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updated 11/6/2008

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Daniel L. Reger, Chair

Professors
Richard D. Adams, Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1973, Carolina Distinguished Professor of Chemistry
S. Michael Angel, Ph.D., North Carolina State University, 1984, Fred M. Weissman Palmetto Chair
Brian C. Benicewiez, Ph.D., University of Connecticut, 1980, USC Educational Foundation Distinguished Professor
Mark A. Berg, Ph.D., University of California-Berkeley, 1985
John H. Dawson, Ph.D., Stanford University, 1976, Carolina Distinguished Professor
Scott R. Goode, Ph.D., Michigan State University, 1974
W. Stephen Kistler, Ph.D., Harvard University, 1970
Lukasz Lebioda, Ph.D., Jagiellonian University, 1972
Stephen L. Morgan, Ph.D., Emory University, 1975
Catherine J. Murphy, Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, Madison, 1990, Guy F. Lipscomb Chair of Chemistry
Michael L. Myrick, Ph.D., New Mexico State University, 1988
Daniel L. Reger, Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1972, Carolina Distinguished Professor and Chair
Timothy J. Shaw, Ph.D., University of California, 1988
James M. Sodetz, Ph.D., University of Notre Dame, 1975, Carolina Distinguished Professor
Thomas Vogt, Ph.D., Eberhard Karls Universitatin, Tubingen, Germany, 1987, Director of USC NanoCenter
Hans-Conrad zur Loye, Ph.D., University of California-Berkeley, 1988, David W. Robinson Palmetto Professor

Associate Professors
Donna A. Chen, Ph.D., Harvard University, 1997
John L. Ferry, Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 1996
Vitaly A. Rassolov, Ph.D., University of Notre Dame, 1996
Ken D. Shimizu, Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1995

Assistant Professors
P. Lee Ferguson, Ph.D., SUNY-Stony Brook, 2002
Sophya V. Garashchuk, Ph.D., University of Notre Dame, 1998
John L. Lavigne, Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin, 2000
Caryn E. Outten, Ph.D., Northwestern University, 2001
F. Wayne Outten, Ph.D., Northwestern University, 2001
Vitaly A. Rassolov, Ph.D., University of Notre Dame, 1996
Linda S. Shimizu, Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1997
Paul R. Thompson, Ph.D., McMaster University, Hamilton, Ont., 2000
Benjamin S. Twining, Ph.D., Stony Brook University, 2003
Qian Wang, Ph.D., Tsinghua University, Beijing, China, 1997

Sheryl L. Wiskur, Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin, 2003

Instructors
Lori M. Amato, M.S., University of South Carolina, 2002
William E. Brewer, Ph.D., University of South Carolina, 1991
Daniel L. Freeman, Ph.D., University of South Carolina, 1995
George A. Handy, Ph.D., University of Nottingham, England, 1973

Faculty Emeriti
Elmer L. Amma, Ph.D., Iowa State University, 1957
John W. Baynes, Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1973, Carolina Distinguished Professor Emeritus
Thomas A. Bryson, Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh, 1970
Robert S. Bly, Ph.D., University of Colorado, 1958
H. Willard Davis, Ph.D., University of Cincinnati, 1941
R. Bruce Dunlap, Ph.D., Indiana University, 1968
James R. Durig, Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1962
W. Richard Gilkerson, Ph.D., University of Kansas, 1953
Benjamin M. Gimarc, Ph.D., Northwestern University, 1963
Edward E. Mercer, Ph.D., Purdue University, 1960
Jerome D. Odom, Ph.D., Indiana University, 1968, Distinguished Professor Emeriti and Provost Emeritus
Robert H. Philp Jr., Ph.D., Emory University, 1962
Roy E. Wuthier, Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, 1960, Guy F. Lipscomb Sr. Distinguished Chair Emeritus


Overview

The Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry offers two undergraduate degrees. A general major leads to the Bachelor of Science with a major in chemistry; the intensive major, suggested for those intending to enter the chemical profession, leads to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Chemistry. For both majors a minimum grade of C in Chemistry 111 and 112 is required. The Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry has been approved by the American Chemical Society’s (ACS) Committee on Professional Training, and the curriculum for the Bachelor of Science in Chemistry meets ACS requirements.

Retention, Progression, and Transfer Standards

1. Chemistry majors may enroll in a chemistry course a maximum of twice to earn the required grade of C or higher.
2. A chemistry major must receive a grade of C or higher in any chemistry course in order for it to
be used to satisfy a major requirement.
3. Any student applying for transfer to the chemistry major from other programs within the University, or from other accredited colleges and universities, is required to have a minimum overall grade point average of 2.50 on a 4.00 scale.

Degree Requirements

(128 hours)

Bachelor of Science with a Major in Chemistry

1. General Education Requirements (43–54 hours)

The following courses fulfill some of the general education requirements and some cognates and must be completed for a B.S. degree with a major in chemistry: CHEM 111, 112 or CHEM 141, 142; calculus through MATH 241; CSCE 145 or 206; PHYS 211, 211L and 212, 212L.

For an outline of other general education requirements, see "College of Arts and Sciences."

2. Major Requirements (minimum 24 hours)

Courses in chemistry numbered 300 level and above to include the following: CHEM 321, 321L, 333, 333L, 334, 334L, 541, 541L or 591, 542, 542L or 592; and at least one course from CHEM 511, 533, 545, 550, 555, 621, 623, 624, 633, and 644.

3. Cognates (12 hours), see "College of Arts and Sciences."

4. Electives, see "College of Arts and Sciences."

Bachelor of Science in Chemistry

1. General Education Requirements (43-54 hours)

The following courses fulfill some of the general education requirements and some cognates and must be completed for a B.S. in Chemistry degree: CHEM 111, 112 or CHEM 141, 1421; one math course beyond MATH 241, selected with advisor; PHYS 211, 211L, 212, 212L; CSCE 145 or 206.
For an outline of other general education requirements, see "College of Arts and Sciences."

2. Major Requirements (34-35 hours)

Courses in chemistry numbered 300 level and above to include the following: CHEM 321, 321L, 333, 333L, 334, 334L, 511, 541, 541L or 591, 542, 542L or 592, 550 or 555, 621, 621L, and 3 credits of undergraduate research.

3. Cognates, see "College of Arts and Sciences."

4. Electives, see "College of Arts and Sciences."

1 CHEM 141, 142 are equivalent to CHEM 111, 112, and 321L.
2Students who transfer into the program after completion of CHEM 331L and 332L may meet the organic chemistry requirements by completing CHEM 334L.


Course Descriptions (CHEM)

  • 101 -- Fundamental Chemistry I. (4) Three lecture, one recitation, and two laboratory hours per week. A science elective surveying inorganic and solution chemistry. First of a terminal two-semester sequence.
  • 102 -- Fundamental Chemistry II. (4) (Prereq: 1 year high-school chemistry, CHEM 101, 111, or equivalent) Three lecture, one recitation, and two laboratory hours per week. An introductory survey of organic and biochemistry.
  • 105 -- Chemistry and Modern Society I. (4) A conceptual and qualitative approach to chemistry, its evolution, achievements, and goals and its impact on technology, the environment, and modern life and thought. (Specifically designed for non-science majors.) Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week.
  • 106 -- Chemistry and Modern Man II. (3) (Prereq: CHEM 105) A continuation of Chemistry 105. Three lecture hours per week.
  • 106L -- Chemistry and Modern Man Laboratory. (1) (Prereq: CHEM 105; coreq: CHEM 106) Laboratory associated with CHEM 106. Three hours of laboratory per week.
  • 107 -- Forensic Chemistry. (4) Surveys chemical aspects of criminal investigation and adjudication including drug, arson, DNA, paint, and fiber identification. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week.
  • 111 -- General Chemistry I. (4) (Prereq: MATH 111 or 115) Three lecture, one recitation, and two laboratory hours per week. A survey of the principles that underlie all chemistry with applications illustrating these principles.
  • 112 -- General Chemistry II. (4) (Prereq: MATH 111 or 115 and a grade of C or better in CHEM 111 or CHEM 141) A continuation of CHEM 111. Special emphasis on chemical equilibrium. Three lecture, one recitation, and three laboratory hours per week.
  • 118 -- Computational Chemistry I. (1) (Prereq or coreq: CHEM 112 or CHEM 142) Introduction to the use of computers in solving chemical problems. One discussion and two laboratory hours per week.
  • 141 -- Principles of Chemistry I. (4) (Prereq: high-school chemistry; Prereq or coreq: MATH 141 or higher) Advanced general chemistry I. Atoms and chemical bonds. Three lecture hours, one recitation hour, and three laboratory hours per week. No credit will be given for both CHEM 111 and CHEM 141.
  • 142 -- Principles of Chemistry II. (4) (Prereq: CHEM 141) Advanced general chemistry II. Chemical kinetics, equilibria, and thermodynamics. Three lecture hours, one recitation hour, and three laboratory hours per week. No credit will be given for both CHEM 112 and CHEM 142.
  • 318 -- Computational Chemistry II. (1) (Prereq: CSCE 145 or 206, CHEM 118 or consent of instructor) A continuation of CHEM 118, with applications to more advanced chemical problems. One discussion and two laboratory hours per week.
  • 321 -- Quantitative Analysis. (3) (Prereq: CHEM 112 or CHEM 142; coreq: CHEM 321L) Gravimetric, volumetric, and introductory instrumental analysis. Three lecture and one recitation hours per week.
  • 321L -- Quantitative Analysis Laboratory. (1) (Coreq: CHEM 321) Three laboratory hours per week.
  • 331L -- Essentials of Organic Chemistry Laboratory I. (1) (Prereq or coreq: CHEM 333) Laboratory safety, syntheses, separation, and purification of carbon compounds. For non-majors.
  • 332L -- Essentials of Organic Chemistry Laboratory II. (1) (Prereq: CHEM 331L or, with permission of instructor, CHEM 333L; prereq or coreq: CHEM 334) Continuation of CHEM 331L. Spectroscopic identification of carbon compounds. For non-majors. Three lab hours per week.
  • 333 -- Organic Chemistry I. (3) (Prereq: CHEM 112 or CHEM 142) Contemporary theories, nomenclature, reactions, mechanisms, and syntheses of carbon compounds. Required for chemistry majors. Three lecture and one recitation hours per week.
  • 333L -- Comprehensive Organic Chemistry Laboratory I. (2) (Prereq or coreq: CHEM 333) Laboratory safety, synthesis, separation, and purification of carbon compounds. Required for chemistry majors. Six laboratory hours per week.
  • 334 -- Organic Chemistry II. (3) (Prereq: CHEM 333) Continuation of CHEM 333. Required for chemistry majors. Three lecture and one recitation hours per week.
  • 334L -- Comprehensive Organic Chemistry Laboratory II. (2) (Prereq: CHEM 332L or 333L; prereq or coreq: CHEM 334) Continuation of CHEM 333L. Spectroscopic identification of carbon compounds. Required for chemistry majors. Six laboratory hours per week.
  • 340 -- Elementary Biophysical Chemistry. (3) (Prereq: CHEM 112 or CHEM 142) A non-calculus approach to the study of the principles of physical chemistry emphasizing their application to significant biochemical and biological systems. Chemical thermodynamics, kinetics, equilibrium, solution chemistry, the structure of macromolecules, and acid-base properties of biomolecules. Three lectures per week. Credit for a degree will not be given for both CHEM 340 and CHEM 541.
  • 340L -- Elementary Biophysical Chemistry Laboratory. (1) (Coreq: CHEM 340 or 550) Experimental study of the physical and chemical properties of matter, especially of the characteristics of biomolecules. Three laboratory hours per week. Credit for a degree will not be given for both CHEM 340L and CHEM 591 or CHEM 541L.
  • 399 -- Independent Study. (1-3) Contract approved by instructor, advisor, and department chair or dean is required.
  • 401 -- Industrial Chemistry Capstone Experience. (3) (Prereq: senior standing) Prepares students for future roles in chemical industry or graduate school and provides career-enhancing interpersonal skills, including team-building, public speaking, resume preparation, and interviewing.
  • 496 -- Undergraduate Research. (3 each) (Prereq: consent of instructor) Introduction to the methods of chemical research. A written report on work accomplished is required at the end of each semester. Nine hours of library and laboratory per week.
  • 497 -- Undergraduate Research. (3 each) (Prereq: consent of instructor) Introduction to the methods of chemical research. A written report on work accomplished is required at the end of each semester. Nine hours of library and laboratory per week.
  • 498 -- Undergraduate Research. (3 each) (Prereq: consent of instructor) Introduction to the methods of chemical research. A written report on work accomplished is required at the end of each semester. Nine hours of library and laboratory per week.
  • 499 -- Undergraduate Research. (3 each) (Prereq: consent of instructor) Introduction to the methods of chemical research. A written report on work accomplished is required at the end of each semester. Nine hours of library and laboratory per week.
  • 511 -- Inorganic Chemistry. (3) (Prereq: CHEM 334, PHYS 212 or 207, and MATH 241) Consideration of atomic structure, valence, complex compounds, and systematic study of the periodic table.
  • 533 -- Comprehensive Organic Chemistry III. (3) (Prereq: CHEM 334 or the equivalent) Selected organic reactions from synthetic and mechanistic viewpoints.
  • 541 -- Physical Chemistry. (3) (Prereq: CHEM 112 or CHEM 142, MATH 241; prereq or coreq: PHYS 212 or PHYS 207 or consent of instructor) Chemical thermodynamics and kinetics.
  • 541L -- Physical Chemistry Laboratory. (2) (Prereq: CHEM 321L or CHEM 142 or consent of instructor; prereq or coreq: CHEM 541) Applications of physical chemical techniques. Five laboratory hours and one recitation hour per week.
  • 542 -- Physical Chemistry. (3) (Prereq: CHEM 112 or CHEM 142, PHYS 212 or PHYS 207, MATH 241 or consent of instructor) Spectroscopy, statistical mechanics, and chemical applications of quantum mechanics.
  • 542L -- Physical Chemistry Laboratory. (2) (Prereq: CHEM 321L or CHEM 142 or consent of instructor; prereq or coreq: CHEM 542) Applications of physical chemical techniques. Five laboratory hours and one recitation hour per week.
  • 545 -- Physical Biochemistry. (3) (Prereq: CHEM 541 and CHEM 550) A survey of physical methods essential for studies of biomacromolecules. Three lecture hours per week.
  • 550 -- Principles of Biochemistry. {=BIOL 541} (3) (Prereq: CHEM 334 or the equivalent) A survey of fundamentals of biochemistry. Three lecture hours per week.
  • 550L -- Principles of Biochemistry Laboratory. {=BIOL 541L} (1) (Prereq or coreq: CHEM 550) Three laboratory hours per week.
  • 555 -- Biochemistry/Molecular Biology I. {=BIOL 545} (3) (Prereq: CHEM 334 or equivalent) Essentials of modern biochemistry. Three lecture hours per week. First semester of a two-semester course.
  • 556 -- Biochemistry/Molecular Biology II. {=BIOL 546} (3) (Prereq: BIOL 302; CHEM 555 or consent of instructor) Essentials of modern biochemistry and molecular biology. Three lecture hours per week. Second semester of a two-semester course.
  • 590 -- Introductory Glassblowing. (1) (Prereq: junior or senior standing or consent of instructor) The history and fundamental application of glassblowing techniques. Three laboratory hours per week.
  • 591 -- Advanced Experimental Chemistry I. (2) (Prereq: CHEM 321; prereq or coreq: CHEM 541) Synthesis of compounds by specialized methods; measurement of thermochemical, electrochemical, and structural properties. Six laboratory hours per week.
  • 592 -- Advanced Experimental Chemistry II. (2) (Prereq: CHEM 541; CHEM 541L or CHEM 591) A continuation of Chemistry 591. Six laboratory hours per week.
  • 621 -- Instrumental Analysis. (3) (Prereq or Coreq: CHEM 541, and CHEM 541L or CHEM 591) Chemical instrumentation including electronics, signal processing, statistical analysis, molecular/atomic spectroscopy, electrochemical methods, chromatography, and mass spectrometry. Three lecture hours per week.
  • 621L -- Instrumental Analysis. (1) (Prereq: CHEM 321/321L; prereq or coreq: CHEM 541, 621, and CHEM 541L or 591) Chemical instrumentation laboratory with environmental, forensic, and biotechnology applications. Three laboratory hours per week.
  • 622 -- Forensic Analytical Chemistry. (3) (Prereq: CHEM 321/321L and CHEM 334/332L or 334L) Analytical chemical methods in forensic science, including gathering of evidence, toxicology, drug identification, analysis of trace evidence, arson analysis, and DNA/serology.
  • 623 -- Introductory Environmental Chemistry. (3) (Prereq: CHEM 321, CHEM 333, and MATH 142) Study of the chemical reactions and processes that affect the fate and transport of organic chemicals in the environment. Three lecture hours per week.
  • 624 -- Aquatic Chemistry. {=MSCI 624} (3) (Prereq: CHEM 321, MATH 142, or consent of instructor) Study of the chemical reactions and processes affecting the distribution of chemical species in natural systems. Three lecture hours per week.
  • 633 -- Introduction to Polymer Synthesis. (3) (Prereq: CHEM 334 or equivalent) Special emphasis on the modern synthesis of polymeric materials. Definitions, characterization, and applications of polymers will be briefly presented.
  • 644 -- Materials Chemistry. (3) (Prereq or coreq: CHEM 542) Introduction to materials science; structural and electronic description of inorganic-based solids; experimental techniques in materials chemistry; interfacial energetics and optoelectronic processes at metal and semiconductor surfaces.

College of Arts and Sciences

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