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updated 5/11/2009

Languages, Literatures, and Cultures

Marja Warehime, Chair

Professors
Celso de Oliveira, Ph.D., University of South Carolina, 1976
William F. Edmiston, Ph.D., Indiana University, 1978
Kurt G. Goblirsch, Ph.D., University of Minnesota, 1990
Freeman G. Henry, Ph.D., University of Colorado, 1973
Paul Allen Miller, Ph.D., University of Texas, 1989
Francisco J. Sanchez, Ph.D., University of Minnesota, 1990
Marja Warehime, Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1975

Associate Professors
Lara Lomicka Anderson, Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University, 2001
Junko Baba, Ph.D., University of Texas, 1996
Alfredo Alejandro Bernal, Ph.D., Indiana University, 1984
Catherine J. Castner, Ph.D., University of North Carolina, 1979
Lucile C. Charlebois, Ph.D., University of Massachusetts, 1982
James T. Day, Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1978
Daniela DiCecco, Ph.D., University of British Columbia, 1998
Jeanne M. Garane, Ph.D., University of Michigan, 1994
D. Eric Holt, Ph.D., Georgetown University, 1997
Judith E. Kalb, Ph.D., Stanford University, 1996
Ramona Lagos, Ph.D., University of Arizona, 1982
Nancy E. Lane, Ph.D., Indiana University, 1976
María C. Mabrey, Ph.D., University of North Carolina, 1991
Agnes Mueller, Ph.D., Vanderbilt University, 1997
J. Alexander Ogden, Ph.D., Stanford University, 1997
Jeffery C. Persels, Ph.D., University of Virginia, 1991
Yoshitaka Sakakibara, Ph.D., University of Southern California, 1984
Stephen P. Sheehi, Ph.D., University of Michigan, 1998
Wiebke Strehl, Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University, 1992
Nicholas Vazsonyi, Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles, 1993
Tan Ye, Ph.D., Washington University, 1991

Assistant Professors
Mark A. Beck, Ph.D., University of North Carolina, 1998
Jorge L. Camacho, Ph.D., University of Toronto, 2000
Lara C. Ducate, Ph.D., University of Texas, 2003
Annie Duménil, Ph.D., University of South Carolina, 1983
Hunter H. Gardner, Ph.D., University of North Carolina, 2005
Jie Guo, Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 2007
David P. Hill, Ph.D., Duke University, 1978
Yvonne Ivory, Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles, 2001
Paul Malovrh, Ph.D., Indiana University, 2008
Nina Moreno, Ph.D., Georgetown University, 2007
Faust F. Pauluzzi, Ph.D., Rutgers University, 1980
Isis Sadek, Ph.D., Duke University, 2008
Krista Van Fleit Hang, Ph.D., University of Chicago, 2006

Instructors
Carla Aguado de la Fuente, M.A., University of South Carolina, 1994
Maria S. Benavente, M.A.T., Universidad Naiconal De Educacion A Distancia, Uned, Spain, 2007
Ellen Brightwell, M.A., Winthrop University, 1999
Youko Akao Brooks, Ph.D., University of South Carolina, 1994
Michael Buerstner, M.A., University of South Carolina, 2001
Sylvain Chabra, M.A., University of Delaware, 2006
Andrew Corley, M.A., University of South Carolina, 2008
Purificacion Crowe, M.A., University of South Carolina, 2000
Ana Cueto, M.A., University of South Carolina, 2006
Judith Dent, M.A., University of South Carolina, 1982
Antonio Di Giacomantonio, M.A., Rutgers University, 1969
John Duffy, Ph.D., Indiana University, 1995
Elizabeth Evans, M.A., University of Valencia, 1995
Curtis Ford, Ph.D., University of North Carolina, 2001
Carla Grimes, M.A., University of South Carolina, 1989
Brigitte Guillemin, M.A., University of South Carolina, 1990
Carolyn Hansen, M.A., University of Kansas, 1974
Lenora Hayes, M.A.T., University of Georgia, 2003
Lizette Laughlin, M.A., University of South Carolina, 1975
Timothy McAteer, M.A., University of South Carolina, 2004
El-Ayech Mafoudi, M.A., University of South Carolina, 2004
Patti J. Marinelli, M.A., Pennsylvania State University, 1976
Leah Miller, M.A., University of South Carolina, 2007
Keiko Miyazaki, M.A., California State University-Northridge, 1997
Lucille Mould, M.A., University of Kansas, 1967
Margo Newton, M.A., Florida State University, 1973
Harriet H. Nichols, Ed.D., College of William and Mary, 1995
Charles B. Owens, M.A., University of South Carolina, 1996
Kathleen M. Ross, M.A., Louisiana State University, 1984
Wendy C. Schneider, M.A., University of outh Carolina, 2005
Catherine Smith, M.A.T., University of South Carolina, 1999
Maia Solovieva, Ph.D., Rostov State University, 2000

John Zyck Jr., M.A., Purdue University, 1999

Faculty Emeriti
Stephen Hamilton Ackerman, Ph.D., Ohio State University, 1955
Stephen Bull Adams, M.A., University of Illinois, 1954
Charles J. Alber, Ph.D., Indiana University, 1971
Edward T. Aylward, Ph.D., Princeton University, 1974
Mary C. Borelli, Ph.D., Ohio State University, 1954
Ward W. Briggs Jr., Ph.D., University of North Carolina, 1974
Francis J. Dannerbeck, Ph.D., Purdue University, 1965
Wolfgang D. Elfe, Ph.D., University of Massachusetts, 1970

T. Bruce Fryer, Ph.D., University of Texas, 1970
Rita M. Gardiol, Ph.D., Indiana University, 1968
James N. Hardin, Ph.D., University of North Carolina, 1967
Gunther J. Holst, Ph.D., University of Texas, 1971
Elizabeth G. Joiner, Ph.D., Ohio State University, 1974
Gerda P. Jordan, Ph.D., University of South Carolina, 1971
Isaac Jack Lévy, Ph.D., University of Michigan, 1966
María Angelica G. Lopes, Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, 1980
Patricia P. Matsen, Ph.D., Bryn Mawr College, 1968
William A. Mould, Ph.D., University of Kansas, 1967
G. Buford Norman Jr., Ph.D., Yale University, 1971
George M. Reeves, D.U., University of Paris, 1953
Margit Resch, Ph.D., University of Illinois, 1974
Carl R. Shirley Jr., Ph.D., University of South Carolina, 1974
David G. Speer, D.U., University of Montpellier, 1953
Rosamond Kent Sprague, Ph.D., Bryn Mawr College, 1953

Comparative Literature

Core Faculty
Jorge Camacho, Ph.D., University of Toronto, 2000 (Spanish)
Kwame Senu Neville Dawes, Ph.D., University of New Brunswick, 1992 (English)
Martin J. Donougho, Ph.D., University of Toronto, 1980 (Philosophy)
Jeanne M. Garane, Ph.D. University of Michigan, 1994 (French)
Jie Guo, Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 2007
Scott Gwara, Ph.D., University of Toronto, 1993 (English)
Freeman Henry, Ph.D., University of Colorado, 1973 (French)
Yvonne Ivory, Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles, 2001 (German)
Judith Kalb, Ph.D. Stanford University, 1996 (Russian)
Maria C. Mabrey, Ph.D., University of North Carolina, 1991 (Spanish)

David Miller, Ph.D., University of California, Irvine, 1979 (English)
Paul Allen Miller, Ph.D., University of Texas, 1989 (French, Greek, Latin)
John Muckelbauer, Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University, 2002 (English)
Agnes Mueller, Ph.D. Vanderbilt University, 1997 (German)
J. Alexander Ogden, Ph.D. Stanford University, 1997 (Russian)
Celso de Oliveira, Ph.D., University of South Carolina, 1976 (Portuguese)
Lawrence Rhu, Ph.D., Harvard University, 1987 (English)
Francisco J. Sanchez, Ph.D., University of Minnesota, 1990 (Spanish)
Stephen Sheehi, Ph.D., University of Michigan, 1998 (Arabic)
Andrew Shifflett, Ph.D., Princeton University, 1993 (English)
Meili Steele, Ph.D., University of North Carolina, 1984 (English)
Nicholas Vazsonyi, Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles, 1997 (German)

Consulting Faculty
Alejandro A. Bernal, Ph.D., Indiana University, 1984 (Spanish)
John Duffy, Ph.D., Indiana University, 1995 (French)
Ina Rae Hark, Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles, 1975 (English, Film Studies)
Ramona Lagos, Ph.D., University of Arizona, 1982 (Spanish)
Nancy E. Lane, Ph.D., Indiana University, 1976 (French)
Kevin Lewis, Ph.D., University of Chicago, 1980 (Religious Studies)
Faust Pauluzzi, Ph.D., Rutgers University, 1980 (Italian)
Tan Ye, Ph. D., Washington University, 1991 (Chinese)

Professors Emeriti
Samuel Ashley Brown, Ph.D., Vanderbilt University, 1958 (English)
Maria Angelica G. Lopes, Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, 1980 (Portuguese)


Overview

The department offers undergraduate majors in classics, comparative literature, French, German, Italian, Russian, and Spanish, all leading to the bachelor of arts degree. The department offers minors in ancient Greek, classical studies, comparative literature, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Latin, Russian, and Spanish. Minors in foreign languages generally require 18 hours of course work at the 200 level or above. For information about specific minors, students should go to www.cla.sc.edu/dean and select "Minors Bulletin" from the list on the left side of the page. Language instruction is also offered in Arabic, Chinese, Korean, Portuguese, and Swahili.

Advanced Standing

Students who have studied a foreign language during the five years preceding their enrollment at USC must take the placement test in that language. A maximum of 7 or 8 semester hours of advanced standing credit for 121-122 courses in one foreign language may be earned on the basis of completion (with a grade of B or better) of the first 200-level or above 3-credit course in that foreign language; 4 hours credit for 121 may be awarded for a grade of B or better in a 122 course. Courses that may not be offered for advanced standing credit are: all CLAS courses, FREN 290, 295, 315, 397, and 399: GERM 315, 398, and 399; LATN 314, 315, and 399; and SPAN 315, 350, 398, and 399.

Exemptions

Students will not normally be permitted to repeat for credit foreign language units previously earned in high school or college. Freshmen achieving advanced standing at the University may be permitted to validate certain omitted courses, according to current regulations, and should consult the department for further information. Students who have learned English as a foreign language may, with the concurrence of the dean of their college and that of the chair of the department, be exempted from the language requirement without credit. Such students will, at the discretion of the department, be excluded from courses in their native language.

Degree Requirements

Bachelor of Arts in Classics

(120 hours)

1. General Education Requirements (53-62 hours)

For a general outline, see "College of Arts and Sciences."

2. Program Requirements (24 hours)

Greek Concentration
GREK at the 300 level or above (18 hours)
LATN at the 300 level or above (6 hours)

Latin Concentration
LATN at the 300 level or above (18 hours)
GREK at the 300 level or above (6 hours)

Classical Studies Concentration
GREK or LATN at the 300 level or above (6 hours)
CLAS 586 (3 hours)
CLAS 401 or CPLT 301 (3 hours)
HIST 502, 503, or 504 (3 hours)
Electives within the program (9 hours)

Teacher Certification Option
LATN at the 300 level or above (27 hours)
GREK 121, 122 (6 hours)
CLAS 586 (3 hours)
FORL 472 (3 hours)
FORL 510 (3 hours)
FORL 511 (3 hours)
EDFN 300 (3 hours)
EDTE 400 (1 hour)
EDEX 491 (2)
EDPY 401, 401P (4 hours)
EDSE 584 (3 hours)
FORL 448, 474 (15 hours)

Application and admission to the professional program in education/internship are required for all majors seeking teacher certification. All teacher education candidates must adhere to all education policies and procedures related to clinical experiences and meet University and S.C. Board of Education requirements in order to be recommended for certification. Information is available from academic advisors or the College of Education, Office of Student Affairs, at 803-777-6732.

3. Cognates or minor

See "College of Arts and Sciences."

Note: Cognate courses must be selected in consultation with the student's major advisor (12 hours). Normally, students pursuing the teacher certification option may apply 300- or higher level education courses and/or 300- or higher level FORL courses to the cognate.

4. Electives

See "College of Arts and Sciences."

Courses Offered in Classical Studies

The following courses from outside the department may be used for the electives in the classical studies concentration.

ARTH 313, History of Roman Art
ARTH 511, Etruscan Art and Archaeology
CPLT 301 {=ENGL 390}, Great Books of the Western World
ENGL 393, Epic Poetry
HIST 322, Celtic and Roman Britain, 2000 B.C.-A.D. 500
HIST 501, The Ancient Near East to 323 B.C.
HIST 515, Byzantine History: 4th to 11th Centuries
HIST 518, Coinage of the Ancient World
PHIL 303, Greek and Roman Philosophy after Aristotle
PHIL 505, Plato
PHIL 506, Aristotle
RELG 301, Old Testament
RELG 302, New Testament
RELG 311, The Mission and Message of Jesus
RELG 312, The Life and Letters of Paul
RELG 313, The Johannine Literature
RELG 320, Old Testament Sacred Histories
RELG 321, Old Testament Prophets
RELG 341, Israel's Wisdom Literature
RELG 501, Religious Philosophies of the West I
RELG 502, Religious Philosophies of the West II
RELG 512, History of Western Religion 

Bachelor of Arts in Comparative Literature

(120 hours)

CPLT 270 (World Literature), CPLT 300 (Introduction to Comparative Literature), and the three survey classes CPLT 301, 302, and 303 form the core of both the major and the minor. Both the major and the minor ensure study in the student's chosen foreign language as well as in various national and ethnic literatures. The major also requires some study in a second foreign language.

1. General Education Requirements (53-62 hours)

For a general outline of other general education equirements, see "College of Arts and Sciences."

2. Prerequisite (3 hours)

CPLT 270 {=ENGL 270} Introduction to World Literatures (3 hours)

3. Corequisite (3 hours)

One 122-level course in the second foreign language.

4. Major Requirements (27 hours)

CPLT 300 Introduction to Comparative Literature (3 hours)
Two courses from CPLT 301, 302, or 303: Great Books of the Western World I and II and Great Books of the Eastern World, respectively (note: these courses are cross-listed with ENGL 390, 391, and 392) (6 hours)
One elective course in CPLT at the 300 level or above (note: CPLT courses 380-386 are cross-listed with ENGL 380-386) (3 hours)
One 415 topics course in CPLT Two 300-level or above foreign-language courses in literature (6 hours)
One 300-level or above course in the literature of a second foreign language (may be in translation) (3 hours)
CPLT 499 (thesis) (3 hours)

5. Cognate or Minor (12-18 hours)

6. Electives (7-22 hours)

Bachelor of Arts in French

(120-123 hours)

1. General Education Requirements (53-62)

For a general outline, see "College of Arts and Sciences."

2. Major Requirements

General Option:
27 hours of course work at or above the 300 level:

I. Required core (9 hours)

FREN 309 Reading French Texts
FREN 310 Advanced Oral Communication
FREN 311 French Composition
FREN 400 French Cultural History
FREN 451 French Literature and Culture Before 1800
FREN 452 French Literature and Culture After 1800
FREN 453 Francophone Literatures and Cultures

II. Electives (18 hours)

Chosen from 300- to 500-level courses, with approval of undergraduate advisor

Teacher Certification Option

Students pursuing a French major with teacher certification will complete the following courses in addition to the general French major requirements:

FORL 472
FORL 510
FORL 511
EDFN 300
EDTE 400
EDEX 491
EDPY 401, 401P
EDSE 584
FORL 448, 474

Application and admission to the professional program in education/internship are required for all majors seeking teacher certification. All teacher education candidates must adhere to all education policies and procedures related to clinical experiences and meet University and S.C. Board of Education requirements in order to be recommended for certification. Information is available from academic advisors or the College of Education, Office of Student Affairs, at 803-777-6732.

3. Cognates or Minor

See "College of Arts and Sciences."

Note: Cognate courses must be selected in consultation with the student's major advisor (12 hours). Normally, students pursuing the teacher certification option may apply 300- or higher level education courses and/or 300- or higher level FORL courses to the cognate.

4. Electives

See "College of Arts and Sciences."

Bachelor of Arts in German

(120-123 hours)

1. General Education Requirements (53-62 hours)

For a general outline, see "College of Arts and Sciences."

2. Major Requirements

General Option:
Nine German courses numbered 270 or above (27 hours)
1. A maximum of one course (3 credit hours) at the 200 level
2. Eight to nine courses (24-27 credit hours) at the 300 level or above.
*Only three GERM courses taught in English (270, 280, 295, 398, 580) may apply to the major. German majors taking a course in English must do some of the readings in German. 398 may be repeated with a different suffix as topics vary.

Teacher Certification Option

Students pursuing a general major with teaching certification will complete the following courses in addition to the general German major requirements:
FORL 472
FORL 510
FORL 511
EDFN 300
EDTE 400
EDEX 491
EDPY 401, 401P
EDSE 584
FORL 448, 474

Application and admission to the professional program in education/internship are required for all majors seeking teacher certification. All teacher education candidates must adhere to all education policies and procedures related to clinical experiences and meet University and S.C. Board of Education requirements in order to be recommended for certification. Information is available from academic advisors or the College of Education, Office of Student Affairs, at 803-777-6732.

3. Cognates or Minor

See "College of Arts and Sciences."

Note: Cognate courses must be selected in consultation with the student's major advisor (12 hours). Normally, students pursuing the teacher certification option may apply 300- or higher level education courses and/or 300- or higher level FORL courses to the cognate.

4. Electives

See "College of Arts and Sciences."

Bachelor of Arts in Italian

(120 hours)

1. General Education Requirements (53-62 hours)

For a general outline, see "College of Arts and Sciences."

2. Major Requirements

Courses numbered 300 level and above* (27 hours)

3. Cognates, see "College of Arts and Sciences"

Note: These courses must be selected in consultation with the appropriate language advisor. (12 hours)

4. Electives, see "College of Arts and Sciences"

*Prospective majors should consult with advisor concerning specific requirements.

Bachelor of Arts in Russian

(120 hours)

1. General Education Requirements (53-62 hours)

For a general outline, see "College of Arts and Sciences."

2. Prerequisites

Six credits in RUSS 201 and 202 (or equivalent) and 3 credits in RUSS 280.

3. Major Requirements

Russian courses numbered 300 or above (24 hours)
1. Twelve credits from RUSS 301, 302, 401, and 402.
2. Twelve credits from RUSS 319, 319L, 320, 320L, 398, 399, 598 (must include 319 or 320)
398 and 598 can be repeated for major credit under different suffixes.

4. Cognates or Minor, see "College of Arts and Sciences"

Cognate courses must be selected in consultation with the student's major advisor (12 hours).

5. Electives, see "College of Arts and Sciences"

Bachelor of Arts in Spanish

(120-123 hours)

1. General Education Requirements (53-62 hours)

For a general outline, see "College of Arts and Sciences."

2. Major Requirements

General Major
Courses numbered 300 level and above* (27 hours)

Intensive Major in Spanish
Thirty hours of courses numbered 300 level and above; SPAN 499; attainment of an advanced rating on an oral proficiency interview conducted by a departmentally approved tester (33 hours)

Note: Intensive majors must earn a B or better in major courses.

Teacher Certification Option

SPAN 300
SPAN 309
SPAN 310
SPAN 312
SPAN 400
SPAN 401
SPAN 404
SPAN 409
SPAN 515
FORL 472
FORL 510
FORL 511
EDFN 300
EDTE 400
EDEX 491
EDPY 401, 401P
EDSE 584
FORL/EDSE 448, 474

Application and admission to the professional program in education/internship are required for all majors seeking teacher certification. All teacher education candidates must adhere to all education policies and procedures related to clinical experiences and meet University and S.C. Board of Education requirements in order to be recommended for certification. Information is available from academic advisors or the College of Education, Office of Student Affairs, at 803-777-6732.

3. Cognates

See "College of Arts and Sciences."

Note: Cognate courses must be selected in consultation with the student's major advisor (12 hours). Normally, students pursuing the teacher certification option may apply 300- or higher level education courses and/or 300- or higher level FORL courses to the cognate.

4. Electives

See "College of Arts and Sciences."

*Prospective majors should consult with advisor concerning specific requirements.


Course Descriptions

Arabic (ARAB)

  • 121 -- Elementary Arabic. (4) Grammar and practical vocabulary necessary for fundamental communication skills. Assumes no prior experience in the language. Offered only in fall.
  • 122 -- Basic Proficiency in Arabic. (4) Practice and further development of essential listening, reading, speaking, and writing skills. Admission only by successful completion of Arabic 121. Offered only in spring.
  • 201 -- Intermediate Arabic. (3) (Prereq: ARAB 122 or consent of instructor) Continuation of reading, writing, and speaking Arabic.
  • 202 -- Intermediate Arabic. (3) (Prereq: ARAB 201 or consent of instructor) Increased emphasis on reading and writing skills in Arabic.
  • 280 -- Introduction to Modern Arab Culture. (3) Introduction to Arab culture (literature, music, film, and art) from the 19th century to the present.
  • 301 -- Advanced Arabic Language I. (3) (Prereq: successful completion of Arabic 202 or equivalent) This course builds on grammar and vocabulary by reading and listening to authentic Arabic materials. By semester’s end, the student will be able to write in detail and comprehend and use advanced vocabulary grammar and syntax in all forms of expression.
  • 302 -- Advanced Arabic Language II. (3) (Prereq: successful completion of ARAB 301 or equivalent) This course is a continuation of ARAB 301 and builds on grammar and vocabulary by reading and listening to authentic Arabic materials. By semester’s end, the student will be able to write in detail and comprehend and use advanced vocabulary grammar and syntax.
  • 310 -- Conversational Arabic. (3) (Prereq: ARAB 202 or consent of instructor) Practical drills in aural-oral skills to develop facility in the spoken language.
  • 312 -- Topics in Colloquial Arabic. (3) (Prereq: ARAB 122 or equivalent or consent of instructor) Topics in colloquial Arabic. May be repeated.
  • 315 -- Intensive Readings in Arabic. (3) Intensive reading for non-majors. Graduate students fulfill their foreign-language requirement with successful completion of the course. Undergraduates may take the course as an elective only. Grades S/U for graduates and undergraduates.
  • 320 -- Introduction to Modern Arab Literature in Translation. (3) Introduction to dominant trends and genres in nineteenth and twentieth century Arabic literature.
  • 398 -- Selected Topics. (3) Selected literary topics of the Arab world. May be repeated for credit under different suffix. Taught in English.
  • 399 -- Independent Study. (3-6) Contract approved by instructor, advisor, and department chair is required for undergraduate students.
American Sign Language (ASLG)
  • 121 -- Elementary American Sign Language (ASL). (4) Introduction to basic vocabulary and common grammar structures of ASL. Focus on communication and familiarization with aspects of deaf culture. This course does not satisfy the foreign language requirements of any college.
  • 122 -- Basic Proficiency in American Sign Language (ASL). (4) (Prereq: ASLG 121 or consent of instructor) Practice and further development in the language and culture of the American deaf community. This course does not satisfy the foreign language requirement of any college.

Chinese (CHIN)

  • 103 -- Introduction to Chinese Calligraphy. (2) Five hundred of the most commonly used Chinese characters. Emphasis is on the phonetic and significant elements common to large groups of ideograms.
  • 121 -- Elementary Chinese Mandarin. (4) Grammar and practical vocabulary necessary for fundamental communication skills. Assumes no prior experience in the language. Offered only in fall.
  • 122 -- Basic Proficiency in Mandarin Chinese. (4) Practice and further development of essential listening, reading, speaking, and writing skills. Admission only by successful completion of Chinese 121. Offered in spring.
  • 221 -- Intermediate Mandarin Chinese. (3-5) Continued practice of basic sentence patterns used in modern speech with increased emphasis on reading and acquisition of additional characters.
  • 222 -- Intermediate Mandarin Chinese II. (3-5) Continued practice of basic sentence patterns used in modern speech with increased emphasis on reading and acquisition of additional characters.
  • 240 -- Chinese Culture, Tradition, and Modern Societies. (3) Introduction to Chinese culture, heritage, and modern societies. Readings selected from printed and online sources. Taught in English.
  • 321 -- Advanced Intermediate Mandarin Chinese I. (3) (Prereq: CHIN 222 or consent of instructor) Provides intermediate training in spoken and written Chinese. By increasing students' vocabulary and knowledge of sentence patterns, the course focuses on speaking and writing in coherent, well-formed paragraphs.
  • 322 -- Advanced Intermediate Mandarin Chinese II. (3) (Prereq: CHIN 321) Continues advanced intermediate training in spoken and written Chinese. Attention is given to complex grammatical patterns, discourse characteristics, and discussions of clutural topics.
  • 335 -- Women in China. {=WGST 335} (3) Introduces the connection between gender and the Chinese national imagination Readings include cultural and historical documents that purport to explain the experience of women in China. Readings in English. Taught in English.
  • 341 -- Modern Chinese Literature. (3) Readings of canonical texts from modern Chinese literature. A focus is on the role of literature and other cultural documents in the imagination of China as a modern nation. Readings and discussion in English.
  • 398 -- Selected Topics. (3) Intensive study in selected authors or literary movements of China, including cultural aspects. May be repeated for credit under different suffix. Taught in English.
  • 399 -- Independent Study. (3-6) Contract approved by instructor, advisor, and department chair is required for undergraduate students.

Classics (CLAS)

  • 220 -- Introduction to Classical Mythology. (3) Major gods, goddesses, heroes, and heroines of classical mythology as portrayed in major literary works; the function of myth in society and its relevance to modern life.
  • 230 -- Medical and Scientific Terminology. (3) Greek and Latin elements in the formation of medical and scientific vocabulary; designed for students intending to enter the scientific and health professions. No previous knowledge of Greek or Latin required.
  • 240 -- Sport and Combat in the Ancient World. (3) This course is designed to introduce students to the importance of competition in the military and private spheres of the Greco-Roman world, a dominant legacy of antiquity.
  • 320 -- Sexuality and Gender in Ancient Greece. {=WGST 320} (3) Gender roles, standards of sexual behavior, evidence for women's lives, as manifested in ancient Greek literary and archaeological evidence; attitudes toward homosexuality; the modern media's representation of famous Greeks.
  • 321 -- Sexuality, Gender, and Power in Ancient Rome. [=WGST 321} (3) Sexuality as a social construct exemplified in standards of sexual behavior in ancient Rome and their reinforcement of the ruling ideology; feminine virtue, definitions of manliness, attitudes toward homosexuality.
  • 324 -- Topics in Classical Humanities. (3) Intensive study of one topic per semester dealing with ancient contributions to Western civilization. Such topics include: women in the ancient and modern worlds; modern interpretations of classical literature; the roots of comedy; the hero in ancient and modern times; ancient religion (not mythology) and the rise of Christianity; the role of the writer in ancient and modern times. Not for Greek or Latin major credit. In English.
  • 340 -- Greek Art and Archaeology. (3) A survey of ancient architecture, painting, and sculpture 2000-160 B.C.
  • 360 -- Classical Origins of Western Medical Ethics. {=PHIL 360} (3) Examination of ancient Greek and Roman philosophical, medical, and literary works (in English) as sources for the origins of medical ethics.
  • 401 -- Greek and Latin Literature in Translation. (3) A comparative survey of Greek and Latin masters.
  • 469 -- Classical Drama. {=ENGL 395} (3) Representative plays by Greek and Roman dramatists.
  • 586 -- Classical Mythology. (3) The major Greek and Roman myths, with emphasis on their meaning, functions, and influence on ancient and later Western culture.
  • 598 -- Classics of Western Literary Theory. {=CPLT 701, =ENGL 733} (3) Problems of literary theory in texts from the ancients to the 17th century, with an emphasis on the classical tradition.

Comparative Literature (CPLT)

Comparative literature courses are taught using books in translation.

  • 270 -- World Literature. {=ENGL 270} (3) Selected masterpieces of world literature from antiquity to the present.
  • 300 -- What Is Comparative Literature? (3) (Prereq: any 200-level literature course) Introduction to ways of reading and comparing literatures drawn from diverse languages and cultures.
  • 301 -- Great Books of the Western World I. {=ENGL 390} (3) European masterpieces from antiquity to the beginning of the Renaissance.
  • 302 -- Great Books of the Western World II. {=ENGL 391} (3) European masterpieces from the Renaissance to the present.
  • 303 -- Great Books of the Eastern World. {=ENGL 392} (3) Classical and contemporary poetry and prose of the Middle and Far East.
  • 380 -- Epic to Romance. {=ENGL 380} (3) (Prereq: ENGL 101 and 102) Comprehensive exploration of medieval and other pre-Renaissance literature using texts representative of the evolution of dominant literary forms.
  • 381 -- The Renaissance. {=ENGL 381} (3) (Prereq: ENGL 101 and 102) Literature of the Renaissance, in its cultural contexts, explored through representative works.
  • 382 -- The Enlightenment. {=ENGL 382} (3) (Prereq: ENGL 101 and 102) Literature of the Enlightenment in its cultural contexts, explored through representative works.
  • 383 -- Romanticism. {=ENGL 383} (3) (Prereq: ENGL 101 and 102) Literature of Romanticism, in its cultural contexts, explored through representative works.
  • 384 -- Realism. {=ENGL 384} (3) (Prereq: ENGL 101 and 102) Literature of Realism in its cultural contexts, explored through representative works.
  • 385 -- Modernism. {=ENGL 385} (3) (Prereq: ENGL 101 and 102) Literature of Modernism in its cultural contexts, explored through representative works.
  • 386 -- Postmodernism. {=ENGL 386} (3) (Prereq: ENGL 101 and 102) Literature of Postmodernism in its cultural contexts, explored through representative works.
  • 415 -- Topics in Comparative Literary Relations. (3) Topics involving two or more national literatures. Topics to be announced in master schedule by suffix and title.
  • 499 -- Senior Thesis. (3)
  • 597 -- Comparative Studies in Film. {=FILM 597} (3) Topics in film from an international perspective. National cinematic traditions are compared and contrasted.

Foreign Languages (FORL)

  • 398 -- Selected Topics. (3) Studies in language not otherwise taught. May include a cultural and/or linguistic component.
  • 448 -- Teaching Internship in Foreign Languages. {=EDTE 448} (3) (Prereq: admission to the professional program in education) Application of effective teaching techniques and organization of instructional settings in foreign languages for k-12.
  • 472 -- Introduction to Technology in Language Education. {=LING 472} (3) (Prereq: FORL 511) Acquaints students with principles and practices concerning the use of technology in foreign language teaching. Explores connection between second language acquisition and the implementation of Internet and multimedia technologies.
  • 474 -- Directed Teaching in Foreign Languages. {=EDSE 474} (12) (Prereq: admission to the professional program in education) Students apply methods of curriculum and assessment, professionalism, effective teaching, and organization of instructional settings during internship in foreign language classroom.
  • 501 -- Spanish for Medical Personnel. (3) (Prereq: 2 semesters of college-level Spanish or equivalent) Basic course in health professions. Functional language and lexicon as well as cultural practices for interaction with Hispanic clients.
  • 510 -- Teaching Second Languages to Young Children. {=EDEL 510} (3) (Prereq: 210 level of a foreign language or its equivalent) To assist prospective teachers of young children in the development of a second language and multicultural learning activities. Practicum sessions are an integral part.
  • 511 -- Teaching Foreign Languages in Secondary Schools. {=EDSE 575} (3) Current methods, techniques, and materials of instruction appropriate for secondary schools.
  • 598 -- Topics in World Film. {=FILM 598} (3) Intensive study of a specific topic concerning films produced in a country other than the United States. Course content varies and will be announced in the schedule of courses by suffix and title.

French (FREN)

  • 109 -- Beginning French I. (3) Introduction to grammar and practical vocabulary necessary for fundamental communication skills. Admission to 109 restricted to those who have never studied French, who have not studied French in the previous five years, or who have a score of F-1 on the placement test.
  • 110 -- Beginning French II. (3) Introduction to grammar and practical vocabulary necessary for fundamental communication skills. Admission to 110 restricted to those who have completed FREN 109. Credit may be received only for one of the following: 109/110 or 121.
  • 121 -- Elementary French. (4) Grammar and vocabulary necessary for fundamental communication skills. Assumes prior experience in French. Admission to 121 restricted to those who have a score of F-2 on the placement test. Credit may be received for only one of the following: 109/110 or 121.
  • 122 -- Basic Proficiency in French. (3) Practice and further development of essential listening, reading, speaking, and writing skills. Admission either by placement score of F-3 or by successful completion of FREN 110 or 121.
  • 209 -- Reading and Written Expression. (3) (Prereq: FREN 122 or score of F-5 on placement exam) Readings in French; grammar, basic writing, and composition.
  • 210 -- Oral Communication. (3) (Prereq: FREN 122 or score of F-5 on placement exam) Practice in conversation involving authentic listening materials; vocabulary building.
  • 290 -- French Literature in Translation. (3) Readings and discussion in English, with consideration of the cultural context.
  • 295 -- Topics in French Culture. (3) (Prereq: FREN 110, 121, or equivalent) Intensive one-term study of a particular topic identified by suffix and title. Taught in English.
  • 300 -- French Phonetics. (3) Analysis of and practice in pronunciation and listening comprehension.
  • 307 -- Advanced Oral Practice. (1) (Prereq: FREN 210 or equivalent; FREN 209 recommended; recommended prereq for or coreq with FREN 310) Development and maintenance of speaking and listening skills at the advanced level. Offered Pass-Fail only. May be repeated.
  • 309 -- Reading French Texts. (3) (Prereq: FREN 209 or equivalent; FREN 210 strongly recommended) Reading, discussion, and written analysis of French texts, both literary and nonliterary.
  • 310 -- Advanced Oral Communication. (3) (Prereq: FREN 209 and 210 or equivalent; FREN 307 strongly recommended) Current issues and events presented in French-language media. Discussion and presentations in French provide practice with advanced structures and idiomatic speech.
  • 311 -- French Composition. (3) (Prereq: FREN 209 or equivalent; FREN 210 strongly recommended) Practice in French composition; intensive review of French grammar.
  • 315 -- Intensive Readings in French. (3) Graduate students fulfill their foreign-language reading requirement with successful completion of the course. Undergraduates may take the course as an elective only. Grades S/U for graduates and undergraduates.
  • 316 -- Introduction to Business French. (3) (Prereq: FREN 311 or consent of instructor) Practical oral and written communication in a commercial context; introduction to business terminology and correspondence.
  • 330 -- The French Theatre Experience. (3) (Prereq: FREN 122 and consent of instructor) Project work in the production of plays in the French language. Includes readings in French theatre and related materials. May be repeated once on a Pass-Fail basis for free elective credit.
  • 350 -- French Language Study in France. (1-6) Intensive language practice with special attention to oral skills. Classroom instruction by native speakers.
  • 397 -- The French Film Experience. (3) An introduction to the history of the French film, with special emphasis on the aesthetic appreciation of the films in their artistic and cultural context. Films in French, with English subtitles. Taught in English.
  • 399 -- Independent Study. (3-6) Contract approved by instructor, advisor, and department chair is required for undergraduate students.
  • 400 -- La Civilisation française. (3) (Prereq: FREN 309, 310; FREN 311 recommended) French history and the arts from early times through the Napoleonic era.
  • 416 -- Advanced Business French. (3) (Prereq: FREN 316 or consent of instructor) Commercial organizations and businesses in France. Practical business correspondence. Terminology and techniques in commercial transactions with the Certificat Pratique of the Paris Chamber of Commerce in view. Taught in French.
  • 450 -- Topics in Literature. (3) (Prereq: FREN 309, 310, and 311, or equivalent) May be repeated for credit.
  • 451 -- French Literature and Culture Before 1800. (3) (Prereq: FREN 309, 310, and 311, or equivalent) Study and discussion of French works written before 1800 within their cultural and historical contexts.
  • 452 -- French Literature and Culture After 1800. (3) (Prereq: FREN 309, 310, and 311, or equivalent) Study and discussion of French works written after 1800 within their cultural and historical contexts.
  • 453 -- Francophone Literatures and Cultures. (3) (Prereq: FREN 309, 310, and 311, or equivalent) Study and discussion of works from French-speaking societies outside France, with attention to their cultural contexts and historical contexts.
  • 499 -- Senior Thesis. (3)
  • 501 -- La France Contemporaine. (3) (Prereq: FREN 310 and 311 or equivalent) Readings in and discussion of the culture of contemporary France.
  • 510 -- L'Actualité Francaise. (3) (Prereq: FREN 310 or permission of instructor) Development of advanced oral skills in French. Study of linguistic and cultural aspects of French-language media.
  • 511 -- Techniques of Literary Analysis. (3) Texts from standard authors, with emphasis on explication de texte.
  • 515 -- Advanced French Stylistics. (3) Practice in descriptive and narrative composition with special attention to contrastive stylistics; thème et version.
  • 516 -- French Phonology. {=LING 512} (3) The sound system and its functioning in the morphological system of French from the point of view of current phonological theory.
  • 517 -- French Linguistics. {=LING 502} (3) The structure, morphology, and syntax of modern French.
  • 595 -- Selected Topics in French. (3) Poetry, prose, theatre, cinema, civilization, language, linguistics. May be repeated.

German (GERM)

  • 109 -- Beginning German. (3) Introduction to grammar and practical vocabulary necessary for fundamental communication skills. (Admission to 109 restricted to those who have never studied German previously or who have placed by examination into 109; admission to 110 restricted to those who have completed GERM 109. Credit may be received only for one of the following: 109/110; 111; 121.)
  • 110 -- Beginning German. (3) Introduction to grammar and practical vocabulary necessary for fundamental communication skills. (Admission to 109 restricted to those who have never studied German previously or who have placed by examination into 109; admission to 110 restricted to those who have completed GERM 109. Credit may be received only for one of the following: 109/110; 111; 121.)
  • 111 -- Intensive Beginning German. (6) Intensive introduction to grammar and practical vocabulary necessary for fundamental communication skills. Admission only to highly motivated beginning students who obtain permission of the department. Equivalent to 109 and 110. Credit may be received only for one of the following: 109/110; 111; 121.
  • 121 -- Elementary German. (4) Grammar and vocabulary necessary for fundamental communication skills. Assumes prior experience in German. Admission only by proficiency examination. Credit may be received for only one of the following: 110; 111; or 121.
  • 122 -- Basic Proficiency in German. (3) Practice and further development of essential listening, reading, speaking, and writing skills. Admission either by placement examination or successful completion of GERM 110, 111, or 121. Offered each semester.
  • 210 -- Intermediate German. (3) (Prereq: GERM 122, or satisfactory score on Basic Proficiency Phase II placement test) Further development of listening, reading, speaking, and writing skills; discussion of selected literary texts, and current issues; intensive review of basic grammar structures.
  • 211 -- Intermediate German. (3) (Prereq: GERM 122, or satisfactory score on Basic Proficiency Phase II placement test; can be taken before, or simultaneously with 210 with consent of instructor) Reading strategies, a review, and expansion of grammar structures, supplemented with materials concerning current issues.
  • 216 -- German for Business and Other Professions through the Internet. (3) (Prereq: GERM 210 or 211, or consent of instructor) Development, through use of the Internet, of basic language skills and cultural understanding necessary to function in the professional world in German-speaking countries.
  • 280 -- German Culture and Civilization. (3) Survey of German literature, culture, and heritage from the Middle Ages to the present. Taught in English.
  • 310 -- German Conversation. (3) (Prereq: GERM 210 and 211, or consent of instructor) Continued practice in the four skills with focus on a selected aspect of German culture and society.
  • 311 -- German Conversation and Composition. (3) (Prereq: GERM 210 and 211, or consent of instructor) Continued practice in the four skills with emphasis on developing writing skills and with focus on a specific aspect of German culture.
  • 315 -- Intensive Readings in German. (3) Intensive reading for non-majors. Graduate students fulfill their foreign-language requirement with successful completion of the course. Undergraduates may take the course as an elective only. Grades S/U for graduates and undergraduates.
  • 316 -- Advanced German for Business and Other Professions I. (3) (Prereq: GERM 216 or consent of instructor) Development of advanced language and cultural skills necessary for functioning in the professional world of German-speaking countries.
  • 320 -- German Kabarett Production. (3) (Prereq: GERM 310 or consent of instructor) Literary-historical analysis and discussion of texts from German Kabarett, including comedic skits, political and social satire, parody, humorous poetry. Semester ends with a public performance in German.
  • 333 -- Study of German Abroad. (3-6) (Prereq: consent of instructor) Intensive language practice and cultural studies. May be repeated for credit by permission.
  • 340 -- Readings in German Literature. (3) (Prereq: GERM 310 and 311 or consent of instructor) An introduction to the literary genres illustrated by masterpieces in German poetry, drama, and prose.
  • 398 -- Selected Topics. (3) Taught in English. Intensive study of cultural and/or literary movements in German-speaking countries. Course content varies by suffix.
  • 399 -- Independent Study. (1-6) Contract approved by instructor, advisor, and department chair is required for undergraduate students.
  • 401 -- Teaching German to Young Children. (1) (Prereq: must be concurrently enrolled in GERM 210 or higher and GERM 401P) Introduction to the principles of foreign language instruction in elementary school.
  • 401P -- Practicum in Teaching German to Young Children. (2) (Prereq: must be concurrently enrolled in GERM 210 or higher and GERM 401) Field experience planning instruction and teaching German to young children ages 2-10 in local elementary schools.
  • 410 -- Advanced German Grammar. (3) (Prereq: GERM 310 and 311, or equivalent course work) Emphasis on advanced grammar structures, with continued development of all four skills (reading, writing, listening, speaking).
  • 411 -- Advanced Language Practice in German. (3) (Prereq: GERM 310 and 311, or consent of instructor) Advanced practice in correct spoken idiomatic German with special focus on issues of the 20th century and contemporary culture.
  • 416 -- Advanced German for Business and Other Professions II. (3) (Prereq: GERM 316 or consent of instructor) Development of advanced language and cultural skills necessary for functioning in the professional world of German-speaking countries. Preparation for standardized exams.
  • 420 -- German Literature and Culture of the Middle Ages and Early Modern Period. (3) (Prereq: GERM 340 or consent of instructor) Survey of the significant aspects of German literature and culture from 750 to 1700.
  • 430 -- The Age of Goethe. (3) (Prereq: GERM 340, or consent of instructor) Major works by Goethe and Schiller with emphasis on Faust.
  • 440 -- German Literature and Culture of the 19th Century. (3) (Prereq: GERM 340, or consent of instructor) Literature and culture of the 19th century until 1890, including Romanticism, Biedermeier, and Realism.
  • 450 -- German Literature from 1890-1945. (3) (Prereq: GERM 340, or consent of instructor) German literary, cultural, and intellectual developments from 1890 to 1945, including Expressionism, Weimar Republic, the Third Reich, and exile period.
  • 460 -- Post-War and Contemporary German Literature. (3) (Prereq: GERM 340, or consent of instructor) German literary, cultural and political developments from Post-War destruction and reconstruction, through the Cold War period of division, with examination of the reunification process.
  • 500 -- Survey of German Culture. (3) (Prereq: advanced reading ability in German) Historical survey of the German contribution to the intellectual and cultural life of Europe. Texts and films in German.
  • 515 -- Introduction to German Linguistics. {=LING 503} (3) (Prereq: consent of instructor) Structural and descriptive linguistics applied to the German language.
  • 580 -- Topics in German Film. (3) Examination of recurring themes and issues or of significant periods and influential styles in German film. Course content varies and individual topics will be announced with course suffix and title.
  • 598 -- Selected Topics in German. (3) (Prereq: consent of instructor)

Greek (GREK)

  • 121 -- Elementary Ancient Greek I. (4) Basic grammar and vocabulary necessary for reading Classical and Koine Greek. Assumes no prior experience in the language.
  • 122 -- Elementary Ancient Greek II. (4) Additional grammar and vocabulary necessary for reading Classical and Koine Greek. Admission only by successful completion of Greek 121.
  • 305 -- The Greek New Testament. (3) (Prereq: GREK 121, 122) Readings in the Gospels and Epistles.
  • 314 -- Intensive Grammar Review of Ancient Attic Greek. (3) Intensive review for nonmajors designed to prepare them for GREK 315.
  • 315 -- Intensive Readings in Ancient Attic Greek. (3) (Prereq: GREK 314) Intensive reading for nonmajors. A review of grammar and syntax with reading of passages from Plato’s Apology. Primarily for graduate students to fulfill the foreign-language reading requirement. Grades of S/U for graduates and undergraduates. Pass/Fail grading.
  • 321 -- Plato. (3) (Prereq: GREK 121, 122) The life of Socrates based on the reading of Plato's Apology and Crito in Greek. Supplementary reading in English from Xenophon's Memorabilia and Aristophanes' Clouds.
  • 322 -- Homer. (3) (Prereq: GREK 121, 122) Readings from the Iliad and the Odyssey in Greek. Discussion of the language, background, and composition of the poems.
  • 399 -- Independent Study. (3-6) Contract approved by instructor, advisor, and department chair is required for undergraduate students.
  • 501 -- Herodotus. (3) Readings from the Histories.
  • 502 -- Thucydides. (3) Readings from the History of the Peloponnesian War.
  • 533 -- Sophocles. (3) Selected plays.
  • 534 -- Euripides. (3) Selected plays.
  • 543 -- Hesiod and the Homeric Hymns. (3) Readings from the Works and Days, the Theogony, and the Homeric Hymns.
  • 550 -- Greek Seminar. (3) Authors and topics not covered in other Greek language courses, chosen to meet the needs of individual students. May be repeated with the approval of the department.
  • 560 -- Independent Study. (3) (Prereq: permission of head of department) Special projects for independent study and research.
  • 561 -- Independent Study. (3) (Prereq: permission of head of department) Special projects for independent study and research.

Hebrew (HEBR)

  • 121 -- Elementary Hebrew. (4) Grammar and practical vocabulary for fundamental communication skills. Assumes no prior experience in the language. Offered only in fall.
  • 122 -- Basic Proficiency in Hebrew. (4) Practice and further development of essential listening, reading, speaking, and writing skills. Admission only by successful completion of Hebrew 121. Offered only in spring.
  • 201 -- Intermediate Hebrew. (3) Review of the basic principles of grammar, with emphasis on reading, oral skills, and writing.
  • 202 -- Intermediate Hebrew. (3) Review of the basic principles of grammar, with emphasis on reading, oral skills, and writing.
  • 310 -- Conversation and Composition. (3) (Prereq: HEBR 202 or equivalent) Practical training in the spoken and written language.
  • 398 -- Selected Topics. (3) Intensive study in selected and cultural topics related to Judaism. May be repeated for credit under different suffix. Taught in English.
  • 399 -- Independent Study. (3-6) Contract approved by instructor, advisor, and department chair is required for undergraduate students.

Italian (ITAL)

  • 101 -- Basic Italian Language Study Abroad. (3) Basic language practice, emphasizing oral skills. Classroom instruction by native speakers, contact with community members, and field trips. Not applicable to foreign language requirement.
  • 121 -- Elementary Italian. (4) Grammar and practical vocabulary necessary for fundamental communication skills. Features BBC television course. Assumes no prior experience in the language. Offered only in fall.
  • 122 -- Basic Proficiency in Italian. (3) (Prereq: ITAL 121) Practice and further development of essential listening, reading, speaking, and writing skills. Offered in spring.
  • 221 -- Intermediate Proficiency in Italian I. (3) (Prereq: ITAL 122) Practice and rapid development of accurate skills in speaking, listening, reading and writing. Features BBC television course. Offered only in the fall.
  • 222 -- Intermediate Proficiency in Italian II. (3) (Prereq: ITAL 221) Practice and further rapid development of accurate skills in speaking, listening, reading and writing. Features BBC television course. Offered only in the spring.
  • 309 -- Vocabulary Building in Italian. (3) (Prereq: ITAL 222) Study of bilingual dictionaries, Italian cognates of English words, and false cognates for the purpose of readily increasing active vocabulary.
  • 310 -- Italian Conversation. (3) Oral practice with advanced protocols of Italian conversation, focusing on perfecting rhythms and tonalities, and on a clear presentation of meaning.
  • 311 -- Writing in Italian. (3) (Prereq: ITAL 222) Introduction to letter, short essay, and creative writing, and to newspaper reports and selected essays as models of self-expression.
  • 312 -- Italian-English Translation Skills. (3) (Prereq: ITAL 222) Develops the ability to translate a wide variety of Italian tests into English and exposes the student to personal and institutional styles used by Italians.
  • 315 -- Intensive Readings in Italian. (3) Graduate students fulfill their foreign language reading requirement with successful completion of the course. Undergraduates may take the course as an elective only. Grades of S/U for graduates and undergraduates.
  • 350 -- Advanced Italian Study Abroad. (3-6) (Prereq: ITAL 122, or consent of the instructor) Intensive language practice, emphasizing oral proficiency skills and advanced conversational protocols. Classroom instruction by native speakers, extensive contact with native environment, field trips. May be repeated for credit by permission.
  • 398 -- Selected Topics. (3) Intensive study of selected literary and cinematic topics of the Italian world. May be repeated for credit under different suffix. Taught in English.
  • 399 -- Independent Study. (3-6) Contract approved by instructor, advisor and department chair is required for undergraduate students.
  • 400 -- Contemporary Italian Civilization. (3) (Prereq: ITAL 310 and 311, or 350 with instructor's permission) Significant values in the Italian cultural heritage, as presented in native print and visual media.
  • 404 -- Twentieth Century Italian Literature. (3) (Prereq: ITAL 310 and 311, or 350 with instructor's permission) Selected plays, short stories, novels and poems which characterize quality achievements by Italians, and which promote a better understanding of Italian life.
  • 405 -- The Italian Love Lyric. (3) (Prereq: ITAL 310 and 311, or 350 with instructor's permission) Italian love poetry, beginning with the "Dolce Stil Nuovo" of the late Middle Ages and ending with post-WWII avant-garde poetry.
  • 406 -- Business Readings in Italian. (3) (Prereq: ITAL 310, 311, and 312, or 350 with instructor's permission) Selected literature from the Italian business world, such as correspondence, brochures, specialized newspapers and magazines, biographies of businessmen, prospectuses, and annual reports.
  • 407 -- Advanced Conversation and Composition. (3) (Prereq: ITAL 310 and 311, or 350 with instructor's permission) Prepares students for making lengthy formal reports in Italian, both written and oral, on topics of importance for success within an Italian environment.
  • 411 -- Italian Literature in Translation. (3) Italian writers, focusing on the works of Dante, Petrarch, and Boccaccio, with additional selections from later authors.
  • 412 -- Post-World War II Italian Cinema. (3) Italian films of high esthetic value that present major cultural concerns of post-WWII Italians. Skills in film criticism and analysis. Films are subtitled. Taught in English.
  • 499 -- Senior Project. (3-6) (Prereq: consent of instructor) Directed independent research project, with a formal presentation and public discussion.
  • 516 -- Practical Italian Phonetics. (3) Synchronic analysis of the Italian sound system; intensive exercises to perfect Italian pronunciation.
  • 560 -- Independent Studies in Italian Literature. (3) (Prereq: permission of head of department) Special topics in Italian literature.
  • 561 -- Independent Studies in Italian Literature. (3) (Prereq: permission of head of department) Special topics in Italian literature.

Japanese (JAPA)

  • 121 -- Elementary Japanese. (4) Grammar and practical vocabulary necessary for fundamental communication skills. Assumes no prior experience in the language. Offered only in fall.
  • 122 -- Basic Proficiency in Japanese. (4) Practice and further development of essential listening, reading, speaking, and writing skills. Admission only by successful completion of Japanese 121. Offered only in spring.
  • 123 -- Accelerated Introductory Japanese. (8) Intensive introduction to grammar and practical vocabulary necessary for fundamental listening, reading, speaking, and writing skills. Admission only to highly motivated students who obtain the permission of the department. Equivalent to 121 and 122. Offered only in the summer.
  • 221 -- Intermediate Japanese I. (3) (Prereq: JAPA 122 or 123) Review and continuation of fundamentals of the language; development of oral and reading skills.
  • 222 -- Intermediate Japanese II. (3) (Prereq: JAPA 221) Review and continuation of fundamentals of the language; development of written and oral expression.
  • 223 -- Accelerated Intermediate Japanese. (6) (Prereq: JAPA 122 or 123, or consent of instructor) Intensive intermediate language practice emphasizing oral communication. Admission only to highly motivated students who obtain permission of the department; credit not awarded for both JAPA 223 and 221-222. Offered only in the summer.
  • 240 -- Introduction to Japanese Culture. (3) Introduction to Japanese culture through an examination of cultural elements such as traditions, arts, history, geography, people, society, and religion. Taught in English.
  • 321 -- Advanced Japanese I. (3) (Prereq: JAPA 222 or 223, or consent of instructor) Improvement of skills in conversation and composition; advanced reading in modern Japanese materials.
  • 322 -- Advanced Japanese II. (3) (Prereq: JAPA 321) Continuation of 321, with emphasis on strengthening proficiency in the use of Kanji.
  • 323 -- Accelerated Advanced Japanese. (6) (Prereq: JAPA 222 or 223, or consent of instructor) Intensive advanced language practice of modern spoken Japanese. Admission only to highly motivated students who obtain permission of the department; credit not awarded for both JAPA 323 and 321-322; offered only in the summer.
  • 331 -- Japanese for Business I. (3) (Prereq: JAPA 222 or 223, or consent of instructor) Development of language skills specific to the Japanese business world and its practices.
  • 332 -- Japanese for Business II. (3) (Prereq: JAPA 331) This is a continuation of JAPA 331.
  • 340 -- Introduction to Japanese Culture and Literature. (3) (Prereq: JAPA 222 or 223, or consent of instructor) Introduction to Japanese literature and its cultural background up to the modernization of Japan. Conducted in English, but some background of Japanese is required.
  • 341 -- Modern Japanese Literature. (3) (Prereq: JAPA 340 or consent of instructor) Survey of modern Japanese literature and its cultural background up to the present. Conducted in English, but some knowledge of Japanese is required.
  • 350 -- Japanese Culture and Society through Film. (3) Examination of Japanese culture and contemporary society using selected films. Taught in English.
  • 351 -- Japanese Culture and Society through Theatre. {=THSP 369} (3) Introduction to Japanese traditional theatre and its influences on Japanese culture and society. Taught in English.
  • 398 -- Selected Topics. (3) Intensive study of selected topics in Japanese literature and culture. May be repeated for credit under different suffix. Taught in English.
  • 399 -- Independent Study. (3-6) Contract approved by instructor, advisor, and department chair is required for undergraduate students.
  • 421 -- Advanced Japanese III. (3) (Prereq: JAPA 322, 323, or consent of instructor) Development of proficiency in speaking, reading, and writing through advanced studies of authentic Japanese materials.
  • 422 -- Advanced Japanese IV. (3) (Prereq: JAPA 421) Strengthening proficiency in writing and reading.
  • 500 -- Japanese Language in Society. {=LING 546} (3) Japanese language and communication in its sociocultural context; emphasis on comparison with American English. Taught in English.

Korean (KORE)

  • 121 -- Elementary Korean. (4) Grammar and practical vocabulary necessary for fundamental communication skills. Assumes no prior experience in the language.
  • 122 -- Basic Proficiency in Korean. (4) Practice and development of essential listening, reading, speaking, and writing skills. Admission only by successful completion of Korean 121.
  • 221 -- Intermediate Korean I. (3) (Prereq: KORE 122) Review and continuation of fundamentals of the language; development of oral and reading skills.
  • 222 -- Intermediate Korean II. (3) (Prereq: KORE 221) Increased emphasis on written and oral expression in Korean.

Latin (LATN)

  • 109 -- Beginning Latin I. (3) Introduction to grammar and practical vocabulary necessary for fundamental reading skills. Admission to 109 restricted to those who have never studied Latin, who have not studied Latin in the previous five years, or who have a score of L-1 on the placement test.
  • 110 -- Beginning Latin II. (3) Introduction to grammar and practical vocabulary necessary for fundamental reading skills. Admission to 110 restricted to those who have completed LATN 109. Credit may not be received for both 109/110 and 121.
  • 121 -- Elementary Latin. (4) Grammar and vocabulary necessary for fundamental reading skills. Assumes prior experience in Latin. Admission only by proficiency examination. Credit may be received for only one of the following: 109/110 or 121.
  • 122 -- Basic Proficiency in Latin. (3) Practice and further development of essential reading skills. Admission either by placement score of L-3 or successful completion of LATN 110 or 121.
  • 301 -- Advanced Readings in Latin Literature. (3) A survey of Latin literature designed for the student who wishes to develop a major or cognate in Latin. Admission either by placement score of L-5 or completion of LATN 122.
  • 314 -- Intensive Grammar Review in Latin. (3) Intensive grammar review for non-majors; designed as preparation for LATN 315.
  • 315 -- Intensive Readings in Latin. (3) Intensive reading for non-majors. Graduate students fulfill their foreign-language reading requirement with successful completion of the course. Undergraduates may take the course as an elective only. Grades S/U for graduates and undergraduates.
  • 321 -- Virgil. (3) Readings from the Aeneid.
  • 322 -- Latin Literature of the Golden Age. (3) Selected readings in prose and poetry of representative authors.
  • 342 -- Latin Composition. (3) A study of Latin syntax in order to translate English prose into Latin. Instruction is individualized.
  • 399 -- Independent Study. (3-6) Contract approved by instructor, advisor, and department chair is required for undergraduate students.
  • 501 -- Latin Drama. (3) Selected plays of Plautus and Terence.
  • 502 -- Cicero. (3) Readings from a variety of Cicero's works to gain a concept of the man as a humanist.
  • 504 -- Horace. (3) Readings from the Odes.
  • 508 -- Ovid. (3) Selected readings from the Metamorphoses.
  • 513 -- Tacitus. (3) Agricola or selections from the Annales.
  • 514 -- Livy. (3) Readings from Ab Urbe Condita.
  • 525 -- Roman Satire. (3) Readings in Horace, Juvenal, and Petronius.
  • 530 -- Latin Erotic Poetry. (3) Readings from the elegies of Catullus, Tibullus, Propertius, and Ovid.
  • 537 -- Lucretius. (3) Readings from the De Rerum Natura.
  • 551 -- History of Latin Literature from the Origins to the Golden Age. (3) Readings from the Twelve Tables to Virgil, supplemented by readings in history and scholarship. Designed to prepare majors and honors students for further study.
  • 552 -- History of Latin Literature in the Silver Age. (3) Readings from Ovid to Ammianus, supplemented by readings in history and scholarship. Designed to prepare majors and honors students for further study.
  • 560 -- Independent Study. (1-3) (Prereq: permission of head of department) Special projects for independent study and research.
  • 561 -- Independent Study. (1-3) (Prereq: permission of head of department) Special projects for independent study and research.
  • 575 -- Teaching Latin in Secondary Schools. {=EDSE 577} (3) Current methods, techniques, and materials of instruction appropriate for secondary schools.
  • 580 -- Teaching Advanced Latin in Secondary School. {=EDSE 580} (3) (Prereq: permission of instructor) Methods and materials for teaching the Latin Advanced Placement courses in secondary school.

Portuguese (PORT)

  • 121 -- Elementary Portuguese. (4) Grammar and practical vocabulary necessary for fundamental communication skills. Assumes no prior experience in the language.
  • 122 -- Basic Proficiency in Portuguese. (3) Practice and further development of essential listening, reading, speaking, and writing skills. Admission only by successful completion of Portuguese 121.
  • 201 -- Intermediate Portuguese. (3) (Prereq: permission of Portuguese instructor) Review of the basic principles of grammar with additional emphasis on reading and oral skills.
  • 202 -- Intermediate Portuguese. (3) (Prereq: PORT 201 or equivalent) Review of the basic principles of grammar with additional emphasis on reading and oral skills.
  • 301 -- Cultural Manifestations in Modern Brazil. (3) Examination of representative works of literature, the visual arts, dance, music and crafts in order to build an image of Brazil today, with emphasis on popular culture.
  • 309 -- Advanced Conversation and Composition. (3) (Prereq: PORT 202 or equivalent) Conversational and compositional skills through systematic grammar study and review, text, reading, and oral activities.
  • 315 -- Intensive Readings in Portuguese. (3) Intensive reading for non-majors. Graduate students fulfill their foreign-language reading requirements with successful completion of the course. Undergraduates may take the course as an elective only. Grades S/U for graduates and undergraduates.
  • 325 -- The Brazilian Modern Short Story. (3) (Prereq: PORT 202 or equivalent) Examination of Brazilian short fiction and cronicas (literary journalistic pieces).
  • 398 -- Selected Portuguese Topics. (1-3) Intensive study of selected topics. May be repeated for credit under different suffix. Taught in English. Individual topics to be announced under suffix and title.
  • 399 -- Independent Study. (3-6) Contract approved by instructor, advisor, and department chair is required for undergraduate students.

Russian (RUSS)

Note: See also related courses in Russian literature under comparative literature.
  • 121 -- Elementary Russian. (4) Grammar and practical vocabulary necessary for fundamental communication skills. Assumes no prior experience in the language.
  • 122 -- Basic Proficiency in Russian. (4) (Prereq: RUSS 121) Practice and further development of essential listening, reading, speaking, and writing skills.
  • 201 -- Intermediate Russian I. (3) (Prereq: RUSS 122 or satisfactory score on language placement test) Continued exposure to the fundamentals of Russian grammar, along with increased focus on reading and speaking skills.
  • 202 -- Intermediate Russian II. (3) (Prereq: RUSS 201 or satisfactory score on language placement test) Completion of exposure to the fundamentals of Russian grammar, with emphasis on writing, reading, and conversation.
  • 280 -- Introduction to Russian Civilization. (3) A multimedia introduction to Russian culture from its beginnings to the present. No knowledge of Russian required.
  • 298 -- Selected Topics. (1-3) Introductory-level study of selected topics in Russian culture. Does not apply toward the Russian major. May be repeated for credit under a different suffix.
  • 301 -- Russian Conversation and Composition I. (3) (Prereq: RUSS 202 or satisfactory score on language placement test) Conversation, reading, composition, comprehensive review of grammar.
  • 302 -- Russian Conversation and Composition II. (3) (Prereq: RUSS 301 or satisfactory score on language placement test) Emphasis on oral proficiency, using contemporary authentic materials from Russian newspapers, textbooks, and television newscasts.
  • 315 -- Intensive Readings in Russian. (3) (Prereq: RUSS 316 must be preceded by Russian 315) Intensive reading course for non-majors, designed for preparation for reading knowledge examinations for higher degrees. May be taken by graduate students who will fulfill their language requirement by obtaining a grade of S (satisfactory) on the course. May be taken also by undergraduates as an elective for letter grades A, B, etc.; it will not be applied toward the degree language requirements nor will it be accepted as a substitute in the course sequence leading to the various degree requirements.
  • 316 -- Intensive Readings in Russian. (3) (Prereq: RUSS 316 must be preceded by Russian 315) Intensive reading course for non-majors, designed for preparation for reading knowledge examinations for higher degrees. May be taken by graduate students who will fulfill their language requirement by obtaining a grade of S (satisfactory) on the course. May be taken also by undergraduates as an elective for letter grades A, B, etc.; it will not be applied toward the degree language requirements nor will it be accepted as a substitute in the course sequence leading to the various degree requirements.
  • 319 -- Nineteenth-Century Russian Literature in Translation. (3) Masterworks of Russian literature by Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Turgenev, Pushkin, Chekov, and others.
  • 319L -- Nineteenth-Century Russian Literature in Russian. (1) (Prereq: RUSS 302 or instructor's permission) A Russian-language course designed to supplement 319. Reading and discussion in Russian of 19th-century poetry and prose.
  • 320 -- Twentieth-Century Russian Literature in Translation. (3) Masterworks of Russian literature by Bely, Pasternak, Bulgakov, Nabokov, Solzhenitsyn, and others.
  • 320L -- Twentieth-Century Russian Literature in Russian. (1) A Russian-language course designed to supplement 320.
  • 398 -- Selected Topics. (3) Taught in English. Intensive study of selected topics in Russian cultural and/or literary movements. May be repeated for credit under a different suffix.
  • 399 -- Independent Study. (3-6) Contract approved by instructor, advisor, and department chair is required for undergraduate students.
  • 401 -- Advanced Russian I. (3) (Prereq: RUSS 302 or satisfactory score on language placement test) Acquisition of subtleties of Russian grammar. Increased focus on reading, writing, and discussion.
  • 402 -- Advanced Russian II. (3) (Prereq: RUSS 401 or satisfactory score on language placement test) Exposure to prose and poetry from a wide variety of sources and periods. Focus on oral proficiency, reading, comprehension, and writing.
  • 598 -- Selected Topics in Russian. (3) Reading and research on selected topics in Russian. Course content varies and will be announced in the schedule of courses by suffix and title.

Spanish (SPAN)

  • 109 -- Beginning Spanish I. (3) Introduction to grammar and practical vocabulary necessary for fundamental communication skills. Admission to 109 restricted to those who have never studied Spanish previously or who have placed by examination into 109; admission to 110 restricted to those who have completed SPAN 109. 109 offered in fall and summer I only; 110 in spring and summer II only. Credit may be received only for one of the following: 109/110; 111; or 121.
  • 110 -- Beginning Spanish II. (3) Introduction to grammar and practical vocabulary necessary for fundamental communication skills. Admission to 109 restricted to those who have never studied Spanish previously or who have placed by examination into 109; admission to 110 restricted to those who have completed SPAN 109. 109 offered in fall and summer I only; 110 in spring and summer II only. Credit may be received only for one of the following: 109/110; 111; or 121.
  • 111 -- Intensive Beginning Spanish. (6) Intensive introduction to grammar and practical vocabulary necessary for fundamental communication skills. Admission only to highly motivated beginning students who obtain the permission of the department. Equivalent to SPAN 109 and 110. Credit may be received only for one of the following: SPAN 109/110, 111, or 121.
  • 121 -- Elementary Spanish. (4) Grammar and vocabulary necessary for fundamental communication skills. Assumes prior experience in Spanish. Admission only by proficiency examination. Credit may be received for only one of the following: 110; 111; or 121.
  • 122 -- Basic Proficiency in Spanish. (3) Practice and further development of essential listening, reading, speaking, and writing skills. Admission either by placement examination or successful completion of SPAN 110, 111, or 121. Offered each semester.
  • 207 -- Intermediate Oral Practice. (1) (Prereq: SPAN 122) Development and maintenance of speaking and listening skills at the intermediate level. May be repeated once for credit.
  • 209 -- Intermediate Spanish I. (3) (Prereq: SPAN 122 or score on placement exam) Further development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Use of authentic cultural materials.
  • 210 -- Intermediate Spanish II. (3) (Prereq: SPAN 209 or permission of instructor) Continued development of the four skills practiced in SPAN 209.
  • 211 -- Intensive Intermediate Spanish. (6) (Prereq: SPAN 122 or placement at 209 level on Phase II placement exam) Further development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Designed for highly motivated students. Credit not awarded for both 209-210 and 211.
  • 220 -- Selected Works of Hispanic Literature in English Translation. (3) Selected major works, especially contemporary works, in all genres of Hispanic literature in English translation.
  • 300 -- Cultural Readings for Conversation. (3) (Prereq: SPAN 210 or 211 or by Phase II placement exam) Readings and discussion of topics affecting the Hispanic world. Emphasis on speaking and listening skills. Use of electronic media. Not open to native speakers.
  • 301 -- Service Learning in Spanish. (1-3) (Prereq: SPAN 210, special permission of department) Contract approved by instructor, director, and department chair required. May be repeated. Maximum of 3 hours may apply towards major or minor.
  • 305 -- Working with Hispanic Clients. {=LASP 305} (3) (Prereq: Placement at 300 level on Phase II placement exam, grade of B or better in SPAN 210 or 211, or consent of instructor. Department permission required for transfer students) Crosscultural approaches to interactions with persons of Hispanic origin in a variety of professional settings. Readings, speakers, media. Taught in Spanish.
  • 307 -- Advanced Oral Practice. (1) (Prereq: Placement at 300 level on Phase II placement exam, grade of B or better in SPAN 210 or 211, or consent of instructor. Department permission required for transfer students.) Development and maintenance of speaking and listening skills at the advanced level. May be repeated once for credit.
  • 309 -- Advanced Spanish Language I. (3) (Prereq: Grade of B or better in SPAN 210 or 211, by Phase II placement exam,or consent of instructor. Department permission required for transfer students.) Advanced practice of listening, speaking, reading and writing skills.
  • 310 -- Advanced Spanish Language II. (3) (Prereq: SPAN 309, by Placement on Phase II placement exam or consent of instructor. Department permission required for transfer students.) Continuation of advanced practice of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills.
  • 311 -- Spanish for Heritage Speakers. (3) (Prereq: Placement by Phase II Exam or permission of instructor) Intensive grammar practice, enhancement of reading and writing skills for individuals raised in a Spanish-speaking household but with little or no formal Spanish instruction.
  • 312 -- Introduction to Reading Hispanic Literary Texts. (3) (Prereq: Placement at 300 level on Phase II placement exam, grade of C+ or better in SPAN 309, or consent of instructor. Department permission required for transfer students.) Approaches to reading literary texts through carefully selected readings from different genres.
  • 315 -- Intensive Readings in Spanish. (3) Intensive reading for non-majors. Graduate students fulfill their foreign language reading requirement with successful completion of the course. Undergraduates may take the course as an elective only. Grades S/U for graduates and undergraduates.
  • 316 -- Business Spanish. (3) (Prereq: Prereq: Placement at 300 level on Phase II placement exam, grade of C+ or better in SPAN 309, or consent of instructor. Department permission required for transfer students.) Commercial organizations and business in Spanish-speaking countries, business correspondence, terminology, and techniques in commercial transactions. Standardized examinations available such as the Certificado de la Camara de Comercio de Madrid.
  • 317 -- Spanish Phonetics and Pronunciation. {=LING 314} (3) (Prereq: placement at 300 level of Phase II placement exam, C+ or better in SPAN 309, or consent of instructor; department permission required for transfer students) Analysis of and practice in pronunciation, listening comprehension, and dialect recognition based on study of the speech sounds, combinations, patterns, and processes of Spanish phonetics and phonology.
  • 350 -- Spanish Language Study Abroad. (3) (Prereq: Placement at 300 level on Phase II placement exam, grade of B or better in SPAN 210 or 211, or consent of instructor. Department permission required for transfer students.) Intensive language practice in native environment with emphasis on oral skills. Instruction by native speakers; community contact and home stay. Prior placement test required. May be repeated once for credit.
  • 375 -- Topics in Hispanic Cultures and Literatures. (3) (Prereq: Placement at 300 level on Phase II placement exam, grade of B or better in SPAN 210 or 211, or consent of instructor. Department permission required for transfer students.) Course content varies and will be announced in the schedule of classes by suffix and title. May be repeated once for credit. Taught in Spanish.
  • 380 -- Hispanic Film and Culture. (3) A-Spanish Film; B-Spanish-American Film. (Prereq: Placement at 300 level on Phase II placement exam, grade of C+ or better in SPAN 309, or consent of instructor. Department permission required for transfer students.) Interpretation of contemporary Hispanic culture through selected Spanish or Spanish-American films.
  • 398 -- Selected Topics. (3) (Prereq: Placement at 300 level on Phase II placement exam, grade of B or better in SPAN 210 or 211, or consent of instructor. Department permission required for transfer students.) Intensive study of selected topics of the Hispanic world. May be repeated for credit under different suffix. Taught in English.
  • 399 -- Independent Study. (3-6) (Prereq: Placement at 300 level on Phase II placement exam, grade of B or better in SPAN 210 or 211, or consent of instructor. Department permission required for transfer students.) Contract approved by instructor, advisor, and department chair is required for undergraduate students.
  • 400 -- Spanish Civilization. (3) Lectures, readings, and visuals on selected topics of Spanish civilization and its cultural heritage.
  • 401 -- Spanish American Civilization. {=LASP 361} (3) Lectures, visuals, and readings on selected topics of Spanish American civilization and its cultural heritage.
  • 404 -- Literary Tendencies and Masterpieces of Spain. (3) (Prereq: SPAN 312 or consent of instructor) A survey of the masterworks and literary tendencies of Spain.
  • 405 -- Literary Tendencies and Masterpieces of Spanish America. {=LASP 371} (3) (Prereq: SPAN 312 or consent of instructor) A survey of the masterworks and literary tendencies of Spanish America.
  • 409 -- Introduction to Stylistics in Spanish. (3) (Prereq: SPAN 309 or consent of instructor) Written application of advanced Spanish structures and composition techniques; directed writing exercises based on model reading selections.
  • 410 -- Advanced Oral Communication for the Professions. (3) (Prereq: SPAN 309, 310) Designed to develop linguistic functions such as supporting opinions and hypothesizing, as well as communicative strategies and vocabulary that are essential to effective communication in Spanish in the workplace. Restricted to Students who have successfully completed 309-310 and/or have permission of instructor to enroll.
  • 417 -- Advanced Spanish for Business and the Professions. (3) (Prereq: SPAN 316 or consent of instructor) Vocabulary, concepts, and oral/written skills necessary to communicate effectively in the social, cultural, or economic infrastructure of Hispanic countries. Introduction to the use of technology for the acquisition and processing of materials relevant to students' professional goals.
  • 499 -- Senior Seminar. (3) (Prereq: senior status; 3.00 GPA; 18 hours of 300-level Spanish; or special permission) A special seminar devoted to the in-depth study of selected subjects in Hispanic literature, culture, or language. Required for the intensive major in Spanish.
  • 500 -- Contemporary Spain. (3) Analysis and discussion of 20th-century Spanish history and the sociocultural forces that have contributed to define this country's national identity. Taught in Spanish.
  • 501 -- Contemporary Spanish America. {=LASP 501} (3) Analysis and discussion of 20th-century Spanish American history and the sociocultural forces that have contributed to define this area's national identities. Taught in Spanish.
  • 512 -- Advanced Writing and Research in Spanish Language Studies. (3) Reading, writing, and research methodologies, bibliographic documentation, and research papers on Spanish language and Hispanic literatures. (Required of all M.A. and M.A.T. candidates in the first year of study.)
  • 513 -- Introduction to Professional and Technical Translation. (3) (Prereq: SPAN 409 or consent of instructor) Introduction to translation and practice of skills required for professional and technical Spanish/English translation.
  • 515 -- Introduction to Spanish Linguistics. {=LING 504} (3) Phonology, morphology, and syntax of modern Spanish.
  • 516 -- The Structure of Modern Spanish. [=LING 554] (3) Description of the grammatical structures of Modern Spanish. Intensive study of the theory and practice of word formation and sentence structure of Spanish.
  • 517 -- Contrastive English-Spanish Phonetics and Phonology. {=LING 514} (3) Introduction to the study of phonetics and phonology and their application to the sounds and sound systems of English and Spanish. Includes transcription practice and discussion of relevance to teaching.
  • 518 -- Introduction to Spanish Medieval Literature. (3) Survey of Spanish literature from its first manifestations to La Celestina. Introduction; early works; the epic; 13th- through 15th-century prose and verse; Berceo, Alfonso X, Juan Ruiz, Marques de Santillana; others.
  • 524 -- Renaissance and Golden Age Literature. (3) Survey of the works of Garcilaso, the Spanish mystics, Lope, Quevedo, Tirso, Calderon, Gongora and others.
  • 534 -- Nineteenth-Century Spanish Literature. (3) Survey of the works of the major literary figures of the period.
  • 538 -- Twentieth-Century Spanish Literature. (3) Survey of major peninsular writers from the Generation of '98 to the present.
  • 541 -- Colonial Spanish-American Literature to Neoclassicism. {=LASP 541} (3) Survey of pre-Columbian poetry and of texts dating from the time of Columbus to the end of the Colonial period.
  • 543 -- Spanish-American Literature from the Independence Through Modernism. (3) Survey of the most significant works of the Independence through Modernism.
  • 550 -- Advanced Language Study Abroad. (3) Intensive language practice in native environment with special emphasis on oral skills. Instruction by native speakers; extensive community contact and home stay. Prior placement test required.
  • 555 -- Spanish-American Literature from Modernism Through 1960. (3) Survey of the most significant works of this period.
  • 557 -- Contemporary Spanish-American Literature. (3) Survey of the most significant works from 1960 to the present.

Swahili (SWAH)

  • 121 -- Elementary Swahili. (4) Grammar and practical vocabulary necessary for fundamental communication skills. Assumes no prior experience in the language. Offered only in fall.
  • 122 -- Basic Proficiency in Swahili. (3) (Prereq: SWAH 121) Practice and further development of essential listening, reading, speaking, and writing skills. Offered in spring and summer II semesters.
  • 201 -- Intermediate Swahili. (3) Development of reading, speaking, listening, and writing skills; introduction of East African culture. 201 offered in fall, 202 offered in spring.
  • 202 -- Intermediate Swahili. (3) Development of reading, speaking, listening, and writing skills; introduction of East African culture. 201 offered in fall, 202 offered in spring.
  • 399 -- Independent Study. (3-6) Contract approved by instructor, advisor and department chair is required for undergraduate students.

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