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updated 5/20/2009

English Language and Literature

William Elbert Rivers, Interim Chair

Professors
Robert Brinkmeyer, Ph.D., University of North Carolina, 1980
David Cowart, Ph.D., Rutgers University, 1977, Louise Fry Scudder Professor
Kwame Senu Neville Dawes, Ph.D., University of New Brunswick, 1992, Louise Fry Scudder Professor
Stanley Dubinsky, Ph.D., Cornell University, 1985
Paula R. Feldman, Ph.D., Northwestern University, 1974, C. Wallace Martin Professor of English, Louise Fry Scudder Professor
William Price Fox, B.A., University of South Carolina, 1950, Writer-in-Residence
Scott Gwara, Ph.D., Center for Medieval Studies, University of Toronto, 1993
Janette Turner Hospital, M.A., Queens University, 1973, Carolina Distinguished Professor, Distinguished Writer-in-Residence
Dianne Johnson, Ph.D., Yale University, 1988
Steven W. Lynn, Ph.D., University of Texas, 1981, Louise Fry Scudder Professor
, Senior Associate Dean
David Lee Miller, Ph.D., University of California, Irvine, 1979
Lawrence Rhu, Ph.D., Harvard University, 1987, Graduate Director
Thomas J. Rice, Ph.D., Princeton University, 1971
William Elbert Rivers, Ph.D., University of North Carolina, 1976
, Interim Chair
Patrick Greig Scott, Ph.D., University of Edinburgh, 1976
David S. Shields, Ph.D., University of Chicago, 1982, McClintock Professor of Southern Letters
H. Meili Steele, Ph.D., University of North Carolina, 1984
Laura Dassow Walls, Ph.D., Indiana University, 1992

Associate Professors
Thorne Compton, Ph.D., University of South Carolina, 1974
Mark Garrett Cooper, Ph.D., Brown University, 1998
Susan Courtney, Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley, 1997, Film Studies Director
Cynthia Davis, Ph.D., Duke University, 1994
, Undergraduate Director
Fred Dings, M.F.A., University of Iowa; Ph.D., University of Utah, 1991
Dorothy Disterheft, Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles, 1977
Greg Forter, Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley, 1998
Christy Friend, Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin, 1997
Edward Gieskes, Ph.D., Boston University, 1999
Bernard E. Greer, M.A., Hollins College, 1973
Chris Holcomb, Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin, 1995
, First-Year English Director
Judith G. James, Ph.D., University of North Carolina, 1984
Tony Jarrells, Ph.D., State University of New York, Stony Brook, 2002
Nina S. Levine, Ph.D., Tulane University, 1991
Edward Madden, Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin, 1994
Esther Gilman Richey, Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles, 1990
Andrew Shifflett, Ph.D., Princeton University, 1993
Susan J. Vanderborg, Ph.D., Stanford University, 1996
Tracey Weldon, Ph.D., Ohio State University, 1998
Charles Wilbanks, Ph.D., University of Nebraska, 1982

Assistant Professors
Elise Blackwell, M.F.A., University of California, Irvine, 1990
Debra Rae Cohen, Ph.D., University of Mississippi, 2000
Holly Crocker, Ph.D., Vanderbilt University, 1999
Mindy Fenske, Ph.D., Louisiana State University, 2001
Pat J. Gehrke, Ph.D., Penn State University, 2003
Brian Glavey, Ph.D., University of Virginia, 2007
Leon Jackson, D.Phil., Oxford University, 1994
Catherine Keyser, Ph.D., Harvard University, 2007
John Mucklebauer, Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University, 2002, First-Year English Director
Kristan Poirot, Ph.D., University of Georgia, 2004
Tara Powell, Ph.D., University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, 2004
Barbara Schulz, Ph.D., University of Hawaii, forthcoming
Daniel Smith, Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University, 2004
Rebecca Stern, Ph.D., Rice University, 1997
Shevaun Watson, Ph.D., Miami University, 2004
Qiana Whitted, Ph.D., Yale University, 2003

Distinguished Faculty Emeriti
Samuel Ashley Brown, Ph.D., Vanderbilt University, 1958
Matthew J. Bruccoli, Ph.D., University of Virginia, 1960, Emily Brown Jeffries Professor
Carol Jones Carlisle, Ph.D., University of North Carolina, 1951
Benjamin Franklin V, Ph.D., Ohio University, 1969
George L. Geckle III, Ph.D., University of Virginia, 1965
Donald J. Greiner, Ph.D., University of Virginia, 1967
Ina Rae Hark, Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles, 1975
Jeffrey A. Helterman, Ph.D., University of Rochester, 1969
Trevor H. Howard-Hill, Ph.D., Victoria University, 1960; D.Phil., Oxford University, 1971
Joseph Katz, Ph.D., Indiana University, 1967
Carol McGinnis Kay, Ph.D., University of Tennessee, 1967
John Lansing Kimmey, Ph.D., Columbia University, 1955
John MacNicholas, Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin, 1973
Carolyn B. Matalene, Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1968
William B. McColly, Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles, 1958
James B. Meriwether, Ph.D., Princeton University, 1958
Michael B. Montgomery, Ph.D., University of Florida, 1979
Carol Myers-Scotton, Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, Madison, 1967
Joel A. Myerson, Ph.D., Northwestern University, 1971
Ennis Samuel Rees, Ph.D., Harvard University, 1951
Philip B. Rollinson, Ph.D., University of Virginia, 1968
G. Ross Roy, D.U., University of Paris, 1958; Ph.D., University of Montreal, 1959
Donald T. Siebert, Ph.D., University of Virginia, 1972
Mary Ann Wimsatt, Ph.D., Duke University, 1964

Faculty Emeriti
Mary Anderson, Ph.D., University of South Carolina, 1966
Jack Dillard Ashley, Ph.D., Vanderbilt University, 1960
Edward H. Bodie, M.A., University of South Carolina, 1960
Christopher C. Brown, Ph.D., Duke University, 1977
Abner Keen Butterworth, Ph.D., University of South Carolina, 1970
David Byrd, Ph.D., University of South Carolina, 1965
William Henry Castles Jr., Ph.D., University of Tennessee, 1962
Bert Dillon, Ph.D., Duke University, 1972
Phyllis F. Fleishel, M.A., University of South Carolina, 1961
Greta D. Little, Ph.D., University of North Carolina, 1974
Henry W. Matalene III, Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1970
Joseph Bernard Ower, Ph.D., University of Alberta, 1972
Bruce L. Pearson, Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles, 1972
William B. Thesing, Ph.D., Indiana University, 1977
Nancy Thompson, Ph.D., Arizona State University, 1975
Harriett Schneider Williams, Ph.D., University of South Carolina, 1986


Overview

The Department of English offers the Bachelor of Arts degree with a major in English. The general major assures a broad knowledge of literature and composition. The intensive major is tailored for those students planning to pursue graduate study in English and/or American literature. The writing concentration is a version of the major placing special emphasis on advanced composition. The department also offers a minor in speech, with courses in public speaking, business and professional communication, speech criticism, performance studies, and small group communication.

Degree Requirements

Bachelor of Arts in English

(120 hours)

1. General Education Requirements (53-62 hours)

For a general outline of other general education requirements see, "College of Arts and Sciences."

2. Prerequisites (9 hours)

ENGL 287, 288, 289

3. Major Requirements (27-33 hours)

General Major
Two courses in pre-1800 literature chosen from ENGL 380-382, 400-410, 415, 419 (depending on content), 420, and 429 (depending on content) (6 hours)
Three courses in post-1800 literature chosen from ENGL 383-386, 411-414, 416, and 419 (depending on content), 421-428, and 429-430 (depending on content) (9 hours)
Four additional courses numbered 300 or above (12 hours)
At least one of the courses above must be in linguistics (ENGL 389, 450-456) unless a course with a LING designator has been taken elsewhere in the student's curriculum.

Intensive Major
Three courses in pre-1800 literature chosen from ENGL 380-382, 400-410, 415, 419 (depending on content), 420, and 429-430 (depending on content) (9 hours)
Four courses in post-1800 literature chosen from ENGL 383-386, 411-414, 416, and 419 (depending on content), 420, and 429 (depending on content) (12 hours)
Either ENGL 388 or 440 (3 hours)
ENGL 490 or a senior thesis (3 hours)
Three additional courses numbered 300 or above (6 hours)
At least one of the courses above must be in linguistics (ENGL 389, 450-456) unless a course with a LING designator has been taken elsewhere in the student's curriculum.

B.A. with Distinction
The Departmental Undergraduate Research Track (B.A. with Distinction) is available to students majoring in English on the Intensive Major track who wish to participate in significant research activities in collaboration with, or under the supervision of, a faculty mentor.

Intensive Major Requirements plus:

  • Minimum GPA of 3.50 in major and 3.30 overall.
  • A Senior Thesis (rather than 490) is required. The senior thesis will produce a piece of original research.
  • A public presentation of the thesis in one of the following venues:
    English Department Colloquium Series
    USC Discovery Day
    Professional Conference approved by
    supervisor
    Journal publication
  • A written sponsorship agreement with the supervising faculty member will be placed on file in the Department of English Language and Literature undergraduate office.

Students who successfully complete this track with an overall GPA of 3.30 or higher and a GPA of at least 3.50 in the major will be awarded their degree with "Distinction in English" upon graduation.

Writing Concentration
Two courses in pre-1800 literature chosen from ENGL 380-382, 400-410, 415, 419 (depending on content), 420, and 429 (depending on content) (6 hours)
Two courses in post-1800 literature chosen from ENGL 383-386, 411-414, 416, 419 (depending on content), 421-428, and 429-430 (depending on content) (6 hours)
ENGL
360 and 387 (6 hours)
Two writing courses chosen from ENGL 460, 462-4701 (6 hours)
One course from ENGL 491-494 (3 hours)

1ENGL 461 does not meet these requirements.

4. Cognates

See "College of Arts and Sciences."

5. Electives

See "College of Arts and Sciences."

Exemptions

One or two semesters of freshman English may be exempted on the basis of sufficiently high scores on one of two placement examinations: the Advanced Placement Test, or the College Level Subject Examination(s).

Note: Students must complete one sophomore literature course (282-289) before taking any upper-level course. English majors must complete the three courses ENGL 287, 288, 289 and earn at least a C; they must successfully complete one before taking any literature courses beyond the 200 level. Only courses numbered 300 and above may count toward a major in English. With the approval of the department, a graduate student may enroll in some courses at the 500 level and receive graduate credit by doing additional work.

Minor in Speech Communication

Prerequisite (3 hours): SPCH 140

Requirements (18 hours): 3 hours from SPCH 222, 230, 260, 543
15 hours chosen from THEA 240 and from courses numbered SPCH 300 and above (except SPCH 543)


Course Descriptions

English Language and Literature (ENGL)

With the approval of the student's advisor, some courses offered through the comparative literature program may be taken for English major credit.

  • 101 -- Critical Reading and Composition. (3) A course offering structured, sustained practice in close reading, critical analysis, and composing. Students will read a range of literary and nonliterary texts and write expository and analytical essays.
  • 102 -- Rhetoric and Composition. (3) (Prereq: ENGL 101) A course offering structured, sustained practice in researching, analyzing, and composing arguments. Students will read about a range of academic and public issues and write researched argumentative and persuasive essays.

Note: Students must complete English 101 and 102 (or equivalent) before taking any other English course.

  • 270 -- World Literature. {=CPLT 270} (3) Selected masterpieces of world literature from antiquity to present.
  • 282 -- Fiction. (3) Fiction from several countries and historical periods, illustrating the nature of the genre.
  • 283 -- Themes in British Writing. (3) Reading a variety of British texts that exemplify persistent themes of British culture.
  • 284 -- Drama. (3) Drama from several countries and historical periods, illustrating the nature of the genre.
  • 285 -- Themes in American Writing. (3) Reading a variety of American texts that exemplify persistent themes of American culture.
  • 286 -- Poetry. (3) Poetry from several countries and historical periods, illustrating the nature of the genre.
  • 287 -- American Literature. (3) Survey of American literature: major authors, genres, and periods. Designed for English majors.
  • 288 -- English Literature I. (3) British poetry, drama, and prose from Beowulf to the 18th century. Designed for English majors.
  • 289 -- English Literature II. (3) British poetry, drama, and prose from the 18th century to the present. Designed for English majors.
  • 309 -- Teaching Writing in One-to-One Sessions. (3) Prereq: ENGL 101 and 102) The study of theories and pedagogy of individualized writing instruction with intensive writing practice including hands-on one-on-one sessions. Recommended for prospective writing teachers.

Note: All literature courses 300 and above require ENGL 101, 102, and one course between ENGL 270 and 292.

  • 360 -- Creative Writing. (3) Workshop course on writing original fiction, poetry, drama, and creative nonfiction.
  • 370 -- Language in the USA. {=LING 345} (3) Linguistic examination of the structure, history, and use of language varieties in the U.S., with a particular focus on regional and sociocultural variation and relevant sociolinguistic issues.
  • 380 -- Epic to Romance. {=CPLT 380} (3) Comprehensive exploration of medieval and other pre-Renaissance literature using texts representative of the evolution of dominant literary forms.
  • 381 -- The Renaissance. {=CPLT 381} (3) Literature of the Renaissance, in its cultural contexts, explored through representative works.
  • 382 -- The Enlightenment. {=CPLT 382} (3) Literature of the Enlightenment in its cultural contexts, explored through representative works.
  • 383 -- Romanticism. {=CPLT 383} (3) Literature of Romanticism, in its cultural contexts, explored through representative works.
  • 384 -- Realism. {=CPLT 384} (3) Literature of Realism in its cultural contexts, explored through representative works.
  • 385 -- Modernism. {=CPLT 385} (3) Literature of Modernism in its cultural contexts, explored through representative works.
  • 386 -- Postmodernism. {=CPLT 386} (3) Literature of Postmodernism in its cultural contexts, explored through representative works.
  • 387 -- Introduction to Rhetoric. {=SPCH 387} (3) Theories of human communication useful for understanding and informing the everyday work of writers. Emphasis on intensive analysis and writing.
  • 388 -- History of Literary Criticism and Theory. (3) Representative theories of literature from Plato through the 20th century.
  • 389 -- The English Language. {=LING 301} (3) Introduction to the field of linguistics with an emphasis on English. Covers the English sound system, word structure, and grammar. Explores history of English, American dialects, social registers, and style.
  • 390 -- Great Books of the Western World I. {=CPLT 301} (3) European masterpieces from antiquity to the beginning of the Renaissance.
  • 391 -- Great Books of the Western World II. {=CPLT 302} (3) European masterpieces from the Renaissance to the present.
  • 392 -- Great Books of the Eastern World. {=CPLT 303} (3) Classical and contemporary poetry and prose of the Middle and Far East.
  • 395 -- Classical Drama. {=CPLT 469} (3) Representative plays by Greek and Roman dramatists.
  • 399 -- Independent Study. (3-9) (Prereq: consent of instructor) Contract approved by instructor, advisor, and department chair is required for undergraduate students.
  • 400 -- Early English Literature. (3) Major works of Old and Middle English literature (excluding Chaucer).
  • 401 -- Chaucer. (3) Chaucer's works, with special attention to The Canterbury Tales.
  • 402 -- Tudor Literature. (3) English non-dramatic poetry and prose of the 16th century.
  • 403 -- The 17th Century. (3) Poetry and prose of major 17th-century writers (excluding Milton).
  • 404 -- English Drama to 1660. (3) Drama in England, from the Middle Ages to the Restoration (excluding Shakespeare).
  • 405 -- Shakespeare's Tragedies. (3)
  • 406 -- Shakespeare's Comedies and Histories. (3)
  • 407 -- Milton. (3) Milton's works, with special attention to Paradise Lost.
  • 410 -- The Restoration and 18th Century. (3) Poetry and prose from 1660 to the later 18th century.
  • 411 -- British Romantic Literature. (3) Poetry and prose of the English Romantic period.
  • 412 -- Victorian Literature. (3) Poetry and prose from the 1830s to the end of the century.
  • 413 -- Modern English Literature. (3) Poetry and prose of the 20th century.
  • 414 -- English Drama Since 1660. (3) Major dramatists from the Restoration to the present.
  • 415 -- The English Novel I. (3) A study of the novel from the beginnings through Walter Scott.
  • 416 -- The English Novel II. (3) A study of the novel from Walter Scott into the 20th century.
  • 419 -- Topics in English Literature. (3) Intensive study of selected topics. May be repeated for credit under a different suffix.
  • 420 -- American Literature to 1830. (3) Colonial, Revolutionary, and early Romantic poetry and prose.
  • 421 -- American Literature 1830-1860. (3) Poetry and prose of the American Romantic period.
  • 422 -- American Literature 1860-1910. (3) Poetry and prose from the Civil War to the early modern era.
  • 423 -- Modern American Literature. (3) Poetry and prose of the 20th century.
  • 424 -- American Drama. (3) Representative plays from the 18th century to the present.
  • 425A -- The American Novel to 1914. (3) Representative novels from the 18th century to World War I.
  • 425B -- The American Novel Since 1914. (3) Representative novels from 1914 to the present.
  • 426 -- American Poetry. (3) Representative works from the 17th century to the present.
  • 427 -- Southern Literature. (3) Representative works of Southern writers.
  • 428A -- African-American Literature I: to 1903. (3) Representative works of African-American writers to 1903.
  • 428B -- African-American Literature II: 1903-Present. (3) Representative works of African-American writers from 1903 to the present.
  • 429 -- Topics in American Literature. (3) Intensive study of selected topics. May be repeated for credit under a different suffix.
  • 430 -- Topics in African American Literature. (3) Intensive study of selected topics. May be repeated for credit under a different suffix.
  • 431 -- Children's Literature. (3) Reading and evaluating representative works appropriate for the elementary school child.
  • 432 -- Adolescent Literature. (3) Reading and evaluating representative works appropriate for the adolescent reader.
  • 434 -- Environmental Literature. (3) (Prereq: ENGL 101, 102, and one course from ENGL 270-289) Literature of the natural environment and of human interactions with nature, along with critical theories about human/nature interactions.
  • 435 -- The Short Story. (3) The characteristics of the short story and its historical development in America and Europe.
  • 436 -- Science Fiction Literature. (3) Representative masterworks of science fiction from the beginnings of the genre to the present.
  • 437 -- Women Writers. {=WGST 437} (3) Representative works written by women.
  • 438A -- Studies in Regional Literature. (3) Authors and literary forms representative of South Carolina.
  • 438B -- Studies in Regional Literature. (3) Authors and literary forms representative of Scotland.
  • 438C -- Studies in Regional Literature. (3) Authors and literary forms representative of Ireland.
  • 438D -- Studies in Regional Literature. (3) Authors and literary forms representative of Africa.
  • 438E -- Studies in Regional Literature. (3) Authors and literary forms representative of the Caribbean.
  • 439 -- Selected Topics. (3) Intensive study of selected themes, topics, currents of thought, or interdisciplinary concerns. May be repeated for credit under a different suffix.
  • 440 -- Principles of Modern Literary Theory. (3) Major 20th-century approaches to texts, from New Criticism to the present.
  • 449 -- Special Topics in Theory. (3) Approaches to criticism, such as feminism, Marxism, semiology, deconstruction, New Historicism, cultural materialism, and others; or genre, such as narrative, poetry, drama, and others.
  • 450 -- English Grammar. {=LING 421} (3) Major structures of English morphology and syntax; role of language history and social and regional variation in understanding contemporary English.
  • 453 -- Development of the English Language. {=LING 431} (3) History of English from the earliest Old English texts through Middle English to Contemporary English. No previous knowledge of Old or Middle English is required.
  • 455 -- Language in Society. {=LING 440} (3) Patterns in language use as a reflection of social group memberships or the negotiation of interpersonal relationships; special attention to social dialects and stylistic differences in American English.
  • 457 -- African-American English. {=AFRO 442, =ANTH 442, =LING 442} (3) Linguistic examination of the structure, history, and use of African-American English, as well as literary presentations, language attitudes, and issues relating to education and the acquisition of Standard English.
  • 460 -- Advanced Writing. (3) Extensive practice in different types of nonfiction writing.
  • 461 -- The Teaching of Writing. (3) Theory and methods of teaching composition and extensive practice in various kinds of writing. Recommended for prospective writing teachers.
  • 462 -- Technical Writing. (3) Preparation for and practice in types of writing important to scientists, engineers, and computer scientists, from brief technical letters to formal articles and reports.
  • 463 -- Business Writing. (3) Extensive practice in different types of business writing, from brief letters to formal articles and reports.
  • 464 -- Poetry Workshop. (3) (Prereq: ENGL 360) Workshop in writing poetry for students who have successfully completed ENGL 360.
  • 465 -- Fiction Workshop. (3) (Prereq: ENGL 360) Workshop in writing fiction for students who have successfully completed ENGL 360.
  • 466 -- Writing Internship. (Prereq: ENGL 387 and consent of instructor and advisor) Supervised professional experience writing in a workplace or community agency, including analysis and production of documents.
  • 467 -- Topics in Rhetoric. (3) Intensive study of selected topics. May be repeated for credit under a different suffix.
  • 468 -- Special Topics in Creative Writing. (3) (Prereq: ENGL 360) Focuses on a specific topic in the field of creative writing, ranging from a specialized genre to form and theory courses concentrating on poetics. May be repeated for credit under a different suffix.
  • 469 -- Creative Nonfiction. (3) (Prereq: ENGL 360) Explores the various subgenres and techniques of creative nonfiction, such as collage, memoir and literary journalism by reading polished examples and by responding to writing exercises designed to prompt ideas and hone skills.
  • 473 -- Film and Media Theory and Criticism. {=FILM 473, PHIL 473} (3) (Prereq: FILM 240 or consent of instructor) Theory and criticism of film and media from the 1910s to the present. Considers a range of critical approaches to analyzing what different forms of audio-visual media do to and for the audiences they address and the worlds they depict.
  • 474 -- History of Cinema I. {=ARTH 365, FILM 365, and THSP 480} (3) Survey of the international cinema from its inception until 1945.
  • 475 -- History of Cinema II. {=ARTH 366, FILM 366, and THSP 481} (3) Survey of the international cinema from 1945 to the present.
  • 485 -- Women's Rhetoric. {=SPCH 485, WOST 485} (3) Study of rhetoric by and about women as manifested in speeches, essays, and other rhetorical artifacts.
  • 486 -- African-American Rhetoric. {=AFRO 486 and SPCH 486} (3) African-American rhetoric as manifested in speeches, essays, and other rhetorical artifacts.
  • 490 -- Topics in Advanced Study. (3) (Prereq: English major, junior or senior standing, or consent of instructor) Course content varies and will be announced in the schedule of classes by suffix and title. May be repeated as topics vary.
  • 491 -- Advanced Poetry Workshop. (3) (Prereq: ENGL 360 and 464) Students will study poetry writing at an advanced undergraduate level through close readings of professional poetry, composition of original work, and regular practice in the evaluation of peer work.
  • 492 -- Advanced Fiction Workshop. (3) (Prereq: ENGL 360 and 465) Students will study the art and craft of writing literary fiction at an advanced level through close readings and the composition of original short stories.
  • 493 -- Advanced Creative Nonfiction. (3) (Prereq: ENGL 360 and 469) The art and craft of writing creative nonfiction at the advanced level.
  • 494 -- Advanced Professional Writing Workshop. (3) (Prereq: ENGL 387) An advanced workshop on the genres, practices, and contexts of professional writing for experienced writers.
  • 550 -- Language of the Professions. (3) Understanding language use in business, scientific, and legal contexts, including linguistic analysis of readability, technical terminology, and document design.
  • 565 -- African American Theatre. {=THEA 565} (3) The major movements, figures, plays, and critical strategies that have marked the development of African American theatre in the 19th, 20th, and 21st centuries.
  • 566 -- Topics in American Film. {=FILM 566} (3) Intensive study of a specific topic concerning American film. Course content varies and will be announced in the schedule of courses by suffix and title.
  • 600 -- Seminar in Verse Composition. (3) First half of a year-long course in the writing of poetry taught by a contemporary poet. Limited to 15 students.
  • 601 -- Seminar in Verse Composition. (3) Second half of a year-long course in the writing of poetry taught by a contemporary poet. Limited to 15 students.
  • 602 -- Fiction Workshop: Short Story. (3) Instruction in the writing of short fiction taught by a contemporary prose writer. May be repeated once for credit.
  • 603 -- Nonfiction Prose Workshop. (3) (Prereq: graduate status in the English department, or permission of instructor for undergraduates) Instruction in the writing of the nonfiction essay taught by a contemporary prose writer. May be repeated once for credit.
  • 604 -- Seminar in Composition for the Visual Media. (3) (Prereq: ENGL 565 or equivalent experience in film as determined by the instructor) Writing for the visual arts, the student will write a treatment (prospectus) and one or more multimedia scripts; or one or more teleplays; or a feature-length screenplay. Limited to 15 students.
  • 605 -- Seminar in Composition for the Visual Media. (3) (Prereq: ENGL 565 or equivalent experience in film as determined by the instructor) Writing for the visual arts, the student will write a treatment (prospectus) and one or more multimedia scripts; or one or more teleplays; or a feature-length screenplay. Limited to 15 students.
  • 606 -- Playwriting Workshop. (3) (Prereq: graduate status in the English department, or permission of instructor for undergraduates) Instruction in playwriting taught by a contemporary playwright. May be repeated once for credit.
  • 610 -- Fiction Workshop: Book-Length Manuscript. (3) Instruction in the writing of book-length manuscripts taught by a contemporary prose writer. May be repeated once for credit.
  • 611 -- Writing the Longer Nonfiction Project. (3) (Prereq: graduate status in the English department, or permission of instructor for undergraduates) Instruction in the writing of a book-length nonfiction memoir or literary journalism project taught by a contemporary prose writer. May be repeated once for credit.
  • 612 -- Writing Poetry: Traditional and Modern Forms. (3) The writing of traditional and modern poetic forms. Exercises will give practice in composing metered and free verse. Representative masterpieces of traditional and modern poetry will also be studied.
  • 613 -- Writing the Full-Length Play. (3) (Prereq: graduate status in the English department, or permission of instructor for undergraduates) Instruction in the writing of a full-length, two-act play for publication or production. May be repeated once for credit.
  • 615 -- Academic and Professional Writing. (3) A workshop course in the development and revision of writing for academic and professional audiences.
  • 620 -- Computer Methods for Humanistic Problems. {=CSCE 508} (3) Introduction to data processing concepts suitable for research interests in non-numerical areas such as the humanities.
  • 620P -- Laboratory for Computer Methods for Humanistic Problems. {=CSCE 508L} (1) (Coreq: ENGL 620) Broad but intensive introduction to computer systems and programming for students in the humanities. No mathematical or scientific background is presumed. Laboratory experience with data-processing equipment; introduction to elementary digital computer programming in an appropriate language.
  • 650 -- Special Topics in Literature. (1-3) Course content varies and will be announced in the schedule of classes by suffix and title. May be repeated for credit as topics vary.
  • 680 -- Survey of Linguistics. {=LING 600} (3) Major approaches to language study and linguistics related to other disciplines.
  • 690 -- Special Topics in Composition. (3) Course content varies and will be announced in the schedule of classes by suffix and title. Limited to 15 students.

Speech (SPCH)

  • 140 -- Public Communication. (3) Public speaking and the principles and criticism of oral public communication, to include performance by students.
  • 150 -- Speaking Anxiety Reduction Laboratory. (1) (Coreq: THSP 140 or THSP 230) Exercises, techniques, and demonstrations aimed toward reducing public speaking anxiety. Not for major credit.
  • 230 -- Business and Professional Speaking. (3) Fundamentals of oral communication within business and professional settings. Includes performance.
  • 260 -- Argumentation and Debate. (3) Preparing and delivering the debate. Academic debate serves as a model.
  • 330 -- Small Group Communication. (3) The development of the skills and methods of effective participation in teams, committees, and other small groups.
  • 331 -- Organizational Communication. (3) Examines communication behavior and networks within organizations through the study of major theories of organizational communication, identifies and defines primary concepts, and applies them to organizational scenarios and case studies.
  • 340 -- Literature and Performance. {=THEA 340} (3) Introduction to the study of literature through performance; reading, analysis, and performance of prose, poetry, nonfiction, and drama.
  • 380 -- Persuasive Communication. (3) Analysis of the process and functions of persuasive communication.
  • 387 -- Introduction to Rhetoric. {=ENGL 387} (3) Theories of human communication useful for understanding and informing the everyday work of writers. Emphasis on intensive analysis and writing.
  • 399 -- Independent Study and Research. (3-6) Contract approved by instructor, advisor, and department chair is required for undergraduate students.
  • 411 -- Arguments in Cultural Studies. (3) The study of texts and discourse from contemporary culture drawing from concepts such as politics, television, music, and other popular culture and entertainment.
  • 441 -- Rhetorical Criticism. (3) Interpretation and evaluation of communication texts and events such as speeches, media, and social movements. Employs a variety of critical methods and approaches.
  • 448 -- Contemporary Political Rhetoric. (3) Analysis and evaluation of the suasory speechmaking of political figures seeking state or national offices. Offered only in fall semesters in which national elections are held.
  • 463 -- Great Debates. (3) A study of debates at the Constitutional Convention, Lincoln-Douglas debates (1858), vice presidential and presidential debates, and other national debates.
  • 464 -- Speechwriting. (3) An exploration of the process of advanced policy advocacy emphasizing speechwriting strategies, issues management, and systematic advocacy campaigns.
  • 485 -- Women's Rhetoric. {= ENGL 485, WOST 485} (3) Study of rhetoric by and about women as manifested in speeches, essays, and other rhetorical artifacts.
  • 486 -- African-American Rhetoric. {=AFRO 486 and ENGL 486} (3) African-American rhetoric as manifested in speeches, essays, and other rhetorical artifacts.
  • 499 -- Special Topics in Speech. (3) Reading and research on selected topics. Course content varies and will be announced in the schedule of classes by suffix and title. May be repeated once as topics vary.
  • 500 -- Selected Topics in Speech. (1) A series of courses, each lasting one-third of a semester. Topics and prerequisites are announced in the class schedule for each semester.
  • 543 -- Communication, Law, and Society. (3) Examines the role of communication in legal and judicial contexts. Focus on case studies that illustrate the theoretical and practical significance of rhetoric in the work of the courts, lawyers, and public advocacy groups.
  • 546 -- Alternative Voices. (3) The oral discourse of selected American speakers drawn from groups such as women, African Americans, and other populations traditionally underrepresented in the canons of public address.

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