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updated 12/08/2008

Course Descriptions

Overview

The sample course description below indicates the notational system employed in the following pages. The connotations of the numbered elements are as follows:

1. Academic discipline. Course descriptions are arranged alphabetically by discipline. The four-character abbreviation is the computer code used for course registration and all academic records.

Biology (BIOL)

2. Course number and title. Appear in bold type.

101 Innovation in Biology Teaching

3. Crosslisting. In case of courses which are offered in an identical form by two or more colleges or departments, all other listings by which they may be identified appear in brackets between the course title and statement of hour credit. An equality sign (=) indicates such equivalencies.

4. Credit hours. A bold numeral in parentheses indicates the number of semester credit hours awarded for successful completion of a course. In the case of course sequences where two or more related courses are included in the same entry, a statement such as (3 each) indicates that all courses in the sequence carry the same credit. If the courses do not all carry the same credit, the credits awarded for each course are individually itemized. Variable credit, indicated by an entry such as (3-6) or (up to 15), is employed in the case of courses whose content and credit are to be individually determined.

5. Prerequisites. Any necessary prerequisites or corequisites, indicated by abbreviations "prereq" and "coreq," are given in parentheses after the statement of hour credit.

{ =EDUC 101} (3) (Prereq: 18 hours of biology) Audio tutorial, computer assisted instruction, closed circuit TV, and other innovative techniques available for teaching biological concepts will be presented and discussed. Programming procedures, logistical problems, cost analysis, and equipment improvisation are included. Three lecture hours per week.

Note: Some of the courses listed in this section are offered by the originating campus through alternative methods such as open and closed circuit television and videocassette. These courses will be designated as such in the Master Schedule of Classes.

African American Studies (AFRO)

  • 201 -- Introduction to African-American Studies. (3)
  • 202 -- Introduction to African-American Studies. (3)
  • 335 -- Survey of Civil Rights Movements. (3)

Anthropology (ANTH)

Note: Unless otherwise noted, there are no prerequisites to anthropology courses.

  • 101 -- Primates, People, and Prehistory. (3) An exploration of human origins, human evolution, human prehistory, and cultural existence from its less complex forms to early civilizations. An introduction to the concepts, methods, and data of physical, biological, and archaeological anthropology. May be taken with, or independently of, ANTH 102.
  • 102 -- Understanding Other Cultures. (3) An exploration and comparison of selected contemporary cultures, including their languages. An introduction to the concepts, methods, and data of socio-cultural anthropology and anthropological linguistics. May be taken with, or independently of, ANTH 101.
  • 209 -- Introduction to Folklore. (3) Folk expression as shaped by various cultures; fieldwork methodology and anthropological theory.
  • 307 -- Cultures of Africa. (3) A comparative study of ethnographic data on African cultures with emphasis upon its significance for broader anthropological theory.
  • 317 -- North American Indian Cultures. (3) Comparative study of ethnographic data on American Indian cultures, with emphasis on their significance for ethnological theory.
  • 319 -- Principles of Archaeology. (3) Introduction to principles, methods, and theory of archaeology, including prehistoric and historic case studies.
  • 320 -- Archaeology Theory. (3) (Prereq: ANTH 319) This course charts the history of ideas in archaeology, over the past century, as a means of understanding current directions in archaeological thinking and current applications in archaeological practice.
  • 321 -- South Carolina Archaeology. (3) Prehistoric and historic archaeology of South Carolina.
  • 352 -- Anthropology of Magic and Religion. {=RELG 360} (3) A comparative examination of such topics as ritual, cosmology, revitalization movements, magic, witchcraft, myth, and possession.
  • 353 -- Anthropology of Law and Conflict. (3) Understanding human behavior through the examination of cultural norms, mechanisms of social control, and social conflict.
  • 358 -- Gender, Culture, and Behavior. {=WOST 358} (3) Anthropological study of gender, with emphasis on cross-cultural investigation of the interaction of biological, cultural, and environmental factors including intersections of race, social class, and sexuality as influences gender behavior.

Art

Art Education (ARTE)

  • 101 -- Introduction to Art. (3) Lectures in art appreciation introducing the elements and principles of the visual arts, with examples from the history of art.
  • 360 -- Interdisciplinary Relationships in the Arts. (3) The study of relationships among visual arts, music, theatre, and dance.
  • 520 -- Art for Elementary Schools. (3) Methods of teaching art to elementary and preschool children. Major emphasis will be given to relevant studio experiences.

Art History (ARTH)

  • 105 -- History of Western Art. (3) The visual arts from Paleolithic times to the Renaissance.
  • 106 -- History of Western Art. (3) The visual arts from the Renaissance to the present.
  • 340 -- History of American Art I. (3) A survey of the history of art in America from colonial times to 1860.
  • 341 -- History of American Art II. (3) A survey of art in America from 1860 to the present.
  • 342 -- Contemporary American Art. (3) Recent trends in painting and sculpture.

Studio Art (ARTS)

  • 102 -- Introduction to Visual Arts Computing. (3) A foundations level course in the use of personal computers and discipline-related software as aids in visual design.
  • 103 -- Fundamentals of Art. (3) Introduction to visual thinking and principles of two-dimensional design.
  • 104 -- 3-Dimensional Design I. (3) Introduction to visual thinking and principles of three-dimensional design.
  • 107 -- Color and Composition. (3) (Prereq: ARTS 103) Color, color theory, and compositional systems.
  • 108 -- 3-Dimensional Design II. (3) (Prereq: ARTS 104) A further explanation of the principles of three-dimensional design.
  • 111 -- Basic Drawing I. (3) Introduction to the materials and basic techniques of drawing.
  • 112 -- Basic Drawing II. (3) (Prereq: ARTS 111) Introduction to the materials and basic techniques of drawing.
  • 210 -- Introduction to Painting. (3) (Prereq: ARTS 103, 111, 112, or consent of instructor) An introductory course in the materials and techniques of painting.
  • 235 -- Introduction to Fiber Arts. (3) An introductory course in the materials and processes of fiber arts.
  • 241 -- Color for Design. (3) Color theory, systems, and applications in visual communications.
  • 245 -- Introduction to Graphic Design I. (3) (Prereq: ARTS 102 and 103) The basics of visual communication, including formal issues, fundamental communication principles, image development, and relevant digital applications. Studio art majors and graphic design minors only.
  • 246 -- Introduction to Graphic Design II. (3) (Prereq: ARTS 107 and 245) Continuation of ARTS 245, with the addition of typography and word/image relationships. Relevant digital applications.
  • 260 -- Introduction to Photography. (3) The history, theory, and aesthetics of fine arts photography and limited instruction in color slide and black and white photography.
  • 330 -- Intermediate Drawing I. (3) (Prereq: ARTS 103, 104, 111, 112, or consent of instructor) Enhancing graphic richness in drawings with intellectual and visual perception as content.
  • 331 -- Intermediate Drawing II. (3) (Prereq: ARTS 330) Contemporary cultural stimuli as the content for drawing projects. Emphasis on intellectual and emotive approaches.

Biology (BIOL)

  • 101 -- Biological Principles I. (4) Introductory survey of macromolecules, cell structure and function, genetics, and molecular biology. Three lecture hours and three lab hours per week.
  • 101A -- Biological Principles I. (3) (Prereq: BIOL 101L) Introductory survey of macromolecules, cell structure and function, genetics, and molecular biology. Three lecture hours per week. Restricted to students who have credit for BIOL 101L but lack the lecture.
  • 101L -- Biological Principles I Laboratory. (1) Enrollment by special permission only. Intended for students who have taken BIOL 101 lecture or its equivalent but lack the lab. Three hours per week.
  • 102 -- Biological Principles II. (4) (Prereq: grade of C or better in BIOL 101) Introductory survey of plant and animal development, physiology, ecology, and evolution. Three lecture hours and three lab hours per week.
  • 102L -- Biological Principles II Laboratory. (1) Enrollment by special permission only. Intended for students who have taken BIOL 102 lecture or its equivalent but lack the lab. Three hours per week.
  • 110 -- General Biology. (4) Basic biological concepts and issues for non-biology majors. Credit may not be given for both this course and BIOL 120. Three lecture, two laboratory hours per week.
  • 120 -- Human Biology. (3) Fundamental principles of human biology. Credit may not be given for both BIOL 110 and BIOL 120. Three lecture hours per week. Not for major credit.
  • 120L -- Laboratory in Human Biology. (1) (Prereq or coreq: BIOL 120) Exercises dealing with basic concepts of human biology. Not for major credit.
  • 200 -- Plant Science. (3) An introduction to plant science for the non-major. This course does not carry major credit, and is not designed as a prerequisite for other biology courses. Plant development, physiology, genetics, evolution, and ecology will be considered. Three lecture hours per week.
  • 200L -- Plant Science Laboratory. (1) (Prereq or coreq: BIOL 200) Laboratory exercises, demonstrations, and audio-visual supplements to BIOL 200. Two hours per week. Not for major credit.
  • 206 -- Genetics and Society. (3) (Designed for nonmajor students) Genetic principles, emphasizing human heredity. Relevance of recent advances in genetics. Three lecture hours per week.
  • 243 -- Human Anatomy and Physiology I. (3) (Prereq: CHEM 102) Functional anatomy and physiology of the human body, including the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems. Not available for biology major credit. Three lecture hours per week.
  • 243L -- Human Anatomy and Physiology Laboratory. (1) (Coreq: BIOL 243) The principles of anatomy and physiology as demonstrated by microscopic studies, animal dissection, and physiological experiments. One three-hour laboratory per week.
  • 244 -- Human Anatomy and Physiology II. (3) (Prereq: BIOL 243) Functional anatomy and physiology of the human body, including the cardiovascular, endocrine, excretory, reproductive, digestive, and respiratory systems. Not available for biology major credit. Three lecture hours per week.
  • 244L -- Human Anatomy and Physiology Laboratory. (1) (Coreq: BIOL 244) A continuation of BIOL 243L. One three-hour laboratory per week.
  • 250 -- Microbiology. (3) (Prereq: college-level biology and chemistry; coreq: BIOL 250L) An introduction to bacteria and viruses, emphasizing structure, metabolism, and pathogenesis. Discussion of infectious diseases, antigen-antibody relationships, and anti-microbial agents in chemotherapy. Not available for biology major credit. Three lecture hours per week.
  • 250L -- Microbiology Laboratory. (1) (Prereq or coreq: BIOL 250) Not available for biology major credit. Three hours per week.
  • 260 -- Physiology. (3) (Prereq: BIOL 102) Physiology of human systems especially susceptible to disturbance: immunobiology, circulation, excretion, metabolism, endocrinology, and muscle physiology. Not for biology major credit. Intended for pharmacy students.
  • 270 -- Introduction to Environmental Biology. (3) Basic ecological principles and the impacts of human population growth and technology. Not for major credit.
  • 270L -- Introduction to Environmental Biology Laboratory. (1) (Prereq or coreq: BIOL 270) Demonstrations, data analyses, discussions, and films relating to human ecology, resource use, and environmental impact. Two hours per week. Not for major credit.
  • 301 -- Ecology and Evolution. (3) (Prereq: BIOL 102 or MSCI 311) Concepts of evolution, populations, and population interactions; communities and ecosystems. Three lecture hours per week.
  • 301L -- Ecology and Evolution Laboratory. (1) (Prereq or coreq: BIOL 301) Experiments, exercises, and demonstrations. Three hours per week.
  • 302 -- Cell and Molecular Biology. (3) (Prereq: BIOL 102 or MSCI 311; prereq or coreq: CHEM 333) Principles of eukaryotic cell structure, molecular organization, and physiology. Genome organization and expression. Cell growth, division, and cell-cell interactions. Three lecture hours per week.
  • 302L -- Cell and Molecular Biology Laboratory. (1) (Prereq or coreq: BIOL 302) Experiments, exercises, and demonstrations. Three hours per week.
  • 303 -- Fundamental Genetics. (3) (Prereq: BIOL 102 or MSCI 311) Basic principles of transmission and molecular genetics; quantitative inheritance; recombination; biochemical aspects of gene function and regulation; developmental genetics and population genetics. Three lecture hours per week.
  • 398 -- Laboratory Teaching Experience. (1) (Prereq: Department permission) Participation in preparation and teaching of undergraduate biological sciences laboratories.

Business Administration

Accounting (ACCT)

  • 225 -- Introduction to Financial Accounting. (3) (Prereq: sophomore standing) User-oriented approach to the study of financial accounting and reporting topics related to business decisions.
  • 226 -- Introduction to Managerial Accounting. (3) (Prereq: ACCT 225) User-oriented approach to the study of managerial accounting topics related to business decisions.
  • 324 -- Survey of Commercial Law. (3) Basic legal concepts and the judicial system, with emphasis on business law.
  • 335 -- Survey of Federal Taxation. (3) Federal tax law and preparation of individual income tax returns. (Not allowed as an upper-division elective by accounting majors and not open for students who received credit for ACCT 403.)
  • 364 -- Financial Institutions. {=ECON 364} (3) A study of the functions and operations of financial institutions and their relationships to the commercial banking system and the general economy. Attention is devoted to savings institutions, insurance companies, rural and urban real estate credit, consumer credit, and associated topics.
  • 366 -- Introduction to Real Estate and Urban Development. (3) Real estate analysis and administration; basic principles, concepts, terminology, and institutional factors related to real estate decisions in the urban environment. This course fulfills a pre-examination requirement of the South Carolina Real Estate licensing law (30-hour approved course).

Finance (FINA)

  • 301 -- Money and Banking. {=ECON 301} (3) The role of money in the market economy. Commercial banks, the Federal Reserve System, and monetary policy.
  • 363 -- Introduction to Finance. {=ECON 363} (3) (Prereq: ECON 221/222, ACCT 225/226, and 3 hours of statistics at the 200 level) Basic concepts of finance related to decision making.
  • 369 -- Personal Finance. (3) Life insurance, health insurance, wills, trusts, Social Security, stocks, bonds, real estate, mutual funds, and other uses of funds.
  • 467 -- Real Estate Finance. (3) (Prereq: FINA 366) The nature and importance of credit in real estate development and operations; legal framework, sources of mortgage funds, role of public and private financial institutions.

Management (MGMT)

  • 300 -- Careers in Business. (1) An introduction to career opportunities and the career placement process in business.
  • 371 -- Principles of Management. (3) A comprehensive survey of the basic principles of management applicable to all forms of business. The course provides the student with a basis for thinking about complex business situations in the framework of analysis of the management process.
  • 374 -- Management of Human Resources. (3) (Prereq: MGMT 371) A survey of the major approaches used in managing human resources. Covers selection, compensation, legal compliance, discipline, organizational restructuring, TQM, motivation, labor relations, and performance management.
  • 376 -- Organization Behavior. (3) (Prereq: MGMT 371) Introduction to human behavior in organizations. Emphasis on factors that contribute to the effectiveness of individuals and groups in organizations.
  • 472 -- Entrepreneurship and Small Business. (3) (Prereq: MGMT 371) This course is an introduction to the ownership and management of small firms, emphasizing their role in the U.S. economy, their particular demands on owners, and the effects of newness and smallness on their managers' decisions.
  • 478 -- Strategic Management. (3) (Prereq: MKTG 350, FINA 363, MGMT 371, and senior standing) A study of the formulation and application of functionally integrated business policy by top management. Emphasis is on decision making in the face of changing conditions.

Management Science (MGSC)

  • 290 -- Computer Information Systems in Business. (3) An introduction to the effective use of information systems tools in day-to-day business communications, analysis, and decision making.
  • 291 -- Statistics for Business and Economics. (3) Descriptive statistics, topics in probability, statistical inference and modeling. Emphasis on the collection, summarization, analysis, and reporting of numerical findings relevant to business decisions and economic analysis.

Marketing (MKTG)

  • 350 -- Principles of Marketing. (3) (Prereq: ECON 221/222, ACCT 225/226 for B.A. major sections; ECON 224, ACCT 222 for non-B.A. major sections) Principles and concepts underlying marketing functions, including the conception, pricing, promotion, and distribution of products and services and the role of marketing in society.
  • 351 -- Consumer Behavior. (3) (Prereq: MKTG 350) The consumer decision process, with emphasis on consumer decision making, satisfaction/dissatisfaction factors, perception, learning, group influences, and marketing strategy implications.
  • 457 -- Personal Selling and Sales Management. (3) (Prereq: MKTG 350) Examines fundamentals of personal selling and sales management and the development of communication and selling skills that yield desired sales results.

Chemistry and Biochemistry (CHEM)

  • 102 -- Fundamental Chemistry II. (4) (Prereq: 1 year high-school chemistry, CHEM 101, 111, or equivalent) Three lecture, one recitation, and two laboratory hours per week. An introductory survey of organic and biochemistry.
  • 105 -- Chemistry and Modern Society I. (4) A conceptual and qualitative approach to chemistry, its evolution, achievements, and goals and its impact on technology, the environment, and modern life and thought. (Specifically designed for non-science majors.) Three lecture hours per week.
  • 106 -- Chemistry and Modern Society II. (3) (Prereq: CHEM 105) A continuation of Chemistry 105. Three lecture hours per week.
  • 106L -- Chemistry and Modern Society Laboratory. (1) (Prereq: CHEM 105; coreq: CHEM 106) Laboratory associated with CHEM 106. Three hours of laboratory per week.
  • 107 -- Forensic Chemistry. (4) Surveys chemical aspects of criminal investigation and adjudication including drug, arson, DNA, paint, and fiber identification. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week.
  • 111 -- General Chemistry. (4) (Prereq: MATH 111 or 115) Three lecture, one recitation, and two laboratory hours per week. A survey of the principles that underlie all chemistry with applications illustrating these principles.
  • 112 -- General Chemistry. (4) (Prereq: MATH 111 or 115 and a grade of C or better in CHEM 111 or CHEM 141) A continuation of CHEM 111. Special emphasis on chemical equilibrium. Three lecture, one recitation, and three laboratory hours per week.
  • 118 -- Computational Chemistry I. (1) (Prereq or coreq: CHEM 112 or CHEM 142) Introduction to the use of computers in solving chemical problems. One discussion and two laboratory hours per week.
  • 321 -- Quantitative Analysis. (3) (Prereq: CHEM 112 or CHEM 142; coreq: CHEM 321L) Gravimetric, volumetric, and introductory instrumental analysis. Three lecture and one recitation hours per week.
  • 321L -- Quantitative Analysis Laboratory. (1) (Coreq: CHEM 321) Three laboratory hours per week.
  • 331L -- Essentials of Organic Chemistry Laboratory I. (1) (Prereq or coreq: CHEM 333) Laboratory safety, syntheses, separation, and purification of carbon compounds. For non-majors.
  • 332L -- Essentials of Organic Chemistry Laboratory II. (1) (Prereq: CHEM 331L or, with permission of instructor, CHEM 333L; prereq or coreq: CHEM 334) Continuation of CHEM 331L. Spectroscopic identification of carbon compounds. For non-majors. Three lab hours per week.
  • 333 -- Organic Chemistry I. (3) (Prereq: CHEM 112 or CHEM 142) Contemporary theories, nomenclature, reactions, mechanisms, and syntheses of carbon compounds. Required for chemistry majors. Three lecture and one recitation hours per week.
  • 333L -- Comprehensive Organic Chemistry Laboratory I. (2) (Prereq or coreq: CHEM 333) Laboratory safety, synthesis, separation, and purification of carbon compounds. Required for chemistry majors. Six laboratory hours per week.
  • 334 -- Organic Chemistry II. (3) (Prereq: CHEM 333) Continuation of CHEM 333. Required for chemistry majors. Three lecture and one recitation hours per week.
  • 334L -- Comprehensive Organic Chemistry Laboratory II. (2) (Prereq: CHEM 332L or 333L; prereq or coreq: CHEM 334) Continuation of CHEM 333L. Spectroscopic identification of carbon compounds. Required for chemistry majors. Six laboratory hours per week.

Computer Science and Engineering (CSCE)

  • 101 -- Introduction to Computer Concepts. (3) (Prereq: two years of college preparatory mathematics or equivalent) History, application, and social impact of computers; problem-solving, algorithm development, applications software, and programming in a procedural language. Open to all majors.
  • 102 -- General Applications Programming. (3) (Prereq: two years of college preparatory mathematics) Introduction to systematic computer problem-solving and programming for a variety of applications. Open to all majors.
  • 145 -- Algorithmic Design I. (4) (Prereq: Placement in MATH 141 or grade of C or better in MATH 115) Problem-solving, algorithmic design, and programming. Three lectures and two laboratory hours per week. Open to all majors.
  • 146 -- Algorithmic Design II. (4) (Prereq: Grade of C or better in both CSCE 145 and MATH 141) Continuation of CSCE 145. Rigorous development of algorithms and computer programs; elementary data structures. Three lecture hours and two laboratory hours per week. Open to all majors.
  • 190 -- Computing in the Modern World. (1) (Coreq: CSCE 145, 204, 205, 206 or equivalent) An introduction to the field of computing: trends in computing technology, the profession, and careers; subdisciplines in computing; the nature of research and development. Open to all majors. Not auditable.
  • 204 -- Program Design and Development. {=MGSC 298} (3) (Prereq: CSCE 101 or MGSC 290) Fundamental algorithms and processes used in business information systems. Development and representation of programming logic. Introduction to implementation using a high-level programming language.
  • 205 -- Business Applications Programming. (3) (Prereq: MGSC 290 or CSCE 101 or above) Introduction to computer applications in business. Programming exercises in COBOL.
  • 206 -- Scientific Applications Programming. (3) (Prereq: MATH 122 or 141) Introduction to computer applications in science and engineering. Programming exercises in a high-level language. Open to all majors.
  • 207 -- Programming and the Unix Environment. (3) (Prereq: CSCE 145 or 206) The Unix programming environment: I/O programming, Unix processes, fork, exec, pipes and signals, and tools. Open to all majors.
  • 209 -- Special Topics in Computer Programming. (1-3) Programming and application development using selected programming languages. Course content varies and will be announced in the schedule of classes by suffix and title.
  • 210 -- Computer Hardware Foundations. (3) (Prereq: CSCE 145, 204, 205, 206, or 207) Number representation, data formats, CPU and memory organization, assembly language, I/O and peripherals, computer networks.
  • 211 -- Digital Logic Design. (3) (Prereq: MATH 141 or 174) Number systems, Boolean algebra, logic design, sequential machines.
  • 212 -- Introduction to Computer Architecture. (3) (Prereq: either CSCE 211 and either CSCE 145 or 206) Computer architecture, components. and organization; memory addressing; Input/Output; instruction sets; interrupts; assembly-language programming.
  • 215 -- UNIX/Linux Fundamentals. (1) (Prereq: CSCE 145) UNIX operating system, user-level system commands, and programming tools. UNIX scripting languages.
  • 240 -- Introduction to Software Engineering. (3) (Prereq: grade of C or better in CSCE 146) Fundamentals of software design and development; software implementation strategies; object-oriented design techniques; ethics in software development.
  • 245 -- Object-Oriented Programming Techniques. (3) (Prereq: grade of C or better in CSCE 146) Advanced object-oriented concepts and techniques; multiple inheritance; memory management; operator overloading; polymorphism; performance issues.

Criminology and Criminal Justice (CRJU)

  • 101 -- The American Criminal Justice System. (3) A survey of the law enforcement, courts, corrections, juvenile, and planning systems. Problems of interrelationships between criminal justice agencies and the community.
  • 202 -- Research Methods in Criminal Justice. (3) (Prereq: STAT 201 or equivalent courses in quantitative methods) Introduction to the practice of social research in criminology and criminal justice settings.
  • 301 -- Research Methods in Criminal Justice. (3) (Prereq: STAT 201 or equivalent courses in quantitative methods) Logic, design, analysis, and ethical principles in criminal justice.
  • 311 -- Policing. (3) Current and historical perspectives on American policing.
  • 312 -- Corrections. (3) Current and historical perspectives on incarceration and its alternatives.
  • 313 -- Criminal Courts. (3) A study of the structure and organization of the federal and state court systems, with special attention to the criminal courts. The basic functions of the courts will be examined.
  • 314 -- Criminal Law. (3) Origin and development of criminal law in America. Basic elements of crimes and defenses.
  • 341 -- Sociology of Crime. {=SOCY 353} (3) Social factors in the development, identification, and treatment of criminals.
  • 351 -- Juvenile Delinquency and Justice. {=SOCY 350} (3) Social factors in the development, identification, and treatment of delinquents.
  • 399 -- Independent Study. (1-6) (Prereq: consent of instructor) Contract approved by instructor, advisor, and Office of Academic Programs is required for undergraduate students.
  • 491 -- Special Topics. (3) Topics in criminology and criminal justice. Individual topics to be announced with suffix and title. May be repeated once with consent of advisor.

Criminal Justice (LCRJ)

Note: The following courses are intended specifically for students enrolled in the associate degree program in criminal justice and are not regularly applicable to baccalaureate degree requirements.

  • 271 -- Criminal Investigation. (3) Fundamentals of criminal investigation theory and history; crime scene to courtroom, with emphasis on techniques appropriate to specific crimes.
  • 272 -- Criminal Law and Court Procedure. (3) An introduction to basic criminal law and the mechanics of the courts.
  • 281 -- Seminar: Criminal Justice. (3) Research, reading, and small group discussions of contemporary issues, problems, and possible solutions in the area of criminal justice and related social institutions.
  • 282 -- Practicum: Criminal Justice. (3) Supervised work experience (9-12 hours per week) above the clerical level with a criminal justice agency for pre-service students. Will provide opportunity for a student to apply previously studied theory to practical use in a meaningful life experience. Student must have earned at least 40 semester hours and have approval of academic dean and instructor.

Economics (ECON)

ECON 221 and 222, or ECON 224 are prerequisite to all 300-, 400-, and 500-level economics courses.

  • 123 -- The American Economy. (3) Basic concepts, institutional foundations, structure of the private and public sector, labor markets; major economic problems.
  • 221 -- Principles of Microeconomics. (3) Microeconomic analysis: theory of the firm, cost and output determination, market pricing, theory of consumer and income distribution. Students cannot receive credit for both ECON 221 and 224.
  • 222 -- Principles of Macroeconomics. (3) (Prereq: ECON 221 or the equivalent) Macroeconomic analysis: basic definitions and concepts, mechanics of pricing and the fundamentals of American capitalism, national income economics, income and employment theory, monetary and fiscal policy, and international economics. Students cannot receive credit for both ECON 222 and 224.
  • 224 -- Introduction to Economics. (3) Micro- and macroeconomic principles of markets, government policy, and household or firm decision-making. Open to all students except business administration majors. Credit not granted for both ECON 224 and either 221 or 222.
  • 301 -- Money and Banking. {=FINA 301} (3) The role of money in the market economy. Commercial banks, the Federal Reserve System, and monetary policy.
  • 311 -- Issues in Economics. (3) The nature and causes of major economic problems facing the nation and its communities, and policy alternatives designed to solve them. The philosophy and methodology of economics in social problem solving.
  • 329 -- American Economic History. (3) Growth and development of the American economy; applications of economic theory to economic history.

Education

Early Childhood Education (EDEC)

  • 201 -- Inquiry into Early Childhood Education. (3) Inquiry into the roles, programs, history, and culture trends in early childhood education.
  • 250 -- Play and Early Learning. (3) Theory and practice related to children's play and early learning in family, community, and educational settings.

Education Leadership (EDLP)

  • 520 -- The Teacher as Manager. (3) To help teachers, principals, and other personnel solve school problems by identifying and applying selected management techniques.

Educational Psychology (EDPY)

  • 333 -- Introduction to Child Growth and Development. (3) Basic course designed to familiarize the prospective teacher with the patterns of social, emotional, physical, and intellectual growth of the individual. Development of these growth patterns from the prenatal stage to the onset of adolescence.
  • 334 -- Introduction to Adolescent Growth and Development. (3) Basic course designed to familiarize the prospective junior and senior high school teacher with the pattern of social, emotional, physical, and intellectual growth of the individual during his adolescent years. Recommendation of the advisor(s) required.
  • 335 -- Introduction to Educational Psychology. (3) Applications of the psychology of learning and development. Special attention to basic statistics and the behavior of the school child.
  • 401 -- Learners and the Diversity of Learning. (3) (Prereq: EDUC 300, 400; coreq: EDUC 401P) Lifespan development and learning with an emphasis on individual and group diversity.

Foundations of Education (EDFN)

  • 300 -- Schools In Communities. (3) (Prereq: sophomore standing) Social, political, and historical aspects of diverse educational institutions in American culture with an emphasis on families, schools, and communities.

    Instruction and Teacher Education (EDTE)

  • 402 -- Teachers and Teaching. (3) (Prereq: EDUC 300, 400, 401, and 401P; coreq: EDUC 402P) Teaching as reflective and ethical practice. Professional standards, teacher leadership and school change, and various roles of professional educators.

    Physical Education (PEDU)

    Fitness and Conditioning
    • 103 -- Jogging. (1) Exercise, lectures, and self-evaluation for weight control and fitness improvement.
    • 104 -- Personal Fitness and Weight Control. (1) Advanced techniques for controlling weight and improving fitness through exercise, lectures, and self-evaluation.
    • 105 -- Weight Training. (1) Fundamentals of progressive resistance exercise training.
    • 106 -- Advanced Weight Training. (1) (Prereq: PEDU 105 or consent of instructor) Advanced techniques.
    • 107 -- Aerobic Dance. (1) Cardio-respiratory fitness, flexibility, and coordination through continuous rhythmical movements.
    • 108 -- Fitness Swimming. (1) (Prereq: PEDU 140 or consent of instructor) Individualized physical conditioning through lap swimming and aquatic calisthenics, games, and activities.
    • 110 -- Orientation to Physical Education. (1) Experiences in a variety of physical-activity areas.
    Sport
    • 112 -- Basketball. (1) Fundamental skills of game performance. Strategy, rules, and basic offenses and defenses.
    • 113 -- Bowling. (1) Fundamental skills and techniques of bowling.
    • 114 -- Golf. (1) Basic strokes, rules, and strategy of golf.
    • 116 -- Handball. (1) Fundamentals, strategy, and rules of handball.
    • 117 -- Karate. (1) Fundamentals.
    • 119 -- Soccer. (1) Fundamental skills for game performance; history, rules, and game strategy.
    • 120 -- Softball. (1) Fundamental skills for game performance; history, rules, and game strategy.
    • 121 -- Beginning Tennis. (1) Basic strokes, history, rules, and strategy of the game.
    • 122 -- Volleyball. (1) Recreational and competitive volleyball skills.
    • 129 -- Racquetball. (1) Fundamental skills, rules, and terminology.
    • 132 -- Intermediate Tennis. (1) (Prereq: PEDU 121 or consent of instructor) Intermediate skills and strategies.
    • 136 -- Yoga. (1) Fundamental skills and terminology.
    Aquatics
    • 140 -- Beginning Swimming. (1) Skills for safety and recreation.
    • 141 -- Intermediate Swimming. (1) (Prereq: PEDU 140 or consent of instructor)
    • 142 -- Lifeguard Training. (1) (Prereq: swim 500 yards, tread water for one minute, and swim 20 feet underwater) Skills of lifesaving.
    • 147 -- Synchronized Swimming. (1) (Prereq: PEDU 141 or consent of instructor) Stroke modifications, basic figures, and sculling techniques; floating patterns and elementary composition of creative aquatics.
    • 148 -- Team Water Sports. (1) (Prereq: intermediate swimming skills) Fundamental skills, rules, and strategies for participation in team water sports.
    • 149 -- Survival Swimming. (1) (Prereq: swim 100 yards, tread water for one minute, and swim 20 feet underwater) Skills and techniques for survival under adverse conditions.
    Outdoor Activities
    • 181 -- Equestrian. (1) English hunter-style riding for intermediate students.
    • 182 -- Backpacking. (1) Living in the out-of-doors; gear selection, map and compass reading, backpacking, hiking, and camping.
    • 183 -- Canoeing. (1) Fundamentals of lake, river, and whitewater canoeing.
    • 184 -- Snow Skiing. (1) Fundamental skills and techniques.
    Physical Education Major Courses
    • 575 -- Physical Education for the Classroom Teacher. (3) (Prereq: EDUC 201) Appropriate movement experiences for children. Not available for physical education majors.

    Engineering (ENCP)

    The following courses carry the prefix ENCP indicating that students from more than one engineering department commonly enroll in them.

    • 101 -- Introduction to Engineering I. (3) Engineering problem solving using computers and other engineering tools.
    • 102 -- Introduction to Engineering II. (3) Principles and practice of visualization and graphical representation using modern computer-aided design tools.
    • 200 -- Statics. (3) (Prereq: MATH 141) Introduction to the principles of mechanics. Equilibrium of particles and rigid bodies. Distributed forces, centroids, and centers of gravity. Moments of inertia of areas. Analysis of simple structures and machines. A study of various types of friction.
    • 210 -- Dynamics. (3) (Prereq: ENCP 200) Kinematics of particles and rigid bodies. Kinetics of particles with emphasis on Newton's second law; energy and momentum methods for the solution of problems. Applications of plane motion of rigid bodies.

    English Language and Literature (ENGL)

    • 101 -- Composition. (3) A course in the composing process with attention to invention, arrangement, and style, and closely supervised practice in reading and writing essays.
    • 102 -- Composition and Literature. (3) (Prereq: ENGL 101) A course in the writing of expository and critical essays with an introduction to literature and including a research paper.

    Note: Students must complete English 101 and 102 (or equivalent) before taking any other English course.

    • 270 -- World Literature. [=CPLT 270] (3) Selected masterpieces of world literature from antiquity to present.
    • 280 -- Introduction to Literary and Language Studies. (3) Introduction to techniques of close-reading, to the analysis of literary texts, and to the theoretical approaches that give rise to these methods. Designed for English majors.
    • 282 -- Fiction. (3) Fiction from several countries and historical periods, illustrating the nature of the genre.
    • 283 -- Themes in British Writing. (3) Reading a variety of British texts that exemplify persistent themes of British culture.
    • 284 -- Drama. (3) Drama from several countries and historical periods, illustrating the nature of the genre.
    • 285 -- Themes in American Writing. (3) Reading a variety of American texts that exemplify persistent themes of American culture.
    • 286 -- Poetry. (3) Poetry from several countries and historical periods, illustrating the nature of the genre.
    • 287 -- American Literature. (3) Survey of American literature: major authors, genres, and periods. Designed for English majors.
    • 288 -- English Literature I. (3) British poetry, drama, and prose from Beowulf to the 18th century. Designed for English majors.
    • 289 -- English Literature II. (3) British poetry, drama, and prose from the 18th century to the present. Designed for English majors.
    • 292 -- Vocabulary and Language. (3) Native and borrowed sources of the English vocabulary, with attention to language relationships, changes in the pronunciation and meaning of words, and history and linguistic function of dictionaries.
    • 381 -- The Renaissance. [=CPLT 381] (3) Literature of the Renaissance, in its cultural contexts, explored through representative works.
    • 382 -- The Enlightenment. [=CPLT 382] (3) Literature of the Enlightenment, in its cultural contexts, explored through representative works.
    • 384 -- Modernism. (3) Literature of Modernism, in its cultural contexts, explored through representative works.
    • 387 -- Introduction to Rhetoric. (3) Theories of human communication useful for understanding and informing the everyday work of writers. Emphasis on intensive analysis and writing.
    • 427 -- Southern Literature. (3) Representative works of Southern writers.
    • 431 -- Children’s Literature. (3) Reading and evaluating representative works appropriate for the elementary school child.
    • 435 -- The Short Story. (3) The characteristics of the short story and its historical development in America and Europe.
    • 437 -- Women Writers. [=WOST 437] (3) Representative works written by women.
    • 460 -- Advanced Writing. (3) Extensive practice in different types of nonfiction writing.
    • 463 -- Business Writing. (3) Extensive practice in different types of business writing, from brief letters to formal articles and reports.
    • 465 -- Fiction Workshop. (3)

    Environment (ENVR)

    • 101 -- Introduction to the Environment. (3) Analysis of environmental issues and the role of science in their identification and resolution.
    • 101L -- Introduction to the Environment Lab. (1) (Prereq or coreq: ENVR 101) Demonstrations, field trips, data analyses, and discussion relating to environmental issues, such as sustainability, resource management, and pollution control.

    Film Studies (FILM)

    • 240 -- Introduction to Film Studies. (3) Basic concepts of how films convey meaning to viewers and viewers ascribe meaning to films.

    Languages, Literatures, and Cultures

    French (FREN)

    • 109 -- Beginning French I. (3) Introduction to grammar and practical vocabulary necessary for fundamental communication skills. Admission to 109 restricted to those who have never studied French, who have not studied French in the previous five years, or who have a score of F-1 on the placement test.
    • 110 -- Beginning French II. (3) Introduction to grammar and practical vocabulary necessary for fundamental communication skills. Admission to 110 restricted to those who have completed FREN 109. Credit may be received only for one of the following: 109/110 or 121.
    • 121 -- Elementary French. (4) Grammar and vocabulary for fundamental communication skills. Assumes prior experience in French. Admission only by proficiency examination. Credit may be received only for one of the following: 109/110 or 121.
    • 122 -- Basic Proficiency in French. (3) Practice and further development of essential listening, reading, speaking, and writing skills. Admission either by placement examination or successful completion of FREN 110, 111, or 121. Offered each semester.

    Spanish (SPAN)

    • 109 -- Beginning Spanish I. (3) Introduction to grammar and practical vocabulary necessary for fundamental communication skills. Admission to 109 restricted to those who have never studied Spanish previously or who have placed by examination into 109; admission to 110 restricted to those who have completed SPAN 109. 109 offered in fall and summer I only; 110 in spring and summer II only. Credit may be received only for one of the following: 109/110; 111; or 121.
    • 110 -- Beginning Spanish II. (3) Introduction to grammar and practical vocabulary necessary for fundamental communication skills. Admission to 109 restricted to those who have never studied Spanish previously or who have placed by examination into 109; admission to 110 restricted to those who have completed SPAN 109. 109 offered in fall and summer I only; 110 in spring and summer II only. Credit may be received only for one of the following: 109/110; 111; or 121.
    • 121 -- Elementary Spanish. (4) Grammar and vocabulary necessary for fundamental communication skills. Assumes prior experience in Spanish. Admission only by proficiency examination. Credit may be received only for one of the following: 110 or 121.
    • 122 -- Basic Proficiency in Spanish. (3) Practice and further development of essential listening, reading, speaking, and writing skills. Admission either by placement examination or successful completion of SPAN 110, 111, or 121. Offered each semester.

    Geography (GEOG)

    • 103 -- Introduction to Geography. (3) A survey of the principles and methods of geographic inquiry. Not required for the geography major.
    • 104 -- Introduction to Physical Geography. (3) Basic concepts of landform geography, climatology and meteorology, and biogeography.
    • 121 -- Lands and People of the World. (3) Introduction to the physical and human geography of the world with a focus on selected regions.
    • 141 -- The Earth from Above. (3) Use of maps, aerial photographs, and images from satellites as representations of the earth's surface.
    • 201 -- Landform Geography. (4) Hydrology, soil science, and interpretation of physical features formed by water, wind, and ice, with emphasis on environmental change. Three hours of lecture and one two-hour laboratory per week.
    • 202 -- Weather and Climate. (4) Processes that influence weather and climate patterns on the earth. Three lectures and one two-hour laboratory per week.
    • 346 -- Climate and Society. (3) Major theories and methodologies for studying the relationship between climate and society.

    Geology (GEOL)

    • 101 -- Introduction to the Earth. (4) Origin and nature of the earth with emphasis on internal processes and phenomena such as earthquakes, volcanoes, and mountain building; surface processes, including landform evolution. Three lectures and three laboratory hours each week.
    • 102 -- Fossils and the Evolution of Life on Earth. (4) Basic overview of fossils, including dinosaurs, and their importance for understanding earth history and the evolution of life. Three lectures and three laboratory hours each week.
    • 103 -- Environment of the Earth. (4) Analysis of basic energy cycles of the earth. Interaction of human activity with earth processes to affect the environment. Three lectures and three laboratory hours each week. Field trips required.
    • 110 -- Cultural Geology. (3) The growth of geological concepts, scientific and non-scientific. The impact of geological factors on human affairs. The role of time and evolution (biological and physical). Restricted to non-science majors. Two lectures and one two-hour recitation.

    History (HIST)

    • 101 -- European Civilization from Ancient Times to the Mid-17th Century. (3) The rise and development of European civilization from its Mediterranean origins through the Renaissance and Reformation.
    • 102 -- European Civilization from the Mid-17th Century. (3) European development and expansion from the mid-17th century to the present.
    • 109 -- Introduction to Latin American Civilization. (3) A discussion of the political, cultural, and economic forces which have conditioned the development of institutions and ideas in Spanish and Portuguese America.
    • 111, 112 -- History of the United States from Discovery to the Present Day. (3 each) A general survey of the United States from the era of discovery to the present, emphasizing major political, economic, social, and intellectual developments. First semester: to 1865; second semester: since 1865.
    • 312 -- French Revolution and Napoleon. (3) The changes in France and Europe during the revolutionary decade, the rise of Napoleon, and the establishment of French hegemony over the Continent.
    • 316 -- Nineteenth-Century Europe. (3) Political, social, economic, and intellectual developments from 1815-1900, which brought European culture to its zenith and contributed to Europe’s global domination.
    • 317 -- Contemporary Europe from World War I to World War II. (3) The Great War, revolution, and reconstruction; the rise of authoritarian and totalitarian regimes and the coming of World War II.
    • 320, 321 -- The History of Great Britain. (3 each) A survey of the political, social, economic, and cultural development of the British Isles from Anglo-Saxon times to the present. First semester: to the Restoration of 1660; second semester, since 1660.
    • 404 -- Civil War and Reconstruction, 1860-1877. (3) The political, military, and social history of the War and the reorganization which followed.
    • 405 -- The Rise of Industrial America, 1877-1917. (3) A survey of recent United States history with emphasis on the economic, social, and literary developments from 1877 to 1917.
    • 406 -- The United States and a World at War, 1917-1945. (3) A survey of the political, economic, social, and cultural developments of the period.
    • 407 -- United States History Since 1945. (3) A survey of the political, economic, social, and cultural developments in the period after World War II.
    • 409 -- The History of South Carolina, 1670-1865. (3) A study of South Carolina origins and developments.
    • 410 -- History of South Carolina Since 1865. (3) A survey of recent South Carolina history with emphasis on social and institutional development.
    • 413 -- History of Canada. (3) A survey of Canadian development from colony to modern nation.
    • 415 -- Black Americans. (3) A survey of the historical development of black people in the Western Hemisphere.
    • 442 -- The Old South. (3) Development of Southern society and of the forces that made the South a distinctive section of the United States.
    • 443 -- The New South. (3) Reconstruction, the Bourbon era, agrarian revolt, industrial revolution, racial problems, and the changes resulting from the impact of two world wars and the New Deal (1865-1946).
    • 449 -- American Popular Culture Since 1890. (3) A history of the contributions of the popular aspects of American culture and their interactions with American institutions.

    Hospitality, Retail, and Sport Management

    Retailing (RETL)

    • 260 -- Income Tax Procedures. (3) (Prereq: RETL 162 or equivalent) Prepares the student for practical work with individual tax returns for the three major types of businesses.
    • 261 -- Functional Accounting I. (3) The accounting cycle as it relates to retail and service businesses.
    • 262 -- Functional Accounting II. (3) The accounting cycle as it relates to retail and service businesses.
    • 344 -- Personnel Organization and Supervision. (3) Recruitment, selection, utilization, and development of human resources; role of supervisors in management and personnel administration.
    • 351 -- Small Business Organization and Operation. (3) Concepts and philosophies of ownership for the small retailing operation.

    Technology Support and Training Management (TSTM)

    • 143 -- Advanced Business Document Preparation. (3) Emphasis on production and versatility in preparing business documents. Not for TSTM majors. For business teacher certification.
    • 164 -- Introduction to Office Automation. (3) Overview of office automation systems including technology, human relations, improved productivity, and essential procedures within organizational and environmental contexts.
    • 240 -- Business Law. (3) Formation of contracts and their operation as they apply to business; promissory notes and checks; agency and employment.
    • 243 -- Word Processing Concepts and Technology. (3) (Prereq: keyboarding) Introduction to word processing concepts and applications.
    • 264 -- Computer Applications in Business. (3) A survey of microcomputer systems including basic computer functions, applications, and operations.
    • 270 -- Records Control. (3) (Prereq: TSTM 264) Analysis and control of office records including creation, processing, maintenance, protection, and disposition.
    • 338 -- Integrated Document Production. (3) Use of computers and other electronic equipment to produce documents in a problem-solving, decision-making environment.
    • 342 -- Business Communications. (3) (Prereq: TSTM 264 or equivalent and ENGL 101 and 102) Theory and processes in written business communications; composing effective business letters and reports.
    • 343 -- Introduction to Technology Support and Training Management. (3) (Prereq: TSTM 264) Development of hardware and software troubleshooting, computer security, and end-user training skills.
    • 345 -- Introduction to Networking. (3) (Prereq: TSTM 343) Design, architecture, standards, implementation, and administration of a client-server networking environment.
    • 347 -- Advanced Office Procedures. (3) (Prereq: TSTM 264 or approval of instructor) Supervisory and administrative skills of the office administrator.

    Journalism (JOUR)

    • 201 -- Survey of Mass Communications. (3) Principles, history, philosophies, and social role and function of the mass media and allied professions of public relations and advertising.

    Marine Science (MSCI)

    • 101 -- The Ocean Environment. (4) (Prereq: science, engineering, or education major or consent of instructor) Origin and evolution of the oceans, plate tectonics, ocean circulation, waves and tides, seawater and sediment composition, and influences on biology. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week. Scheduled field trips required.
    • 102 -- The Living Ocean. (4) (Prereq: science, engineering, or education major or consent of instructor) Origin, evolution, and diversity of marine life, biological production, trophic dynamics, nutrient cycles, marine resources, and environmental concerns. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week. Scheduled field trips required.
    • 210 -- Oceans and Man. (3) A nontechnical introduction to human interactions with the marine environment: marine organisms, marine systems, and the physical and chemical characteristics of oceans and estuaries. Not available for marine science major credit.
    • 210L -- Oceans and Man Laboratory. (1) (Prereq or coreq: MSCI 210) Experiments and exercises which illustrate how specific components of marine environments are structured, function, and can be measured. Two laboratory hours per week. Not available for marine science major credit. Attendance on designated field trips may be required.
    • 215 -- Coastal Environments of the Southeastern U.S. {=GEOL 215} (3) Coastal zones of South Carolina and neighboring states, including geologic history, geomorphology, stratigraphy, hydrogeology, shoreline processes, environmental issues, and effect of man. Three lecture hours each week plus optional field trips. Not available for marine science major credit.
    • 215L -- Coastal Environments of the Southeastern U.S. (Laboratory). {=GEOL 215L} (1) Exercises examining coastal ecology, geomorphology, hydrogeology, shoreline processes, environmental issues, and human impact. Two laboratory hours per week. Scheduled field trips required. Not available for marine science major credit.

    Mathematics (MATH)

    • 111 -- Basic College Mathematics. (3) (Prereq: qualification through placement) Basic college algebra; linear and quadratic equations, inequalities, functions and graphs of functions, exponential and logarithm functions, systems of equations. Credit may not be received for both MATH 111 and MATH 115.
    • 111I -- Intensive Basic College Mathematics. (4) (Prereq: qualification through placement) An intensive treatment of the topics covered in MATH 111.  
    • 112 -- Trigonometry. (2) (Prereq: qualification through placement or a grade of C or better in MATH 111) Topics in trigonometry specifically needed for MATH 141, 142, 241. Circular functions, analytic trigonometry, applications of trigonometry. Credit may not be received for both MATH 112 and 115.
    • 115 -- Precalculus Mathematics. (4) (Prereq: qualification through placement) Topics in algebra and trigonometry specifically needed for MATH 141, 142, 241. Subsets of the real line, absolute value; polynomial, rational, inverse, logarithmic, exponential functions; circular functions; analytic trigonometry. Credit may not be received for both MATH 111 and 115 or both MATH 112 and 115.
    • 122 -- Calculus for Business Administration and Social Sciences. (3) (Prereq: qualification through placement or a grade of C or better in MATH 111 or 115) Derivatives and integrals of elementary algebraic, exponential, and logarithm functions. Maxima, minima, rate of change, motion, work, area under a curve, and volume.
    • 141 -- Calculus I. (4) (Prereq: qualification through placement or a grade of C or better in MATH 112 or 115) Four classroom hours and one laboratory hour per week. Functions, limits, derivatives, introduction to integrals, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, applications of derivatives and integrals.
    • 142 -- Calculus II. (4) (Prereq: qualification through placement or a grade of C or better in MATH 141) Four classroom hours and one laboratory hour per week. Methods of integration, sequences and series, approximations.
    • 151 -- Calculus Workshop I. (2) (Coreq: MATH 141) Small study group practice in applications of calculus. For elective credit only. Two 2-hour sessions per week.
    • 152 -- Calculus Workshop II. (2) (Coreq: MATH 142) Small study group practice in applications of calculus. For elective credit only. Two 2-hour sessions per week.
    • 170 -- Finite Mathematics. (3) (Prereq: qualification through placement or a grade of C or better in MATH 111 or 115) Elementary matrix theory; systems of linear equations; permutations and combinations; probability and Markov chains; linear programming and game theory.
    • 172 -- Mathematical Modeling for the Life Sciences. (3) (Prereq: C or better in MATH 122 or MATH 141) Biological modeling with differential and difference equations; techniques of model modifications; analytic, numerical, and graphical solution methods; equilibria, stability, and long-term system behavior; geometric series; vectors, matrices, eigenvalues, and eigenvectors. Applications principally to population dynamics and compartment models.
    • 174 -- Discrete Mathematics for Computer Science. (3) (Prereq: qualification through placement or a grade of C or better in MATH 112 or 115) Induction, complexity, elementary counting, combinations and permutations, recursion and recurrence relations, graphs and trees; discussion of the design and analysis of algorithms--with emphasis on sorting and searching.
    • 198 -- Introduction to Careers and Research in the Mathematical Sciences. (1) (Prereq: Qualification through placement in MATH 142 or higher, or a grade of C or better in MATH 141) An overview of different areas of mathematical research andcareer opportunities for mathematics majors. Pass/fail only.
    • 221 -- Basic Concepts of Elementary Mathematics I. (3) (Prereq: qualification through placement or a grade of C or better in MATH 111 or 115) The meaning of number, fundamental operations of arithmetic, the structure of the real number system and its subsystems, elementary number theory. Open only to students in elementary or early childhood teacher certification.
    • 222 -- Basic Concepts of Elementary Mathematics II. (3) (Prereq: MATH 221) Informal geometry and basic concepts of algebra. Open only to students in elementary or early childhood teacher certification.
    • 241 -- Vector Calculus. (3) (Prereq: qualifications through placement or a grade of C or better in MATH 142) Vector algebra, geometry of three-dimensional space; lines, planes, and curves in space; polar, cylindrical, and spherical coordinate systems; partial differentiation, max-min theory; multiple and iterated integration, line integrals, and Green's theorem in the plane.
    • 242 -- Elementary Differential Equations. (3) (Prereq: qualification through placement or a grade of C or better in MATH 142) Ordinary differential equations of first order, higher order linear equations, Laplace transform methods, series methods; numerical solution of differential equations. Applications to the physical sciences and engineering.
    • 374 -- Discrete Structures. (3) (Prereq: MATH 142 and CSCE 146) Propositional and predicate logic; proof techniques; recursion and recurrence relations; sets, combinatorics, and probability; functions, relations, and matrices; algebraic structures.
    • 399 -- Independent Study. (3-9) Contract approved by instructor, advisor, and department chair is required for undergraduate students.

    Music (MUSC)

    History and Literature

    • 110 -- Introduction to Music. (3) Perceptive listening and appreciation of musical elements, forms and style periods, including composers’ lives, individual styles and representative works. Emphasis on classical music; jazz and American popular music included.
    • 140 -- Jazz and American Popular Music. (3) Development of jazz and American popular music through the study of important soloists, ensembles, arrangers, and composers.

    Nursing

    Associate Nursing (LANU)

    Note: The following courses are intended specifically for students enrolled in the two-year (associate's degree) program in technical nursing and are not regularly applicable to baccalaureate degree requirements.

    • 104 -- Nursing Care Management I. (4) This course focuses on the knowledge, skills, and abilities that are fundamental to nursing practice with application in acute or extended care settings. Admission to the nursing program; corequisites: BIOL 243, BIOL 243L; ENGL 101; LANU 206, LANU 106.
    • 106 -- Pharmacologic Basics. (2) This introductory course outlines the basic concepts of pharmaceutics, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and pharmacotherapeutics. The process of clinical calculations is introduced, as well as the major drug classifications. Admission to the nursing program; corequisites: BIOL 243, BIOL 243L; ENGL 101; LANU 104, LANU 206.
    • 140 -- IV Therapy. (1) This course is a study of the principles and practices of intravenous therapy. Emphasis is placed on venipuncture techniques, complications, fluid balance, and the responsibilities of a licensed nurse.
    • 159 -- Nurse Care Management II. (6) Focuses on the delivery of nursing care to an increasing number of individuals experiencing health problems emphasizing selected physiological systems. Prerequisites: LANU 104, LANU 106, LANU 206; corequisites: BIOL 244, BIOL 244L; PSYC 101; LANU 211.
    • 201 -- Transition Nursing. (3) Through a variety of educational experiences, practical nurse graduates will be assisted in their transition to the role of associate degree nursing student.
    • 206 -- Clinical Skills Application. (2) Involves the application of knowledge, skills, and abilities in a clinical setting. Admission to the nursing program; corequisites: BIOL 243, BIOL 243L; ENGL 101; LANU 104, LANU 106.
    • 209 -- Nursing Management III. (5) Focuses on the delivery of nursing care to an increasing number of individuals experiencing health problems emphasizing selected physiological systems. Prerequisites: LANU 159, LANU 211; corequisite: ENGL 102.
    • 211 -- Care of the Childbearing Family. (4) This course facilitiates the application of the nursing process to assist in meeting the needs of the childbearing and child-rearing family. Focus is on both normal and abnormal aspects. Prerequisites: LANU 104, LANU 106, LANU 159, LANU 206; corequisites: PSYC 101; BIOL 244, BIOL 244L.
    • 214 -- Mental Health Nursing. (4) This course facilitates the utilization of the nursing process to assist in meeting the needs of patients with common mental health problems. Focus is on the dynamics of human behavior, ranging from normal to extreme. Prerequisite: LANU 229; corequisites: LANU 219, humanities/fine arts elective, elective.
    • 219 -- Nursing Management and Leadership. (4) This course prepares the student for the professional nursing role through the introduction of management skills required to care for small groups of individuals and to function as a leader of a nursing team. Prerequisite: LANU 214.
    • 229 -- Nursing Management IV. (6) This course focuses on the delivery of nursing care to clients throughout the lifespan who are experiencing complex, multi-system health problems. Prerequisite: LANU 209; corequisites: BIOL 330, BIOL 330L; MATH 111.

    Nursing (NURS)

    • 210 -- Facilitative Communication. (3) (Prereq: ENGL 101) Examination of communication theory and development of communication skills. Focuses on non-directive and directive interviewing techniques with dyads, small groups, and families
    • 212 -- Evolution of Nursing Science. (3) Examination of development of nursing as a scientific discipline.
    • 216 -- Biophysical Pathology. (3) (Prereq: CHEM 102, NURS 220, and MATH 111 or placement score of B22) Pathology associated with biophysical alterations.
    • 220 -- Clinical Nutrition. (3) (Prereq: CHEM 102) Utilization of principles of therapeutic nutrition with consideration for the physiological and chemical disturbances of various health problems; the role of the nurse in clinical nutrition.
    • 226 -- Socio-Cultural Variations in Health and Illness. (3) Diverse health care belief systems and how they influence human responses to health and illness. Focus on African-American and other cultural groups.
    • 231 -- Foundations of Community Health Nursing. (3) Basic concepts and principles of aggregate and community health.

    Philosophy (PHIL)

    • 102 -- Introduction to Philosophy. (3) An introduction to the main problems of philosophy and its methods of inquiry, analysis, and criticism. Works of important philosophers will be read.
    • 110 -- Introduction to Logic I. (3) The nature of arguments; fallacies, criteria, and techniques of valid deductive inference; applications.
    • 111 -- Introduction to Logic II. (3) (Prereq: PHIL 110) Inductive and decision-making arguments, and criteria of acceptability for them.
    • 201 -- History of Ancient Philosophy. (3) An introduction to the development of philosophy in the ancient world through study of the works of representative philosophers. PHIL 202 may be taken prior to this course.
    • 202 -- History of Modern Philosophy. (3) An introduction to the development of philosophic thought since the Renaissance through the study of the works of important philosophers. The chief emphasis is on the 17th and 18th centuries.
    • 210 -- Philosophical Themes in Literature. (3) Selected philosophical problems as they are presented in imaginative and theoretical literature. Works of fiction and philosophical treatments of issues involved in them will be read and discussed.
    • 211 -- Contemporary Moral Issues. (3) Moral issues confronting men and women in contemporary society. Topics will vary but may include discussion of problems related to abortion, drugs, euthanasia, war, social engineering, and punishment of criminals.
    • 302 -- American Philosophy. (3) The principal movements of philosophical thought from Colonial times to the present, with special emphasis on the 19th and 20th centuries.
    • 303 -- Greek and Roman Philosophy after Aristotle. (3) Problems such as hedonism, providence, belief and evidence, and mysticism, as they appear in the writings of the Epicureans, Stoics, Sceptics, and Plotinus.
    • 304 -- History of Medieval Philosophy. (3) Major philosophical traditions in the Middle Ages.
    • 311 -- Ethics. (3) A study of the moral principles of conduct and the basic concepts underlying these principles, such as good, evil, right, wrong, justice, value, duty, and obligation. The ethical works of influential philosophers are analyzed in terms of these concepts.
    • 314 -- Social and Political Philosophy. {=POLI 300} (3) An examination of modern political philosophers, their responses to political, social, economic, and legal concepts, and the issues concerning liberties and rights in the authority-individual relationship.
    • 318 -- Business Ethics. (3) Ethical problems in business; application to business situations of philosophical theories of individual, corporate, and governmental rights and responsibilities.
    • 320 -- Existentialism. (3) An introduction to existentialist themes in contemporary philosophy, literature, psychology, and religion. The writings of existentialists such as Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Camus, Sartre, Buber, May, and Binswanger will be read and discussed.

    Physics and Astronomy

    Astronomy (ASTR)

    • 111 -- Descriptive Astronomy I. (3) The universe: physical processes and methods of study. Lectures, demonstrations, and laboratory experience. Designed primarily for the non-science major.
    • 111A -- Descriptive Astronomy IA. (1) (Prereq or coreq: ASTR 111) Topics from ASTR 111 studied in greater depth. Laboratory experience required of students who have not completed ASTR 111.
    • 211 -- Descriptive Astronomy II. (3) (Prereq or coreq: ASTR 111) Selected areas from ASTR 111 studied in greater depth. Includes laboratory experience.
    • 211A -- Descriptive Astronomy IIA. (1) (Prereq or coreq: ASTR 111A) Topics from ASTR 111/211 studied in greater depth. Laboratory experience required of students who have not completed ASTR 111.

    Physics (PHYS)

    • 201 -- General Physics I. (3) (Prereq: MATH 115, or 122, or equivalent) First part of an introductory course sequence. Topics include mechanics, wave motion, sound, and heat. No previous background in physics is assumed.
    • 201L -- General Physics Laboratory I. (1) (Prereq or coreq: PHYS 201)
    • 202 -- General Physics II. (3) (Prereq: a grade of C or better in PHYS 201) Continuation of PHYS 201; includes electromagnetism, relativity, quantum physics, atomic and nuclear physics.
    • 202L -- General Physics Laboratory II. (1) (Prereq or coreq: PHYS 202)
    • 211 -- Essentials of Physics I. (3) (Prereq: a grade of C or better in MATH 141; coreq: PHYS 211L) Classical mechanics and wave motion. Calculus-level course for students of science and engineering.
    • 211L -- Essentials of Physics I Lab. (1) (Prereq or coreq: PHYS 206 or 211)
    • 212 -- Essentials of Physics II. (3) (Prereq: a grade of C or better in PHYS 211 and MATH 142; coreq: PHYS 212L) Classical electromagnetism and optics.
    • 212L -- Essentials of Physics II Lab. (1) (Prereq or coreq: PHYS 207 or 212)

    Political Science (POLI)

    • 101 -- Controversies in World Politics. (3) Principal forces and factors influencing world affairs, with emphasis on the role of the United States: resources, food, arms control, human rights, the environment, and rich and poor countries.
    • 105 -- Introduction to Politics. (3) Concepts and problems involved in human relationship with governments, the nation-state, and political change.
    • 201 -- American National Government. (3) The formation and development of the national government, its organization and powers.
    • 341 -- Contemporary United States Foreign Policy. (3) A critical analysis of selected problems of United States foreign policy.
    • 357 -- Film, Politics, and Social Change. (3) Critical analysis of film as expression and agent of political cultural, ideology, and change.
    • 362 -- Politics and the Mass Media. (3) Survey of the role in American politics of mass communications media, including the press and electronic news reporting; influence of mass media on the conduct of political campaigns, political leadership style, and public opinion.
    • 370 -- Introduction to Public Administration. (3) A study of the basic principles and theory of administrative structure, responsibility, and control in relation to policy making in the modern state.

    Psychology (PSYC)

    • 101 -- Introduction to Psychology. (3) An introduction to and survey of the basic concepts and findings within the field of psychology.
    • 103 -- Psychology of Adjustment. (3) Introduction to theories and processes underlying and facilitating human adjustment in the community, family, and workplace.
    • 226 -- Research Methods in Psychology. (4) (Prereq: PSYC 101 or SCCC 130) Basic principles and methodology.
    • 227 -- Psychological Statistics. (4) (Prereq: PSYC 226 and MATH 111 or placement out of MATH 111) Introduction to statistical methods essential for psychological research.
    • 301 -- Psychology of Marriage. [=WOST 301] (3) The psychological, physiological, and social characteristics of marriage.
    • 400 -- Survey of Learning and Memory. (3) (Prereq: PSYC 101 or SCCC 130) Research and applications concerning the acquisition of new behavior and knowledge, including accounts based on classical and instrumental conditioning and on information-processing models.
    • 410 -- Survey of Abnormal Psychology. (3) (Prereq: PSYC 101 or SCCC 130) Covers the classification, diagnosis, etiological theories, and treatments of the major mental and emotional disorders.
    • 420 -- Survey of Developmental Psychology. (3) (Prereq: PSYC 101 or EDPY 335 or SCCC 130) Psychological development from conception to late adulthood. Topics include physical, cognitive, and social processes associated with development at each stage of the life cycle.

    Public Health

    Exercise Science (EXSC)

    • 191 -- Introduction to Exercise Science. (3) Concepts of exercise, nutrition, behavior changes, and skills to promote lifelong physical activity and health.
    • 223 -- Anatomy and Physiology I. (4) (Prereq: ENGL 101, 102; BIOL 101, 102; CHEM 111; MATH 122 or 141) The structure and functions of the human body: the skeletal, articular, nervous, and muscular systems. Three lecture, one recitation, and two laboratory hours per week.
    • 224 -- Anatomy and Physiology II. (4) (Prereq: ENGL 101, 102; BIOL 101, 102; CHEM 111; MATH 122 or 141; EXSC 223) The structure and functions of the human body: the circulatory, respiratory, digestive, urinary, endocrine, and reproductive systems. Three lecture, one recitation, and two laboratory hours per week.
    • 343 -- Practicum in Exercise Science. (1-3) (Prereq: EXSC 223) Supervised practicum in a research or clinical setting for scientific-foundations track. Departmental special permission required.
    • 395 -- Research Seminar in Exercise Science. (3) (Prereq: EXSC 223, 224) The research process in exercise science; participation in, presentation and discussion of current research.
    • 499 -- Independent Study. (1-3) (Prereq: EXSC 223, 224 or consent of instructor) Enrollment and topic to be approved in advance by advisor and instructor.

    Health Promotion, Education, and Behavior (HPEB)

    • 502 -- Applied Aspects of Human Nutrition. (3) (Prereq: BIOL 120 or equivalent, CHEM 101 or equivalent, or consent of instructor) Nutrition and basic biological needs of man, metabolic mechanisms, and energy requirements; nutritional requirements as related to health education programs.

    Regional Campuses (RCAM)

    • 141 -- Introduction to Computer Keyboarding. (3) Keyboarding using the touch method, inputting, editing, and printing. Designed for students without keyboarding skills. Elective credit only. This course might not apply toward associate's degrees or Columbia baccalaureate degrees.

    Religious Studies (RELG)

    • 110 -- Introduction to Religious Studies. (3) An introduction to the methods of religious inquiry and to the beliefs and practices of major religious traditions.
    • 111 -- Biblical History and Literature. (3) A brief introduction to contemporary study of the Bible, its historical background, writing, and transmission, its principal persons, events, and ideas, and their significance for the present time.
    • 203 -- Comparative Religion. (3) The religious experience of varied persons and groups, East and West, in traditional and contemporary settings.
    • 301 -- Old Testament. (3) A critical study of the literature of the Old Testament emphasizing its historical development and meaning in the life of ancient Israel.
    • 302 -- New Testament. (3) A historical and critical study of the origin, structure, and transmission of the New Testament writings and their meaning in the life and thought of the early Church; emphasis is placed on the life, teaching, and significance of Jesus and Paul--both for their day and for ours.
    • 311 -- The Mission and Message of Jesus. (3) An analysis of the historical and social setting of the Gospels designed to afford the student a fuller understanding of Jesus and his mission.
    • 312 -- The Life and Letters of Paul. (3) A critical study in the life and thought of Paul, his letters to the early Christian churches, his role in the expansion of the Christian movement, and his continuing influence today.
    • 314 -- Religion and Culture. (3) The impact of religion on modern Western culture, and of culture on religion. Selected topics: Holocaust, Puritanism, fundamentalism, Islam, Freud, "love," wisdom tradition, "civil religion."
    • 330 -- Faith, Doubt, and God. (3) Judeo-Christian views of God; modern criticism and contemporary responses.

    Sociology (SOCY)

    Note: Sociology 101 is prerequisite to all other sociology courses.

    • 101 -- Introductory Sociology. (3) An introduction to sociological facts and principles: an analysis of group-making processes and products.

    Speech (SPCH)

    • 140 -- Public Communication. (3) Public speaking and the principles and criticism of oral public communication, to include performance by student.

    Statistics (STAT)

    • 110 -- Introduction to Descriptive Statistics. (3) Computation and graphical techniques for organizing and presenting statistical data. Sample mean and sample variance, cross tabulation of categorical data, correlation and simple linear regression, quality control charts, statistical software.
    • 201 -- Elementary Statistics. (3) (Prereq: MATH 111 or 115 or STAT 110, or consent of department) An introductory course in the fundamentals of modern statistical methods. Topics include descriptive statistics, probability, random sampling, tests of hypothesis, estimation, simple linear regression and correlation.
    • 205 -- Elementary Statistics for the Biological and Life Sciences. (3) (Prereq: MATH 111 or higher or consent of department) An introduction to fundamental statistical methods with applications in the biological and life sciences. Topics include descriptive statistics, probability, inference, and an overview of contingency tables, linear regression, and ANOVA.

    Theatre (THEA)

    • 170 -- Fundamentals of Acting. (3) The techniques of body and voice control; improvisations; interpretation of characters: characterization applied in scenes.
    • 240 -- Voice and Diction. (3) The analysis, evaluation, and improvement of speech through a study of the anatomy and physiology of the vocal mechanism, voice production, and articulation.

    University (UNIV)

    • 101 -- The Student in the University. (3) The purposes of higher education and potential roles of the student within the university. Open to freshmen. Also open to other undergraduate students in their first semester of enrollment.

    Women's and Gender Studies (WOST)

    • 111 -- Women in Culture. (3) A humanistic perspective of the images, roles, and contributions of women in historical, literary, religious, philosophical, and artistic contexts.
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