediate apoptosis. (Supported in part by NIH grants P01AT003961, R01AT006888, R01ES019313, R01MH094755, R01AI123947, R01AI129788 and P20GM103641).

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Columbia Ballroom C
Time: 1:30
Belgrad, Benjamin Griffen, Blaine Personality interacts with habitat quality to govern individual mortality and migration patterns
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Animal personalities are increasingly recognized as key drivers of ecological processes. However, studies examining the relative importance of personalities in comparison to other environmental factors remain lacking. We performed two field experiments to assess the concurrent roles of personality and habitat quality in mediating individual mortality and migration. We quantified the predator avoidance response of mud crabs, Panopeus herbstii, collected from low and high quality oyster reefs and measured crab loss in a caging experiment. We simultaneously measured the distance crabs traveled across reef quality in a separate reciprocal transplant experiment. Habitat quality was the primary determinant of crab loss, although the distance crabs traveled was governed by personality which interacted with habitat quality to control the fate of crabs. While crabs on low quality reefs rapidly emigrated, starting with the boldest individuals, both bold and shy crabs would remain on high quality reefs for months and experienced higher predation risk, particularly among bold individuals. These findings suggest that personalities could produce vastly different population dynamics across habitat quality and govern community responses to habitat degradation.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 296
Padi, Akhila Wood, Susan The Role of Estrogen in the Cardiovascular Consequences of Witness Stress
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Repeated exposure to or the witnessing of social stressors is known to result in the emergence of psychosocial disorders, which significantly increases the risk of cardiac morbidity. Depressed women are at a greater risk for the development of comorbid diseases such as coronary heart disease and heart attacks in comparison to depressed men. Furthermore, increased risk in females begins during puberty and ends following menopause, suggesting that ovarian hormones play a role in this vulnerability, particularly estrogen (E). We utilized a model of social defeat stress to determine stress-induced cardiovascular dysfunction between (1) female intact vs ovarectomized (OVX) witness rats, and (2) female OVX rats treated with estrogen (OVX + E) vs treated with placebo (OVX +V). For the first stage of the study, female Sprague Dawley rats were randomly assigned into control/witness and intact/OVX groups. For the second stage of the study, in order to determine the contribution of E, female OVX Sprague Dawley rats were randomly assigned into control/witness and OVX+E/OVX+V groups. Each witness was paired with an intruder, and was placed behind a plexi-glass partition in the resident cage for the duration of the intruder defeat exposure. 5 days after the 5th stress/control exposure, all stressed rats were re-exposed to the defeat environment in the absence of the resident. Cardiovascular telemetry (blood pressure and ECG) were collected for 5 mins/hr, 24 hrs/day starting 2 days before control or stress began and continued until 5 days after the final stress/control exposure. Analysis of cardiovascular telemetry of Stage 1 of the study indicated a higher presence of increases in heart rate, blood pressure, and the occurrence of pre-ventricular contractions (PVCs) during defeat for female witness intact rats in comparison to female witness OVX rats and controls. This suggests that ovarian hormones make females more sensitive to stress-induced cardiac dysfunction. The data that was found in Stage 2 of the study demonstrates a higher presence of these same cardiac dysfunction factors during defeat in OVX + E witnesses in comparison to OVX + V witnesses. This demonstrates that estrogen plays a role in the increased vulnerability to stress-induced cardiac dysfunction. Ongoing studies are assessing the mechanism by which estrogen increases this susceptibility to cardiac dysfunction through analyses of heart rate variability, a non-invasive measure of sympathetic and parasympathetic balance of cardiovascular control. This is the first report of using a witness stress paradigm in female rodents and is unique in that it recapitulates the increased vulnerability to cardiovascular dysfunction in an intact, cycling female population as compared to an OVX female. The results of this study will identify why females who undergo stress are more vulnerable to the development of co-morbid diseases as compared to men who undergo stress.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 25
Mazzeo, Gabriella O'Connor, Shannon Examining Differences in Fear Regulation in Infant Populations
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Fear is defined as a natural response to a real or imagined threat to an individual’s safety (Turner & Romanczyk, 2012). Therefore, it is normal for children to show signs of fear in response to distress, threats, or pain. However, in a study by Clifford et al. (2012), that compared differences in negative affect between infant siblings of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASIBs), who later received a diagnosis of ASD and typically developing (TD) infants, those who received the diagnosis of ASD were found to have higher levels of negative affect. Children with fragile X syndrome (FXS) display similar abnormalities as ASIBs in their fear response. Children with FXS and ASIBs also experience high rates of anxiety diagnoses as children, which can be attributed to their dysregulated fear responses as infants (Buss et al., 2013). Appropriate emotional regulation, including the regulation of fear, is important for the socio-emotional development of children (Hirschler-Guttenberg et al., 2015). In TD infants, the fear of strangers emerges at six months and increases before twelve months (Pappa et al., 2014). The present study aims to look at the emergence of fear in response to a “stranger” stimulus in three groups of nine-month-old infants (FXS, ASIBs and TD). The Laboratory Temperament Assessment Battery (LabTAB) stranger episode was used to capture infant fear response to a novel stranger. The episode was recorded and then behaviorally coded with Observer software. It is hypothesized that infants with FXS and ASIBs have reduced ability to regulate their fear. Therefore, it is predicted that, compared to TD infants, the FXS and ASIB groups will exhibit increased fear of the stranger, as evidenced by more time spent looking away or at their parent. By looking at stranger fear in infancy, we hope to add to existing literature on the early identification and emergence of anxiety and ASD in these high risk groups.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 116
Rotheiser, Jessica
Burdette, Tret
Morgan, Stephen Infrared spectroscopy detection of magnetic tape degradation
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Identifying degraded magnetic tapes is a challenge to the preservation of historical recordings because attempting to play such tapes can destroy valuable data when tapes stick to recording heads. U.S. cultural heritage institutions have over 46 million tapes, of which 40% are in unknown condition. If degradation can be detected, tapes can be restored for digitizing by baking. Our laboratory showed that combining attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and multivariate statistics provides a fast, objective, and non-destructive method to assess a tape’s playability. This previous model classified Library of Congress (LC) tapes with a 92-94% accuracy but showed poor separation with non-LC tapes. Our hypothesis was that separate models can be devised for classifying degradation for different tape formulations. Replicate spectra were obtained from multiple locations along the tape to determine degradation, which was compared to playability results. Principal component analysis was used to reduce the dimensionality of the projected spectral data to maximize the explained variance in an easily visualized space. This project addresses a vital conservation goal to promote the use of technology to preserve tapes for future generations.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Alumni Center - Ballroom 1A
Time: 11:15-11:25am
Neamah, Wurood Nagarkatti, Mitzi
Nagarkatti, Prakash
2,3,7,8-tetrachloridbenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)-induced MDSCs mediate immunosuppressive activity through microRNA dysregulation
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Myeloid-Derived Suppressor cells (MDSCs) are a heterogeneous population of immunosuppressive cells derived from the bone marrow. MDSCs serve an important, if not paradoxical role, during early and late stages of infection and inflammation. The compound 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), one of the most potent environmental contaminants, is formed not only as an unwanted byproduct in the manufacturing of chlorinated hydrocarbons, but also in incineration processes, paper and pulp bleaching, and emissions from steel foundries and motor vehicles. TCDD is known to suppress the immune response by many mechanisms, such as induction of T regulatory cells. However, in our current study, we demonstrated that TCDD treatment mediates immunosuppression by inducing unique cells known as MDSCs that express both the macrophage marker, CD11b and neutrophil marker, Gr-1. For this purpose, we injected C57BL/6 mice with vehicle or 10µg/kg TCDD intraperitoneally and harvested the cells from the peritoneal cavity and estimated the MDSCs and MDSC subsets by flow cytometry when we found increased numbers both monocytic and granulocytic MDSCs following TCDD treatment when compared to vehicle treated group. Further studies revealed TCDD-induced MDSC can suppress ConA-mediated T-cell proliferation, we next investigated the epigenetic mechanisms including microRNA dysregulation underlying the induction and immunosuppressive effects of MDSC induced by TCDD. MiRNA are small non-coding RNA molecules involved in transcriptional and post-transcriptional inhibition in gene expression. We performed high throughput microarray analysis of MDSC isolated from TCDD and vehicle treated groups. We found that in TCDD-induced MDSCSs, certain miRNAs such as mir-543-3p and mir-150-5p were downregulated. These miRNA target genes including ARG, IL-10, STAT-3 and, PIM1 which are involved in MDSC induction and function. In summary, our data shows that TCDD can affect MDSC induction and function through modulation of miRNA. (Supported in part by NIH grants P01AT003961, R01AT006888, R01ES019313, R01MH094755, and P20GM103641).

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Columbia Ballroom A
Time: 1:45
Abdulla, Osama Nagarkatti, Mitzi
Nagarkatti, Prakash
Role of Ahr ligands in microRNA-mediated Th17/T regulatory cell differentiation in Delayed Type Hypersensitivity
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The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is known to have an impact on immunomodulation. Recent data showed that TCDD, an exogenous AhR ligand, tends to induce T regulatory cells (Tregs), while FICZ, an endogenous AhR ligand, induces Th17 cells. The aim of this present study is to investigate the effects of TCDD and FICZ on microRNA profile in delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH). Treatment of C57BL/6 mice with TCDD attenuated DTH responses to methylated bovine serum albumen and induced Tregs. Focusing on the Treg subsets, we found that there was a significant increase in inducible peripheral, natural thymic, and Th3 T regs. In addition, there is increase in TGFβ levels in the draining lymph node, as well as increased expression of TGFβ and Treg transcription factor, Foxp3. In contrast, treating DTH mice with FICZ induced inflammatory Th17 cells and increased the expression of IL-17 and Th17 transcription factor, RORγ. Analysis of microRNA (miR) profiles from draining lymph nodes showed differential regulation between TCDD and FICZ groups. Specifically, miR-132, which was overexpressed in TCDD groups, leads to downregulation of gene targets HMGB1. Downregulation of these gene targets leads to an increase in Treg differentiation. In contrast, FICZ treatment caused a downregulation of miR-132, which leads to an upregulation of HMGB1. In summary, this study demonstrates that TCDD and FICZ have divergent effects on miRNA modulation in a DTH model, and both ligands differentially regulate miR-132, which targets key components involved in Th17 and Treg development.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Columbia Ballroom A
Time: 1:25
Balog, Elizabeth Mactutus, Charles
McLaurin, Kristen
Booze, Rosemarie
Neurocognitive Impairment in the HIV-1 Transgenic Rat at an Advanced Age
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The introduction of combination antiretroviral therapy has expanded the lifespan of HIV+ individuals. The percentage of HIV+ patients over the age of 50 is projected to reach 73% in 2030. To establish deficits in sustained attention, flexibility, and inhibition at an advanced age we compared intact HIV-1 transgenic (Tg; male, n=15; female, n=18) and control (male, n=16; female, n=18) rats using a signal detection task. All animals had previous experience with signal detection tasks at varying durations (100-1000 msec). At 18 months of age, animals were challenged with shorter signal durations (10, 100, & 1000 msec) for 5 consecutive days. Subsequently, reversal learning was assessed in all animals, regardless of their previous performance, until they met criteria (70% accuracy for 5 consecutive days or 7 days total) or completed 60 days. Analyses showed a significant genotype effect [F(1,63)=6.3, p<0.015], which was moderated by biologic sex [F(1,63)=8.8, p<0.01] for the 18-month task. More specifically, the signal duration at which animals failed to distinguish between hits and misses shifted rightward from 25 msec in controls to 70 msec in HIV-1 Tg animals; a shift which was more pronounced in the males. In the reversal task, the signal duration at which animals failed to distinguish between hits and misses shifted rightward from 400 msec in controls to an indeterminate value greater than 1000 msec in HIV-1 Tg animals. Prominent neurocognitive impairment in the HIV-1 Tg rat at an advanced age suggests a clear progression of cognitive dysfunction across the lifespan. Supported by NIH grants DA013137, HD043680, MH106392

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 78
Eta, Ayi Tang, Chuanbing Sustainable Polymers from Plant Oils
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Biomass extracted from sustainable resources may be a substitute of petroleum chemicals in the synthesis of bio-based polyamide. Using methyl 10-undecenoate, a renewable derivative from castor oil, a monomer with two amide groups and two terminal double bonds was prepared after base-catalyzed amidation reaction with 1,3 diamino-2-propanol. The monomer was then polymerized in a poly-condensation approach via thiol-ene addition with di-functional thiols. The hydroxyl group in the monomer could then be capped via a reaction with a number of different anhydrides after the polymerization. By using this method, properties of bio-based polyamides, such as degree of crystallization, thermal and mechanical properties, could be finely tuned.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 80
Villareal, Valerie
Crow, Savannah
Dobson, Cameron
Efland, Hayley
Maas, Laura
Galloway, Laura
Gamecocks Fight Hunger with a Sustainable Mindset
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To put it in the most blatant way possible: there are people in South Carolina who are hungry. The city of Columbia has the highest rate of food insecurity in the state of South Carolina. With the help of our mentors in Sustainable Carolina, Hayley Efland, Laura Maas, and Laura Galloway, we were able to take on a Feeding Children Everywhere project. This project was designed to feed 25,000 children in the Midlands — the food going directly to one of Columbia’s most known food banks, Harvest Hope. We were able to incorporate the three pillars of sustainability into this project — making sure the event was economically, environmentally, and socially responsible. The result of this project shows that we are able to address hunger in larger quantities with the help of the community. As we continue our work around this initiative, we hope all Columbia residents become more aware of a problem that lies deeply in our city and decide to take action in sustainable ways. 

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: Table 417
Kelley, Sharron Lowell, Randy Impact of Implicit Bias on Perceptions, Dreams, and Memory
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The purpose of this study is to gain a better understanding of how participants' perceptions, dreams, and memories interact. There is evidence in the literature of negative perceptions of women wearing full/partial headscarves, compared to no headwear, on dimensions such as attractiveness and intelligence (e.g., Everett et al., 2015; Mahmud & Swami, 2010). It is less clear how the presence/absence of such headwear influences memory for those individuals. In the current study, we will manipulate the photos attached to fake dating profiles (i.e. 1) headwear [no headwear, Western headwear, or non-Western headwear]; 2) skin tone [light skin, or dark skin]; and 3) gender [male, or female]), have participants evaluate those profiles and attempt to recall the information from those profiles a week later. Implicit bias regarding the variables of interest will be assessed, via the Implicit Association Test at the end of their participation, and examined in relation to their evaluation data and memory performance. In addition to the experimental tasks during participants’ visits to the lab, they will also keep a dream journal at home to track the appearance of our stimuli in their dream content. This at-home task will reinforce the impressions that participants formed of the featured men/women on their initial encounter with the profiles, and allow us to examine the relationship between wakeful encoding of these profiles with potential encoding/consolidation of related information in their dream content, which have been shown to have common mechanisms (e.g., DeGennaro et al., 2012). Data collection is in progress.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 102
Lee, Daniel Wilson, Marlene Activation of Hypothalamic Orexin Neurons during Extinction of Fear Memories
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Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a prevalent anxiety disorder that can occur after a serious traumatic event such as serving in the armed forces or a natural disaster. However, not all people who experience a traumatic event develop PTSD which indicates that some neurobiological mechanisms may make some individuals more or less susceptible to the disorder. Long Evans rats have been shown to exhibit individual differences in cue-induced freezing during extinction of fear memories suggesting this outbred strain could serve as a useful model for PTSD. The neuropeptide orexin (hypocretin) has been shown to preserve fear responses during extinction of fear memories. Although orexinergic neurons are located in the hypothalamus, they project to areas of the brain associated with fear extinction (e.g., amygdala and prefrontal cortex). This study tested the hypothesis that individual differences in fear extinction will lead to differential activation of orexin neurons. Three cohorts of rats were exposed to three tone-shock pairings, followed by extinction training two days later in a novel environment with twenty cue (tone) presentations. Brains were collected either after the extinction learning trial or after an extinction recall trial two days later. Rats were divided into good and poor extinction groups based on their freezing during the last ten minutes of the extinction learning trial. The percentage of activated orexinergic neurons in the lateral and medial hypothalamus were examined through dual label immunohistochemistry for orexin-A and cFos. Rats showing resistance to extinction learning (high freezers) had a significantly greater percentage of orexinA neurons with cFos in the medial hypothalamus than low freezers following the extinction recall trial. Interestingly, no individual differences in the activation of orexin neurons were observed in the lateral hypothalamus, or in the medial hypothalamus following extinction learning. These data suggest that orexinergic neurons in the medial hypothalamus may contribute to differential extinction learning.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Congaree Meeting Room B
Time: 1:15-1:25pm
Dale, Zoe Pournelle, Jennifer Best Management Practices Review for Constructed Wetlands Wastewater Treatment in Iraq and UAE
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In Persian Gulf countries, there are growing concerns about water quality, wastewater treatment and wetland management. Work is ongoing to establish constructed wetlands for wastewater treatment throughout the Basra Governorate in southern Iraq. In neighboring UAE, there are examples of wastewater treatment wetlands and functioning aquaponics systems. The goal of this project is to develop a best management practices review using an evaluation matrix developed by Research Planning Inc., which does work in the region, measuring fish farm bioproductivity, water amount, level of training, and input costs at facilities in UAE in order to estimate the effectiveness of wastewater treatment and aquaponics systems in Iraq. This project includes a literature review on interactions between coastal wetlands reconstruction and fish agriculture in the Persian Gulf region—focused on regional and local policy regarding connecting effluent streams to marine systems—which will be used to develop interviews. The interviews will be given to managers, researchers and other stakeholders at wastewater treatment and aquaponics facilities in Abu Dhabi.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 33
Dyck, Melaina Pournelle, Jennifer Assessing Potential Bioproductivity of Constructed Wetlands Wastewater Treatment in Iraq
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The city of Basra, Iraq, was once the thriving economic center of a vast marsh-dwelling community in the Tigris– Euphrates river delta, a region that has sustained civilization for 6,000 years. Over the last several decades, damming and draining have decimated those wetlands and the communities that depended on the ecosystem services they provided. “MaRSHiI” (Maintaining and Restoring Sustainable Hydrology in Iraq), a collaborative project under the Memorandum of Cooperation between UofSC and the University of Basra (UB), studies the sustainability impacts of wetlands collapse and the possibility for wetland restoration. Work is ongoing to establish constructed wetlands for wastewater treatment throughout the Basra Governorate, beginning at UB. However, questions remain about how bioproductive this system could be, how long it would take to be economically viable, whether fish so raised would comply with health standards, and how regulation will influence the development of wastewater aquaculture. This project addresses those questions through an extensive literature review of the productivity of mature constructed wetlands along the same latitude as southern Iraq, analysis of restored wetland and aquaponics systems in the Gulf region, and a proposed experimental design to assess bioproductivity of such marsh systems.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Congaree Meeting Room A
Time: 1:15-1:25pm
Allen, Carter Peña, Edsel A Comparison of Imputation Algorithms En Route to a Predictive Water Quality Model
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A predictive model of water quality in Charleston, SC is sought to inform residents and visitors of potentially dangerous concentrations of bacteria in recreational waterways. This project develops and compares three missing and censored data imputation methods in the context of water quality data, and compares predictive models of estuarine fecal bacteria concentration built under each imputation method. Such a method does not exist for the recreational sites sampled by Charleston Waterkeeper, whose data this project is based on. Each of the imputation algorithms rely on simulations conducted under different distributional assumptions for the missing and censored values in Charleston Waterkeeper's data. What follows is a consideration of different modeling strategies including multiple regression and logistic regression. This analysis can be expanded by discovering other effective imputation algorithms, and expanding the size of the data set. Those performing modeling of fecal bacteria may use this research to get ideas as to how to deal with missing and censored data that often occurs in measuring water quality over time.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 42
Askins, Amanda Hancock, C. Nathan Developing an Activation Tagging System for Wheat Mutagenesis
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Transposable elements are sequences of DNA that can jump from one location to another in the genome. A transposable element named mPing, first discovered in rice, requires two proteins, ORF1 and Transposase (TPase), to move in the genome. This element can be used for mutagenesis, changing an organism’s genome, which is useful for gene discovery. An activation tagging version of mPing, called mmPing20F, was created by inserting an enhancer sequence from the promoter region of the figwort mosaic virus into a hyperactive version of mPing. An activation tag can show gene function by causing overexpression of nearby coding regions in the genome. Wheat is a good organism for applying activation tagging because it is a polyploid and one of the most widely grown crops in the world. Plant transformation was used to get mmPing20F:GUS and an ORF1/TPase expression construct into the wheat genome. Cross-pollination between plants with mmPing20F and plants with ORF1 and Transposase were performed. The F1 generation is being analyzed by PCR to determine if mmPing20F shows evidence of transposition. The expectation is that mmPing20F will be able to transpose if both ORF1 and TPase proteins are expressed. We are also using GUS staining to determine if mmPing20F has been removed from its original position in the GUS reporter.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 19
King, Sarah B. Kaczynski, Andrew T.
Knight, Jackie
Stowe, Ellen W.
Walkability 101: Using multiple methods to assess the walkability of a large university campus in the southeastern United States
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Background/ Purpose: University campuses serve as ideal settings for physical activity due to their expansive landscape and pedestrian infrastructure. However, only half of U.S. college students, faculty, and staff meet physical activity recommendations. This study employed multiple methods to evaluate the walkability of a large, urban university campus, campus members’ perceptions of walkability, and campus environment impact on their physical activity. Methods: Campus walkability was assessed using environmental scans and campus member surveys. Evaluators objectively audited ten highly-used campus walking routes for key walkability characteristics, including safety, pavement markings, paved routes, and overall walking experience. University faculty, staff, and students (n=78) completed surveys that investigated perceptions and attitudes about the campus’ walkability and whether it promoted or hindered physical activity. Data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics in SPSS 22.0. Results: Over 85% of survey participants agreed that the campus sidewalks, walking routes, and layout encouraged physical activity. Environmental audits and surveys noted sidewalks were continuous, shaded, and free from obstructions. Survey participants, however, rated sidewalks as uneven and motor vehicle traffic a potential risk to pedestrians. The route audits also indicated a need for improvements in lighting, pedestrian visibility, crosswalks, and safety enforcements in key areas throughout campus. Conclusion: Campus walkability is impacted by both the physical environment and university members’ perceptions of the environment. This study is one of the first to combine both perceived and objective walkability assessments, and provides substantial data to support interventions to improve walkability and promote physical activity within the university setting.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 302
LeBrun, Jenna Custer, Sabra Interventions for Parental Transitions of Care to a General Pediatric Floor
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Background/ Purpose Hospitalization of a child is a recognized major stress for parents. Transfer between units, especially from a critical care unit to a general pediatric floor, is likely to increase parental stress and uncertainty. Although transfer to a general pediatric floor signifies improved stability of the child, parents also experience a change in the level of involvement of the child’s nurses. The increase in patient-to-nurse ratios on a general pediatric floor means that the parents are more responsible for their child’s care and updating the nurse on changes of their status. In addition, parents receive less frequent physician updates, as rounding only occurs twice a day on general pediatric floors. Appropriate interventions could be helpful to reduce parental stress and smooth the transition of care to a general pediatric floor. Methods Current literature was explored to determine best practices for educating parents about the environment of a general pediatric floor. A literature search was conducted using CINAHL Complete, PubMed, and The Journal of Pediatric Nursing, with search terms of PICU, transition, intensive care, and stress. Results were limited to within the past five years. Results When compared to the standard of care, studies found that providing parents with written educational materials of unit protocols and patient care significantly reduces parental stress. Videos and verbal explanations may enhance knowledge and help lessen uncertainty, however a tangible reference to consult after the transfer has been shown most beneficial. Conclusions/Implementations Through both verbal and written education of what to expect of their nurses and floor policies, along with what is expected of the parent, their uncertainty has been proven to be eased, which has led to overall increased family satisfaction. This evidence could be implemented to increase parent satisfaction at the current unit in question, in a specialty children’s hospital, in a mid-sized city, within the southeastern region of the United States.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 103
Slawinski, Michelle Sierra, Luis The Happiness Effect; A Reflection
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Last year I was 1 out of the 16 million Americans who experienced depression. Not many people know the extent to how broken I was or that I was struggling at all. Not only losing a sorority sister to suicide but also, plunging into every organization, community service experience, and leadership position forced me to change my outlook on life for the better. Researchers in London found that monthly volunteers were 7% (16% weekly) happier than individuals who did not volunteer at all. Through my personal experience I fully support the notion that volunteering positively enhances mental health. With my presentation I will discuss how immersing yourself at USC can help lead to a healthier outlook and also, highlight some programs and organizations here at USC that have contributed to my success today. Mental health is heavily stigmatized against. I hope by speaking out we can see how ‘happy’ can often just mask the hidden.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Alumni Center - Conference Room Main Floor 2
Time: 1:15-1:25pm
Heckel, Georgia Worthy, Karen
Rivers Jackson, Joynelle
Can We Make Progress with Progression?: Analyzing the Traditional BSN Upper Division Application Process
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Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) programs are typically divided into two segments: a lower division, consisting of general education requirements and basic nursing courses, and an upper division, comprised of clinical rotations and hands-on learning in hospital settings. Colleges and universities with BSN programs use different types of application models in order to determine the likelihood of success for students progressing from lower division to upper division. The application for upper division can include the applicant’s grade point average (GPA), hospital experience, community service hours, leadership experience, extracurricular activities, and/or an interview. The purpose of this descriptive study is to conduct a national best practice search to find the most effective model for upper level progression standards in traditional BSN programs. Utilizing the Carnegie Classification for Institutions of Higher Education, the following inclusive criteria was determined to be the most appropriate for sample development: large, four-year, public institution with doctoral programs, a high undergraduate enrollment profile, and the highest level of research activity. The colleges and universities that met the inclusive criteria were then cross-referenced with the American Association of Colleges of Nursing in order to determine which of those schools had accredited traditional BSN programs. Using the cross-referenced list of institutions, two schools were randomly selected from each of the five major regions of the United States. The upper division application models of 9 traditional BSN programs will be compared in a best practice search with the goal of finding the most effective progression process.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 1
Smith, Raymond Pitner, Ronald Teaching Colorblind Awareness Through Diversity Education
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The purpose of this study was to examine whether a dedicated diversity course model or an infusion model was more effective at reducing students’ level of colorblindness. The National Association of Social Workers and the Council for Social Work Education require schools of social work to design curricula in ways that produce culturally responsive and competent practitioners. Schools, however, have discretion in how they meet this requirement in regards to teaching diversity through an infusion model, or a dedicated diversity course. One measure of diversity is practitioner maintained color-blind ideology (CBI). Students completed the Color-Blind Racial Attitudes (CoBRA) Scale, which measured these three subcomponents of CBI: 1) awareness of racial privilege, 2) awareness of institutional racism, and 3) awareness of racial discrimination. From baseline to posttest, revealed that the diversity course group scored significantly better on colorblindness overall, however, this seemed to be more a function of their scores on the awareness of racial privilege subcomponent of CoBRA. Both groups scored significantly lower than the psychology students did on all subcomponents of colorblindness. Our findings suggest that a dedicated diversity course model is an effective approach for decreasing students’ levels of colorblind ideology.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 320
Carson, Anthony Grady, John #ReadyForRio: How a Revised Rule 40 Impacted Athlete Sponsorship at the 2016 Rio Olympic Games
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The purpose of this research was to analyze Rule 40, a bylaw of the Olympic Charter that limits athlete sponsorship, and determine the effect of its revision for official sponsors and non-affiliated brands during the 2016 Olympic Games.  While Rule 40 was amended to give athletes greater flexibility in their ability to be used in advertising, it also required event organizers to balance the official sponsor’s needs of exclusivity in their sponsorship agreements. Using observational data gathered on-site and online during the 2016 Olympics, unique insight was gained regarding the changing Olympic sponsorship landscape. The researchers found that Rule 40 allowed official sponsors to effectively activate on-site featuring Olympic athletes while many non-sponsor brands shifted to social media to promote their brands and the athletes they sponsor during the Games. In the future, the IOC will need to have a more detailed strategy for monitoring social media and providing metrics for online sponsorship value in order to encourage brands to become official partners of the Olympic Games.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Carolina Meeting Room B
Time: 1:00-1:10pm
Pettit, Elizabeth Schryer, Asheley My Life-changing Summer as a Medical Intern at The Center for Birds of Prey
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This past summer 2016, I served as a medical intern for the Center for Birds of Prey (CBOP) in Awendaw, South Carolina, which is located about 30 minutes north of Charleston. Since its founding in 1991, the CBOP is a non-profit public education and wild raptor and shore bird rehabilitation center that has treated over 7,000 birds in the past 25 years. As a medical intern, I worked five days a week learning about various husbandry and medical-related tasks, such as performing physical exams on intake, proper feeding and medical dosage techniques, administration of fluids and intravenous medications, carrying out blood and fecal tests, and analyzing X-rays for broken bones. As a pre-veterinary student, this experience was essential for me in further understanding the different aspects of animal care and veterinary medicine. Through this internship, I learned that I have a passion for caring for wildlife and that I wish to pursue this as a labor of love outside of my future veterinary career as a small animal orthopedic surgeon. My time at the CBOP was one of the most fulfilling times of my life, as I felt that I was truly making a difference in the world. The community and volunteer support surrounding the center was astounding, and I hope to continue supporting and working with the amazing employees, volunteers, and birds in the future.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 196
Monreal, Tim Shah, Piyal Mapping the Terrain of Latinx Teachers in the Southeast: Rasquache Style
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Spurred by a cheaper cost of living, globalization, and stable work in meat processing, poultry, construction, and light industry the United States Southeast (SE) has emerged as the center of the “New Latino Diaspora” (Hamann & Harklau, 2015; Levinson, 2002; Odem & Lacy, 2009; Villenas, 2001, 2002;). In South Carolina, 2000-2010 saw a 148% increase in the state's Latinx population good for the largest percentage growth in the U.S. over that time period (Cooper-Lewter, 2013; Ennis, Rios-Vargas, & Albert, 2011). A larger Latinx population naturally means changes in school demographics. Although there is an growing field of scholarship about Latinx education in the SE, there is a dearth of research about Latinx K-12 teachers in this geographic area. This talk presents a rasquache (Chicanx resourcefulness) inspired literature review to help create foundational knowledge about Latinx teachers in the SE, an emerging and under researched topic. It concludes by laying out the goal of creating a collective of South Carolina Latinx educators.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Columbia Ballroom B
Time: 1:10
Likins, Ben Booze, Rosemarie The potential effects of abnormal β-Amyloid aggregation on HIV-related cognitive disorder in aged rats
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The HIV-related cognitive impairment has shown prevalent in aged patients. However, the cause of the worsening cognitive disorder is still unknown. To investigate the neurodegenerative process associated with HIV, we used HIV-1 transgenic rats (Fisher 344) as a model to study the cognitive deficits and abnormal protein aggregates (β-Amyloid) in the brain. First, we used immunohistochemistry staining (IHC) to detect the intraneuronal β-Amyloid expression in the hippocampus and the cortex in both HIV-1 transgenic and control rats. Second, we observed the expression of amyloid precursor protein (APP) in the hippocampus and the cortex both in HIV-1 transgenic rats and F344 control rats. To further investigate, we also performed Western Blot to detect the expression of β-Amyloid and amyloid precursor protein in the brain. The IHC results indicated that an abnormal intraneuronal β-Amyloid accumulation was found in hippocampal CA3 region (1.34 fold increase) and cortex (4.06 fold increase) in HIV-1 transgenic rats compared with the F344 control rats. Interestingly, a higher amount of amyloid precursor protein was detected in CA3 region of hippocampus in F344 control rats (3.81 fold increase) relative to the HIV-1 transgenic rats. However, there was no significant difference of amyloid precursor protein expression in cortex between the F344 control and HIV-1 transgenic rats. The Western Blot data additionally proved the abnormal increase of β-Amyloid in HIV-1 transgenic rats. Further experiments will elucidate the potential effects of intraneuronal β-Amyloid accumulation on the HIV-induced neuronal dysfunction. Collectively, in HIV patients, an accumulation of β-Amyloid suggests that long-term survival with HIV might interfere with the elimination of harmful proteins like β-Amyloid that might worsen the neurodegenerative process and cognitive impairment.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 69
Van Meerssche, Elise Pinckney, James Lack of allelopathic effect of domoic acid on microalgal communities
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In the ocean, tiny plants called phytoplankton, are important for the marine ecosystem as they are the base of the food web and they create, through photosynthesis, 50% of the oxygen we breathe. But, some of them are harmful and are able to release toxins in seawater. That is the case of Pseudo-nitzschia, a type of phytoplankton that secretes a neurotoxin, domoic acid (DA). The reason why Pseudo-nitzschia releases DA is still unknown. It has been hypothesized that DA is an allelochemical allowing Pseudo-nitzschia to outcompete the other phytoplankton species by inhibiting their growth. The purpose of this research was to examine the phytoplankton response to dissolved DA (dDA) exposure on natural estuarine and benthic microalgal communities from North Inlet and Winyah Bay estuaries, ecosystems not exposed to intense toxigenic blooms of Pseudo-nitzschia. In particular we detail here the microalgal responses over different dDA concentrations ranging from 2 to 650 ng/ml based on measurements of total microalgal cell abundances, photopigment concentrations, and abundances of the different phytoplankton genera. Benthic and estuarine phytoplankton communities responded differently to the exposure to dDA but they were not significantly affected.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 285
Yaw, Haley Weist, Mark
Beattie, Paul
Examining Disparities in Public Perceptions of Veterans and Veteran Healthcare
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Many Americans state that they "support the troops" and believe that veterans are deserving of certain benefits, including healthcare. Despite the public's positive perceptions of veterans, healthcare provided by the Veterans Administration (VA) remains variable in quality and lacking in terms of access. The purpose of this study was to investigate the gap that exists between positive perceptions of veterans and the reality that these veterans encounter numerous problems when seeking healthcare. The study involved a qualitative research design involving two focus groups with nine participants (seven males and two females) and key informant interviews with three additional veterans (two males and one female). All participants were veterans who served in multiple service branches during Operations Iraqi and Enduring Freedom. The focus group sessions and key informant interviews were analyzed using NVivo 10 Software to identify themes related to this gap between positive perceptions of veterans and the poor healthcare they typically receive. Themes included the perception that Americans view male student veterans more positively that female student veterans. Participants confirmed past research findings and cited lengthy wait times and excessive administrative processes as well as variability of healthcare quality in the VA. Student veterans offered unique insights about the disparity that exists between positive perceptions of veterans and poor healthcare resources due to the public's lack of awareness of veteran healthcare problems and lack of awareness of VA funding. Findings from the study are discussed in relation to public awareness and policy strategies to reduce the gap between positive perceptions of veterans and the generally poor quality of healthcare they receive.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Carolina Meeting Room A
Time: 10:15-10:25am
Paris, Morgan Bulusu, Subrahmanyam Role of ENSO events on SST variability in the Agulhas leakage region
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The Agulhas Current, a western boundary current, is a limb of the wind driven anti-cyclonic circulation of the south Indian Ocean. Near the tip of Africa, the current retroflects shedding warm saline waters into the Atlantic Ocean. This phenomenon, referred to Agulhas leakage, feeds the upper arm of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation. Fluctuations in this highly dynamic system impact the strength of overturning sequentially altering climate patterns. This study explores the relationship between small-scale fluctuations in sea surface temperature of Agulhas leakage from NOAA’s AVHRR in response to ENSO events classified by the Oceanic Niño Index. Our findings suggest Agulhas retroflection sheds anomalously warm waters in response to El Niño and anomalously cool waters due to La Niña. Starting at the peak of an ENSO event the signal is transmitted at 12°S and 25°S from the Pacific Ocean into the Indian Ocean basin by Rossby waves. These waves travel westward until they reach Madagascar where they interact with source currents to complete the transfer of an ENSO signal into the Agulhas leakage region. The process occurs during a timescale spanning two years. Changes in the region of Agulhas leakage can be seen as early as 16 months after the peak of an ENSO event but the continued impact lasts no longer than 2 years following the event. The strength of an ENSO event and interactions with other events appear to affect the rate and strength of transmission of the ENSO signal to the point of Agulhas leakage.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Alumni Center - Ballroom 3
Time: 10:15-10:25am
DuRant, Justin Mousseau, Timothy Radionuclide Emissions from Nuclear Power Plants in South Carolina
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The goal of this project is to measure radiation doses around NPPs and compare those data to the annual averages reported by utility companies. Even if no discrepancies are found, the results, in a GIS framework, will add to our understanding of the behavior of radioactive particles after they have been released into the environment, including possible correlations with meteorological data.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 57
Eggenberger, Harli
Clark, Brooke
Parr, Brian
Southworth, Ginny
Candy and Soda for Breakfast: Developing visual communication tools to promote healthy eating
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The purpose of this project was to to develop a series of infographics and videos to help explain confusing nutrition information and clarify common misunderstandings about food to help consumers make healthy choices. Proper nutrition is essential for promoting growth and development, preventing disease, and supporting an active lifestyle. However, Americans tend to adhere to recommendations for a healthy diet less than 60% of the time. Communicating nutrition information through infographics and videos may be helpful for explaining nutrition concepts and lead to healthier choices. We identified eight foods that have similar characteristics that are commonly confused by consumers and created infographics to compare their nutritional values. For example, orange “juice” drinks, which contain little actual juice, are commonly used as a substitute for real orange juice. When you look more closely at added sugar, the nutritional value of the orange drink is more like orange soda than an actual orange. For each, we photographed the items against a plain backdrop using a digital camera, incorporated pictures and nutrition information from food labels, manufacturer websites, and nutrition databases into infographics, and created videos explaining each comparison. The infographics and videos present nutrition information including calories, added sugar, and other nutrition facts on a spectrum from healthy to less healthy to help consumers make smarter choices.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 112
Canavan, Jamie Jones, Joe Pursing what you are passionate about pays off
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In beginning my journey as an undergraduate at the University of South Carolina I began to pursue a degree in environmental studies. Though I have always been passionate about art, I had previously considered it to be primarily a hobby and not a viable career path. Through the encouragement of my peers and advisors I have had the courage to change my passion for the arts into a promising career that I hope to continue pursing in my post-graduate career. Here at the University of South Carolina we truly have no limits as students and can achieve anything we set our minds to. In my presentation I hope to share with you all that being passionate about something can truly pay off in terms of your future.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Alumni Center - Conference Room Main Floor 1
Time: 10:30-10:40am
Hannah, Miranda Camp, Lisa A Servant's Attitude: How Community Service Impacted Me and My Community
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When I showed up on campus my freshman year at the University of South Carolina, I had no idea what level of impact service would have on me and I could have on the community. As part of my Graduation with Leadership Distinction in community service, I spent about 150 hours volunteering at Harvest Hope Food Bank in Cayce, South Carolina. At Harvest Hope I organized donations for distribution to families of a certain poverty level so that they could concentrate their efforts and funds on providing their families with a good quality of life while not having to worry as much on food. Through this experience, I was able to find the value of serving and realize my passion for it. I continued serving because I felt the need for service was critical to the organization, and if I did not serve, how could I expect others to fill the need? I hope to incorporate a servant’s attitude into my future career to serve wherever possible.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Congaree Meeting Room A
Time: 11:00-11:10am
Hannah, Miranda Camp, Lisa More Than A Program: My Experience With the MedEx Academy
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For my Graduation with Leadership Distinction in professional and civic engagement I have had many experiences that I feel have shaped me as an adult. One of the most impactful experiences in my college career has been my two summers with the Medical Experience (MedEx) Academy in Greenville, South Carolina. In my time at the MedEx Academy, I had the opportunity to shadow physicians, network with medical school admissions boards, and work on the skills necessary to make me a competitive medical school applicant. A lot of the experiences were specifically tailored to medical school applications but I was also able to gain valuable skills that can apply to more areas of life. For example, I practiced my interview skills through extensive mock interviewing, and I practiced researching and oral presentation through presentation assignments and debates about topics in the medical field. Through the MedEx Academy I was able to prepare for my future while making life-long connections. Throughout my life and career I will be able to look back on my time at MedEx with fondness and maybe even be able to take on future MedEx Academy students in need of shadowing hours down the line when I am a physician.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Congaree Meeting Room A
Time: 11:15-11:25am
Schlee, Caroline Outten, Caryn Overexpression and Purification of Iron Regulators Aft1 and Yap5 from Yeast
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Iron homeostasis in eukaryotic cells is controlled in part by two important proteins, Aft1 and Yap5. Aft1 is involved in the processes when there is low iron in the cell, while Yap5 contributes when there are high levels of iron in the cell. In order to purify these proteins in a more successful and stable manner, each was put on a plasmid and transformed into yeast strain 334 that had been shown to be useful in other experiments. Once the plasmids were transformed into yeast, the process of finding the best induction conditions began. Two main conditions were used, and the high optical density (OD) growth in the morning, induction in the afternoon, and growth overnight was found to be the most successful so far. Three Western Blots were performed with varying conditions and in two of them, no bands were visible. In the third Western Blot trial, protease inhibitors were used during the extraction of the protein, which allowed for proteins to be visualized on the Western. However, these bands had moved much too far down the gel and their identity could not be determined. In future experiments, the plan is to dilute the samples and use a higher percentage gel in order to better visualize the bands present. In the long term, the goal will be to eventually purify Yap5 and Aft1 for use in future in vitro binding experiments.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 73
Vallabhapuram, Hemant Jensen, John
Hanly, Pat
Integrated Managerial Process Construction and Improvement (IMPCI) Strategy
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Organizational creation and development is a pivotal factor in the perpetual growth of society. The purpose of this presentation is to illustrate the "Integrated Managerial Process Construction and Improvement (IMPCI) Strategy" that I created to found and sustain Delta Kappa Epsilon Fraternity and implement methods to reaching record breaking student engagement statistics through the Student Government Elections Commission. The University of South Carolina affiliates both organizations as they are they committed to the enhancement of community and societal prosperity. USC students continuously pursue the construction of organizations however if there is an absence in a structured process and strategic implementation, said organizations can have high potencies in defaulting which puts members, their long-term and short-term objectives, and overall credibility at risk. After utilizing entrepreneurial strategies learned from my curriculum at the Darla Moore School of Business to formulate visions and mission statements for the Fraternity and Elections Commission, I found a variety of strategies using the Lean Six-Sigma DMAIC method to continuously improve both processes to achieve maximum longevity. Said internal and external process improvements allowed for efficiency in receiving Fraternity Charter and admitting over 100 quality members within only two years of existence. Furthermore, the improvements granted the success of the record breaking Elections Commission’s student engagement goals, as 90+ individuals filed for candidacy with over 6K in student voters. These successes were highlighted by the compelling usage of the IMPCI Strategy as it supported the achievements in all entities. This strategy has further proved to provide stability in maintaining procedures to adequately adhere to the completion of organizational aspirations by detailing the Define, Measure, Analyze, Improve, and Control phases. The blend of Lean Six-Sigma principles with implementation techniques shows clarity and credibility to prospective student leaders.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Congaree Meeting Room A
Time: 11:30-11:40am
Loyo-Rosado, Frances DeLaurier, April Understanding the function of kdm1a using CRISPR/Cas-9 in zebrafish
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The purpose of this research is to understand the function of the lysine demethylase 1a (kdm1a) gene of the PHF21A complex in human Potocki-Shaffer Syndrome (PSS) using the clustered regularly-interspersed short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) and associated Caspase 9 (Cas9) system in zebrafish. PSS is a genetic disorder that follows an autosomal dominant inheritance pattern in which symptoms include craniofacial abnormalities and intellectual disabilities. These anomalies are caused by a mutation on chromosome 11, resulting in the deletion of the p11.2 p11.12 band. One goal of this research is to create a stable line of zebrafish carrying a mutant form kdm1a in order to study the phenotype-genotype correlation of loss of kdm1a. Targeted mutagenesis in this gene was completed by co-injecting a guide RNA (gRNA) targeting kdm1a and nuclear-localized nCas9n mRNA into the one cell stage of zebrafish embryos. These embryos were screed using a T7E1 assay for mutations. Founder fish were identified, raised, and outcrossed in order to test germline transmission to the F1 generation via T7E1 assay. Positive F1 fish were sequenced in order to establish the nature of mutations. To date, we have two lines showing frameshift mutations in the kdm1a gene. These fish will be in-crossed and F2 offspring will be screened for phenotypes. Ultimately, we want to establish the effect a kdm1a knockout can have on craniofacial development and development on other organs such as the brain and spinal cord, with a goal of understanding the role of kdm1a in PSS.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Alumni Center - Ballroom 2
Time: 10:15-10:25am
Sultan, Muthanna Nagarkatti, Mitzi Endocannabinoid as anti-inflammatory agents in acute Lung Injury-Role of micro-RNA
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Muthanna Sultan, Hasan Alghetaa, Prakash Nagarkatti and Mitzi Nagarkatti Department of Pathology, Microbiology, and Immunology, University of South Carolina SOM, Columbia. Abstract Staphylococcus Enterotoxin B (SEB), produced by Staphylococcus aureus causes a wide range of symptoms. It is a superantigen that activates up to 30% T cells by crosslinking the T cell receptor (TCR) to nonpolymorphic region of MHC class II on antigen presenting cells (APC). The inhalation of SEB leads to toxic shock syndrome and death. SEB is a CDC select agent of bioterrorism. In the current study, we used an intranasal dose of SEB to induce acute lung jnjury (ALI) in C57BL/6 mice. Anandamide (AEA), an endogenous cannabinoid, is part of endocannabinoid system (ECs) and binds to CB1 and CB2 receptors. In our study, we found that using AEA alleviated ALI in SEB-exposed mice. Lungs were excised from naïve and SEB-treated mice administered with vehicle (SEB+Veh) or AEA (SEB+AEA) for histopathological analysis. There was a significant decrease in the infiltration of inflammatory cells in the lungs from SEB+AEA mice compared to SEB+Veh. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated a decrease in CD4+, CD8+ and NKT cells as well as Vβ8+ T cells whereas an increase in CD11b+Gr1+ myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) and FoxP3+ T regulatory cells in SEB+AEA group when compared to SEB+Veh treated mice. We next examined whether miRNA mediated the protective effects of AEA on SEB-induced ALI. Microarray analysis of lung-infiltrating cells revealed 60 up- and 77 down-regulated miRNA in SEB+AEA mice relative to SEB+Veh. Using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA), we identified target genes for miRNAs with > 1.5 fold change. We found that miR-34a-5p, miR23a and miR27a were downregulated, which target the T regulatory cell transcription factor, FOXP3, NOS1 and cytokines, TGF-β2 and IL-10 genes, respectively. Also, miR-30c-5p, which targets anti-inflammatory genes, SOCS1 and SOCS3 were downregulated.The miRs and target genes were validated by RT-PCR. Thus, we have identified miRNAs that play a role in protection from SEB-induced ALI by AEA. (Supported by NIH grants P01AT003961, R01AT006888, R01ES019313, R01MH094755 , P20GM103641 and Iraqi Higher Committee Education Development-HCED).

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 290
Beane, Ericka Gudridge, Maegan Leadership in Health: South Carolina Department of Health and Human Services
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The most impactful experience I had while attending the University of South Carolina was my internship as a Program Assistant in the Office of Organizational Development at the South Carolina Department of Health and Human Services. Through this experience, I flourished professionally and gained leadership experience in an array of projects, including one particularly significant one. To help reduce SCDHHS’s Medicaid application backlog, the Office of Organizational Development was tasked with opening a Processing Center and had to hold multiple panel interviews to fill various positions. The largest round of interviews held were for the Program Coordinator II position. I was in charge of contacting all of the candidates to schedule interviews, clearing time with all of the interviewees, reserving meeting space, creating interview questions, developing a rating tool, preparing materials for everyone involved, participating on the interview panel and constructing a final summary of all of the interviews. Although I held the lowest job title of anyone on the interview panel, I facilitated the interview process and was looked to as the leader. This experience expanded my leadership skills and pushed me to be more confident in the work place. These interviews will be very meaningful for the state. These candidates will oversee eligibility workers that process cases and provide medical care for the citizens of South Carolina. This experience will also be meaningful for my future career as I apply these skills while pursuing a Masters of Health Administration at the University of North Carolina Charlotte.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 172
Baird, Jessica Stewart, Jill Development of a 3-Dimensional Motor Learning Task to Investigate Exercise-Enhanced Neuroplasticity
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Brain plasticity is important for motor learning and re-learning. Exercise prior to motor training may facilitate plasticity due to an increase in brain derived neurotrophic factor. However, in most studies examining exercise-enhanced plasticity, changes in motor skill performance are examined on motor tasks involving single finger button presses or small movements of a joystick. Knowledge gained from these tasks may not translate to complex, 3-dimensional (3D) movements. The purpose of this study was to develop a motor learning task that involved 3D reach movements. Fifteen participants (23.5 ±3.7 years) practiced a target task with the dominant, right arm over two days in a 3D virtual environment. Participants were instructed to reach to the target as quickly and accurately as possible. Once a target was “hit” it would disappear and the next target would appear. To examine sequence specific learning, target position alternated between random and repeated sequences. Each sequence consisted of 8 targets and was matched for difficulty. Time to complete both the random and repeated sequences improved significantly across practice (random: t = 5.524, p < .01; repeated t = 5.918, p < .01), and this improvement was maintained at retention (random: t = 5.652, p < .01; repeated t = 5.347, p < .01). Results indicate that a motor task requiring whole arm, 3D reach movements can demonstrate two important motor learning principles: motor skill acquisition and retention. This novel task can be used to assess exercise-enhanced neuroplasticity in a manner that more accurately represents real-world movement.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 317
Sullivan, Catherine Camp, Lisa Dance Marathon: Communicating The
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USC Dance Marathon (USCDM) is one of 300 university and high school Miracle Network Dance Marathon programs in the country, benefitting Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals. USCDM fundraises for the Child Life Program at Palmetto Health Children’s Hospital, Columbia’s only freestanding children’s hospital, through student fundraising, sponsorships, corporate partnerships, merchandise sales, and mini high school dance marathons. As a public relations student, my passion lies in nonprofit communications and advocacy. For my final year as a member of USCDM, I was elected as a member of the public relations committee, which works to build and maintain university, community and media relationships, produce consistent social media strategies and promotional efforts, as well as design all merchandise. Strategic messaging and two-way communication is key to stakeholder, volunteer, and donor engagement, and we implemented a yearlong “Limitless” campaign to tie our organization more closely to the university and to a consistent message. We succeeded in a number of categories in our 2016-2017 program, including surpassing our public goal of $700,000. Our organization reached many historically large numbers, including number of registered participants, fundraising during our 24-hour Day of Miracles, and corporate partnerships and sponsorships. This was all made possible through our communication strategy that focused on our “why” – the reason we all fundraise and participate – being limitless for the kids. Through Dance Marathon, I have learned the importance of thoughtful campaigns, open communication, creative strategy and sharing your “why” about joining the movement.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 250
Hobensack, Michael Oskeritzian, Carole Angiogenesis and mast cells in precancerous prostate
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Prostate cancer (PCa) is an adenocarcinoma that constitutes the second main cause of death due to cancer among men in the USA. Almost half of men display Prostatic Intraepithelial Neoplasia (PIN) by the age of 50. High grade-PIN (HPIN) is considered a precancerous stage, although most cases will not advance to cancer. Angiogenesis or the generation of new blood vessels from pre-existing ones, is a hallmark of solid tumors, as they need blood supply to grow. Vasculature formation is promoted by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Mast cells (MC) are prostate resident cells, with cytoplasmic granules harboring many mediators, including VEGF and tryptase protease. Thus, we hypothesized that MC-mediated angiogenesis drives prostate transformation. We used a transgenic mouse model C3(1)/SV40Tag that mimics the human disease progression to PCa with age. We developed a computer-assisted quantitative imaging method to measure morphometrics to quantify the number and activation of MC in microscopy sections. A similar approach was optimized for angiogenesis through quantification of CD31, an endothelial cell marker. Our preliminary data indicated that Low (L)PIN/C3 prostate sections showed higher numbers of total and activated MC than normal/C3 (N/C3) mice (63.6 vs. 27 MC/mm2 and 44.2 in LPIN vs. 10.7 MC/mm2, respectively). Microvasculature analysis revealed higher density of new capillaries in LPIN/C3 than in N/C3 or WT mice, scoring 0.03 vs. 0.01 for CD31-IOD/total image area ratios, respectfully. In conclusion, increased angiogenesis and MC activation could serve as a predictor for prostatic transformation. Supported by NIH/NIAID R01 AI095494, NIH/NIAMS R21 AR067996 and NIH/NIGMS P30 GM103336 (Pilot Project) to CAO.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 374
McGoye, Amanda Ducate, Lara Transforming Health Care Through Community Service
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During my time at Carolina experience through organizations such as the Therapy Place has played a significant role in shaping both my learning experience and who I have become as an individual in the last four years. The Therapy Place is an outpatient pediatric clinic in Columbia that provides physical, occupational, and speech therapy to children with disabilities. It was during this opportunity that I was able to serve as a volunteer who observed and aided therapists in client sessions. My initial desire to take part in this opportunity stemmed from my desire to gain more experience in my future career as an occupational therapist. Through Graduation with Leadership Distinction I have been able to better understand just how influential the Therapy Place has been on my life and how I plan to carry myself as a leader in my future endeavors. It has provided me with extensive experience working with children of all functional levels and has shown me the impact that therapy can have on transforming the lives of individuals with disabilities. In my future career as an occupational therapist, I plan to utilize the knowledge gained from this experience to create individualized, client-centered sessions as well as develop my own non-profit therapy organization. I will utilize this organization to educate families, caretakers, and other health and wellness personnel on the importance of early intervention in therapy while providing financial assistance to families who are unable to afford therapeutic care.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 237
Tjahjadi, Michael Knight, Lisa
Stephenson, Kathryn
Improving Efficiency and Patient/Provider Satisfaction Through Standardization of School/Work Excuses in a Pediatric Resident Clinic, a Retrospective Chart Review
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Given the rise of administrative duties required by physicians in the outpatient care facility setting, a system that allows for optimum efficiency in these duties is key in order to allow for maximal direct patient contact. In the Children’s Hospital Outpatient Center (CHOC) of the Palmetto Health Children’s Hospital, the residents (MDs) are in charge of creating school/work excuses (SWE), which was the process targeted for improvement and standardization. Prior to the project, SWEs were usually requested by the patient/family at their discretion. The implemented change trained the work up room staff to ask all patients/families if they require an SWE or not and to document accordingly on the face sheet to be given to the MD. Implementation of the change did not cause a significant increase in total number of SWEs requested. Over the course of two PDSA cycles, both the rate of SWEs that were failed to be given when requested (17% in PDSA 1, 0% in PDSA 2) and the rate of failing to document a requested SWE on the face sheet (23% in PDSA 1, 10% in PDSA 2) decreased. This project can pave the way for other quality improvement projects, demonstrating how even small changes in efficiency and increases in patient/provider satisfaction can be significant when extrapolated over multiple providers over time.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 410
Swamy, Nikil Morgan, Harley
Parrott, James
Mrelashvili, Anna
Anterior Myelitis: The Modern Day Relative of Polio
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Introduction: Acute flaccid myelitis (AFM) related to Enterovirus serotypes has no cure and reflects the same clinical course as noted previously by Polio, which happens to be a species of the same viral family. MRI T2 spinal grey matter hyperintensity spanning >3 vertebral segments is found in 90-100% of cases, with or without lesion enhancement, associated cord edema, nerve root enhancement/thickening, paraspinal muscle edema. Patients (or Materials) and Methods: AFM has become an epidemic in the US notably in California, Colorado, and most recently in Philadelphia. The affected population is typically pediatric, presenting with rapidly progressive lateralizing weakness and positive spinal MRI grey matter hyperintensities, spanning more than one vertebral segment. Here we report two pediatric cases, both 17 months of age, the first of their kind in Columbia, SC, with one case having unusual brainstem involvement. Results: MRI of the spine is both cases revealed ventral grey matter nonenhancing T2 hyperintensity spanning multiple vertebral levels. MRI of the brain in the first case was without acute findings, however in the other there were FLAIR and T2 hyperintensity in the posterior pons extending into the cerebellar peduncles in a circular fashion around the fourth ventricle. This is quite an unusual presentation on imaging for this condition. Conclusion: In the scientific community, it is agreed that more investigation of AFM is needed, especially given the epidemic since 2014. This is because there is no evidence for definitive treatment, outcomes based on presentation, specifically with variations in clinical and imaging variability as presented here.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 379
Swamy, Nikil Yallapragada, Anil Fibrinogenemia and Ischemic Stroke: A Case Report and Literature Review
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OBJECTIVE: Thrombophilia is a rare paradoxical complication in patients with fibrinogenemias, whether due to replacement therapy, comorbid thrombotic risk factors, or idiopathic. Strictly looking at arterial strokes, we present here a case report and comprehensive summary of reported cases of the same, and aim to propose based on the known pathophysiologic research in the field how best these cases should be identified and treated. BACKGROUND: A 53-year-old female with family and personal history of hypofibrinogenemia not on any blood thinners presented with headache, pain down left arm, confusion, and left upper quadrantanopia. DESIGN/METHODS: Multiple mechanisms have been proposed and studies undertaken that may explain the underlying mechanism of thrombosis in these patients. In the absence of fibrinogen, platelet aggregation has been shown to occur by, vWF binding gp1b on platelets, free thrombin activation of platelets in the absence of antithrombin I, fibronectin acting as a ligand for platelets in vivo in the absence of both vWF and thrombin. Mutations and polymorphisms in fibrinogen can alter strength, structure, and stability of fibrin polymerization resulting in thrombotic disease. RESULTS: She was found to have right distal PCA occlusion and accompanying stroke in the same distribution. Fibrinogen level was low at 89 mg/dL. TEG scan was abnormal for increased thrombin activity, decreased fibrin crosslinking, decreased clot strength. Hypercoagulable workup was negative, she had not received any blood products, additional stroke work up with carotid duplex, extremity dopplers, TCD with HIT protocol, TEE with bubble study were negative. CONCLUSIONS: She was initially discharged without blood thinners, after presenting again with headache, neck pain and exacerbated visual impairment, workup was negative for acute findings. No consensus exists for the treatment of these patients but our patient was discharged on aspirin, and remained asymptomatic.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 380
Clark, Jamie Avens, Larisa
Bess, Jen
Characterizing hawksbill sea turtle (Eretmochelys imbricata) size-at-age relationships and growth dynamics using skeletochronology
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Sea turtle age and growth is difficult to characterize, since they have slow growth and high variability. However, it is crucial to study age to maturation and individual growth dynamics of hawksbill populations because of the need to conserve this endangered species in different regions. Skeletochronological analyses provide a detailed record of skeletal growth marks found in long bone cross sections that are used to estimate age and growth rates in many marine turtle species. To obtain age and growth data for hawksbill sea turtles in the western North Atlantic, humerus bones and carapace length measurements were obtained from 87 wild hawksbill turtles found stranded and dead on beaches along the Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico coasts of the US. Juvenile hawksbills were found to have higher growth rates and variability among individuals than adult turtles. Growth rates for this sample population were comparable to those of similarly-sized turtles from the east coast of Florida reported by Wood et al. for size classes 40-50, 50-60, and 60-70 cm SCL, as well as those from Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands. However, growth rates yielded by this study were found to be lower than those from the British Virgin Islands and the Bahamas, but higher than samples from the Barbados and the Cayman Islands. As several nesting populations contribute juveniles in different proportions to these foraging areas, it is possible that genetic differences could potentially be the cause for the differing growth rates among sample populations within the Caribbean. The growth rates for the study population were also found to be higher than for Pacific populations in Hawaii and the Australia. The relationship between size and age was also characterized and age at maturation was estimated using minimum and mean maturation size ranges from the literature. Because the available sample contained few humeri from turtles of adult size, it was not possible to estimate ages associated with mean size of nesting females for the population. However, results indicate that mean ages to maturation at minimum female nesting sizes for this population (i.e., 67.0 to 71.8 cm SCL) range from 14 to 17 years of age.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 65
Shayesteh Moghaddam, Nahid Kunchur, Millind Electromagnetic properties of NbTiN superconducting films
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In a normal conductor, when applying a constant voltage across it, the charge carriers speed up and then move at an average, constant speed (called drift velocity). This is because there is resistance in the wire, and the current is determined by that voltage and the resistance. For a superconductor, which has no resistance, by applying an electric field, the charges will accelerate until the superconducting state is broken. When it is broken, the system is said to be in the normal state, and acts just like any other conductor. The amount of current density required to turn the superconductor normal is known as the depairing current density. We explore these properties of NbTiN superconducting films in different states, and under a range of magnetic fields and electric current densities. The variation of resistance with temperature, magnetic field and current provide us the necessary information about superconducting parameters.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 307
Dunn, Caroline Kaczynski, Andrew
Wilcox, Sara
Reliability assessment of a novel tool to evaluate physical activity and healthy eating opportunities in faith-based settings: The Church Environment Audit Tool
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Background: Faith-based settings attract members of all sociodemographic backgrounds and are potential partners for health interventions. Audit tools to assess opportunities for physical activity (PA) and healthy eating (HE) in church environments are lacking. This study assessed the reliability of a novel tool to evaluate the physical environment of faith-based settings pertaining to opportunities for PA/HE. Methods: Using a standardized script and passively guided by church personnel, pairs of trained data collectors independently audited the available facilities and resources in 54 churches of various denominations in a rural South Carolina county. Tool sections included: indoor opportunities for PA, outdoor opportunities for PA, food preparation equipment, type of kitchen, food for purchase, beverages for purchase, and media (e.g. bulletin boards, flyers, or other displays about PA/HE). Kappa and percent agreement were used to determine interrater reliability. Results: Average audit completion took 19 minutes. Of 218 items, 104 were assessed for interrater reliability and 114 could not be assessed because they were not present at enough churches (largely pertaining to food and beverages for purchase). Percent agreement for all 104 items was over 80%. For 37 items, the sample was too homogeneous for Kappa to be assessed. Forty-four of the remaining 67 items had Kappas greater than 0.60 (21 items 0.80-1.00; 23 items 0.60-0.79), indicating substantial to almost perfect agreement. Conclusion: The new tool proved reliable and efficient for assessing church environments and identifying potential intervention points. Future use could include training stakeholders to conduct and use assessments.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Columbia Ballroom C
Time: 10:45
Truesdale, Summer Carnes, Laura Structural mobility and academic performance: Preventing early attrition
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Structural mobility and academic performance: Preventing early attrition Summer Truesdale, Bachelor of Arts, Organizational Leadership As I approach graduation and examine my future role in society, I am struck by the enormous impact structural mobility has upon all of our opportunities within society. As I completed my Graduation with Leadership Distinction E-Portfolio, and reflected upon the components of structural mobility, I became aware of how interconnected education and social networks are for the betterment of society. Individually, each is powerful, but combined together both education and social networks have the power to be truly transformative on both individual and societal levels. With that in mind, I am working with the Director of Student Engagement and Success at USC Lancaster to implement an early intervention program for first time students, with a predicted grade point average of a 1.5 or less. The goal of this program to provide these students with adequate social and educational resources in order to increase their potential for success at USC Lancaster. During my Discover USC presentation, I will highlight the importance of this plan along with my recommend solutions, and a detailed plan for implementation.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 173
Corrigan, Mallory Schryer, Asheley Community Service through the Make-A-Wish Foundation
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As an avid philanthropist, I was chosen to be philanthropy chair for my sorority for the 2015 year. Through this experience, I planned two events that raised funds and awareness for the Make-A-Wish Foundation. For the events, I organized the overarching plans as well as led a team of seven women. Through my work with these events, I have fallen in love with the work the Make-A-Wish Foundation does and the value that it gives to children in need. I headed the cabinet for these philanthropy events as a way to give back to an organization that provides the medicinal benefits of allowing a child to just be a child. The experience of leading a team taught me the importance of finding a place for everyone and giving a voice to those in need. I have been able to see how one can take service in different ways. From this experience I have learned how I want to continue to serve in the future, including creating a blog to help individuals in various communities find service opportunities to fit their lifestyles. I have learned the value of service to one’s personal well-being and how giving back to the community can make an individual feel a renewed sense of gratitude and fulfillment.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 161
Utset, Elizabeth Harrison, Theresa GLD: Study Abroad Experience in China
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Ever since I had the opportunity to visit China for the first time when I was fourteen, learning Chinese and achieving fluency in the language became one of my deepest passions. During my junior year, I spent my two semesters studying abroad at East China Normal University in Shanghai, China. Between my semesters, I made my way to a small organic farm located outside Chengdu, China, and worked there for a month as a foreign volunteer. After my second semester, I worked as a teaching intern at a kindergarten in Nantong, China. I went in to my experience expecting language to be one of my greatest takeaways; yet, I was astounded by how much the experience shaped my learning in ways that I did not originally anticipate. I found myself breaking down language and cultural barriers, moving from struggling to find the confidence to ask “Nihaoma?”, to fluently discussing democracy, human rights, current events, and hopes and dreams in Chinese with people whose opinions differed greatly from mine. I grew to become a local in cities that once made my feel hopelessly different, confused, and alienated. I endured loneliness, culture shock, and homesickness, and I grew to appreciate each of these negative emotions for helping me to love my time abroad, even in its imperfectness. After having many opportunities to teach English and develop my own teaching style, I opened my mind to the possibilities of pursuing a career in higher education on an international level. But, most importantly after one of the most challenging years of my life, I am incredibly independent, fiercely adventurous, happily spontaneous, and deeply appreciative of the small things that make everyday life beautiful.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Alumni Center - Conference Room Main Floor 3
Time: 1:45-1:55pm
Thakker, Parth
Tucker, Michael
Thomas, Lynn WHAT ARE THE MOST EFFECTIVE STUDY TOOLS FOR USMLE STEP 1 AND ARE PRE-STEP 1 ACADEMIC PERFORMANCES INDICATIVE OF HIGHER SCORES?
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The United States Medical Licensing Exam Step 1 (USMLE Step 1) exam is a measure of basic science knowledge that students are required to pass before graduating from M.D. programs in United States medical schools. This exam is also used by residency directors to judge applicants. It is the only objective data that is comparable across all medical school programs. Medical schools in the United States often give their students four to six weeks to prepare for the exam. This is a long, taxing period filled with anxiety and uncertainty. During this time, students use several study resources including review books, question banks, and practice exams. Many students hope to monitor their study progress by using question bank percentages and practice exams scores to predict a USMLE Step 1 score. This study explores the relationship between the use of particular USMLE Step 1 preparatory resources and their Step 1 scores. This is accomplished by using survey data, which asked medical students who have completed their Step 1 exam what Step 1 study resources were used and what score the participant received on his/her Step 1 exam.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 385
Chukwurah, Evelyn Patel, Rekha TRBP phosphorylation regulates the activity of the eIF2α kinase, PKR, during cell stress
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The interferon-induced eIF2α kinase PKR is activated in response to a diverse array of cellular stresses, ranging from viral infection to stress resulting from the accumulation of misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum. During these conditions, activated PKR phosphorylates the α-subunit of the translation initiation factor eIF2 which in turn halts general protein synthesis. This pause allows the cell to attempt to recover from the stress or to induce its own death by apoptosis if the stress cannot be overcome. As such, PKR plays a centrally important role in several cell signaling pathways, and dysregulation of PKR’s activity has been implicated in various neurodegenerative and neuromuscular disorders. PKR is activated during stress by its interaction with its cellular activator, the double-stranded RNA binding protein PACT. During these conditions, PACT is phosphorylated at Serines 246 and 287 and forms heterodimers with PKR, leading to PKR activation and subsequent eIF2α phosphorylation. PKR is also regulated by inhibitory interactions with another double-stranded RNA binding protein, TRBP, which prevents PKR activation by precluding PKR-PACT interaction through the formation of TRBP-PKR and TRBP-PACT heterodimers. Recent studies have also shown that TRBP is also phosphorylated in other cellular contexts with direct effects on TRBP’s interactions with other known binding partners and their activities. The goal of this study then was to investigate how TRBP phosphorylation affects PKR’s activation and cell fate during cell stress. Various biochemical assays were performed to assess how stress-induced TRBP phosphorylation affects TRBP-PKR heterodimer interaction and consequently PKR activation, eIF2α phosphorylation, and the induction of apoptosis during cell stress. Our results strongly indicate that TRBP phosphorylation plays a significant role in regulating PKR activation in response to cell stress and could be an important but overlooked pathway needed to dampen the damaging effects of sustained stress and PKR activation in the cell.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Columbia Ballroom A
Time: 10:15
Loper, Caroline Blauvelt, Alex Sustainable Development Goals: Aligning Initiatives with the Interests of Stakeholders
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In 2015, the United Nations adopted 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) which created the basis for the 2030 Agenda; a comprehensive plan of action to address various global issues such as poverty, health, education, equality, energy, sustainability, and pollution. This past December, I was invited to attend a conference hosted by the European Commission on achieving the goals of the 2030 Agenda where various interest parties gathered for a day to discuss the necessity, impact, and proposed implementation of the SDGs. As an International Business student at the Darla Moore School of Business, in pursuit of Graduation of Leadership Distinction in Global Learning, I was honored for the experience and am compelled to share my critical analysis of the conference agenda. It was apparent that communication is crucial for the success of this aggressive platform, as failure arises when there is a lapse between the conveyance of good ideas and their successful implementation. Not only is it important for myself and my peers to be aware of such global cooperative initiatives, but it is also imperative that these SDGs are effectively communicated for sake of their survival. My research illustrates the importance of managing the interests of stakeholders, understanding existing lessons and foreseeable problems from previous U.N. sustainability projects, while sharing my observations and likely success of the current 2030 Agenda.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 223
Graham, Ashley
Lyerly, Jacob
Quant, William
Sprankle, Haley
Edelson, Samuel
Schwebel, Sara
Tobolski, Erica
Francis, Jeff
Voiceovers for Channel Islands National Park
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This team of USC Theatre and Music students created voiceovers for a National Park Service website focused on the children’s book Island of the Blue Dolphins as well as the historical figure upon whom the book is based. We researched the book, website, and short essays written by researchers on topics related to the science and history presented in the children’s book. We then decided which of the researchers’ essays would be recorded by each actor for the website. As part of the rehearsal process, we made choices about the performance delivery based on the intended audience: school children with learning disabilities and people of all ages with visual impairments. Prior to the recording process, we tested our acting choices in front of the students of the Saluda School of the Arts and we sent recordings to staff members of the Channel Islands National Park. Because it was the first time for all of us working in a professional studio, we faced a steep learning curve in mastering the recording equipment and editing the audio recordings. Additional challenges included performing for an imagined audience, mastering microphone technique and making adjustments according to the notes from the sound engineer and director. This project has honed specific skills necessary to pursue a wide array of professional work in the audio recording industry.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Richland Meeting Room A
Time: 1:15-1:25pm
Rowan, Ansley Ducate, Lara On the Doorstep of Diversity
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Through my role as a Resident Mentor, I was challenged to use my knowledge from my Women's and Gender Studies classes and my training as a Diversity Peer Educator to create y own presentation on gender roles and stereotypes. I capitalized on the opportunity to create a presentation that would engage first year students in dialogue that promotes an awareness of self and awareness of others while allowing me the professional development opportunity to connect with campus partners in order to become more educated on the topics presented. This presentation is now an annual Diversity Dialogue that has garnered recognition for its ability to create a safe space for students to discuss their experiences and opinions on a complex topic, lending to a fascinating dialogue year after year and a facilitated learning experience about gender bias and stereotypes. Facilitating a dialogue on a diversity topic brought together my knowledge from my Women's and Gender Studies classes, my love for presenting, and my skills that I developed through being a Resident Mentor and Diversity Peer Educator. This experience taught me to lean into the discomfort that can come with tough conversations and to be willing to facilitate amongst your peers. Through my preparation research and meetings with campus partners, I found my passion for teaching and guiding students towards topics that they aren't familiar or comfortable with, helping them to access their community through dialogue and to access their school through its professionals that will help them learn more. This experience and the skills I gained through presenting helped shape my career goals , turning me towards masters programs in Higher Education and Student Affairs where I hope to continue engaging students in impactful dialogue and creating meaningful presentation that teach students about one another and themselves. I have learned that, here at the University of South Carolina, learning never ends and being a role model starts with teaching others and testing your limits.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Alumni Center - Conference Room Main Floor 2
Time: 11:30-11:40am
White, Nicole Swan, Suzanne Intimate Partner Violence and Sexual Assault Among Black College Women at Predominantly White Institutions (PWIs)
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Studies have found that between one fifth to one fourth of college women are sexually victimized over their college years (i.e. Cantor et al., 2015; Fisher et al., 2000). Some researchers have found that physical violence occurs in 20-37% of college relationships (Shorey et al., 2008; Bell & Naugle, 2007). Despite the growing research on college populations, there is a dearth of studies on minority populations, particularly Black students. The majority of the literature on Black women and their experience with sexual assault and intimate partner violence (IPV) has been based on community samples. The few studies done with college populations have been conducted at Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs), which have a different environment than predominantly White institutions (PWIs). Researchers have found a relationship between drinking alcohol and sexual assault and IPV (e.g. Fisher et al., 2000), but victims’ alcohol usage is rarely compared by race. Help-seeking, i.e., pursuing formal and informal resources for support, may be able to alleviate some of the adverse effects of sexual assault and IPV. These adverse outcomes can include depression, a decline in academic performance, and increased alcohol use. No prior studies were found examining the help-seeking behaviors of victimized Black college women at PWIs. The current study seeks to examine the differences between: 1) the prevalence of IPV and sexual violence for Black and White female students; 2) the adverse effects of victimization including depression, negative academic outcomes, and binge drinking by race; and 3) racial differences in help-seeking following victimization. The sample size for the study is 491 Black and 4,914 White female students from three large PWIs in the United States.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Columbia Ballroom B
Time: 10:15
Miller, Karen Arns, Jennifer Exploring Rural Public Library Assets for Asset-Based Community Development
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This study of US rural public libraries utilizes the asset-based community development framework developed by John Kretzmann and John McKnight of the Center of Urban Affairs and Policy Research at Northwestern University. Developed in the early 1990s as an alternative to the needs-driven policy approach to solving community problems, asset-based community development (ABCD) theory informs social work praxis and drives domestic and international community development initiatives. Rural public libraries hold and create economic, cultural, and social capital assets that can be mobilized in community development activities, and this study combines data from the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) and the US Department of Agriculture to: (1) identify variables representing the rural public library economic, cultural, and social capital that is available for ABCD initiatives; (2) explore the differences in the asset holdings of fringe, distant, and remote rural libraries; and (3) investigate relationships between fringe, distant, and remote rural public library asset holdings and library service area population size, geographic regions, political (governance) structures, and community demographics. Utilizing supervised data mining algorithms and nonparametric statistics, this study of rural public library assets enables the identification of under- and highly-capitalized rural public library clusters, provides a new dimension to the description of rural public libraries, and expands the analytical and advocacy toolsets available to rural library researchers and practitioners.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 322
Keller, Dan Privette, Troy
Hassinger, Peyton
Complete Recovery from Ventricular Fibrillation in a Patient Diagnosed with Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy: A Case Report
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Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is a rare diagnosis with increasing exposure in the literature. Frequently triggered by profound physical or emotional stress, the cardiomyopathy is characterized by akinesia of the apex and hyperkinesia of the base of the heart. Patients commonly present with symptoms and electrocardiogram abnormalities suggesting an acute coronary syndrome. However, angiography shows no significant coronary artery occlusion. This case describes a 49-year-old female who presented to the emergency department with three hours of chest pain radiating to her left shoulder and mild dyspnea. Her history and physical exam showed no cardiac risk factors or significant abnormalities. Though stable on initial evaluation, the patient’s cardiac rhythm suddenly converted to ventricular fibrillation. She was successfully defibrillated and immediately awoke alert and coherent. Cardiac catheterization and echocardiogram showed severe apical akinesis and compensatory basal hyperkinesia consistent with Takotsubo cardiomyopathy. She underwent placement of an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) and was discharged to home on hospital day 4. The patient returned in three months for a follow up transthoracic echocardiogram which showed that the myocardial function had returned to normal. The present case serves to add to the growing base of literature describing Takotsubo cardiomyopathy. Failure to recognize this syndrome can lead to fatal arrhythmias and other life-threatening consequences in patients. Given its reversibility, Takotsubo cardiomyopathy deserves further attention so that increased recognition may continue to positively influence outcomes of the disease.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 386
Le, Thy Patten, Karen Experiencing the other side of the world
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As an international student from Vietnam, I have had many chances to view the world through my studies abroad. My global learning journey has become a unique aspect of my life, and it has shaped me into who I am today. Coming from a developing country, I have been able to experience a brand-new atmosphere here in America. Through all the differing politics, life styles, and points of views I have learned to keep an open mind, because every story has 2 or more sides. I have been able to meet many people from all different walks of life, and through my encounters I have grown as a person. I learned that in order to treat everyone with the respect they deserve, you must not jump to conclusions without understanding all sides of the issue. Besides learning about the importance of open mindedness, I have also learned to enjoy the unexpected. Through my studies in American colleges, I have been able to take a wide variety of classes. Some of these classes were exactly what I thought they would be, while others caught me off guard. Subjects that I thought would waste my time, ended up becoming new found interests. Lastly, studying here in the United States has taught me to pursue my passions. I learned that no matter what your dream is, if you pursue it and work hard at it, you can achieve anything.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Alumni Center - Conference Room Main Floor 3
Time: 2:00-2:10pm
Madormo, Victor Wang, Guiren Dielectrophoretic Separation of Premalignant Cancer Cells Using a Microfluidics Chip
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The work is to achieve separation of cancerous HKc/DR-61 cells from benign and premalignant HKc/HPV16 cells through use of a microfluidics chip primarily using dielectrophoretic separation to develop a method to selectively move target cells away from nontarget cells.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 278
Curl, Melissa DeWeil, David Two Heads Are Better Than One
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The Capstone Scholars Program promotes active engagement both inside and outside the classroom in an effort to get students involved and to create well-rounded individuals. This two-year educational enrichment program encourages personal growth through leadership, service, social, and academic events that provide opportunities for engaged learning and interaction with faculty and peers. After graduating from this program and becoming a Capstone Scholars Fellow, I knew I wanted to stay close to the program, so I joined the first ever Capstone Scholars Programming Council. As the Vice President of Academic Affairs, I coordinated with other academic offices on campus to provide scholars with exclusive, personalized experiences. It was through this experience that I gained insight into the value of building relationships and working together to create something much bigger than myself. As a team, we had to learn how to communicate effectively, manage our time, and prepare for the unexpected. As a team, we had to figure out how to become one functional, efficient unit so that we could leave our legacy and truly impact the lives of the scholars we set out to help. The skills I developed as a member of the Programming Council will carry forth as I continue my education and begin my career.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 248
Henbest, Victoria Apel, Kenn Is a Systematic Analysis of Spelling a Valid Measure of Orthographic and Phonological Awareness Skills in First Grade Students?
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The relation between students’ scores from a spelling error analysis and their performance on measures of phonological and orthographic pattern awareness were examined. Data were analyzed from 37 first grade students with typical expressive language skills who completed a spelling task, a phonological awareness task, and an orthographic pattern awareness task. The students’ spelling skills were measured using the Spelling Sensitivity System (SSS; Masterson & Apel, 2010). The SSS parses words into elements based on their sounds and then assigns a score to each of the elements based on the linguistic skills represented in the spelling. Elements that were not represented with a letter or letter combination received a score of zero. Elements that were represented by a letter or letter combinations, but that were orthographically illegal received a score of one. Elements represented with a legal, but incorrect spelling earned a score of two, and correctly spelled elements received a score of three. Results indicated that there was a negative correlation between scores of zero on the SSS and performance on the phonological awareness task (r = -.57). There also was a moderate negative correlation (r = -.41) between scores of one and two on the SSS and performance on the measure of orthographic pattern awareness as well as a weak negative correlation between scores of one and two and the measure of phonological awareness (r = -.39). These findings offer initial evidence for support of the SSS as a valid measure of phonological awareness and orthographic knowledge and provide initial educational implications for the use of these measures in the classroom setting.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 295
Sriram, Shyamkumar Khan, Mahmud Exploring the Health System of Taiwan: An Unique Study Abroad Experience
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Taiwan with a population of 23 million has one of the best health systems in the world. Taiwan achieved universal health coverage in 1995 with the establishment of National Health Insurance (NHI) system. Health system of Taiwan provides high level of access to its citizens, comprehensive coverage with high quality and relatively low cost serving as the global model for an effective, efficient, equitable, high quality and humane system. Taiwan has achieved an Infant Mortality Rate of 4.5/1000 live births, which is lower than the US rate. Life expectancy at birth has reached 80 year mark. The health system of Taiwan is highly responsive with a satisfaction rate of 73% among its citizens, highlighting its popularity. The study abroad experience last year provided great opportunities to visit the National Health Insurance Bureau, a number of hospitals such as the Show Chwan health care system, China Medical University health system and the traditional Chinese Medicine Museum and Chinese Medicine Factory. The study abroad experience helped us to meet and learn from the experts who were involved in designing the National Health Insurance system of Taiwan. Outside of classroom, the experience exposed us to Taiwanese culture, food and a variety of other activities from visiting famous tourist destinations like the Sun-Moon Lake to practicing Tai-Chi. Many developing and developed countries are struggling with performance, quality, equity and financial sustainability challenges in their health systems and Taiwan appears to be a good model to carefully evaluate and emulate. The newer challenges that Taiwanese health system is facing are epidemiological transition, demographic transition with relatively high proportion of elderly and declining births which will affect long-term financial sustainability of the system. Despite providing universal, comprehensive, high-quality care with little or no restrictions on the use of specialized medical care, Taiwan’s national health expenditure is still relatively low, less than 7% of GDP of the country.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 318
Robinson, Hunter Martin, Ashley Communication In Production Meetings
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While on spring break I will be attending the South Easter Theatre Conference and plan on partaking in many different workshops as well as a design competition about stage management and leadership in the theatre. As a senior stage manager, it is exciting to hear from professionals and make the connection between my classroom work and what happens in professional theatres. The independent study I am currently working on is communication in a production meetings. This goes hand and hand with the show I am also head stage manager of at the moment. I conducted interviews with five different people. From professional stage manager to leadership professors. It was important to me to hear from many different people on how they thought meetings worked the best. I then created a survey for everyone in my meetings to fill out after the meeting was over. I have planned how each production meeting is going to be run slightly different over the course of the production. I am excited and interest to see the responses I get back from the people reviewing me. I hope to bring what I learn in the workshops at the conference back to implement into my independent study. I picked this topic as my independent study because it is something I personally struggle with and wanted to gain knowledge and get better at it while I was still in a student atmosphere.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 249
LIU, ZHONGHAO Hu, Jianjun Deep Learning in Bioinformatics
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Deep learning has gained hug success in computer vision and language processing. It's viewed as the most promising future of strong AI. We are trying to apply this powerful computation tools on huge datasets from Bioinformatics hoping to solve some most challenging and critical problems in this area.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 356
Rogers, Jane Freedman, Daniel Children with Hidden Disabilities
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I have been a camp counselor at a camp for children with diabetes. During my time as a counselor, I have seen how children with type 1 diabetes are able to empower and connect with each other through a common link- having a "hidden disability". Diabetes is not usually seen by the "naked eye" or by a stranger, the presence of this disease only becomes known until someone with the disease makes it known or an observer notices it.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 250
Jahan, Merina Uline, Mark Molecular modeling in drug delivery for cardiovascular repair: a physical insight towards solving experimental problems with theoretical approach
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Overexpression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) following myocardial infarction (MI) is linked to deleterious left ventricle remodeling and heart failure. Current research has focused on introducing a therapeutically relevant concentration of effective MMP inhibitor to the MI site to mitigate the harmful tissue remodeling. Theoretical molecular level studies provide an effective platform for designing novel delivery systems for MMP inhibition that can provide valuable insights for experimental researchers. This drug delivery system consists of a broad spectrum MMP inhibitor drug PD-166793 that is bound to a polymer in a nanoparticle-polymer vehicle. A molecular model using single chain mean field theory (SCMFT) is used to scan the wide range of possible design parameters. The molecular theory properly accounts for the highly non-additive coupling of molecular interactions among all the species. The size, shape, electrical properties and physical conformations of the polymer, drug and solvent are taken into account. The model is used to study the variation of this binding with changing pH, salt concentration, grafting density and length of the polymer. Experimental studies have shown that this system is capable of retaining PD-166793 at more than 100 times the inhibitory concentration against MMP-2 with a particle concentration of 2.5mg/mL. The model is used as a tool for continual improvements in binding of PD-166793 by providing valuable feedback on how the variations of system parameters affect the binding efficiency.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Columbia Ballroom A
Time: 1:10
Saidy, Clint Harik, Ramy
Bayoumi, Abdel
Part Criticality in inventory Management
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Due to uncertainties in demand, some parts might go out of stock during the manufacturing process. This might lead to delays in delivery if an out-of-stock part is critical in this process. Hence, being out-of-stock might lead to additional costs and customer lost is among them. A back order is a customer order that cannot be filled when presented or on time, and for which the customer is prepared to wait for some time. The percentage of items backordered and the number of backorder days are important measures of the quality of a company's customer service and the effectiveness of its inventory management. Backorders are an important factor in Inventory Management analysis. If a business consistently sees items in backorder then this could be taken as a signal that it is running too lean, and that it is losing out on business by not providing the products demanded by its customers. On the other hand, businesses incur costs to store, track and insure inventory. Inventories that are mismanaged can create significant financial problems for a business, whether the mismanagement results in an inventory surplus or an inventory shortage. Two frequently applied inventory-management approaches are the just-in-time (JIT) method, where businesses plan to obtain parts as they are needed instead of maintaining high inventory levels, and materials requirement planning (MRP), which schedules material deliveries based on sales forecasts. To balance JIT style of inventory management, manufacturers and retailers must work together to monitor the availability of resources on the manufacturer’s end and consumer demand on the retailer’s. Or else, JIT inventory management can be risky. The MRP inventory management method is sales-forecast defendant. This means that manufacturers must have accurate sales records to enable accurate planning of inventory needs and to communicate those needs with materials suppliers in a timely manner. In order to achieve a balance between efficient customer service and low inventory cost, an optimization model should be set in place. The main problem in this situation is dealing with a part that is critical among most of the bills of material. A part criticality index will be generated in order to persistently target critical parts on inventory floor. In this paper, we determined the Part Criticality defined as Compound Global Index. A set of simple products having common parts was employed in order to validate the algorithm. Results showed that on the short term, Criticality might vary form one term to another. This is mainly caused by the variability of demand and supply. Furthermore, this criticality was affected by the inventory policy set in place for this simulation. A further step would be to simulate other inventory policies in order to study their effect on the Part Criticality. As for the long run results, it was realized that one part was the most critical. This short run/long run differentiation helps the management have a plan to tackle parts that are critical on the short term as well as creating a long term improvement policies to decrease the long term part criticality. Our next step is to create a program that optimizes inventory management by identifying the criticality of parts to a company’s production. The program will allow a company to insert data from their production line and the most important parts will then be determined using a part criticality algorithm. These parts will then be given priority in the preexisting inventory management system. The long term goal for this project will be to create a wiki-like database where companies involved in the aerospace industry can use our part criticality algorithm to find the most important parts and then input these parts in a database to be matched with local manufacturers in South Carolina. This would be a part of the actions taken in order to get more engagement of local suppliers in the advancement of the aerospace market in South Carolina.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 360
Eldridge, Melissa Stephenson, Kathryn 5-2-1-0 Approach to Address Childhood Obesity
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The project aims to provide the ability to identify children over the age of 3 years old with a BMI in the 95th percentile or greater by using an obesity questionnaire at each well child check, then document specific goal focused healthy lifestyle modification and provide counseling with a specific handout by 2016 for CHOC patients. We compared the 5 different areas (documentation of BMI, questionnaire, goal setting, scheduled follow up and counseling with handouts) pre and post intervention. Documentation of BMI and healthy lifestyle questionnaire with goals improved to 100 percent. Scheduling follow up improved to 80 percent and counseling with handouts improved to 77 percent. In conclusion, the obesity questionnaire serves as an aid in screening for pediatric obesity, engaging children and their family in setting goal and education on how implement those goals into their lifestyles.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 401
Stewart, Stephanie Magwood-Golston, Jametta
Vaughan, Krista
Fortier, Forrest
Accountable Care Unit: Patient-centered Care Model Designed for Teamwork and Accountability
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Traditional Nursing Medical Units have a fragmented culture care model in which the Physician, Nurse, Nurse Techs, Pharmacists, Case Managers and other health care team members work in silos. Customarily this model has not included the patient in the decision -making process when determining the plan of care for their hospital course. The Accountable Care Unit (ACU™) promotes a unified interdisciplinary team where the patient is engaged as an active participant in their care. The ACU™ care model highlights the need for bedside nurses to recognize their ability to impact clinical decision-making. The standardization and accountability promoted by this care model enhanced employee comfort in providing feedback on issues within the unit. The ACU™ model of care transforms traditional fragmented care into an interdisciplinary collaboration.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 411
Yaw, Haley Bess, Jennifer Connecting Passions with Opportunities
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As a military brat, I have always been passionate about veterans and veteran issues. My career goals were to become a military physical therapist and eventually work in the Veterans Administration to craft policies for veteran healthcare. The Office of Fellowships and Scholar Programs (OFSP) connected my passions with the Truman scholarship, a financial grant that aids students’ graduate studies in any area of public service. Although I was ultimately not named a Truman Scholar, I learned more about myself in the process of applying for the scholarship than I had in any of my other undergraduate experiences. Applying for the Truman Scholarship pushed me to investigate graduate school programs that met my career goal needs, allowed me to create connections with faculty and staff with similar interests, and helped me create my own independent research study with student veterans the spring of my senior year. Working with OFSP was one of the most valuable experiences of my college career. OFSP did not just help me discover what I was passionate about, they pushed me to apply myself and find a path to fix the problems in society that I cared about.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Alumni Center - Conference Room Main Floor 2
Time: 1:00-1:10pm
Boling, Mitchell Carnes, Laura A humanistic approach to student services: Academic advising as a transformational practice
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Given my course of study in both organizational leadership and liberal studies, I have begun to approach societal problems as solvable in two ways: 1) as a human centered, whole person approach which recognizes and celebrates agency within individuals and the collective group and 2) as transformational versus transactional acquisitions. While serving as a Peer Advisor at Lancaster, I began to notice the importance academic advising may have upon the holistic student experience. I understand academic to be the summation of guidance and resources designed to enhance the student experience, and it may serve as an avenue for mentorship into a student’s chosen career path. Currently, USC Lancaster employs faculty and staff to perform academic advising. As the university begins to define what it means to be an academic advisor, I find it important to include humanistic and transformational practices within the spectrum of academic advising. I am currently working with the Director of Student Engagement and Success at USC Lancaster to implement a walk-in summer advisement center for students in need of academic advisement. Currently, USC Lancaster does not have an advisement center, and the summer advisement center will be used to pilot the importance of a center dedicated to academic advisement procedures and processes that focus on the “whole” student in transformational ways versus a transactional approach tied to solely course registration. During my Discover USC presentation, I will highlight the importance of this plan along with recommend solutions, and a detailed plan for implementation while addressing the importance of basic needs, emotional intelligence, and the will to serve as ways to ensure the academic advisement center is truly transformative.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 180
Reid, Mary DeWeil, David Growing through Peer Leadership
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My four years at the University of South Carolina has provided me multiple opportunities to grow as a leader and a person in and out of the classroom. When I applied to be a Resident Mentor my freshman year, I did so because I just wanted to stay on campus another year. While clearly this is not the best reason for applying to the position, three years later I have not regretting filling out that application once. Serving as a Resident Mentor has taught me so much about myself and the people I surround myself with. I was able to assist first year students transition to college, many like me who did not know a single person when entering Carolina. As I grew in the position, I took on more roles to help my fellow RMs including becoming a RM Training Leader and serving as President of RM Council. Both of these positions opened my eye to what others in the role were experiencing and what we could do as a collective group to help. As my confidence strengthened, I got more involved becoming a Changing Carolina Peer Leader (CCPL). The position allowed me to work with more Carolinians and educate U101 classes on healthy relationships and what it means to be an accountable bystander. The RM and CCPL role worked extremely well together as I was able to see what my residents were facing and take that into the programs I was planning through student health. Both roles were influential in developing my communication skills, my ability to work on a team, and most importantly they ignited my passion to help others.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Alumni Center - Conference Room Main Floor 3
Time: 11:00-11:10am
Umling, Natalie Thunell, Robert Deglacial variability in Eastern Equatorial Pacific deep-water ventilation and oxygenation Natalie Umling
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The last deglaciation is marked by two periods of gradual atmospheric CO2 rise during the Younger Dryas and Heinrich Stadial 1. These millennial-scale events are overprinted by periods of rapid (100-200 yrs) increase at 11.7 ka, 14.8 ka, and 16.3 ka. The deep and intermediate ocean is thought to be a major contributor of excess atmospheric CO2 during the last deglaciation. However, the mechanisms associated with oceanic respired carbon storage are not as well constrained. Changes in the efficiency of the biological pump and in meridional overturning circulation have both been cited as possible mechanisms of respired carbon storage. We investigate the role of these mechanisms in the Eastern Equatorial Pacific (EEP) over the last 25,000 years by developing records of ventilation and oxygenation. This study focuses on sediment core TR163-23 located at 2,730 m water-depth off the Galapagos margin. This core site is currently bathed in Pacific Deep Water with thermocline depth waters influenced by upwelling Equatorial Undercurrent waters.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Columbia Ballroom A
Time: 11:10
Allen, Joshua Richardson, Susan Is There a Disinfection By-Product Problem in Flint?
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The issue of lead contamination in the city of Flint, MI has been well documented over the past year. The Flint, MI Water Crisis (April 2014 – present) resulted from an ill-fated decision to switch from Detroit water with corrosion control, to Flint River water without corrosion control. Although lead levels are closer to normal, recent reports of skin rashes have sparked questions surrounding tap water in some Flint homes. This study aims to investigate the presence of contaminants, including disinfection by-products (DBPs), in the hot water used for showering and bathing in the homes of residents in Flint. DBPs are formed when natural organic matter (NOM) reacts with disinfectants (e.g., chlorine) as well as bromide and iodide present in source water. Extensive quantitative and comprehensive, broadscreen qualitative analyses were performed in order to identify a possible source for the reported skin rashes. For comparison, waters from Detroit (using chlorine and Lake Huron as the same source) and two cities in Georgia (also using chlorine) were also analyzed. This work will shine light on possible harmful contaminants present in Flint tap water and give direction on what changes could be made for improved water quality.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 297
Tobin, Sarah Pawelek, Kasia Impact of a waning vaccine and altered behavior on the spread of influenza
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Influenza remains one of the major infectious diseases that targets humankind. Understanding within-host dynamics of the virus and how it translates into the spread of the disease at a population level can help us obtain more accurate disease outbreak predictions. We created an ordinary differential equation model with parameter estimates based on the disease symptoms score data to determine various disease stages and parameters associated with infectiousness and disease progression. Having various stages with different intensities of symptoms enables us to incorporate spontaneous behavior change due to the onset/offset of disease symptoms. Additionally, we incorporate the effect of a waning vaccine on delaying the time and decreasing the size of an epidemic peak. This study further provides information on pharmaceutical and non-pharmaceutical interventions during an influenza epidemic.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 81
Norton, Duncan Stallworth, James Oral Case Presentation Rating Tool Increases the Amount of Formal Feedback Given to Third Year Medical Students
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Providing feedback to medical students is important to their education during their clinical years. Oral presentations play an integral role in medical education but can be difficult to effectively formulate for medical students when they encounter more sophisticated patients. This study used an anonymous survey clerkship to evaluate if there was a lack of formal feedback to third year medical students during their pediatric clerkship and if the introduction of a validated oral case presentation rating tool would increase the amount of feedback given in an inpatient setting. The survey showed only 14.3% of students received formal feedback on their oral case presentations in the inpatient setting. The post intervention group revealed that 50% of students received formal feedback after the introduction of the rating tool. The survey also revealed the distribution of providers (intern, senior resident, attending) giving feedback did not change with the introduction of the rating tool. Results also show that third year medical students believe formal feedback is beneficial to their medical education. In conclusion, this study shows that a validated oral case presentation rating tool is effective in increasing the amount of formal feedback given in the inpatient setting, but suggests that the rating tool may need to be expanded to all clinical settings to maximize the amount of formal feedback interactions for medical students during their pediatric clerkship.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 386
Ebinger, Jessica Castleberry, Lauren Is 'Baby-Friendly' Actually 'Mommy-Friendly?' The Baby-Friendly Initiative and Effect on Patient Satisfaction
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Background and Significance: The Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative was launched by the World Health Organization in 1991. Baby-Friendly USA was created in 1997 and has specific criteria that hospitals must meet to become “Baby-Friendly.” No studies have been reported in the literature about patient satisfaction with this initiative. In this study, an anonymous survey was conducted of patients at our Baby-Friendly designated hospital to determine patient experience and satisfaction. Methods: Patients ages 16 and older who delivered living infants at Palmetto Health Richland during the 4 month study period were given anonymous surveys during postpartum clinic visits. Results: A total of 170 surveys were collected; 145 surveys were analyzed. Of these, 28% delivered via Cesarean section; 72% delivered vaginally. 28.5% of patients responded “neutral or disagree” when asked if they were able to recover on postpartum. Those who underwent a Cesarean section were more likely to respond negatively when asked if they felt like they could safely take care of their infant (P<.05). Of the 103 patients who planned on breastfeeding exclusively at admission, 26.2% switched to formula feeding and 24.3% switched to breastfeeding with formula supplementation at discharge. Of those using formula, 35.7% felt they were inadequately informed about formula feeding, and 26% felt they were made to feel guilty about formula feeding. Conclusion: Baby-Friendly policies can have an impact on postpartum patient wellbeing. This study demonstrates many patients need additional support caring for their newborn postpartum. Half of patient who planned on breastfeeding switched to a form of formula feeding upon discharge; many of these patients felt shamed regarding their decision or inadequately educated on formula feeding. More support and education should be given to the formula-feeding population.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 391
Hutchinson, Angelica Den Ouden, Dirk Separation of Vowels in Aphasic and Apraxic Speakers
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Strokes can result in a deterioration or even complete loss of normal functions such as motor movements, eye sight, and language capabilities, just to name a few. Apraxia of speech is one of those deficits that can occur, as is Aphasia. Both are language deficits that can greatly effect a person’s ability to comprehend and communicate with words; apraxia is an articulatory movement issue, while aphasia is a problem concerning the connections in the brain for language processing and production. These two deficits can express themselves in a similar manner. However, they are two different issues that require different therapies. In this study, we looked to see if the analysis of the vowel formants would allow us to better differentiate between those with aphasia and those with apraxia. We hypothesized that those with apraxia would have altered vowel formants due to their inability to properly manipulate their articulatory muscles. This study utilized speech samples, taken from 20 patients telling the story of Cinderella at three different stages during therapy. The formants of the primary vowels of context words were then analyzed. Preliminary results show that the vowel formants for those with apraxia are different than the formants of those with normal speech or aphasia.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 79
Galkina, Elena Den Ouden, Dirk Vowel formant dispersion reflects severity of Apraxia of Speech
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Apraxia of speech (AOS) after stroke in adults is typically challenging to differentiate from aphasic phonological planning deficits and from dysarthria. Comorbidity of AOS with aphasia means that most speakers with AOS produce a mix of errors generated at different functional levels of production planning (Code, 1998; Den Ouden, 2011). This impedes the objective assessment of the relative severity of the impairments. Articulatory and acoustic studies have revealed high correlations between the presence or severity of AOS and consonant production accuracy, but not for vowel production (Jacks, Mathes, & Marquardt, 2010). The present study focused on the extent to which vowel formant dispersion can be used as a predictor variable for the presence and severity of AOS, as distinguished from aphasia and dysarthria. We hypothesized that if AOS is an articulatory (motor) planning deficit, this should also be reflected systematically in increased variance in vowel formants, which rely on subtle temporal and positional interactions between articulators, and a stable vowel space. With respect to the latter, we also hypothesized that the size of an individual’s vowel space might be affected by AOS and/or dysarthria, in that the deficit might cause all articulations to be generally more ‘centered’ and less enunciated. We measured formants in vowels produced during spontaneous speech by stroke survivors with and without AOS, and assessed to what extent formant characteristics, were predictive of aphasia, AOS and dysarthria, as well as AOS severity, based on the Apraxia of Speech Rating Scale (ASRS; Strand, Duffy, Clark, & Josephs, 2014). Picture-description speech samples from the participants (n=53) were used to measure speech production deficits during connected speech. Vowel boundaries were identified manually in Praat (Boersma, 2001), based on the visible formant structure (Thomas, 2011), and labeled using the SAMPA transcription convention (Wells, 1997). First (F1), second (F2), and third (F3) formants from the midpoint of stressed monophthongs /ɑ, æ, ɛ, i, ɪ, ɒ, ɔ, ʊ, ʌ, u, ɜ/ in content words were extracted (Lennes, 2003). As a measure of individual vowel formant dispersion, standard deviations around the means were computed for normalized F1, F2 and F3 for all vowels separately, and then averaged for each individual. We investigated the extent to which articulatory problems with vowels are associated with the presence and severity of AOS, relative to problems with consonant articulation. The most consistent predictors of both the presence and severity of AOS, turn out to be F2 dispersion and (voiced) VOT dispersion. The apraxic deficit, therefore, does appear to be across-the-board, affecting vowel articulation as much as consonant articulation. The deficit is primarily characterized by articulatory instability, so a lack of consistency between subsequent articulations, within speakers. We also speculate that articulatory searching may lead to generally more open vowel articulations, reflected in a raising of the first formant. Vowel space itself, however, is not consistently affected in AOS, dysarthria or aphasia. Acoustic measures of both consonants and vowels may improve classification of motor speech impairments after stroke, and differentiation from aphasic output problems. References Boersma, P. (2001). Praat, a system for doing phonetics by computer. Glot International, 5(9/10), 341-345. Code, C. (1998). Models, theories and heuristics in apraxia of speech. Clinical Linguistics and Phonetics, 12(1), 47-65. Den Ouden, D. B. (2011). Phonological disorders. In B. Botma, N. C. Kula & K. Nasukawa (Eds.), Continuum Companion to Phonology (pp. 320-340). London, New York: Continuum. Jacks, A., Mathes, K., & Marquardt, T. (2010). Vowel acoustics in adults with apraxia of speech. J Speech Lang Hear Res, 53(1), 61-74. doi: 1092-4388_2009_08-0017 [pii] 10.1044/1092-4388(2009/08-0017) Lennes, M. (2003). Collect_formant_data_from_files.praat [Praat script], from http://www.helsinki.fi/~lennes/praat-scripts/public Strand, E. A., Duffy, J. R., Clark, H. M., & Josephs, K. (2014). The Apraxia of Speech Rating Scale: a tool for diagnosis and description of apraxia of speech. J Commun Disord, 51, 43-50. doi: 10.1016/j.jcomdis.2014.06.008 Thomas, E. R. (2011). Sociophonetics: An Introduction: Palgrave Macmillan. Wells, J. C. (1997). SAMPA computer readable phonetic alphabet. In D. Gibbon, R. Moore & R. Winski (Eds.), Handbook of Standards and Resources for Spoken Language Systems (Vol. Part IV, section B). Berlin and New York: Mouton de Gruyter.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 335
Cahl, Douglas Voulgaris, George Creating a low cost surface ocean measurement system using autonomous unmanned aerial vehicles (drones)
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The ongoing process of the creation and theoretical validity of a rapidly deployable low-cost unmanned aerial system (UAS/drone) to remotely image the ocean for calculating surface ocean currents will be presented. Although still in development, this system will be capable of time critical surface current measurement applications such as search and rescue and pollution trajectory assessment. Additionally, this system will be used to assess the accuracy of already deployed surface current measurement systems (i.e. radar systems and buoys). Although remote surface ocean current measurement systems have rapidly advanced over the recent decades, there are still many instances where no measurements are available or the costs are prohibitive. Surface current observations from HF radar deployments worldwide provide realtime measurements of the coastal ocean, however, most of the world’s coastlines have still have no HF radar deployments. Rapidly deployable HF radar systems are rare and require road access. Satellite Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) surface ocean current measurements can potentially cover the global ocean, but are limited in application as the measurement repeat time is on the order of a week. A more recent system, the Remote Ocean Current Imaging System (ROCIS), uses aerial photography to estimate the surface ocean current. Although accurate and rapidly deployable (it is mounted on a dual engine airplane), the costs of this system are prohibitively expensive for most academic research and many operational applications. The creative aspect of this project is to use the ROCIS method with a drone, providing a low cost and rapidly deployable system for calculating surface ocean currents that does not require any additional infrastructure, such as roads, airports, or beach access. The creation of this measurement system will allow academic researchers and operational oceanographers to measure surface ocean currents at a much lower cost than has been possible previously.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Columbia Ballroom A
Time: 1:15
Luckey, Briana
Wigmore, Jerrod
Benigni, Andrea
Chen, Yan
Distributed Monitoring and Control of Photovoltaic Generation
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In recent decades the world has come to realize our dependence on fossil fuels cannot be permanent due to their eventual decline in availability and their adverse effects on the environment. In order to end our dependence on these fuels we have sought new ways to produce power in the form of hydroelectric, wind, and photovoltaic (PV) sources. Especially with the introduction of tax breaks and other incentives, the installation of photovoltaics in commercial and residential areas has dramatically increased in the past decade. Although there are numerous benefits associated with this growth, there are still issues arising due to our current centralized grid infrastructure. On a clear day, distributed PV generation can cause node voltages to exceed the normal range leading to issues such as equipment overloading, shortened lifespan of voltage controlling devices, and a reduction in efficiency of the grid. In order to prevent such fluctuations new methods must be used to track the voltage profile of distribution systems, and then make corrections based on these measurements. We are developing and testing a fully distributed peer to peer approach for monitoring and control of photovoltaic generation in distribution grids and we will implement the developed algorithm on embedded control units and we will test it using a hardware-in-the-loop approach.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 88
Johnson, Danielle Campbell, Berry Velamentous Cord Insertion into the Dividing Membrane of Dichorionic Diamniotic Twins
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Background: Twin gestation and assisted reproductive technology are two well-described risk factors for abnormal placentation and anomalous cord insertion. Velamentous umbilical cord insertion has been associated with adverse perinatal outcomes, particularly when not diagnosed prenatally. Case: We present the case of a dichorionic diamniotic twin gestation with velamentous cord insertion of twin B into the dividing membrane. This pregnancy was the result of a frozen embryo transfer of two embryos. Ultrasound evaluation at 17 weeks gestation revealed the cord insertion of twin B into the intervening membrane with insertion at the posterior interface of the twin membrane coursing to the anterior interface and then inserting into the placenta of twin B. Twin A was found to have a single umbilical artery with normal cord insertion. Maternal Fetal Medicine followed this patient with serial growth ultrasound examinations and antenatal testing with umbilical artery Doppler twice weekly starting at 28 weeks gestation. Delivery was by repeat cesarean section at 35 weeks after PPROM of twin A, which was well tolerated by both twins. Discussion: This case confirms the increased risk of velamentous cord insertion in twins conceived by assisted reproductive technology and describes a unique cord insertion, with the cord traversing the dividing membrane prior to insertion. It highlights the importance of screening high-risk populations for abnormal placentation and anomalous cord insertion.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 387
Cragun, Ormonde Nyberg, Anthony Narcissistic CEO Selection
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Despite a long history of the study of narcissism, a lack of evidence exists around what leads to the selection of a more narcissistic Chief Executive Officer (CEO). Narcissism is a multifaceted personality trait that combines grandiosity, attention seeking, an unrealistic inflated self-view, a need for that self-view to be continuously reinforced through self-regulation, and a general lack of regard for others. Narcissism is related to visionary, bold, and entrepreneurial behavior. As such, narcissists may have some appeal to boards. Nevertheless, narcissists can create performance volatility and damage personal relationships creating long-term performance uncertainty. Since business environmental characteristics constrain a board’s strategy and that strategy affects the ideal CEO candidate, some environmental circumstances may be more likely to result in the selection of a narcissistic CEO than others. From a sample of 76 fortune 1000 companies I test weather environmental dynamism, environmental munificence, and firm performance are associated with the selection of a more narcissistic CEO.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 292
Villacreses, Camila Spinale, Francis Discovery Through Undergraduate Research
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I have participated in undergraduate research at USC under Dr. Frank Spinale since the summer after my sophomore year. I assist in our laboratory which concentrates on cardiovascular surgical research in animals. The motivation behind my participation in research is a drive to learn more about the connection between discovery in biological research and how it leads to advancement in medicine. In this experience, I learned about specific concepts behind molecular biology, as well as correct procedures behind conducting research, how to use statistics in data analysis, how to conduct and measure an echocardiograph, and how to conduct my own research project and then present my findings – which I was able to do at the American Heart Association in November of 2016. This experience has been significant to me because it has shown me the impact that research can have on medical treatment and how important it is to continuously support discovery and advancement. Going forward, I am working on a manuscript for the project I was given in which I will be published as first author. I look forward to supporting and perhaps participating in research as a future physician as well as using medical research findings in my practice as a physician.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 224
Rogers, Elizabeth Galloway, Laura Get Lost, Get Found: How I Discovered My Purpose Through Community Service
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People serve to help others: that is at the very core of community service. However, we don't realize that when we serve others, we also gain knowledge of ourselves. One of Mahatma Gandhi's most well-known quotes is, "The best way to find yourself is to lose yourself in the service of others." I never really understood what that meant until I became involved in community service. Though I have served in various capacities my entire life, it wasn't until my college years that I found how much service impacted me. Through mission trips to Kingston, Jamaica, and through pursuing a career in education, I came to the realization that my passion in life lies in the service of others. Being able to aid those who do not have the equal access to opportunities and resources has become something that I want to work towards, and strive to apply to my future position as a librarian. Losing myself in service to others has allowed me to find myself and my purpose in life.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 209
Nkwonta, Chigozie Estrada, Robin Assessing the knowledge, attitude and uptake of HPV preventive measures: A qualitative study of international university students
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Background: Human papilloma virus (HPV) infections and related diseases are responsible for high morbidity and mortality rates globally. Though preventable, HPV infection remains the most sexually transmitted infection globally. Preventive measures such as HPV vaccination and Papanicolau (Pap) smear have been underutilized globally, and when international students move to the United States, they may be at increased risk for HPV infection. However, little research has examined their knowledge surrounding HPV. Objective: The aim of this qualitative descriptive study was to explore university international students’ knowledge, attitudes, and practices regarding HPV and prevention. Methods: Participants included undergraduate and graduate international students at a southeastern university. Data included transcripts of audio-recorded interviews and a focus group discussion, which were then analyzed using thematic analysis. Results: Participants (n=15) included 8 females and 7 males, with countries of origin including Nigeria, China, India, Bangladesh, and Saudi Arabia. Five themes emerged: Sources of Health Information; Differences in Health and Healthcare Systems; Limited Knowledge about HPV, associated Cancers, and Prevention; Attitudes toward Health, Vaccination, and Screening; and Student Expectations, Perceptions, and Suggestions. The students had limited knowledge about HPV and associated diseases, as well as gendered assumptions about HPV risk and negative attitudes toward heath and healthcare. However, they expressed willingness to learn more about their health, and offered suggestions in how to target HPV education for international students. Conclusions: Our findings address a knowledge gap regarding international students and HPV. These students represent an important catch-up population for HPV vaccination and cervical cancer screening. Healthcare providers in variety of health settings, including student health centers, can use this evidence to design interventions that meet the needs of this vulnerable population. Future research should examine differences between students based on country/culture of origin in order to more effectively target and message specific international students.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Columbia Ballroom C
Time: 11:05
Carey, Kevin Hunter, Stuart Lessons Learned through Servant Leadership
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Throughout my undergraduate career at the University of South Carolina I have acted in many capacities as a student leader. Of these experiences, my position as a Resident Mentor in the Housing Department has provided me the most opportunities for both personal and professional growth. Serving as a Resident Mentor has allowed me to gain a plethora of transferable skills while fostering the success of my peers in the Carolinian community. My experience in this role has taught me the importance of interpersonal skills and their role in creating a culture which values diversity and inclusion. As a result of my experiences, I have been able to identify and better understand both my values and beliefs. With this knowledge in hand, I will be able to enter the professional workforce as a balanced and dynamic leader.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 174
Yan, Wuzhao Zhang, Bin Lebesgue sampling based fault diagnosis and prognosis design with application to Lithium-ion batteries
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The concept of Lebesgue sampling is introduced into FDP and a novel Lebesgue sampling-based FDP approach with an philosophy of ``execution only when necessary'' or an ``as-needed'' basis. With this new feature is developed, the LS-FDP enables the FDP on systems with limited computation capabilities and enables the distributed FDP.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Columbia Ballroom A
Time: 10:55
Horne, Virginia Lomicka, Lara Closed Borders? Closed Minds? Closed Hearts.
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I studied abroad my junior year in an effort to seek out enriching experiences that could help me understand the larger scope of the world around me. As an International Studies major I knew I wanted to study abroad during my time at the University of South Carolina. Copenhagen, Denmark was a great place for this experience because it provided me access to a different culture, economy and society with the comfort of the English language. I enrolled in a European Politics program for the curriculum and the enrichment experiences around Copenhagen and Europe while living in a homestay just outside of Copenhagen to increase my interaction with Danish culture. I did this to understand how the EU functioned and to witness the major actors of European politics with our class facilitated trips while making sure to engage with the Danish society around me. I learned about Danish culture and the importance of International Relations in a tangible way during my time abroad as I witnessed the Syrian Refugee Crisis from the perspective of a European. The importance of the world around us is critical to understand during this time of interconnectedness and globalization. We as American citizens and citizens of the world need to engage and work harder to be more actively involved in the cultures of the world around us. Through my time abroad I learned that I’m interested in living abroad again, specifically working in International Relations, International Law, or non-profit work in some way. I don’t want to stop experiencing or stop learning new things because that, for me, would be equivalent to no longer living.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 210
Daum, Carrye Brooks, Courtney TRIAGE TRENDS: EXAMINING PATTERNS AMONGST PATIENT EDUCATION,
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Background and significance: Overutilization of emergency departments, including specialized obstetrical triage units, is a common problem in the United States. Although many patients who present to emergency facilities also have a primary healthcare provider, that source of care is not always felt to be readily available or accessible to them. Demographic disparities, including age and race, have also been discovered in the setting of reproductive health-related emergency department visits. This study aimed to identify additional factors that contribute to frequent obstetrical triage visits at Palmetto Health Richland in an attempt to ultimately decrease nonemergent use of triage facilities. Methods: This study was conducted via a prospective anonymous patient survey, distributed to eligible Labor & Delivery triage patients at Palmetto Health Richland Hospital between September 2015 and May 2016. Patients provided basic demographic information, as well as information regarding prenatal care, chief complaint, number of previous triage visits, and education received prior to the triage visit. Results: A total of 201 survey responses were obtained. Sixty seven percent of patients who presented to triage reported having Medicaid/Medicare, while 22% reported private insurance and 5% reported themselves to be self-pay. The majority of patients (58%) reported that they had not spoken with a healthcare provider on the telephone prior to arrival. Significant associations were found between several variables (insurance coverage, age, and education level) and whether or not the patient had utilized the phone triage system prior to presentation to L&D. Of patients with private insurance, 69% had utilized the phone triage system prior to presentation, compared to only 38% of patients with Medicaid/Medicare. Of patients age 30 or greater, 61% had utilized the phone triage system prior to presentation, compared to only 35% of patients aged 16-29. Finally, of patients with a college or graduate degree, 76% had utilized the phone triage system prior to presentation, compared to only 35% of patients with a high school degree or less. Discussion: The goal of this study was to help identify demographic and educational trends amongst triage patients in an attempt to decrease nonemergent hospital visits. Based on the significant associations found between patient use of the triage phone system prior to presentation and the aforementioned demographic parameters, perhaps increasing awareness of the phone triage system to patients with Medicaid, patients younger than age 30, and patients with a high school degree or less may decrease overall Labor & Delivery triage visits.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 392
Harrison, Sayward First Line of Defense: An Evaluation of the Role of Primary Care in the Prevention of Childhood Obesity in South Carolina
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Childhood obesity places children at risk for multiple negative health and psychosocial outcomes; therefore, identifying effective prevention strategies is critical. Primary care has been suggested as an opportune setting for prevention, and clear clinical guidelines exist for the prevention, screening, and treatment of childhood obesity by primary care providers (PCPs). However, few studies have yet examined the extent to which PCPs are complying with current guidelines or explored the feasibility or acceptability of integrating childhood obesity prevention into primary care. Thus the current project engaged in three key activities: 1) a systematic literature review of the role of PCPs in the prevention of childhood obesity, 2) quantitative analysis of electronic medical record data for over 40,000 children and adolescents from South Carolina to examine a number of obesity-related medical codes, and 3) qualitative analysis of data gathered through focus groups with 22 pediatric PCPs from South Carolina to assess training and current practices related to obesity prevention. Mixed method analysis indicated that despite the high prevalence of childhood obesity, significant gaps continue to exist in incorporating prevention into primary care. Data suggested limited adherence to clinical guidelines including universal screening of children’s Body Mass Index and the provision of diet/nutrition and physical activity counseling to all children and families. Though childhood obesity was recognized as a grave public health concern, pediatric PCPs cited numerous barriers to integrating prevention into their daily practice, including limited time, lack of parental buy-in, and poor reimbursement for preventive services. Opportunities for improved clinical care are discussed.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 363
Chaparala, Anusha Hofseth, Lorne Mechanism of Action of American Ginseng and its Components in the Treatment of Ulcerative Colitis
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Ulcerative colitis (UC) or colitis is a type of chronic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) that has a significant impact on the quality of life for the patients and can substantially increase the risk of colon cancer in patients suffering long-term. Current conventional treatments provide only modest relief paired with a high risk of side effects and complementary and alternative medicines (CAMs) offer a safe and effective option for the treatment of UC. Over the past several years, we have shown that American Ginseng (AG), particularly the hexane fraction of AG (HAG), has anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties that can suppress mouse colitis and prevent colon cancer associated with colitis. With a goal of isolating a single compound, we further fractionated HAG, and found the most abundant molecule in this fraction was the polyacetylene, Panaxynol (PA). Recently, we demonstrated that PA effectively treats DSS-induced colitis in the mouse by specifically targeting macrophages for DNA damage and apoptosis. Currently, we are testing the ability of PA to prevent colitis-associated colon cancer in mice. To delineate the pathways involved in the mechanism of action of AG and its components (HAG and PA), we performed microarray analysis of mouse primary macrophage cells and found that AG prepares cells for cellular defense by initiating a stress response involving antioxidant pathways. Concurrently, we have seen that AG and its components activate Nrf2-induced antioxidant response in multiple cell lines. Furthermore, AG, HAG, and Panaxynol were inefficient in treating DSS-induced colitis in Nrf2 knockout mice, demonstrating that mechanism of action of AG and its derivatives depends on the activation of the Nrf2 pathway. Positive outcomes from this study will take AG one-step further towards being a conventional drug for the treatment of colitis, other autoimmune diseases and for the prevention of inflammation driven carcinogenesis.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Columbia Ballroom A
Time: 11:25
Johnson, Hope
Delgado, Daniel
Bremer, Devon
Lightcap, Allie
Wu, Linwan
Williams, Jeffrey
Ad Team - Integrated Marketing and Retail Campaign
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Every year, the Advertising Team competes in the National Student Advertising Competition. This year the team is creating a campaign for Tai Pei frozen Asian food. For the past 8 months, we have conducted both primary and secondary research to gain winning insight. We have created a fully integrated marketing and retail campaign based on our extensive research. The creative ads we've designed target millennials and the platforms we've chosen are untapped and showcase Tai Pei in a new way. With a somewhat limited budget, we have meticulously crafted a media plan that brings our campaign to our audience.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Richland Meeting Room C
Time: 11:00-11:10am
Myer, Madison Lorenzo-Blanco, Elma
Yildiz-Spinel, Melek
Literature Review of the Effects of After School Programs on Depression, Anxiety, Academic Success, and Stress in Latina/o Youth
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There is limited research on the influence of after school programs on the emotional (symptoms of depression, symptoms of anxiety, perceived stress) and academic well-being (e.g., GPA, school engagement, low school-dropout) of Latina/o youth under the age of 18, despite the group being one of the fastest growing minorities in the United States (Acosta, 2004). After school programs tend to promote positive emotional and academic well-being among children from low-income families and vulnerable communities; however, few culturally and linguistically relevant programs have been developed to specifically help Latina/o students (Coller, 2014). This study provides a systematic literature review of the existing research on the effects of after school programs on the emotional and academic well-being of Latina/o children and adolescents. It aims to identify the most important aspects of after school programs that, through academic help and socialization, would promote the emotional and academic well-being of Latina/o students. By analyzing the existing work, the ultimate goal of this project is to develop a curriculum and outline for a school-based program that could be implemented in schools around Columbia, SC.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 95
Coleman, Caitlyn Stephenson, Kathryn Why Asking is Important: Improving Chlamydia Testing in the Outpatient Setting
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Chlamydia is a sexually transmitted infection that is actually the most common reportable communicable disease in the USA. It is most reported in females age 20-24yo followed by females age 15-19 yo (our clinic population). This infection is five times more prevalent in non-hispanic African American women then non-hispanic White women; and ten times more prevalent in non-hispanic African American males than White males. Unfortunately, this infection is often asymptomatic and thus can go undetected for years, leading to increased rates of spread and increased complications. Persistent infection can lead to PID, tubal factor infertility, ectopic pregnancy, increased HIV transmission, chronic pelvic pain, adverse pregnancy outcomes, neonatal infections, epididymitis, and reactive arthritis. USPSTF, AAP, and AAFP recommend annual screening on all sexually active women younger than age 25yo and all high risk males. Nucleic Acid Amplification Tests are the best means of testing for Chlamydia. These can be obtained by vaginal, cervical, urethral or urine swabs/ specimens. Per baseline data collected, the % of teens seen in CHOC (resident clinic) for well child checks tested for chlamydia is roughly 57% and thus has room for improvement. This baseline data was collected from 3/1/15-3/31/15 retrospectively from CHOC well child teenage visits (all children 13 yo and older). Over the course of 3 PDSA cycles, which consisted of speaking with resident physicians in CHOC concerning the importance of STI testing as well as the current recommendations, the % of teens who admitted to sexual activity tested increased from 57% to 100%. The number of teens actually asked about sexual activity did not change however, staying roughly 90% throughout the course of this project. The implementation of AAP guidelines concerning Chlamydial testing could lead to increased testing in our clinic and thus lead to decreased rates of transmission and possibly decreased long term negative outcomes of infection.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 394
Lewis, Tyler Kass, Jesse A Family of Singularities with Infinite Cohen-Macaulay Representation Type
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A celebrated theorem of Buchweitz, Greuel, Knörrer, and Schreyer is that the hypersurface singularities of finite representation type, i.e. the hypersurface singularities admitting only finitely many indecomposable maximal Cohen-Macaulay modules, are exactly the ADE singularities. The codimension 2 singularities that are the analogues of the ADE singularities have been classified by Frühbis-Krüger and Neumer, and it is natural to expect an analogous result holds for these singularities. I will present a proof that, in contrast to hypersurfaces, Frühbis-Krüger and Neumer’s singularities include infinitely many singularities of infinite representation type.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 284
Wardlaw, Andreia Isom Scott, Deena Coloring the Ivory Tower: An Intersectional Assessment of the Academy
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Female scholars of Color are underrepresented in academia, particularly in traditionally male-dominated fields. In an effort to identify the reasons for the racialized gendered divisions of labor that still persist in the academy, we are looking at tenure-tracked faculty from criminal justice departments at universities that are a part of the Association of Doctoral Programs in Criminology and Criminal Justice. Through a systematic assessment of departmental websites and publicly available curriculum vitae, we seek to answer several questions: What is the distribution of female faculty, faculty of Color, and female faculty of Color within criminology? What are their areas of specialization? Is their work mainly published in specialized journals? Answering such questions will lay the groundwork for a mixed methods assessment into the distinct challenges faced by female faculty of Color, above and beyond those of their white female colleagues. By assessing scholars’ perceptions of challenges faced in pursuit of a successful career, this work will highlight the unequal division of labor embedded in traditional academic structure.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 10
Burack, Elissa Kalb, Judith
Cox, Robert
Russia vs. the World: Russian Framing of Putin’s Foreign Policy
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Russian foreign policy is of great concern to American policymakers and citizens who believe that Russia’s actions reflect President Vladimir Putin’s attempt to become a full-fledged dictator. However, Americans rarely take into consideration how the same actions are portrayed in Russia. This project examines the effectiveness of the Russian government’s framing of foreign policy issues to influence public opinion in a favorable direction. It examines Russian newspaper coverage of the Syrian crisis, the annexation of Crimea, and the 2016 United States presidential election in Russia, and identifies three frames commonly used by Russian newspapers when covering these issues: Nationalism, the Threat of the West, and Global Security Threats. The study further finds that these frames correspond with the Russian government’s preferred course of action on each of the issues. An examination of Russian public opinion shows that the most prominent frame is the “Threat of the West,” which aligns with both the government’s and citizens’ views. The findings indicate that the Russian government can generate legitimacy for its strategy of retaliation against the West by framing it as a just reaction to its perception that the West has treated Russia unfairly.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Carolina Meeting Room B
Time: 1:15-1:25pm
Haselden, Jacy Werfel, Krystal Oral-reading Fluency in School-Age Children with and without Language Impairment
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Language impairment affects approximately 7% of children (Tomblin et al., 1997). Specific language impairment is largely unidentified, with roughly 30% of parents of preschool children with SLI aware that their child has a language impairment. Identification of SLI is even more difficult in school-age children, as school-age children with SLI do not commit overt errors in their conversational speech. At the same time, children with SLI struggle with more complex tasks, such as reading and writing. Currently, there is a need for measures that identify specific language impairment in school-age children. The purpose of this study is to develop an experimental oral-reading task and collect preliminary data using the task to determine whether it can be used to improve the identification of school-age children with and without specific language impairment.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 336
Curry, Kimberly McCutcheon, Monica Introducing Newborn Weight Loss Curves to Mothers to Encourage Exclusive Breastfeeding: A Quality Improvement Project
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The benefits of exclusive breastfeeding for the first six months of life for infants and their mothers have been well-documented. One of the maternal concerns identified as a barrier to breastfeeding is the concern that the infant is not exhibiting adequate growth or maintaining sufficient nutrition, despite that the average breastfed infant loses approximately 7% of the birth weight in the days following birth. Flaherman, et al developed a weight loss nomogram in order to identify how an exclusively breastfed term infant compares to a large sample of exclusively breastfed newborns. Our goal was to utilize this nomogram to help alleviate maternal concerns regarding infant growth while breastfeeding. In the month prior to our study, 37.3% of mothers in our Pediatrix Couplet Care population who were initially exclusively breastfeeding introduced formula into their newborns’ diets prior to discharge from the hospital. In our project, we aimed to decrease the percentage of mothers who switched from exclusive breastfeeding to formula supplementation. Over two PDSA cycles, we plotted the newborns on the weight loss curves and presented this information to the mothers in an attempt to educate them on normal newborn weight loss patterns and to encourage continued exclusive breastfeeding. We then reviewed whether the mother provided formula supplementation to the infant at any point in the postpartum stay. The percentages of subjects who introduced formula after initially exclusively breastfeeding in Cycles 1 and 2 were 15% and 13.3%, respectively. Thus, for the period during which our project was implemented, the percentage of breastfeeding mothers who introduced formula in Cycles 1 and 2 decreased by 22.3 and 24, respectively. In addition, 100% of women in the second PDSA cycle reported that the information helped them feel more comfortable with breastfeeding. While additional studies would be useful in helping to establish causation or application to a larger population, this project introduces the idea of educating mothers on normal weight loss patterns of breastfed infants in order to alleviate concerns about infant growth and encourage exclusive breastfeeding.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 402
Potter, Kendall Jones, Joe Graduation with Leadership Distinction: Professional and Civic Engagement
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It was important to me that I make the most of my college experience, and throughout my four years here at the University of South Carolina, I believe I have taken full advantage of all leadership opportunities presented to me. Now taking those leadership experiences and compiling them into my e-portfolio for Graduation with Leadership Distinction in Professional and Civic Engagement, I have had time to reflect on the journey I have taken and where it is leading me. I would like the opportunity to share that journey with you. Along the way, I have taken away many key insights that have shaped the way I will conduct myself in my professional career. The main insights that I have highlighted in my portfolio are understanding what people need to grow, presenting information in the best way possible, and that team work really does make the dream work. I have developed the insights by pulling my within-the-classroom knowledge and experience I have gained as a Resident Mentor, Resident Mentor Training Leader, Senior Resident Mentor, Teaching Assistant, and Leadership and Staff Development Intern. My journey was not always clear or easy, but it was all worth it to get to where I am today.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Alumni Center - Ballroom 3
Time: 1:15-1:25pm
ZHOU, JIE ZHANG, JIAJIA Joint Model of the CVD Mortality and Nonlinear Longitudinal Effect of Physical Activity
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Physical inactivity, mainly due to the sedentary lifestyle, has been shown to have a positive association with CVD mortality. The repeated records of cardiorespiratory fitness in the Aerobics Center Longitudinal Study (ACLS) database facilitate the analysis of the longitudinal effect of fitness on the CVD mortality. According to recent studies, the age-associated decline in fitness is not linear but accelerated. Therefore, a nonlinear interaction effect between fitness and age should be considered to reveal the true association between physical activity and CVD mortality. We developed a novel statistical tool to jointly model the CVD mortality and nonlinear longitudinal effect of physical activity, while adjusting for other possible confounding factors such as the tobacco and alcohol use. The EM algorithm is used to estimate the unknown parameters and the variance estimators are obtained based on the empirical Fisher information matrix of the profile likelihood. The performance of the proposed model is evaluated through a comprehensive simulation study, where different censoring proportions, baseline hazard functions and sample sizes are considered. The application on the ACLS dataset is also discussed.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 283
Randall, Clarie Lloyd, Ryan Young, Southern, and Queer: A Coming Out Process
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Coming out is not an instance; it’s a process, and it lasts a lifetime. For me, the beginning of this process coincided with becoming an LGBT Peer Advocate in the Office of Multicultural Student Affairs (OMSA) at the end of my first year at the University of South Carolina and is now part of my everyday life. This presentation will reflect on my most formative collegiate experiences with OMSA, as a member and leader within multiple progressive, LGBTQ-friendly/focused student organizations, and through a variety of queer events, discoveries, and incidences along the way. Within these spaces, not only have I come to more fully grasp the depth of the LGBTQ+ community and my place within it, but also now understand a multitude of other communities and their intersecting natures. By openly identifying as queer, I have facilitated the personal and radical acceptance of other aspects of my identity as well, namely southern-ness, a trait I long rejected even as a life-long Southerner. Being out in the South is not always (or usually) easy; especially in a state known for flying the Confederate flag at the state house until 2015 and with no laws to protect against hate crimes. However, in discovering the true depth and breadth of Southern culture, removed from stereotypes and internalized prejudices, I have found reason to explore and reclaim this identity, as well as reclaim space as a queer Southerner. Join me as I discuss what it means to be queer, Southern, and content with both of those identities.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Alumni Center - Ballroom 1A
Time: 1:45-1:55pm
Mollo, Katie Carney, Scott The Effects of Establish Palliative Care Criteria in the NICU
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Introduction: The benefits of Palliative Care to patients, families, and the economics of health care have been shown in the adult population. Palliative Care is a growing field in the pediatric population. With slightly more than half of childhood deaths occurring in infancy, there is a need for Palliative Care in the NICU. Recent studies and institutions are looking at the benefits of establishing criteria for Palliative Care consults in the NICU. The question this project poses is if establishing Palliative Care criteria in our NICU will increase, the number of Palliative Care consults. Methods: Palliative Care consult criteria for this study were created based on different studies and reviewed by the staff. Data was collected prior to establishing criteria, and after criteria. A mid-point intervention during the study was to determine if emailing the criteria to the residents prior to their assignment to the NICU would increase consults. The data was analyzed using a Quasi-poisson Regression Model Summary. A short survey was given to the residents after the completion of this project to discuss barriers they may have encountered. Results: The Incidence rate ratio (IRR) with 95% CI for palliative care consults in the NICU is 1.41 (0.61, 3.23). The palliative care consult rate is 41% higher after the intervention than before. This IRR is not significantly different from 1.00 (the value of no effect) at the 0.05 level (p = .504). There was no significant difference in the number of Palliative Care consults in the pre-criteria group when compared to the post-criteria group. There was a slight increase in consults when the criteria were emailed to the residents just prior to starting a NICU rotation. Conclusion: This quality improvement projected showed that making criteria for NICU Palliative Care did not statistically increase consults. However, the study was successful in highlighting areas of improvement for further study.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 403
Hayes, Megan Fogerty, Daniel Rhythmic Processing in Speech Perception
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Previous research proposes that rhythm is what simplifies complex processes involving coordination of separate components to complete a task. This concept of rhythm helping link separate components together has been studied with limb coordination tasks as well as speech production tasks. This study examines the effects of rhythm in speech perception. Because listening requires tracking various properties of a speech signal over time, speech perception is also a complex task. We examined how temporal properties of the speech signal influence perception, specifically with timing constraints based on rhythm. Subjects were presented with rhythmic speech stimuli recorded by a male and female speaker.  The stimuli were four-word phrases with nearly identical prosodic structure and low predictability. Each followed the form X for a Y, with consonant-vowel-consonant words as X and Y in each phrase. Subjects listened during the first presentation of each phrase, and were instructed to speak along with the recording as the phrase was repeated five times at the same rate. Alignment was measured by comparing the subject’s phase alignment to syllabic beats in the stimuli, with values closest to 0 milliseconds indicating better alignment. This presentation reports on current work in progress regarding the development of a speech entrainment test battery that will further delineate the role of rhythmic processing in speech perception. The results of this project will help to explain how listeners track rhythmic constraints in the speech signal. Furthermore, it investigates if alignment during speech entrainment tasks is correlated to performance in speech-in-noise tasks.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 332
Banks, Katelyn
Hunnicutt, William
Privette, Troy Unilateral Facial Paralysis- A Case Report
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Abstract Text

Acute unilateral facial paralysis is a relatively common disorder that can be caused by a number of different factors. It has an estimated yearly incidence of 13 to 34 cases per 100,000 and affects all ages. Due to the startling nature of this usually benign condition, many of these patients will seek care in the Emergency Department. For these patients, the clinician must distinguish whether the weakness is due to a central or peripheral lesion. Many times, differentiating between these can be done during the physical exam of the head and neck and confirmed with MRI if needed. Acute onset peripheral facial paralysis is most commonly an infectious or idiopathic cause, known as Bell’s palsy. Bell’s palsy can then be further divided into complete and incomplete depending on the extent of facial nerve involvement. Bell’s palsy generally has a good prognosis, with the majority of patients having full recovery. Some patients maintain signs of slight weakness and rarely may have recurrent attacks. Acute onset, central facial paralysis is much less common and often caused by a stroke or an UMN lesion of the facial nerve or facial motor nucleus located in the pontine tegmentum. In this case, we report about a patient with a remote history of Bell’s palsy who presented with left sided facial paralysis due to a cavernous malformation in the left side of the pons.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 387
Johnson, Matthew
Coe, Elizabeth
Humphrey, Mark Should the ED be Your Final Destination? - An Evaluation of Emergency Department Utilization and Identification of Methods to Decrease Over Utilization
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Abstract Text

Introduction: Emergency department(ED) utilization as a substitute for primary care, especially for minor episodic care, has been an ongoing topic of interest in healthcare. According to 2007 data, the overuse of U.S. EDs is responsible for $38 billion in wasteful spending each year. It is estimated that 13-27% of ED visits in the United States could be managed in physician offices, clinics and urgent care centers. Research Design: We examined the overutilization of our emergency departments within our healthcare system specifically looking at patients that have an established relationship with our outpatient office and who have used the ED during clinic hours. We conducted a telephone survey of patients that have been identified as having established care and followed up (at least two office visits) with our outpatient office and have utilized the emergency departments within our healthcare system on at least one occasion during normal office business hours. The survey assessed whether the patient was aware that we have same-day appointments available, whether or not the patient attempted to obtain an appointment with our office, if the patient was referred to the ED by our office and if cost and/or transportation were factors. Major primary aim was to create an intervention in order to have patients visit the office instead of the ED for non-emergent complaints. Results: A total of 54 patients were contacted to complete the survey and of those, 30 surveys were completed. From the 30 completed surveys, 63% did not know about same-day appointments, 90% did not call into the office prior to going to the ED and only 16% were advised to go to the ED after speaking with a nurse/physician. The reasons the other 24 patients did not complete the survey include patient was deceased, wrong number listed in chart, patient never seen at our practice, patient never answered the phone and patient did not recall going to the ED. Intervention: Increase patient access by increasing awareness of same-day appointment availability. This can be achieved with flyers posted in exam rooms and in the waiting room and by handing out refrigerator magnets. The call center staff may need to be re-trained in placing patients in appropriate access care slots on physicians schedule.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 412
Woods, Morgan Lewis, Elise Finding My Path Through Understanding and Teaching
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Abstract Text

My portfolio is on the professional and civic engagement pathway. Through several of my science classes I have gained valuable information and combined that with out of the classroom experiences helped me gather insights. Some of these activities include becoming a chemistry TA, an SI leader, and interning at a physical therapy clinic. I did these activities because of my love for the subject matter and to gain more experience. One insight I learned freshman year is that to truly understand something you must first find the real point of contention. Another insight is that learning to explain something is not only beneficial to others but to you as well. The last insight I learned is that things do not always go your way and you need to be flexible to accomplish your desired goal. These skills will have a direct impact on my future by giving me the skills I need to be successful in medical school. These are important because if it has opened by eyes to new ways of handling and processing information. All these insights combined I will use going forward in my path to becoming a doctor because I will need to be able to learn efficiently.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 167
Papadea, Nicholas
Thakker, Parth
Cantrell, Matthew Thromboembolic Serratia marcescens endocarditis, with delayed surgical management
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Abstract Text

Serratia marcescens is a gram-negative rod implicated in a range of nosocomial infections, but is rarely implicated in infective endocarditis. Herein, we describe a 30-year-old male with a history of intravenous drug use that presented with five days of fever and right-sided neurological deficits. On physical exam a holosystolic murmur was appreciated and computerized tomography of the head demonstrated multiple infarcts with hemorrhagic conversion in the territory of the left posterior cerebral artery. Transesophageal echocardiography following presentation revealed a mass on the anterior leaflet of the mitral valve and serial blood cultures grew Serratia marcescens. Surgical intervention for mitral valve replacement was deferred for due to risk of hemorrhage and prophylactic, total dental extraction was performed in anticipation of surgery. His clinical course was complicated by evidence of multiple ring-enhancing brain abscesses on MRI and enlargement of the mitral valve vegetation.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 380
Mitchell, Michael Stephenson, Kathryn Increasing Access to Tobacco Cessation Services in a Pediatric Practice: A Prospective Study
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Secondhand smoke exposure is a problem which affects tens of millions of American children. This contributes to decreased lung function and increased infections in children exposed to smoke, as well as an association with increased rates of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome. Telephone-based tobacco cessation programs have proven successful to many individuals who receive services through these programs. Contact information for the South Carolina DHEC Quitline has been available for patients and their family members at Palmetto Health Children’s Hospital Outpatient Center for several years, however there has been no data regarding how many individuals are given this information, nor the number of people who then utilize quitline services. Baseline data was collected on subjects who were given quitline information. The process of tobacco cessation referral was changed and subsequent participants were followed to assess the rate of enrollment into quitline services. Ultimately, the number of persons successfully enrolled into tobacco cessation services increased by 200% from baseline data, following two major interventions. A referral process which places more initial responsibility on the part of the medical provider and/or cessation service provider may result in an increased number of enrollments into tobacco cessation services.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 393
lin, xiao Terejanu, Gabriel Computational Tool for Identifying Growth Patterns in Fungi
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In this project, I developed a computational tool to accelerate the identification of growth patterns in fungi. This is significant in developing computational models for understanding the growth of fungi such as Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus on various solid media. These two types of fungi present a fundamental challenge for grain industry, makers of dairy products and crop insurers, as they naturally produce a carcinogenic toxin called aflatoxin, which is estimated to have an economic impact in the US agriculture in the range of $276 - $709 million annually and it is estimated that 5 billion people worldwide are at risk of aflatoxin exposure.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 310
Major, Nicholas Jones, Joe Graduation with Leadership Distinction in Community Service: Understanding the Importance of Community Health
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I will be graduating from the University of South Carolina in May 2017 with a Bachelor of Science degree in Public Health and two minors in Psychology and Medical Humanities. Throughout my experiences at USC as an undergraduate, I have obtained many experiences, both inside and outside of the classroom, to help bolster my education and ultimately prepare me for applying to and attending medical school at the Medical University of South Carolina. Through these unique experiences, I have chosen to pursue a pathway of graduating with leadership distinction in community service to help reaffirm and solidify my leadership, dedication, love, and support of my fellow community members. One of my key insights for graduating with leadership distinction is that of the understanding of the importance of community health. Mt time at USC as well as within certain required courses for my major have provided me with the opportunities to engage with local underserved community members at their level to help provide them with the tools they need to live better lives. One of my most impactful volunteer experiences occurred while I was volunteering for Healthy Columbia. My time at Healthy Columbia has taught me invaluable life lessons that will guide me as a physician as well as give me firsthand access to vulnerable populations in Columbia to help bring them knowledge about their current health statuses as well as the tools and resources to find a medical home and to manage their different health conditions. My time working within underprivileged communities has given me great insight into the importance of community health and the work that must go into it to provide our fellow man with equal opportunities and access to a better tomorrow.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 251
Dobson, Jordan Lewis, Elise Lessons Learned through Community Engagement
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In May 2017 I will be graduating with Leadership Distinction in Community Service. I spent majority of my volunteer time volunteering with Palmetto Animal Assisted Life Services (PAALS). PAALS is an organization that trains canines to assist people who have various disabilities, in order to live their lives more independently. While at PAALS, I fostered puppies and helped to train them. One way I helped to train these dogs is by bringing them out into the community in order to expose them to different environments. The other part of my volunteer experiences was conduced at Hand Middle School. While volunteering at Hand Middle School I worked to improve vocabulary and test scores of children from low income families. Between beyond and within classroom experiences, one of the important lessons that I have learned is how to look at strengths instead of weaknesses. I have also learned the importance of getting to the root of issues in order to fix them instead of just treating the symptoms of the problem. Lastly, through my experiences I have learned to look at problems from unique angles. These lessons have helped to shape my future career pathway, as well as the person I have become today. In the future I plan to attend graduate school at the University of South Carolina for social work. These hands-on experiences will also assist me in my future hands-on career.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 230
Assi, Lateef Ziehl, Paul Cost and fuel energy optimization of activating solution based silica fume geopolymer concrete
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Development of sustainable construction materials has been the focus of research efforts worldwide in recent years. Concrete is a major construction material; hence, finding alternatives to ordinary Portland cement is of extreme importance due to high levels of carbon dioxide emissions associated with its manufacturing process. Geopolymer concrete is a potential solution; however, concerns about the high cost and the low real fuel energy efficiency are obstacles against its increase in the market share. In this paper, the current cost and fuel (thermal energy) usage are calculated. In addition, the cost and fuel usage were optimized based on previous experimental results. The results show that geopolymer concrete cost can be reduced using Portland cement in low percentage replacement (5-35%). The required fuel usage (thermal energy) for producing geopolymer concrete was lower than Portland cement. Using Portland cement and reducing sodium hydroxide concentration not only reduce the cost of geopolymer concrete, but also reduce the thermal energy. Based on the results of the study, the sodium hydroxide and silica fume have a significant role on the fuel usage and the cost. Three new mixtures were proposed to reduce the cost. Additionally, the fuel usage was 30% lower than Portland cement. Marketing and communication plans showed that geopolymer cement industries can be profitable because geopolymer concrete can be used for varied civil engineering applications including sidewalks, concrete panels, etc. The best locations to start the business were proposed, including some cites in the north east or east of the United States such as Chagrin Falls, Milwaukee, and Charlotte. Internationally, China was considered the best place to start the business due to the availability of raw materials and affordable prices.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 305
Wildman, Katelyn Schryer, Asheley A Comprehensive Look at Cultural Awareness Sparked by Global Learning
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Travel. A six letter word that can have a thousand different meanings, depending on who you ask. The most influential travel of my life occurred when I studied abroad in Madrid, Spain in the Spring of 2016. Being a Spanish minor, I wanted to go to a Spanish speaking country where I could practice my skills that I had learned in the classroom. During my time abroad, I traveled to 12 countries, 22 cities, and had 1 trip of a lifetime. While I was in Spain, I became close friends with someone whose family lived in Mexico, which opened up an opportunity for me to live with her family over the summer and further immerse myself in the language. While my experiences in Mexico and Spain were very different, they opened my eyes to the concept of cultural awareness. After critically reflecting on embracing opportunities, cultural immersion and the inequalities in foreign aid access, it was apparent that lack of cultural awareness is a problem throughout the world. In this ever-changing diverse world, cultural awareness is an important concept to comprehend in order to have a greater understanding of how people from various backgrounds think and react in situations. My goal is to create a cultural awareness training program for international businesses to combat the lack of cultural awareness that plagues our society and ultimately avoid conflicts that stem from a cultural misunderstanding.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 217
Jacques, Samuel Stevenson, Joel Brand Name Marketing on Campus
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Recent technology has made entrepreneurship attainable for many Millennials. The University of South Carolina encourages entrepreneurship among students, yet a cloud of uncertainty still surrounds opportunities that are available for student business ventures on campus. In Spring of 2017, I set out to determine exactly what opportunities students have to market a new idea at school. I used my small startup clothing company, The Pinkish Flamingo, as a sample. Urged by my mentor to first check that it was legal to host a company’s operations on campus, I quickly found that there are many legal restrictions to commercial activity. Conducting work in a public facility, such as university buildings, comes with limits due to equity rights between students, the university, and taxpayers. I am still researching the full extent of legal restrictions and permissions for student businesses on campus. Within these permissions, I will continue to identify unique opportunities for students to market business ideas. This ranges from PR tables on Greene street, to fliers throughout campus, to participation in campus networking events. The goal is to prove that students have a competitive advantage simply by being a student at USC. An explicit layout of ways that students can get ahead may inspire others to step out as entrepreneurs while still in school.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Richland Meeting Room C
Time: 10:45-10:55am
Alrafas, Haider Nagarkatti, Mitzi Effect of resveratrol on gut microbiome in TNBS-induced colitis
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Effect of resveratrol on gut microbiome in TNBS-induced colitis Haider R Alrafas1, Brandon P. Busbee1, Farhan Zameer1, Prakash Nagarkatti1 and Mitzi Nagarkatti1 1Department of Pathology, Microbiology, and immunology, University of South Carolina School of Medicine, Columbia, SC 29208, USA ABSTRACT Colitis is an inflammatory bowel disease of unknown etiology characterized by acute or chronic inflammation of the large intestine. Currently there is no cure for patients suffering from colitis, and most treatments involve the use of immunosuppressive drugs that can have adverse side-effects or increased toxicity. In the current study, we investigated the effects of resveratrol, a natural component found in grapes, strawberries, and raspberries, on murine TNBS colitis model. Our data shows that administration of resveratrol alleviates symptoms associated with colitis in this model, which includes reversal of weight loss and colon shortening. In addition, mice treated with resveratrol showed decreased levels of circulating inflammatory biomarkers like serum amyloid A, myeloperoxidase and lipocalin 2. Flow cytometry data showed significant increasein mesenteric lymph node CD3+, CD4+ T cell population and INF gamma in TNBS group, while significant increase in Foxp3 T cells was seen in resveratrol treatment group. Endoscopy and histopathology also showed decreased tissue damage and cellular infiltration in the colon. In order to better understand the beneficial effects of resveratrol against colitis, we performed 16S rRNA metagenomic sequencing to investigate alterations in the gut microbiome after induction of colitis by TNBS and treatment with resveratrol. Analysis of cecal flushes revealed that TNBS administration leads to increase in Firmicutes, Tenericutes and Bacteroidetes. However, mice that were treated with resveratrol showed a remarkable reversal in these gut microbial alterations caused by TNBS colitis induction, with gut microbiome similar to that of vehicle-treated control mice. Collectively, these data suggest that resveratrol is able to ameliorate colitis by preventing pathogenic gut microbial dysbiosis and restoring gut microbiome composition to a more homeostatic state. (Supported in part by NIH grants P01AT003961, R01AT006888, R01ES019313, R01MH094755 and P20GM103641).

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 337
Fry, Austin Newton, Drew A Medical Mission to Inspire my Future Mission
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In fulfillment of my Graduation with Leadership Distinction in Professional and Civic Engagement requirements, I will be presenting on how my medical mission trip to Nicaragua impacted my view of medicine and my attitude toward my future goals. As a Capstone Scholar, I had the opportunity to travel in March of 2015 with Dr. Patrick Hickey and about thirty other team members to serve rural Nicaraguan communities. On this trip, we set up clinics in Masaya, Nicaragua to provide informational pamphlets, medical care, and medications to local community members. I gained experience in taking patient history, diagnosing, and assigning treatment under the direct supervision of doctors in a local clinic setting. I also observed surgery in local hospital, navigated language barrier, and attended lectures throughout the week. Overall, this experience demonstrated the importance of prevention and education in medicine and solidified my desire to pursue medicine as a physician in the United States Navy.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Alumni Center - Conference Room Main Floor 3
Time: 11:15-11:25am
Lewis, Alyson Harrison, Theresa Siempre para los ni
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Student organizations are an essential part of the collegiate experience as they promote campus and community involvement, cultivate personal growth, foster learning, and give meaning to college beyond the walls of the classroom. During my time at the University of South Carolina, I have become heavily involved in two student organizations – USC Dance Marathon and Amigos del Buen Samaritano. Becoming a leader in both of these organizations has greatly enhanced my collegiate experience by teaching me how to advocate ethically, utilize critical thinking, and acknowledge and promote diversity. The combination of what I have learned inside of the classroom and outside of the classroom as a leader in student organizations has enabled me to discover myself and affirm my future career aspirations of becoming a physician. Beyond my personal achievements, my leadership roles in USCDM and Amigos have allowed me to give back to a community and a university that have given me the best four years.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 207
Love-Baker, Cole Greytak, Andrew Spincoating Quantum Dots onto Epitaxial Graphene Chips For Tunable, High-Gain Infrared Detection
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The aim of this project is to develop a process for the deposition of quantum dot films and to measure their light-detecting capabilities. The films will be tested for their potential application in light-detecting devices. The quantum dot films will be placed onto epitaxial graphene, silicon-carbide chips using a spincoating process. This project combines two major aspects; the use of silicon-carbide, epitaxial graphene chips and the creation of lead sulfide quantum dot films. Although lead sulfide quantum dot films have been studied in the past, they have not been combined with silicon-carbide, epitaxial graphene chips.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 48
Parker, Anna Carnes, Laura Encouraging, Understanding, and Supporting Lactation: USC Lancaster's journey to becoming a mother friendly campus
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My name is Anna Parker and I am seeking my Associate Degree in Science from the University of South Carolina Lancaster with Leadership Distinction. My pathway for leadership distinction is Diversity and Social Advocacy. My project consisted of completely renovating my campus’ lactation room. The goal of my project was to provide a safe, private, and sanitary room for lactating moms to use while on campus. I also wanted to inform my community about the many benefits of breastfeeding and show the mothers their school and community supported them. All of the hours spent researching, fundraising, and renovating proved to be successful given that my campus is now a Mother Friendly campus through The South Carolina Breastfeeding Coalition.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 194
Lewis, Alyson Karan, Dev Analysis of LL-37 in association with prostate cancer
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Leucine-leucine (LL-37) is an antimicrobial peptide that belongs to the cathelicidin family and has been linked to carcinogenesis. This study aimed to examine the hypothesis that an increased expression of LL-37 is associated with the development and progression of human prostate cancer. Expression levels of LL-37 were analyzed in a panel of human prostate cancer cell lines using semi-quantitative PCR (RT-PCR), quantitative-PCR (q-PCR), and western blotting methods. The RT-PCR and q-PCR analysis showed variability in expression of LL-37 across various cell lines. However, the protein expression was significantly higher in aggressive prostate cancer cell lines (PC3 and DU145) as compared to early stage LNCaP cells. The action of LL-37 is also linked to immunomodulation and inflammatory reactions, therefore, we further tested the effect of inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α and GM-CSF) on the regulation of LL-37 using early stage LNCaP cells. We observed that IL-1β, IL-6 and GM-CSF significantly increased the transcription level of LL-37 in LNCaP cells while the effect of TNF-α was minimal. Since the prostate is home to infection and injury leading to inflammation, it is likely that activation of LL-37 may play an important role in the growth and development of prostate cancer. However, more studies are warranted to understand the mechanistic regulation of LL-37 and to substantiate its role with the progression of prostate cancer.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 34
Dean, Charles Kunchur, Milind Advances in Magnetism Applied in Audio Technologies
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Neodymium magnets (aka rare earth magnets) are one of the more recent developments in materials science and their importance for new tech, particularly in speaker drivers, is still being discovered. Their higher Remanence, Coercivity, and Energy Product are some of the qualities that make them so important. These lead vastly improved magnetic flux densities in both strength and longevity. Their use as driver motors has changed the way speakers are designed for home or professional uses.

10:15 am - 11:45 am
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 306
Archie, Jasmine Oswald-Hensley, Anna Leadership and Learning: The Jasmine Archie Experience
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Abstract University Ambassador: Being a university ambassador is basically being able to represent the university on and off of campus. It means to carry yourself as a leader around the campus and then turn around and represent the traits you have learned in the community. As an ambassador we lead campus tours, we participate in different campus events and help carry them out. We also often come out and help with the different community service events that the school sponsors. I became an ambassador because I was inspired by my ambassador when I attended SOAR in 2015. The ambassadors were so friendly, easy to talk to, and was someone I could approach and talk to about issues that may have been uncomfortable to approach an adult with. I wanted to be someone easy to approach for those who may have been a little uneasy about starting college. Being an ambassador taught me how to talk to almost anybody about anything. It taught me that no matter what I think, someone is always watching so I must carry myself as a leader at all times. The impact which it has had on me would be that, it made me a little more comfortable about speaking in front of crowds of complete strangers. As an ambassador I hope that others can look at me and build the confidence to do what I do, I want others to not be afraid to bring the leader in them. Being an ambassador on the Sumter Campus has been a great opportunity and has taught me a lot and I hope to take the skills with me when I transfer to the next campus and continue being a leader wherever I go. Student Organization: In the Fall of 2016, I introduced a new club to our campus. The club is called Big Sisters of Sumter, which is a support group for the Girl Scouts of Sumter County and surrounding areas. It is a collegiate troop of the Girl Scouts of the Midlands that stands to mentor the girls involved in Girl Scouts and reach out to the community at the same time. It was inspired by a former dean and alumni of USC Sumter. The club participates in the community by assisting the Girl Scouts with their events. By participating I mean giving back in any way possible, we have sponsored a coat drive and are preparing to sponsor an etiquette class for the girls in the more rural communities. Other than being asked to start the club up, the idea soon became inspirational and I wanted to do it for the community and the campus. I felt as if this would be a great addition to the campus. Also, I always wanted to be a part of a big sister’s program as a little girl. I think in this generation it is extremely crucial for more positive female role models. Being a part of the stepping stones of this organization has taught me so much about leadership and working hands on with my peers. It also taught me how to come together as a group and produce efficient results. This club means so much because other than empowering younger girls to believe in themselves but it taught me to believe in myself and what I was capable of. It taught me that people really do appreciate you and the effort you put in trying to make a difference. Seeing that I will be graduating in May, my hopes is that the club will continue and that the meaning all behind will never be forgotten and will go down in the history of this amazing campus.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 227
Amalean, Anjal Fogerty, Daniel The Effect of Segment Duration of Time-Compressed Speech on Intelligibility
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Speech has a natural rhythmic variation that appears to correspond to neural oscillations present during perception. The current experiment investigated how different time scales are involved in speech perception. This was accomplished by processing sentences using a combination of time compression and time restoration methods. To create the stimuli, Harvard-IEEE phonetically balanced sentences were time-compressed by a factor of three. Silence was then inserted at different intervals to restore the stimulus to the original duration of the sentence. Speech segmentation was based off of periodic time intervals or by specific speech events. Five conditions each of ten sentences were created with the milliseconds of time-compressed sentence to milliseconds of silence in the following ratios: 15:30, 30:60, 60:120, 90:180, and 120:240. Three more conditions were segmented by different speech events: phoneme, word, and voiced/unvoiced segments. Nine normal-hearing participants were asked to listen over headphones to these temporally manipulated sentences while seated in a sound attenuating booth. Participants repeated aloud what they heard, and the proportion of key words correctly spoken was scored. On average, the periodically interrupted sentences were more intelligible with shorter segments than with longer ones. Additionally, the voiced/unvoiced condition was less intelligible than the phoneme and word conditions. Results also indicate that both periodic timescales and the temporal duration of specific speech events contribute to how speech is processed over time. Determining how these timescales contribute to speech perception can potentially help create better theoretical models of speech perception and improved speech transmission technologies.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Exhibit Hall
Poster: 108
Chandler, Tiana Hancock, C. Nathan Development of an mPing-based Activation Tag for Zebrafish Mutagenesis
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Transposable elements (TEs) are DNA sequences that move from one location in the genome to another. A transposable element used frequently for mutagenesis is the element known as mPing, first discovered in rice (Oryza sativa). In order for mPing to transpose from one area of the genome to another it must be provided the proteins ORF1 (Open Reading Frame 1) and Transposase (TPase). This element also preferentially inserts upstream or downstream of genes. This preference can be advantageous in regards to inducing mutations that affect gene expression. One technique of mutagenesis utilized is the use of activation tags, which is an insertional sequence that contains enhancer elements thereby inducing overexpression of nearby genes. To make mPing into an activation tag, we inserted the enhancer sequence from the Xenopus laevis Elongation Factor 1 promoter into a hyperactive version of mPing, mmPing20, creating mmPing20X. A yeast transposition assay showed that mmPing20X transposes at rates similar to mPing. mmPing20X was then inserted into the reporter gene mCherry to function as a visual marker for transposition. Along with the mCherry:mmPing20X reporter, a separate construct containing an ORF1 ONE and TPase genes fused together using a T2A peptide was made. To test these constructs in vivo, they will be injected into zebrafish (Danio rerio) an excellent model organism for vertebrate biology. Fish displaying mCherry expression will indicate that transposition of mmPing20X is occurring.

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Convention Center - Congaree Meeting Room B
Time: 1:00-1:10pm
Gilmore, Kyndra
Branham, Cam
Weisberg, Melissa
Mulvey, Kelly Lynn A Study of Youth Interactions and Bullying Phenomena Pertaining to Children with Disabilities
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Bullying has been identified as an epidemic in the United States (Blumen, 2011). Bullying victimization has been linked to academic difficulties. Furthermore, students with disabilities are seldom represented in bullying studies. Though bullying increases during the transition from elementary to middle school, only a few studies have examined this important transition. The research conducted focused on how students responded to their peers with disabilities. Participants were fourth and sixth graders (N=90) evenly divided by gender. Extensive surveys were given to measure the evaluations of acts of bullying, peer groups, and family context. Linear regressions indicated significance in participants’ responses to whether their group should include a child with disabilities. Participants’ expectations of their group including their peers predicted if the participants thought their group should include their peers. Results were also significant for the likelihood that participants would respond if they saw a child with disabilities being bullied. Participants who viewed bullying as being less acceptable were more inclined to report the bullying. The research examined the important transition from elementary to middle school, which is crucial in understanding bullying. The specific findings from this study can be used to help further develop programs that reduce bullying of students with disabilities. Cam Branham, Kyndra Gilmore, Melissa Weisberg, Dr. Kelly Lynn Mulvey