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updated January 8, 2009

Course Descriptions

This list represents the most up-to-date offerings at the time of publication. Please see the Master Schedule of Classes for expanded offerings.

Some of the courses listed in this section are offered by the originating campus through alternative methods such as open and closed circuit television and videocassette. These courses will be designated as such in the Master Schedule of Classes.

Art History (ARTH)

  • 105 -- History of Western Art. (3) The visual arts from Paleolithic times to the Renaissance.
  • 106 -- History of Western Art. (3) The visual arts from the Renaissance to the present.
  • 346 -- African Art. (3) Sculpture, painting, architecture of Sub-Saharan Africa.

Biology (BIOL)

  • 101 -- Biological Principles I. (4) Introductory survey of macromolecules, cell structure and function, genetics, and molecular biology. Three lecture hours and three lab hours per week.
  • 101L -- Biological Principles I Laboratory. (1) Enrollment by special permission only. Intended for students who have taken BIOL 101 lecture or its equivalent but lack the lab. Three hours per week.
  • 102 -- Biological Principles II. (4) (Prereq: grade of C or better in BIOL 101) Introductory survey of plant and animal development, physiology, ecology, and evolution. Three lecture hours and three lab hours per week.
  • 102L -- Biological Principles II Laboratory. (1) Enrollment by special permission only. Intended for students who have taken BIOL 102 lecture or its equivalent but lack the lab. Three hours per week.
  • 110 -- General Biology. (4) Basic biological concepts and issues for non-biology majors. Credit may not be given for both this course and BIOL 120. Three lecture, two laboratory hours per week.
  • 110A -- General Biology (Audio-Tutorial). (1) Addendum to BIOL 110.
  • 120 -- Human Biology. (3) Fundamental principles of human biology. Credit may not be given for both BIOL 110 and BIOL 120. Three lecture hours per week. Not for major credit.
  • 120L -- Laboratory in Human Biology. (1) (Prereq or coreq: BIOL 120) Exercises dealing with basic concepts of human biology. Not for major credit.
  • 232 -- Anatomy. (3) Functional anatomy of the human body and its relation to disease processes. Not for biology major credit.
  • 232L -- Anatomy Laboratory. (1) (Coreq: BIOL 232) The principles of anatomy as demonstrated by microscopic studies and animal dissection. Three hours per week.
  • 242 -- Human Physiology. (4) (Prereq: BIOL 232 or permission of instructor) Functional biology of organ systems in the maintenance of the whole organism; homeostatic relationships. Not available for biology major credit. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week.
  • 250 -- Microbiology. (3) (Prereq: college-level biology and chemistry; coreq: BIOL 330L) An introduction to bacteria and viruses, emphasizing structure, metabolism, and pathogenesis. Discussion of infectious diseases, antigen-antibody relationships, and anti-microbial agents in chemotherapy. Not available for biology major credit. Three lecture hours per week.
  • 270 -- Introduction to Environmental Biology. (3) Basic ecological principles and the impacts of human population growth and technology. Not for major credit.
  • 270L -- Introduction to Environmental Biology Laboratory. (1) (Prereq or coreq: BIOL 270) Demonstrations, data analyses, discussions, and films relating to human ecology, resource use, and environmental impact. Two hours per week. Not for major credit.
  • 330L -- Microbiology Laboratory. (1) (Prereq or coreq: BIOL 330) Not available for biology major credit. Three hours per week.

Business Administration

Accounting (ACCT)

  • 225 -- Introduction to Financial Accounting. (3) (Prereq: sophomore standing) User-oriented approach to the study of financial accounting and reporting topics related to business decisions.
  • 226 -- Introduction to Managerial Accounting. (3) (Prereq: ACCT 225) User-oriented approach to the study of managerial accounting topics related to business decisions.

Management (MGMT)

  • 371 -- Principles of Management. (3) A comprehensive survey of the basic principles of management applicable to all forms of business. The course provides the student with a basis for thinking about complex business situations in the framework of analysis of the management process.
  • 374 -- Management of Human Resources. (3) (Prereq: MGMT 371) A survey of the major approaches used in managing human resources. Covers selection, compensation, legal compliance, discipline, organizational restructuring, TQM, motivation, labor relations, and performance management.
  • 376 -- Organization Behavior. (3) (Prereq: MGMT 371) Introduction to human behavior in organizations. Emphasis on factors that contribute to the effectiveness of individuals and groups in organizations.

Management Science (MGSC)

  • 290 -- Computer Information Systems in Business. (3) An introduction to the effective use of information systems tools in day-to-day business communications, analysis, and decision making.
  • 291 -- Statistics for Business and Economics. (3) Descriptive statistics, topics in probability, statistical inference and modeling. Emphasis on the collection, summarization, analysis, and reporting of numerical findings relevant to business decisions and economic analysis.

Marketing (MKTG)

  • 350 -- Principles of Marketing. (3) (Prereq: ECON 224, ACCT 222) Principles and concepts underlying marketing functions, including the conception, pricing, promotion, and distribution of products and services and the role of marketing in society.

Chemistry (CHEM)

  • 101 -- Fundamental Chemistry I. (4) Three lecture, one recitation, and two laboratory hours per week. A science elective surveying inorganic and solution chemistry. First of a terminal two-semester sequence.
  • 102 -- Fundamental Chemistry II. (4) (Prereq: 1 year high-school chemistry, CHEM 101, 111, or equivalent) Three lecture, one recitation, and two laboratory hours per week. An introductory survey of organic and biochemistry.
  • 111 -- General Chemistry. (4) (Prereq: MATH 111 or 115) Three lecture, one recitation, and two laboratory hours per week. A survey of the principles that underlie all chemistry with applications illustrating these principles.
  • 112 -- General Chemistry. (4) (Prereq: MATH 111 or 115 and a grade of C or better in CHEM 111 or SCCC 103) A continuation of CHEM 111. Special emphasis on chemical equilibrium. Three lecture, one recitation, and three laboratory hours per week.

Computer Science and Engineering (CSCE)

  • 101 -- Introduction to Computer Concepts. (3) (Prereq: two years of college preparatory mathematics or equivalent) History, application, and social impact of computers; problem-solving, algorithm development, applications software, and programming in a procedural language. Open to all majors.
  • 102 -- General Applications Programming. (3) (Prereq: two years of college preparatory mathematics) Introduction to systematic computer problem-solving and programming for a variety of applications. Open to all majors.

Criminal Justice (CRJU)

  • 101 -- The American Criminal Justice System. (3) A survey of the law enforcement, courts, corrections, juvenile, and planning systems. Problems of interrelationships between criminal justice agencies and the community.
  • 211 -- Policing. (3) Current and historical perspectives on the functioning of American policing. Emphasis on the management of police organizations and relationships with the community.
  • 221 -- Criminal Courts. (3) A study of the structure and organization of the federal and state court systems, with special attention to the criminal courts. The basic functions of the courts will be examined.
  • 231 -- Corrections. (3) Changes in American correctional philosophy, administration, and techniques, including the shift from institutional incarceration to community-based correctional programs.
  • 321 -- Criminal Law. (3) The origin and development of criminal law in America. The basic elements of crimes and defenses.
  • 341 -- Sociology of Crime. {=SOCY 353} (3) Social factors in the development, identification, and treatment of criminals.
  • 351 -- Juvenile Delinquency and Justice. {=SOCY 350} (3) Social factors in the development, identification, and treatment of delinquents.
  • 491 -- Selected Current Topics. (3) A seminar for advanced students. May be repeated once with the consent of the advisor.

Economics (ECON)

ECON 221 and 222, or ECON 224, are prerequisite to all 300-, 400-, and 500-level economics courses.

  • 221 -- Principles of Microeconomics. (3) Microeconomic analysis: theory of the firm, cost and output determination, market pricing, theory of consumer and income distribution. Students cannot receive credit for both ECON 221 and 224.
  • 222 -- Principles of Macroeconomics. (3) (Prereq: ECON 221 or the equivalent) Macroeconomic analysis: basic definitions and concepts, mechanics of pricing and the fundamentals of American capitalism, national income economics, income and employment theory, monetary and fiscal policy, and international economics. Students cannot receive credit for both ECON 222 and 224.
  • 301 -- Money and Banking. {=FINA 301} (3) The role of money in the market economy. Commercial banks, the Federal Reserve System, and monetary policy.
  • 303 -- The International Economy. (3) (Prereq: ECON 224) Survey of international economic issues and institutions, including trade and protectionism, global and regional trade agreements, trade balances and exchange rates, Japan, NAFTA, and the European Union.
  • 311 -- Issues in Economics. (3) The nature and causes of major economic problems facing the nation and its communities, and policy alternatives designed to solve them. The philosophy and methodology of economics in social problem solving.
  • 329 -- American Economic History. (3) Growth and development of the American economy; applications of economic theory to economic history.
  • 364 -- Financial Institutions. {=FINA 364} (3) A study of the functions and operations of financial institutions and their relationships to the commercial banking system and the general economy. Attention is devoted to savings institutions, insurance companies, rural and urban real estate credit, consumer credit, and associated topics.
  • 379 -- Government Policy Toward Business. (3) An analysis of public policy toward business in the United States. Emphasis is on the desirability of various policies in light of their consequences for the general welfare.
  • 402 -- Money, Income, and Prices. (3) A study of monetary standards, monetary theory, monetary policy, and the mechanism of international payments. Attention is devoted to questions of monetary problems, employment, and fiscal policy.

Education

Early Childhood Education (EDEC)

  • 201 -- Inquiry into Early Childhood Education. (3) Inquiry into the roles, programs, history, and culture trends in early childhood education.

Engineering (ENGR)

  • 101 -- Introduction to Engineering I. (3) Working in teams, professional presentations, engineering design and problem-solving using computers and other engineering tools.

English Language and Literature (ENGL)

  • 101 -- Composition. (3) A course in the composing process with attention to invention, arrangement, and style, and closely supervised practice in reading and writing essays.
  • 102 -- Composition and Literature. (3) (Prereq: ENGL 101) A course in the writing of expository and critical essays with an introduction to literature and including a research paper.

Note: Students must complete English 101 and 102 (or equivalent) before taking any other English course.

  • 270 -- World Literature. {=CPLT 270} (3) Selected masterpieces of world literature from antiquity to present.
  • 282 -- Fiction. (3) Fiction from several countries and historical periods, illustrating the nature of the genre.
  • 284 -- Drama. (3) Drama from several countries and historical periods, illustrating the nature of the genre.
  • 285 -- Themes in American Writing. (3) Reading a variety of American texts that exemplify persistent themes of American culture.
  • 286 -- Poetry. (3) Poetry from several countries and historical periods, illustrating the nature of the genre.
  • 287 -- American Literature. (3) Survey of American literature: major authors, genres, and periods. Designed for English majors.
  • 288 -- English Literature I. (3) British poetry, drama, and prose from Beowulf to the 18th century. Designed for English majors.
  • 289 -- English Literature II. (3) British poetry, drama, and prose from the 18th century to the present. Designed for English majors.

Note: Students must complete one sophomore literature course (282-289) before taking any upper-level course. English majors must complete two of the three courses from ENGL 287, 288, and 289 and earn at least a C in both; they must successfully complete one before taking any literature courses beyond the 200 level. Only courses numbered 390 and above may count toward a major in English. With the approval of the department, a graduate student may enroll in some courses at the 500 level and receive graduate credit by doing additional work.

  • 391 -- Great Books of the Western World II. {=CPLT 302} (3) European masterpieces from the Renaissance to the present.
  • 399 -- Independent Study. (3-9) (Prereq: consent of instructor) Contract approved by instructor, advisor, and department chair is required for undergraduate students.
  • 422 -- American Literature 1860-1910. (3) Poetry and prose from the Civil War to the early modern era.
  • 423 -- Modern American Literature. (3) Poetry and prose of the 20th century.
  • 424 -- American Drama. (3) Representative plays from the 18th century to the present.
  • 425A -- The American Novel to 1914. (3) Representative novels from the 18th century to World War I.
  • 425B -- The American Novel Since 1914. (3) Representative novels from 1914 to the present.
  • 427 -- Southern Literature. (3) Representative works of Southern writers.
  • 428 -- African-American Literature. (3) Representative works of African-American writers.
  • 429B -- Topics in American Literature: F. Scott Fitzgerald. (3) A survey of Fitzgerald’s work and times using eight audiotapes developed by National Public Radio and 13 audiotaped lectures by Emily Brown Jefferies Professor of English, Dr. Matthew J. Bruccoli. Each NPR tape includes a documentary presentation of the life and times of Fitzgerald and a dramatization of one of his short stories. (Audio-tape instruction only.)
  • 437 -- Women Writers. {=WOST 437} (3) Representative works written by women.

French (FREN)

  • 109 -- Beginning French I. (3) Introduction to grammar and practical vocabulary necessary for fundamental communication skills. Admission to 109 restricted to those who have never studied French, who have not studied French in the previous five years, or who have a score of F-1 on the placement test.
  • 110 -- Beginning French II. (3) Introduction to grammar and practical vocabulary necessary for fundamental communication skills. Admission to 110 restricted to those who have completed FREN 109. Credit may be received only for one of the following: 109/110 or 121.

Geological Sciences (GEOL)

  • 101 -- Introduction to the Earth. (4) Origin and nature of the earth with emphasis on internal processes and phenomena such as earthquakes, volcanoes, and mountain building; surface processes, including landform evolution. Three lectures and three laboratory hours each week.

Health Promotion, Education, and Behavior (HPEB)

  • 321 -- Personal and Community Health. (3) Principles of personal hygiene: physiological systems of the body with emphasis on nutrition, physical fitness, stress control, consumer health, sexuality, and self-care skills.

History (HIST)

  • 101 -- European Civilization from Ancient Times to the Mid-17th Century. (3) The rise and development of European civilization from its Mediterranean origins through the Renaissance and Reformation.
  • 102 -- European Civilization from the Mid-17th Century. (3) European development and expansion from the mid-17th century to the present.
  • 111 -- History of the United States from Discovery to the Present Day. (3) A general survey of the United States from the era of discovery to the present, emphasizing major political, economic, social, and intellectual developments. First semester: to 1865; second semester: since 1865. Honors sections are available for students in the honors program.
  • 112 -- History of the United States from Discovery to the Present Day. (3) A general survey of the United States from the era of discovery to the present, emphasizing major political, economic, social, and intellectual developments. First semester: to 1865; second semester: since 1865. Honors sections are available for students in the honors program.
  • 385 -- The Expansion of Christianity. (3) Critical epochs in the spread of Christianity. Consideration of the great crises that shaped the structure and form of Christianity during the last 20 centuries: the Hellenistic world; the medieval syntheses; the breakup of Western Christian unity; the transition to worldwide mission activity in the industrial age.
  • 399 -- Independent Study. (1-6) Contract approved by instructor, advisor, and department chair is required for undergraduate students.
  • 409 -- The History of South Carolina, 1670-1865. (3) A study of South Carolina origins and developments.
  • 410 -- History of South Carolina Since 1865. (3) A survey of recent South Carolina history with emphasis on social and institutional development.
  • 442 -- The Old South. (3) Development of Southern society and of the forces that made the South a distinctive section of the United States.
  • 451 -- The History of American Medicine. (3) The development of the art and science of medicine as practiced in the United States from colonial times to Medicare. Emphasis on the social history of American medicine.
  • 452 -- The History of Science in America. (3) The development of science in America from colonial times to the present. Special attention will be given to defining those factors, scientific, economic, and social, which have raised American science to its commanding position in the 20th century.

Interdisciplinary Studies (IDST)

  • 390 -- Introduction to Interdisciplinary Inquiry. (3) A study of the history, philosophy, and theory of and modes of inquiry in interdisciplinary studies.
  • 497 -- Senior Seminar. (3) (Prereq: senior status in B.A.I.S. program in the College of Hospitality, Retail, and Sport Management) Integration of prior academic work.

Marine Science (MSCI)

  • 210 -- Oceans and Man. (3) A nontechnical introduction to human interactions with the marine environment: marine organisms, marine systems, and the physical and chemical characteristics of oceans and estuaries. Not available for marine science major credit.

Mathematics (MATH)

  • 111 -- Basic College Mathematics. (3) (Prereq: qualification through placement) Basic college algebra; linear and quadratic equations, inequalities, functions and graphs of functions, exponential and logarithm functions, systems of equations. Credit may not be received for both MATH 111 and 115.
  • 111I -- Intensive Basic College Mathematics. (4) (Prereq: qualification through placement) An intensive treatment of the topics covered in MATH 111.
  • 112 -- Trigonometry. (2) (Prereq: qualification through placement or a grade of C or better in MATH 111) Topics in trigonometry specifically needed for MATH 141, 142, 241. Circular functions, analytic trigonometry, applications of trigonometry. Credit may not be received for both MATH 112 and 115.
  • 115 -- Precalculus Mathematics. (4) (Prereq: qualification through placement) Topics in algebra and trigonometry specifically needed for MATH 141, 142, 241. Subsets of the real line, absolute value; polynomial, rational, inverse, logarithmic, exponential functions; circular functions; analytic trigonometry. Credit may not be received for both MATH 111 and 115 or both MATH 112 and 115.
  • 122 -- Calculus for Business Administration and Social Sciences. (3) (Prereq: qualification through placement or a grade of C or better in MATH 111 or 115) Derivatives and integrals of elementary algebraic, exponential, and logarithmic functions. Maxima, minima, rate of change, motion, work, area under a curve, and volume.
  • 141 -- Calculus I. (4) (Prereq: qualification through placement or a grade of C or better in MATH 112 or 115) Limits, continuity; derivatives, chain rule, rates of change, curve sketching, max-min problems; definite integral, antiderivatives, and the Fundamental Theorem.
  • 142 -- Calculus II. (4) (Prereq: qualification through placement or a grade of C or better in MATH 141) Techniques of integration, exponential, and inverse trigonometric functions; numerical methods, and applications of the integral; sequences, power and Taylor series.
  • 170 -- Finite Mathematics. (3) (Prereq: qualification through placement or a grade of C or better in MATH 111 or 115) Elementary matrix theory; systems of linear equations; permutations and combinations; probability and Markov chains; linear programming and game theory.
  • 174 -- Discrete Mathematics for Computer Science. (3) (Prereq: qualification through placement or a grade of C or better in MATH 112 or 115) Induction, complexity, elementary counting, combinations and permutations, recursion and recurrence relations, graphs and trees; discussion of the design and analysis of algorithms--with emphasis on sorting and searching.
  • 221 -- Basic Concepts of Elementary Mathematics I. (3) (Prereq: qualification through placement or a grade of C or better in MATH 111 or 115) The meaning of number, fundamental operations of arithmetic, the structure of the real number system and its subsystems, elementary number theory. Open only to students in elementary or early childhood teacher certification.
  • 222 -- Basic Concepts of Elementary Mathematics II. (3) (Prereq: MATH 221) Informal geometry and basic concepts of algebra. Open only to students in elementary or early childhood teacher certification.
  • 241 -- Vector Calculus. (3) (Prereq: qualification through placement or a grade of C or better in MATH 142) Vector algebra, geometry of three-dimensional space; lines, planes, and curves in space; polar, cylindrical, and spherical coordinate systems; partial differentiation, max-min theory; multiple and iterated integration, line integrals, and Green's theorem in the plane.
  • 242 -- Elementary Differential Equations. (3) (Prereq: qualification through placement or a grade of C or better in MATH 142) Ordinary differential equations of first order, higher order linear equations, Laplace transform methods, series methods; numerical solution of differential equations. Applications to physical sciences and engineering.

Music (MUSC)

  • 110 -- Introduction to Music. (3) Perceptive listening and appreciation of musical elements, forms and style periods, including composers' lives, individual styles and representative works. Emphasis on classical music; jazz and American popular music included.

Philosophy (PHIL)

  • 102 -- Introduction to Philosophy. (3) An introduction to the main problems of philosophy and its methods of inquiry, analysis, and criticism. Works of important philosophers will be read. Honors section offered.
  • 110 -- Introduction to Logic I. (3) The nature of arguments; fallacies, criteria, and techniques of valid deductive inference; applications. Honors section offered.
  • 111 -- Introduction to Logic II. (3) Inductive and decision-making arguments, and criteria of acceptability for them. Honors section offered.
  • 201 -- History of Ancient Philosophy. (3) An introduction to the development of philosophy in the ancient world through study of the works of representative philosophers. PHIL 202 may be taken prior to this course.
  • 202 -- History of Modern Philosophy. (3) An introduction to the development of philosophic thought since the Renaissance through the study of the works of important philosophers. The chief emphasis is on the 17th and 18th centuries.
  • 211 -- Contemporary Moral Issues. (3) Moral issues confronting men and women in contemporary society. Topics will vary but may include discussion of problems related to abortion, drugs, euthanasia, war, social engineering, and punishment of criminals.

Physical Education (PEDU)

Sport

  • 111 -- Badminton. (1) Basic strokes and introduction to the history, rules, and strategy of the game.
  • 112 -- Basketball. (1) Fundamental skills of game performance. Strategy, rules, and basic offenses and defenses.
  • 113 -- Bowling. (1) Fundamental skills and techniques of bowling.
  • 121 -- Beginning Tennis. (1) Basic strokes, history, rules, and strategy of the game.
  • 122 -- Volleyball. (1) Recreational and competitive volleyball skills.
  • 129 -- Racquetball. (1) Fundamental skills, rules, and terminology.
  • 132 -- Intermediate Tennis. (1) (Prereq: PEDU 121 or consent of instructor) Intermediate skills and strategies.

Physics (PHYS)

  • 151 -- Physics in the Arts. (3) The physics of sound, color, illumination; musical instruments and photographic processes. Credit may not be received for both PHYS 151 and 153 or both PHYS 151 and 155.
  • 151L -- Physics in the Arts Laboratory. (1) (Prereq or coreq: PHYS 151) Laboratory work on wave motion, including acoustic, optical, photographic, and electronic measurements. Credit may not be received for both PHYS 151L and 153L or both PHYS 151L and 155L.
  • 201 -- General Physics I. (3) (Prereq: MATH 115, or MATH 122, or equivalent) First part of an introductory course sequence. Topics include mechanics, wave motion, sound, and heat. No previous background in physics is assumed.
  • 201L -- General Physics Laboratory I. (1) (Prereq or coreq: PHYS 201)
  • 211 -- Essentials of Physics I. (3) (Prereq: a grade of C or better in MATH 141; coreq: PHYS 211L) Classical mechanics and wave motion. Calculus-level course for students of science and engineering.
  • 211L -- Essentials of Physics I Lab. (1) (Prereq or coreq: PHYS 206 or 211)
  • 212 -- Essentials of Physics II. (3) (Prereq: a grade of C or better in PHYS 211 and MATH 142; coreq: PHYS 212L) Classical electromagnetism and optics.
  • 212L -- Essentials of Physics II Lab. (1) (Prereq or coreq: PHYS 207 or 212)

Political Science (POLI)

  • 107 -- Controversies in Political Theory. (3) An introduction to the analysis of disputes about the nature of politics and of political ideas such as freedom, equality, and justice.
  • 201 -- American National Government. (3) The formation and development of the national government, its organization and powers.
  • 302 -- Classical and Medieval Political Theory. (3) Political theories from the Greeks to the Renaissance.
  • 303 -- Modern Political Theory. (3) Political theories from the Renaissance to the 19th century.
  • 391 -- Topics in Political Science. (3) May be repeated once as topics change.
  • 450 -- Constitutional Law. (3) Nature and functions of the national government and its relations with the states.
  • 451 -- Constitutional Law. (3) Due process and civil liberties.

Psychology (PSYC)

  • 101 -- Introduction to Psychology. (3) An introduction to and survey of the basic concepts and findings within the field of psychology.
  • 103 -- Psychology of Adjustment. (3) Introduction to theories and processes underlying and facilitating human adjustment in the community, family, and workplace.
  • 300 -- Human Sexual Behavior. (3) Psychological, physiological, and sociological factors of human sexual behavior and attitudes.
  • 301 -- Psychology of Marriage. {=WOST 301} (3) The psychological, physiological, and social characteristics of marriage.
  • 310 -- Psychology of Women. {=WOST 310} (3) Women's experiences: childhood and adolescence, work, family, cultural images, adjustment, and social change.
  • 350 -- Industrial Psychology. (3) Psychological techniques applied to various industrial problem areas, such as management and supervision, morale, efficiency, training, personnel selection and placement, and relations among personnel.
  • 360 -- Applied Psychology. (3) Uses of psychological knowledge and techniques in practical contexts; clinical, school, industrial, consumer, and environmental psychology.
  • 380 -- Sport Psychology. (3) The role of sports in socialization, personality development and competence, including: spectator-performer interactions, motivation, competition effects; and the application of psychological techniques to performance enhancement.
  • 399 -- Independent Study. (1-6) (Prereq: PSYC 101 and consent of instructor) Closely supervised project or research experience in psychology. Approved contract required. May be repeated for up to six credits. Not for psychology major credit.
  • 400 -- Survey of Learning and Memory. (3) (Prereq: PSYC 101 or SCCC 130) Research and applications concerning the acquisition of new behavior and knowledge, including accounts based on classical and instrumental conditioning and on information-processing models.
  • 405 -- Cognitive Psychology. (3) (Prereq: PSYC 400) Research and theories on sensory memory, attention, short-term and working memory, human learning and forgetting, imagery, long-term memory, speech perception, reading, language, thinking and problem solving, and decision making.
  • 410 -- Survey of Abnormal Psychology. (3) (Prereq: PSYC 101 or SCCC 130) Covers the classification, diagnosis, etiological theories, and treatments of the major mental and emotional disorders.
  • 420 -- Survey of Developmental Psychology. (3) (Prereq: PSYC 101 or EDPY 335 or SCCC 130) Psychological development from conception to late adulthood. Topics include physical, cognitive, and social processes associated with development at each stage of the life cycle.
  • 430 -- Survey of Social Psychology. (3) (Prereq: PSYC 101 or SCCC 130) Introduction to theory and research in social psychology from a psychological viewpoint. Topics include social perception, social cognition, attitudes, interpersonal relationships, aggression, prosocial behavior, and group processes.
  • 440 -- Survey of Personality. (3) (Prereq: PSYC 101 or SCCC 130) Covers the major theories and research on personality and the dynamics of human motivation.
  • 521 -- Psychology of Adolescence. (3) (Prereq: PSYC 420 or consent of instructor) Theories and research examining social, emotional, and intellectual development in adolescence. Explores influence of family, peer, school, and cultural contexts.

Religious Studies (RELG)

  • 111 -- Biblical History and Literature. (3) A brief introduction to contemporary study of the Bible, its historical background, writing, and transmission, its principal persons, events, and ideas, and their significance for the present time.
  • 114 -- Religion and Culture. (3) The impact of religion on modern Western culture, and of culture on religion. Selected topics: Holocaust, Freud, love, evil, puritanism, fundamentalism.
  • 115 -- Religion in America. (3) Communities, persons, themes and events which have helped to shape the religious climate in America; with emphasis on Christian communities.
  • 202 -- Introduction to Reason and Faith. (3) Historical and systematic introduction to theology; the search for balance between belief and reason; contemporary developments.
  • 203 -- Comparative Religion. (3) The religious experience of varied persons and groups, East and West, in traditional and contemporary settings.

Completion of at least one of the 100- or 200-level courses is prerequisite for registration in any of the following advanced courses:

  • 301 -- Old Testament. (3) A critical study of the literature of the Old Testament emphasizing its historical development and meaning in the life of ancient Israel.
  • 302 -- New Testament. (3) A historical and critical study of the origin, structure, and transmission of the New Testament writings and their meaning in the life and thought of the early Church; emphasis is placed on the life, teaching, and significance of Jesus and Paul--both for their day and for ours.
  • 330 -- Faith, Doubt, and God. (3) Judeo-Christian views of God; modern criticism and contemporary responses.
  • 332 -- Christian Theology. (3) Basic Christian teachings concerning God, creation, sin, the person and work of Christ, and life after death.
  • 335 -- Christian Ethics. (3) Basic Christian teachings concerning human nature and conduct; historical foundations and contemporary applications.
  • 361 -- Psychology of Religion. {=PSYC 320} (3) The development of the religious consciousness and its various expressions, the psychological dynamics of growth and conversion, response to crisis, and the relation of spiritual practice to health and wholeness.
  • 372 -- Religion and Existentialism. (3) Existentialist thought as adapted by theologians to interpret religious experience and the biblical message. The movement from philosophical protest against essentialism into imaginative description of existence revealed under stress.
  • 399 -- Independent Study. (3-6) Contract approved by instructor, advisor, and department chair is required for undergraduate students.
  • 491 -- Selected Topics in Religious Studies. (3) Course content varies and will be announced in the schedule of courses by suffix and title.

Sociology (SOCY)

Note: SOCY 101 is prerequisite to all other sociology courses.

  • 101 -- Introductory Sociology. (3) An introduction to sociological facts and principles: an analysis of group-making processes and products.

Spanish (SPAN)

  • 109 -- Beginning Spanish I. (3) Introduction to grammar and practical vocabulary necessary for fundamental communication skills. Admission to 109 restricted to those who have never studied Spanish previously or who have placed by examination into 109; admission to 110 restricted to those who have completed SPAN 109. 109 offered in fall and summer I only; 110 in spring and summer II only. Credit may be received only for one of the following: 109/110; 111; or 121.
  • 110 -- Beginning Spanish II. (3) Introduction to grammar and practical vocabulary necessary for fundamental communication skills. Admission to 109 restricted to those who have never studied Spanish previously or who have placed by examination into 109; admission to 110 restricted to those who have completed SPAN 109. 109 offered in fall and summer I only; 110 in spring and summer II only. Credit may be received only for one of the following: 109/110; 111; or 121.

Speech (SPCH)

  • 140 -- Public Communication. (3) Public speaking and the principles and criticism of oral public communication, to include performance by students.

Statistics (STAT)

  • 110 -- Introduction to Descriptive Statistics. (3) Computational and graphical techniques for organizing and presenting statistical data. Sample mean and sample variance, cross tabulation of categorical data, correlation and simple linear regression, quality control charts, statistical software.
  • 201 -- Elementary Statistics. (3) (Prereq: MATH 111 or 115 or STAT 110, or consent of department) An introductory course in the fundamentals of modern statistical methods. Topics include descriptive statistics, probability, random sampling, tests of hypothesis, estimation, simple linear regression, and correlation.

Theatre (THEA)

  • 170 -- Fundamentals of Acting. (3) An introduction to the craft of acting that explores Stanislavski's techniques through nonverbal and scripted scene work.
  • 200 -- Understanding and Appreciation of Theatre. (3) An introduction to the understanding and appreciation of theatrical experience. Attendance at theatrical performances required.

University (UNIV)

  • 101 -- The Student in the University. (3) The purposes of higher education and potential roles of the student within the university. Open to freshmen. Also open to other undergraduate students in their first semester of enrollment.

Women’s Studies (WOST)

  • 111 -- Women in Culture. (3) A humanistic perspective of the images, roles, and contributions of women in historical, literary, religious, philosophical, and artistic contexts.
  • 112 -- Women in Society. (3) A social science perspective of women in psychological, sociological, historical, anthropological, economic, and political contexts; the changing roles, images, and institutions.
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