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updated 6/9/2009

Biological Sciences

Charles R. Lovell, Chair

Professors
Ronald H. Benner, Ph.D., University of Georgia, 1984
Franklin G. Berger, Ph.D., Purdue University, 1974, George H. Bunch Professor of Science
Bruce C. Coull, Ph.D., Lehigh University, 1968, Carolina Distinguished Professor and Dean of the School of the Environment
Berten E. Ely III, Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1973,
Director of Science Education Center
Michael R. Felder, Ph.D., University of California, Davis, 1970
Madilyn Fletcher, Ph.D., University College of North Wales, 1974, Director, Belle W. Baruch Institute for Marine and Coastal Sciences
Thomas J. Hilbish, Ph.D., State University of New York at Stony Brook, 1984
Austin L. Hughes, Ph.D., Indiana University, 1984
Charles R. Lovell, Ph.D., Purdue University, 1984, Chair of the Department
László Márton, Ph.D., Jozsef Attila University, 1976
Nawin C. Mishra, Ph.D., McMaster University, 1967
James T. Morris, Ph.D., Yale University, 1979
Timothy A. Mousseau, Ph.D., McGill University, 1988
, Associate Dean for Research and Education of the College of Arts and Sciences
Roger H. Sawyer, Ph.D., University of Massachusetts, 1970, Carolina Distinguished Professor,
Senior Associate Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences
Stephen E. Stancyk, Ph.D., University of Florida, 1974
Vicki Vance-Bowman, Ph.D., Washington University, 1983, Wade T. Batson Professor of Botany
Richard G. Vogt, Ph.D., University of Washington, 1988, Graduate Director
Alan S. Waldman, Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1985
David S. Wethey, Ph.D., University of Michigan, 1979
Larry T. Wimer, Ph.D., University of Virginia, 1962, Distinguished Professor
Sarah A. Woodin, Ph.D., University of Washington, 1972, Carolina Distinguished Professor

Associate Professors
Franklyn F. Bolander Jr., M.D./Ph.D., Duke University, 1977
Lewis H. Bowman, Ph.D., University of Virginia, 1979
Erin L. Connolly, Ph.D., University of California, Davis, 1997
Brian S. Helmuth, Ph.D., University of Washington, 1997
Beth A. Krizek, Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1993
Robert P. Lawther, Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh, 1974
Rekha C. Patel, Ph.D., Indian Institute of Sciences, 1987
James L. Pinckney, Ph.D., University of South Carolina, 1992
Joseph M. Quattro, Ph.D., Rutgers University, 1991
David Reisman, Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, 1986
Richard M. Showman, Ph.D., University of Washington, 1979
Deanna S. Smith, Ph.D., Stanford University, 1994
Johannes W. Stratmann, Ph.D., University of Regensburg, 1994

Assistant Professors
Dan A. Dixon, Ph.D., Northwestern University, 1994
Jeffry L. Dudycha, Ph.D., Michigan State University, 1999
Robert Friedman, Ph.D., University of South Carolina, 2002
Richard A. Long, Ph.D., University of California, San Diego, 2001
Xiongbin Lu, Ph.D., Shanghai Institute of Biochemistry, 1998
Lydia E. Matesic, Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 2000
Tammi L. Richardson, Ph.D., Dalhousie University, Halifax, N.S., Canada, 1996


Overview

The Department of Biological Sciences offers programs leading to the Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. The Master of Arts in Teaching in Sciences (biology option) and the Interdisciplinary Master of Arts in Sciences (biology option) are offered in cooperation with the College of Education.

The purpose of the graduate program in the Department of Biological Sciences is to train biological scientists for careers in teaching, research, administration, and industry. Departmental faculty have broad expertise from molecules to ecosystems, including botany, ecology, evolution, physiology, science education, and molecular, cellular, and developmental biology. Students interested in multiple areas can construct an interdisciplinary curriculum with the consent of both the advisor and the advisory and examination committees.

Admissions

An applicant must have a baccalaureate degree or its equivalent from an accredited college or university. The applicant's academic record must indicate adequate preparation for graduate study in biology and must demonstrate ability to excel in the biological sciences. Generally, to be considered for admission, a student must have a minimum grade point average of 3.00 in the sciences on a 4.00 scale and score at or above the 50th percentile on the GRE. However, these guidelines are flexible, and slight deficiencies in one area can be compensated by strengths in another. In addition, applicants whose native language is not English must obtain a minimum score of 600 (250 computer-based score) on the TOEFL exam or 7 on the IELTS exam.

Degree Requirements

Each of the department’s tracks (ecology, evolution, physiology, plant science, and molecular, cellular, and developmental biology) consists of a basic curriculum and several topics courses. The master's student must satisfy course work in one area, then additional course work for a total of 30 hours, including 6 hours of BIOL 799. The doctoral candidate must complete course work in two areas for a total of 60 hours, including 12 hours of BIOL 899. Advisory and examination committees in either program may impose additional course requirements depending upon the student's background and specific needs. Requirements for both degrees include teaching experience, competence in a foreign language, and original laboratory research. A master's thesis or doctoral dissertation must be presented and defended orally.


Course Descriptions (BIOL)

  • 505 -- Developmental Biology I. (3) (Prereq or coreq: BIOL 302) An introduction to the descriptive and experimental embryology of animals. Living and preserved specimens will be used to demonstrate the basic processes of embryogenesis. Three lecture hours per week.
  • 505L -- Developmental Biology Laboratory I. (1) (Coreq: BIOL 505) Descriptive and experimental exercises related to embryology. One three-hour laboratory per week.
  • 506 -- Developmental Biology II. (3) (Prereq: BIOL 505) Molecular aspects of development from gamete formation through tissue and organ differentiation in plants and animals. Three lecture hours per week.
  • 506L -- Developmental Biology Laboratory II. (1) (Prereq or coreq: BIOL 506) A series of experimentally oriented laboratory exercises will be performed. One three-hour laboratory per week.
  • 510 -- Invertebrate Zoology. (=MSCI 510) (5) (Prereq: BIOL 301 or MSCI 311) Phylogenetic and comparative aspects of anatomy, physiology, reproduction, and embryology of the invertebrates. Three lecture and two three-hour laboratory periods per week.
  • 523 -- Plant Development. (3) (Prereq: BIOL 302 and 303) Descriptive and molecular examination of the processes and mechanisms used by plants in organogenesis, differentiation, and morphogenesis. Three lecture hours per week.
  • 523L -- Plant Developmental Laboratory. (1) (Coreq: BIOL 523) Experiments utilizing a genetic approach to the study of plant development. Three laboratory hours per week.
  • 524 -- Mycology. (4) (Prereq: BIOL 301 or consent of instructor) Taxonomy and morphology of fungi; cultivation, life histories, and economic importance; all classes and major orders considered. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week.
  • 525 -- Marine Plants. (4) (Prereq: BIOL 301 or MSCI 311) Diversity, distribution, physiology, ecology, evolution, and economic importance of marine algal, seagrass, and mangrove communities. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week. Scheduled field trips are required.
  • 526 -- The Fall Flora. (4) (Prereq: BIOL 301 or consent of instructor) Two lecture and four laboratory hours per week.
  • 527 -- The Spring Flora. (4) (Prereq: BIOL 301 or consent of instructor) Two lecture and four laboratory hours per week.
  • 528 -- The Summer Flora. (4) (Prereq: BIOL 301 or consent of instructor) Two lecture and four laboratory hours per week.
  • 530 -- Histology. (4) (Prereq: BIOL 302) An introduction to the tissues that make up the human body. The microscopic anatomy of tissues is examined and discussed in terms of function and physiology. Three lecture hours and four laboratory hours per week.
  • 531 -- Parasitology. {=ENHS 661 and EPID 661} (4) (Prereq: 300-level biology course or equivalent) Parasites of biological, economic, and public health importance. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week.
  • 534 -- Animal Behavior. (3) (Prereq: BIOL 301 or MSCI 311) A comparative survey of behavior patterns of animals from protists to humans and the physiological mechanisms underlying behavior.
  • 534L -- Animal Behavior Laboratory. (1) (Prereq or coreq: BIOL 534) Observational and experimental methods used in classifying animal behavior patterns and in determining underlying control mechanisms. One three-hour laboratory per week.
  • 536 -- Ichthyology. {=MSCI 536} (4) (Prereq: BIOL 301 or MSCI 311 or consent of instructor) Phylogeny, morphology, behavior, and ecology of fishes. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week. Several field trips are required.
  • 537 -- Aquaculture. {=MSCI 537} (3) (Prereq: BIOL 301 or MSCI 311) Introduction to the practical and scientific aspects of the commercial culture of freshwater and marine organisms. Three lecture hours per week. One all-day field trip required.
  • 541 -- Principles of Biochemistry. {=CHEM 550} (3) (Prereq: CHEM 334) A survey of fundamentals of biochemistry.
  • 541L -- Principles of Biochemistry Laboratory. {=CHEM 550L} (1) (Prereq or coreq: BIOL 541) Three laboratory hours per week.
  • 543 -- Comparative Physiology. (3) (Prereq: BIOL 302 or MSCI 311) A study of phylogeny of physiological systems and functional mechanisms involved in the maintenance of life in zoological forms. Three lecture hours per week.
  • 543L -- Comparative Physiology Laboratory. (1) (Coreq: BIOL 543) Laboratory exercises to illustrate principles from BIOL 543. Three hours per week.
  • 545 -- Biochemistry/Molecular Biology I. {=CHEM 555} (3) (Prereq: CHEM 334 or equivalent) Essentials of modern biochemistry. Three lecture hours per week. First semester of a two-semester course.
  • 546 -- Biochemistry/Molecular Biology II. {=CHEM 556} (3) (Prereq: BIOL 545 or consent of instructor) Essentials of modern biochemistry and molecular biology. Three lecture hours per week. Second semester of a two-semester course.
  • 549 -- Plant Physiology. (4) (Prereq: BIOL 302 and 425) A general survey of the major physiological processes in plants. Two lecture and four laboratory hours per week.
  • 550 -- Bacteriology. (3) (Prereq: BIOL 302 or MSCI 311; coreq: BIOL 431L) Introduction to bacteria and viruses emphasizing ultrastructure, physiology, genetics, and growth. Discussion of public health, industrial, and environmental microbiology. Three lecture hours per week.
  • 550L -- Bacteriology Laboratory. (1) (Coreq: BIOL 431) Three laboratory hours per week.
  • 552 -- Population Genetics. {=MSCI 552} (3) (Prereq: BIOL 301, MSCI 302, and BIOL 303) An introduction to the principles of population genetics, with emphasis on the origin, maintenance, and significance of genetic variation in natural populations.
  • 570 -- Principles of Ecology. (3) (Prereq: BIOL 301 or MSCI 311) Interactions of organisms and the environment; ecosystem structure and functions. Three lecture hours per week.
  • 570L -- Principles of Ecology Laboratory. (1) (Prereq or coreq: BIOL 570) Three hours per week.
  • 572 -- Freshwater Ecology. {=ENVR 572} (3) (Prereq: BIOL 301 or permission of instructor) Quantitative study of the population, community, and evolutionary ecology of freshwater habitats (lakes, ponds, rivers, streams, wetlands). Includes mandatory field trips.
  • 575 -- Marine Ecology. {=MSCI 575} (3) (Prereq: CHEM 111 and BIOL 301 or MSCI 311) Structure, dynamics, and interactions between populations and communities in marine ecosystems. Three lecture hours per week. Attendance at designated departmental seminars is required.
  • 575L -- Marine Ecology Laboratory. {=MSCI 575L} (1) (Prereq or coreq: BIOL 575) Laboratory and field exercises in coastal environments.
  • 577 -- Ecology of Coral Reefs. {=MSCI 577} (4) (Prereq: BIOL 301 or MSCI 311 or consent of instructor) Structure, productivity, and biodiversity of coral reefs, emphasizing their sensitivity, stability, and sustainability. Taught as an extended field experience with daily lectures and guided research activities.
  • 599 -- Topics in Biology. (1-3) Current developments in biological sciences. Readings and research on selected topics. Course content varies and will be announced in the schedule of classes by suffix and title.
  • 610 -- Hallmarks of Cancer. (3) (Prereq: BIOL 302 and 303) Survey of current concepts regarding the molecular and genetic factors that regulate the origin and progression of cancer. Readings based on current primary literature.
  • 620 -- Immunobiology. (3) (Prereq: BIOL 302) Basic immunological concepts including antibody structure, function, and genetics; cellular immunology; transplantation; hypersensitivity; autoimmunity; and immunity to infectious diseases.
  • 630 -- Biology of Birds. (3) (Prereq: BIOL 301, 302, and 303 or consent of instructor) Biology of birds at molecular, organismal, and population levels, emphasizing unique adaptations of the class of Aves.
  • 635 -- Neurobiology. (4) (Prereq: BIOL 302 and permission of instructor) Descriptive and experimental aspects of the neural basis of behavior, emphasizing cellular and molecular mechanisms. Two lecture and six laboratory hours per week.
  • 640 -- Microbial Ecology. (3) (Prereq: BIOL 550 and either BIOL 301 or MSCI 311) Interactions of microorganisms with each other, with more complex organisms, and with their environments. Three lecture hours per week.
  • 641 -- Biophysical Ecology. (3) (Prereq: BIOL 301; MATH 141 or MATH 122) This course examines how the mechanisms by which animals and plants interact with their physical environments influence organismal physiology.
  • 643 -- Advanced Microbiology. (3) (Prereq: BIOL 302 and 431) The taxonomy, morphology, metabolism, genetics, and ecology of microorganisms. Three lecture hours per week.
  • 645 -- Senior Seminar. (1) (Prereq: 16 hours of biology)
  • 651 -- Limnology. (4) (Prereq: BIOL 301) A study of the aquatic environment and its biota. Three lecture and four laboratory hours per week.
  • 652 -- Evolutionary Biology. (4) (Prereq: BIOL 552 or consent of instructor) A survey of major themes in evolutionary biology, including natural selection, molecular evolution, population genetics, quantitative genetics, sexual selection, speciation, and coevolution. Three lecture and two recitation/laboratory hours.
  • 653 -- Bioinformatics. (3) (Prereq: BIOL 302, 303) Studies of the principles of genetics and molecular biology as applied to adaptive evolution of genes and genomes.
  • 654 -- Speciation. (3) (Prereq: BIOL 301 or 652) Speciation as the source of biological diversity. Historical and biological viewpoints. Analysis of concepts of species and models of speciation. Two lectures and one recitation per week.
  • 655 -- Biotechnology. (3) (Prereq: BIOL 302 and 303) Studies in molecular biology and genetics with emphasis on the use of newly developed techniques in biotechnology. Three lecture hours per week.
  • 656 -- Experimental Biotechnology. (4) (Prereq: BIOL 302, 302L and consent of instructor) Techniques used in biotechnology will be employed in the context of an experimental project. Twelve laboratory hours per week.
  • 660 -- Biology of Mammals. (4) (Prereq: BIOL 301 or MSCI 311) Evolution, systematics, genetics, ecology, and adaptation of mammals. Emphasis on native South Carolina species. Two lectures and one two-hour laboratory per week, plus five field trips to be arranged.
  • 665 -- Human Molecular Genetics. (3) (Prereq: BIOL 302 and 303 or consent of instructor) Molecular mechanisms underlying gene action and differentiation in man; the genetic bases for human variability and inborn metabolic errors leading to inherited diseases.
  • 670 -- Plant Ecology. (3) (Prereq: BIOL 301) Structure and dynamics of plant populations and communities, including life histories, adaptations, and plant interactions. Three lecture hours per week.
  • 670L -- Plant Ecology. (1) (Prereq or coreq: BIOL 670) Laboratory and field exercises in plant ecology. Four hours per week.
  • 671 -- Plant Responses to the Environment. (3) (Prereq: BIOL 302) Physiological, molecular, and genetic examination of induced plant responses to various biotic and abiotic environmental stresses.
  • 690 -- Ultramicroscopy. (3) (Prereq: BIOL 302 or MSCI 311 or consent of instructor) Theoretical and practical aspects of electron, optical, and atomic force microscopy including energy dispersive analysis and digital image acquisition and processing. Two lecture and one laboratory hour per week, plus a research project to be arranged.
  • 701 -- Selected Topics in Biochemistry. (1-3) (Prereq: two semesters of biochemistry or consent of instructor) Selected biochemical topics emphasizing research literature. One lecture hour per credit per week.
  • 702 -- Selected Topics in Plant Biology. (1-3) (Prereq: two semesters of botany or consent of instructor) Selected botanical topics emphasizing research literature. One lecture hour per credit per week.
  • 703 -- Selected Topics in Ecology. (1-3) (Prereq: two semesters of ecology or consent of instructor) Selected ecology topics emphasizing research literature. One lecture hour per credit per week.
  • 704 -- Selected Topics in Genetics and Developmental Biology. (1-3) (Prereq: consent of instructor) Selected genetic and developmental biology topics emphasizing research literature. One lecture hour per credit per week.
  • 705 -- Selected Topics in Zoology. (1-3) (Prereq: consent of instructor) Selected zoological topics emphasizing research literature. One lecture hour per credit per week.
  • 711 -- Structure and Function of Nucleic Acids. (3) (Prereq: BIOL 350 or 541, or equivalent) A detailed study of nucleic acids including their structure/chemistry, biosynthesis, processing, and biological functions. Three lecture hours per week.
  • 712 -- DNA Transactions and Gene Expression. (3) (Prereq: BIOL 303 or equivalent and BIOL 711, or consent of instructor) Advanced topics in Mendelian genetics, DNA repair/recombination, and mechanisms of gene expression. Three lecture hours per week.
  • 714 -- Advanced Cell Biology. (3) (Prereq: BIOL 541 or equivalent) Problems of cellular organization, interactions, and control. Cell growth and death, cell-cell recognition and communication, intracellular transport, the structure and assembly of cellular organelles, somatic cell genetics, and evolution of cells. Three lecture hours per week.
  • 717 -- Biological Chemistry. (3) (Prereq: CHEM 332 and 332L or equivalents) A comprehensive treatment of the chemistry, metabolism, regulation, and function of biological systems. Three lecture hours per week.
  • 718 -- Biological Chemistry II. (3) (Prereq: BIOL 717 or consent of instructor) A continuation of BIOL 717. Three lecture hours per week.
  • 722 -- Aquatic Bacteriology. (3) (Prereq: BIOL 330 or equivalent) The ecology and physiology of freshwater and marine bacteria. The functions of bacteria in aquatic habitats and the public health aspects of pollution as they relate to microbiology. Three lecture hours per week.
  • 722L -- Aquatic Bacteriology Laboratory. (1) (Prereq or coreq: BIOL 722) Three laboratory hours per week.
  • 725 -- Embryology of Angiosperms. (3) Two lectures and two laboratory periods per week.
  • 726 -- Soil-Plant Relationships. (3) (Prereq: BIOL 102 and permission of instructor) Two lecture and three laboratory hours per week.
  • 727 -- Marine Phytoplankton. (3) (Prereq: BIOL 627 and permission of instructor) Three lecture hours and one three-hour laboratory per week.
  • 728 -- Advanced Phycology. (3) (Prereq: BIOL 627) Three lecture hours and one three-hour laboratory per week.
  • 729 -- The Biology of Fish. (3) (Prereq: permission of instructor) Three lecture hours per week.
  • 730 -- The Biology of Fish Laboratory. (3) (Prereq or coreq: BIOL 729) One seminar and six laboratory hours per week.
  • 731 -- Advanced Invertebrate Zoology I. (3) (Prereq: invertebrate zoology or consent of instructor) Principles of systematics and an in-depth study of invertebrate phylogeny and ecology. Two lecture and three laboratory hours per week.
  • 734 -- The Vertebrates. (3) Three lectures or conferences per week.
  • 736 -- Advanced Developmental Biology. (3) (Prereq: BIOL 340 or 505, or equivalent) The biochemical and molecular mechanisms by which a variety of organisms develop. Three lecture hours per week.
  • 741 -- Fungal Physiology. (3) Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week.
  • 748 -- Molecular Endocrinology. (3) (Prereq: CHEM 332) A brief introduction to general endocrinology followed by an in-depth examination of the molecular mechanisms of hormone action, including receptors, second messengers, and hormonal control of transcription/translation. The evolution of hormone-receptor systems will also be examined.
  • 749 -- Methods in Molecular and Cell Biology. (3) (Prereq: one semester of biochemistry or consent of instructor) A team-taught course on the theory and practice of laboratory techniques for investigating the structure and function of cellular components, especially organelles, proteins, and nucleic acids. Three lecture hours per week. Lectures will be supplemented with laboratory demonstrations.
  • 750 -- Advanced Biological Oceanography. {=MSCI 750} (3) (Prereq: BIOL/MSCI 450 or consent of instructor) Three lecture hours per week.
  • 752 -- Marine Biogeochemistry. {=MSCI 752} (3) (Prereq: consent of instructor) Biological, chemical, geological, and physical processes that influence the cyling of major bioactive elements (C, O, N, P, S) in marine waters and sediments.
  • 753 -- Developmental Genetics. (3) (Prereq: BIOL 350 and two semesters of biochemistry or equivalents and consent of instructor) The action of genes in development and differentiation at the molecular, cellular, and organ (tissue) levels, with examples taken from microorganisms, plants, animals, and man. Three lecture hours per week.
  • 754 -- Oceanographic Techniques. {=GEOL 754} (1) (Prereq: consent of the instructor) Shipboard experience with basic techniques used by geological, physical, chemical, and biological oceanographers.
  • 755 -- Quantitative Ecology. (3) (Prereq: BIOL 570 or consent of the instructor) An intensive field course centered around field problems in a variety of habitats (freshwater, terrestrial, estuarine). Students will use a variety of quantitative sampling methods to test ecological hypotheses on several two-day field trips.
  • 757 -- Special Topics in Biology. (1-4) (Prereq: consent of instructor) An intensive consideration of topics of current interest in biology. One lecture hour per credit per week.
  • 758 -- Research. (1-3) Appropriate designation will be made for the particular program in any given semester.
  • 759 -- Physiological Ecology. (3) Two lecture and three laboratory hours per week.
  • 760 -- Electron Microscopy. (3) (Prereq: permission of instructor) Three lecture hours a week. Theory and design of modern electron microscopes; advancement in the theory and practice of specimen preparation of biological materials; interpretation of ultrastructure of cells and tissues.
  • 760L -- Electron Microscopy Laboratory. (1) (Prereq or coreq: BIOL 760) Four laboratory hours per week.
  • 762 -- Wetlands Ecology. (3) A survey of the structure and function of wetland ecosystems emphasizing the current literature.
  • 763 -- Biology of Populations. (3) Three lecture and two laboratory hours per week.
  • 764 -- Advanced Plant Physiology. (3) (Prereq: BIOL 549) Study of modern advances in plant physiology. Plant biotechnology topics, such as tissue culture, nitrogen fixation, photosynthesis, weed and pest control, molecular cloning, and genetic manipulation. Three lecture hours per week.
  • 765 -- Theoretical Ecology. (3) (Prereq: BIOL 570 or consent of instructor) Theoretical bases of ecology are explored from current literature with topics from organismal, populational, community, and ecosystem approaches. Principles for the construction and testing of hypotheses and models.
  • 766 -- Evolutionary Biology. (3) Theoretical and empirical studies of the evolutionary process. Historical perspective of major developments in evolution as well as modern quantitative and ecological genetic studies.
  • 768 -- Ecological Modeling and Environmental Planning. {=ENHS 767, MSCI 767} (4) (Prereq: MATH 111 or equivalent, ecology, ENHS 660, or permission of instructor) Concepts in systems ecology and ecological modeling. Emphasis on the use of models and computer simulations in examining environmental interactions, predicting environmental impact, and facilitating the process of environmental planning. Lab practice in model development, computer simulation analysis.
  • 769 -- Reproductive Ecology. {=MSCI 769} (3) (Prereq: BIOL 570 or consent of instructor) Theoretical aspects and examples of the variety of reproductive and life history patterns found in animals and plants as adaptations to various environmental constraints. Three lecture hours per week.
  • 770 -- Current Topics in Molecular Biology. (3) Primarily for the M.A.T. program. Recent developments in cellular and molecular biology including genetic mechanisms, ultrastructure, and function of organelles and membranes. Lectures supplemented with readings from current literature. Not available for M.S. or Ph.D. credit in biology.
  • 771 -- Current Topics in Developmental Biology. (3) Primarily for the M.A.T. program. Concepts of growth, differentiation, and morphogenesis of organisms in light of recent advances in biological knowledge. Lectures supplemented with readings from current literature. Not available for M.S. or Ph.D. credit in biology.
  • 772 -- Current Topics in Ecology. (3) Primarily for the M.A.T. program. Ecological concepts with reference to recent advances in environmental sciences. Special attention to the ecology of the coast, swamps, and other habitats of importance in the Southeast. Not available for M.S. or Ph.D. credit in biology.
  • 775 -- Plants of South Carolina. (4) Lecture-laboratory-field course primarily for the M.A.T. program. Introduction to the major forms of plant life in the state. Includes fungi, algae, bryophytes, and vascular plants. Not available for M.S. or Ph.D. credit in biology.
  • 776 -- Animals of South Carolina. (4) Lecture-laboratory-field course primarily for the M.A.T. program. Introduction to the major forms of animal life in the state. Animals will be studied and/or collected in their native habitat. Includes identification, behavior, and ecology of animals with emphasis on vertebrates. Not available for M.S. or Ph.D. credit in biology.
  • 777 -- Statistical Phylogenetics and Molecular Evolution. {=STAT 777} (3) (Prereq: grade of B or better in MATH 241 or STAT 510) Theory and applications of phylogenetics; estimation via Markov models, likelihood, distances and parsimony; hypothesis testing of evolutionary trees and parameters; related topics including molecular divergence time inference.
  • 798 -- Research in Biology. (1-9) Practicum designed to give M.S. and Ph.D. students in-depth experience with research techniques prior to preparation of theses and dissertations (Pass/Fail grading).
  • 799 -- Thesis Preparation. (1-9)
  • 801 -- Directed Readings in Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology. (1) Assigned readings in special topics in molecular, cellular, and developmental biology followed by classroom discussions. Designed to teach critical analysis of the scientific literature (Pass-Fail grading).
  • 802 -- Seminar in Plant Biology. (1-2) A review of current literature in plant biology involving student presentations of seminars. One discussion hour per credit per week. The course may be repeated for credit.
  • 803 -- Seminar in Ecology. (1-2) (Prereq: consent of instructor) A review of current literature in ecology involving student presentations of seminars. One discussion hour per credit per week.
  • 804 -- Seminar in Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology. (1) Student presentations of papers from the current literature in molecular, cellular, and developmental biology. Designed to give experience in oral presentations. May be repeated.
  • 805 -- Seminar in Zoology. (1-2) (Prereq: consent of instructor) A review of current literature in zoology involving student presentations of seminars. One discussion hour per credit per week.
  • 806 -- Perspectives in Biological Research. (1) Recent trends in biological research from the perspective of individual faculty members in the department. May be repeated.
  • 899 -- Dissertation Preparation. (1-12)

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