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updated 9/15/2008

Marine Science

Robert Thunell, Director

Professors
C. Marjorie Aelion, Ph.D., University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, 1988
Ronald Benner, Ph.D., University of Georgia, 1984
, Graduate Director
G. Thomas Chandler, Ph.D., Louisiana State University, 1986
Arthur D. Cohen, Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University, 1968
Alan W. Decho, Ph.D., Louisiana State University, 1987
Robert J. Feller, Ph.D., University of Washington, 1977
Madilyn M. Fletcher, Ph.D., University College of North Wales, 1975
Thomas J. Hilbish, Ph.D., State University of New York at Stony Brook, 1984
Charles R. Lovell, Ph.D., Purdue University, 1984
James T. Morris, Ph.D., Yale University, 1979
Timothy J. Shaw, Ph.D., University of California, San Diego, 1988
Robert Thunell, Ph.D., University of Rhode Island, 1978, Carolina Distinguished Professor
Richard G. Vogt, Ph.D., University of Washington, 1984
David S. Wethey, Ph.D., University of Michigan, 1979
Douglas F. Williams, Ph.D., University of Rhode Island, 1976
Sarah A. Woodin, Ph.D., University of Washington, 1972
, Carolina Distinguished Professor

Associate Professors
Claudia Benitez-Nelson, Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology/Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, 1998
John Ferry, Ph.D., University of North Carolina, 1996
Brian Helmuth, Ph.D., University of Washington, 1997
Venkat Lakshmi, Ph.D., Princeton University, 1995
Jay Pinckney, Ph.D., University of South Carolina, 1992
Dwayne E. Porter, Ph.D., University of South Carolina, 1995
Joseph M. Quattro, Ph.D., Rutgers University, 1991
, Undergraduate Director
Richard M. Showman, Ph.D., University of Washington, 1979
Raymond Torres, Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley, 1997
George Voulgaris, Ph.D., University of Southampton, Southampton, UK, 1992
Alicia Wilson, Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1999

Assistant Professors
Subrahmanyam Bulusu, Ph.D., University of Southampton, 1998
Josh Eagle, J.D., Georgetown University, 1990
Lee Ferguson, Ph.D., State University of New York at Stony Brook, 2002
Blaine Griffen, Ph.D., University of New Hampshire, 2007
Richard Long, Ph.D., University of California, San Diego, 2001
R. Sean Norman, Ph.D., Medical University of South Carolina, 2003
Tammi Richardson, Ph.D., Dalhousie University, 1996
Howard Scher, Ph.D., University of Florida, 2004
Virginia Shervette, Ph.D., Texas A&M University, 2006
Richard Styles, Ph.D., Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, 1998
Benjamin Twining, Ph.D., Stony Brook University, 2003
Scott White, Ph.D., University of California, Santa Barbara, 2001
Alexander Yankovsky, Ph.D., Marine Hydrophysical Institute, Sevastopol, Ukraine, 1991

Research Professors
Dennis M. Allen, Ph.D., Lehigh University, 1978
Willard S. Moore, Ph.D., State University of Stony Brook of New York, 1969

Research Assistant Professors
Scott C. Neubauer, Ph.D., College of William and Mary, 2000
Erik M. Smith, Ph.D., University of Maryland, 2000
Susan Wilde, Ph.D., University of Georgia, 1998

Distinguished Professors Emeriti
Bruce C. Coull, Ph.D., Lehigh University, 1968
John Mark Dean, Ph.D., Purdue University, 1962
L. Robert Gardner, Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University, 1968
Stephen E. Stancyk, Ph.D., University of Florida, 1974
Richard G. Zingmark, Ph.D., University of California, Santa Barbara, 1969

Overview

The Marine Science Program is an interdisciplinary educational program offering curricula that lead to the Bachelor of Science. It is one of the premier marine science educational programs in the nation, with prominent research affiliations, competitively awarded research grants, and an interdisciplinary academic curriculum.

Marine Science includes many areas of study, all concerned with increasing our knowledge of the oceans and coastal regions. Students in marine science may choose to specialize in biological, chemical, geological, or physical oceanography or coastal resource management/marine affairs.

Degree Requirements

(128 hours)

1. General Education Requirements (43-54 hours)

The following courses fulfill some of the general education requirements and must be completed with a grade of C or better for a B.S. degree with a major in marine science: MSCI 101 and 102; mathematics through MATH 142 (Calculus II), STAT 515, two courses in physics (e.g., PHYS 201, 201L and 202, 202L or PHYS 211, 211L and 212, 212L) and chemistry (e.g., CHEM 111, 112), and one course in computer programming (CSCE 102 or higher).

For an outline of other general education requirements, see "College of Arts and Sciences."

2. Major Requirements (36 hours)

Approved courses in marine science and cognate subjects (including MSCI 311, 312, 460, and one hour of MSCI 505)

A maximum of 10 semester hours of a combination of independent study (e.g., MSCI 399, SCCC 499, BIOL 399), seminar (e.g., SCCC 390-398, BIOL 599, BIOL 645), and undergraduate research (e.g., MSCI 496, 497, 498, 499) courses may count in the 36 hours of major credit required for the Marine Science major. Senior Seminar (MSCI 505) is included in these 10 hours.

3. Cognates, see "Major Requirements"

4. Electives, see "College of Arts and Sciences"

Upon completion of the sophomore year, students will select an area of specialization consistent with their interests. Specialization may be directed toward an interdisciplinary area of study in the marine sciences, such as coastal resource management, or chosen from among the more traditional disciplines such as biology, chemistry, geography, geology, or physics. Each student will plan an individual program in consultation with a faculty advisor.

Suggested Program of Study

Freshman Year
MSCI 101, 102 (4) (4) hours
ENGL 101, 102 (3) (3) hours
MATH 115, 141, 142 (4) (4) hours
CHEM 111, 112 with labs (4) (4) hours
Total: (15) (15) hours

Sophomore Year
MSCI 311, 312 (4) (4) hours
MSCI 460 (May session of sophomore year)
PHYS 201, 201L, 202, 202L (3+1) (3+1) hours, or PHYS 211, 211L, 212, 212L
Foreign Language 121, 122 (4) (3) hours
Major Course (4) (4) hours (For example: BIOL 301 and 301L, 510; GEOL 305; CHEM 333+331L)
HIST 101-112 (-) (3) hours
Total: (16) (18) hours

Junior Year
Major Courses (4-6) (4-8) hours (For example: BIOL 303, 570; MSCI 581, 583)
One course per term from Group III (3) (3) hours
One course per term from Group IV (3) (3) hours
Major course (3) (-) hours
Computer Science (CSCE 102 or higher) (-) (3) hours
HIST 101-112 (3) (-) hours
Total: (16-18) (14-18) hours

Senior Year
MSCI 505 (seminar) (-) (1) hours

Advanced courses in the Marine Science Program as needed to satisfy the 36 hours major requirement and the college’s 128 hours minimum. This can include a combination of one to 9 hours of independent study, seminar, and undergraduate research.

Courses Acceptable for Major Credit

Any course which is eligible for cognate credit in the College of Arts and Sciences can potentially be a major course in marine science. The determination of major courses in this interdisciplinary program is the result of consultation between the student and an advisor. The partial list below shows some examples of courses available for major credit in other departments. Please note that some courses are cross-listed with MSCI.

BIOL 301/301L Ecology and Evolution/Laboratory (3/1)
BIOL 302/30
2L Cell and Molecular Biology/Laboratory (3/1)
BIOL 303 Fundamental Genetics (3)
BIOL 431/431L Bacteriology/Laboratory (3/1)
BIOL 460/460L General Physiology/Laboratory (3/1)
BIOL 505/505L Developmental Biology/Laboratory (3/1)
BIOL 510 Invertebrate Zoology (5)
BIOL 534/534L Animal Behavior/Laboratory (3/1)
BIOL 541/541L Principles of Biochemistry {=CHEM 550/550L} (3/1)
BIOL 543/543L Comparative Physiology/Laboratory (3/1)
BIOL 549 Plant Physiology (4)
BIOL 570/570L Principles of Ecology/Laboratory (3/1)
BIOL 640 Microbial Biology (3)
BIOL 643 Advanced Microbiology (3)
BIOL 652 Evolutionary Biology (4)
BIOL 654 Speciation (3)
BIOL 670 Plant Ecology (4)
BIOL 690 Ultramicroscopy (3)
CHEM 321/321L Quantitative Analysis/Laboratory (3/1)
CHEM 333/331L Organic Chemistry I/Essentials of Organic Chemistry Laboratory I (3/1)
CHEM 333/333L Organic Chemistry I/Laboratory (3/1)
CHEM 334/331L Organic Chemistry II/Essentials of Organic Chemistry Laboratory II (3/1)
CHEM 334/334L Organic Chemistry II/Laboratory (3/1)
CHEM 511 Inorganic Chemistry (3)
CHEM 541/541L Physical Chemistry/Laboratory (3/1)1
CHEM 542/542L Physical Chemistry/Laboratory (3/1)
CHEM 621 Advanced Analytical Chemistry (3)
CSCE 561 Numerical Analysis {=MATH 527} (3)
ECON 548 Environmental Economics (3)
GEOG 341 Cartography (3)
GEOG 345 Interpretation of Aerial Photographs (3)
GEOG 363 Geographic Information Systems (3)
GEOG 510 Systematic Geography (3)
GEOG 514 Geography of Ports and Shipping (3)
GEOG 516 Coastal Zone Management (3)
GEOG 541 Advanced Cartography (3)
GEOG 543 Computer Mapping (3)
GEOG 545 Meteorology (4)
GEOG 546 Applied Climatology (4)
GEOG 548 Landscape Ecology (3)
GEOG 551 Principles of Remote Sensing (3)
GEOG 554 Spatial Programming (3)
GEOG 555 Analytical Cartography (3)
GEOG 563 Advanced Geographic Information Systems (3)
GEOG 564 Cartographic Modeling (3)
GEOL 305 Earth Systems through Time (4)
GEOL 315 Surface and Near-Surface Processes (4)
GEOL 325 Stratigraphy and Sedimentary Basins (4)
GEOL 335 Global and Environmental Change (4)
GEOL 345 Internal Earth (4)
GEOL 371 A View of the River (3)
GEOL 500 Field Geology (6)
GEOL 503 Regional Stratigraphy and Biostratigraphy of North America (3)
GEOL 508 Palynology (3)
GEOL 516 Sedimentology (4)
GEOL 520 Isotope Geology and Geochronology (3)
GEOL 522 Optical Mineralogy (3)
GEOL 526 Igneous Petrology (4)
GEOL 527 Metamorphic Petrology (4)
GEOL 531 Plate Tectonics (3)
GEOL 536 Geophysics (3)
GEOL 546 Marine Geophysics (3)
GEOL 555 Elementary Seismology (3)
GEOL 570 Environmental Hydrogeology (3)
MATH 241 Vector Calculus (3)
MATH 242 Elementary Differential Equations (3)
MATH 521 Boundary Value Problems and Partial Differential Equations (3)
MATH 526 Numerical Linear Algebra (4)
MATH 527 Numerical Analysis {=CSCE 561} (4)
MATH 544 Linear Algebra (3)
NAVY 301/301L Navigation and Naval Operations I/Laboratory (4)
NAVY 302/302L Navigation and Naval Operations II/Laboratory (4)
PHYS 212/212L Essentials of Physics II/Laboratory (3/1)2
PHYS 301 Intermediate Classical Physics I (4)
PHYS 302 Intermediate Classical Physics II (4)
PHYS 303 Intermediate Modern Physics (3)
POLI 370 Introduction to Public Administration (3)
POLI 399A Independent Study in Political Science (1-6)
POLI 399B Independent Study in International Studies (1-6)
POLI 420 International Law (3)
POLI 431 Science, Technology, and World Affairs (4)
POLI 477 Ecology and Politics (3)
SOCY 310 Social Demography (3)
SOCY 315 World Populations: Problems and Policies (3)
STAT 506 Introduction to Experimental Design (3)
STAT 511 Probability {=MATH 511} (3)
STAT 512 Mathematical Statistics (3)
STAT 513 Theory of Statistical Inference (3)
STAT 516 Statistical Methods II (3)
STAT 518 Nonparametric Statistical Methods (3)
JOUR 562 Journalism of Science and Technology (3)

1 Credit for a degree will not be given for both CHEM 340 and CHEM 541.
2 PHYS 212 may be used for both program requirement and major courses.


Course Descriptions (MSCI)

  • 101 -- The Ocean Environment. (4) (Prereq: science, engineering, or education major or consent of instructor) Origin and evolution of the oceans, plate tectonics, ocean circulation, waves and tides, seawater and sediment composition, and influences on biology. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week. Scheduled field trips required.
  • 102 -- The Living Ocean. (4) (Prereq: science, engineering, or education major or consent of instructor) Origin, evolution, and diversity of marine life, biological production, trophic dynamics, nutrient cycles, marine resources, and environmental concerns. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week. Scheduled field trips required.
  • 210 -- Oceans and Man. (3) A nontechnical introduction to human interactions with the marine environment: marine organisms, marine systems, and the physical and chemical characteristics of oceans and estuaries. Not available for marine science major credit.
  • 210L -- Oceans and Man Laboratory. (1) (Prereq or coreq: MSCI 210) Experiments and exercises which illustrate how specific components of marine environments are structured, function, and can be measured. Two laboratory hours per week. Not available for marine science major credit. Attendance on designated field trips may be required.
  • 215 -- Coastal Environments of the Southeastern U.S. {=GEOL 215} (3) Coastal zones of South Carolina and neighboring states, including geologic history, geomorphology, stratigraphy, hydrogeology, shoreline processes, environmental issues, and effect of man. Three lecture hours each week plus optional field trips. Not available for marine science major credit.
  • 215L -- Coastal Environments of the Southeastern U.S. (Laboratory). {=GEOL 215L} (1) Exercises examining coastal ecology, geomorphology, hydrogeology, shoreline processes, environmental issues, and human impact. Two laboratory hours per week. Scheduled field trips required. Not available for marine science major credit.
  • 305 -- Ocean Data Analysis. (3) (Prereq: MSCI 101 and 102, or consent of instructor) Instrumentation, oceanographic time series, spatial and directional data sets, and basic parametric modeling.
  • 311 -- Biology of Marine Organisms. (4) (Prereq: MSCI 102 or BIOL 101) Biological concepts emphasizing adaptation to marine environments. Laboratory experiments emphasize principles and techniques of marine biological study. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week. Scheduled field trips are required.
  • 312 -- Physical and Chemical Oceanography. (4) (Prereq: MSCI 101, MATH 142, CHEM 112, PHYS 201 or 211) Properties of seawater, mass balances, biogeochemical cycles, circulation, mixing, waves and tides, continental shelf processes, estuarine dynamics. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week. Scheduled field trips are required.
  • 390 -- Science and Environmental Policy. (3) (Prereq: BIOL 301 or MSCI 311 or permission of instructor) Selected issues in the use of scientific information in resource management policies. Readings, invited lecturers, discussions and debate and a required field trip.
  • 399 -- Independent Study. (1-6) Contract approved by instructor, advisor, and department chair is required for undergraduate students.
  • 450 -- Principles of Biological Oceanography. {=BIOL 450} (3) (Prereq: MSCI 311, BIOL 301, or consent of instructor) Principles and methods of measuring production in the sea. Emphasis on the ocean's role in the global carbon budget. Three lecture hours per week. Scheduled field trips are required.
  • 460 -- Field and Laboratory Investigations in Marine Science. (4) (Prereq: MSCI 311 and 312) Intensive inquiry-based investigations combining oceanographic field sampling with laboratory measurements of collected samples using modern analytical instrumentation, and with analysis and integration of data into a final research report. Course conducted in residence at a marine field site.
  • 496 -- Undergraduate Research. (3 each) (Prereq: consent of instructor) Student research on problems of fundamental significance in collaboration with faculty mentors. Emphasis on critical thinking, problem solving, proposal development, scientific writing, and professional presentation. Nine hours of laboratory, field, or library work per week.
  • 497 -- Undergraduate Research. (3 each) (Prereq: consent of instructor) Student research on problems of fundamental significance in collaboration with faculty mentors. Emphasis on critical thinking, problem solving, proposal development, scientific writing, and professional presentation. Nine hours of laboratory, field, or library work per week.
  • 498 -- Undergraduate Research. (3 each) (Prereq: consent of instructor) Student research on problems of fundamental significance in collaboration with faculty mentors. Emphasis on critical thinking, problem solving, proposal development, scientific writing, and professional presentation. Nine hours of laboratory, field, or library work per week.
  • 499 -- Undergraduate Research. (3 each) (Prereq: consent of instructor) Student research on problems of fundamental significance in collaboration with faculty mentors. Emphasis on critical thinking, problem solving, proposal development, scientific writing, and professional presentation. Nine hours of laboratory, field, or library work per week.
  • 501 -- Principles of Geomorphology. {=GEOL 501} (3) (Prereq: GEOL 101 and 102) The process of earth denudation with emphasis on chemistry of weathering, stream and erosion hydraulics, quantitative analysis of land form evolution.
  • 502 -- Principles of Coastal Geomorphology. {=GEOL 502} (4) (Prereq: MATH 122 or 141 [concurrent enrollment acceptable]) Geological and physical controls on the morphology, development, and stability of coastlines. Analysis of waves and erosional processes, and coastal zone morphodynamics. Several required field trips.
  • 505 -- Senior Seminar. (1) (Prereq: consent of instructor)
  • 510 -- Invertebrate Zoology. {=BIOL 510} (5) (Prereq: BIOL 301 or MSCI 311) Phylogenetic and comparative aspects of anatomy, physiology, reproduction, and embryology of the invertebrates. Three lectures and two 3-hour laboratory periods per week.
  • 511 -- Advanced Paleontology. {=GEOL 511} (3) (Prereq: GEOL 311) Systematic, ecologic, biogeographic, and evolutionary aspects of paleontology. Lectures, practical exercises, occasional field trips.
  • 515 -- Marine Micropaleontology. {=GEOL 515} (4) (Prereq: consent of instructor) Marine microfossils: distribution, ecology, paleoecology, and biostratigraphy; use of microfossils in marine sediments to study oceanographic history. Three lectures and 2 laboratory hours per week.
  • 521 -- Introduction to Geochemistry. {=GEOL 521} (3) Investigation of low temperature chemical reactions controlling the geochemistry of the earth's surface. Emphasis on CO2, carbonates, oxidation reduction, thermodynamics, isotopes, biogeochemistry.
  • 524 -- Environmental Radioisotope Geochemistry. {=GEOL 524} (3) (Prereq: CHEM 111, CHEM 112, MATH 141) Introduction to radioactivity and the use of radionuclides to study environmental processes, including age-dating and biogeochemical cycling in aquatic systems. Two lectures per week.
  • 525 -- Marine Plants. {=BIOL 525} (4) (Prereq: BIOL 301 or MSCI 311) Diversity, distribution, physiology, ecology, evolution, and economic importance of marine algal, seagrass, and mangrove communities. Three lectures and 3 laboratory hours per week. Scheduled field trips are required.
  • 536 -- Ichthyology. {=BIOL 536} (4) (Prereq: BIOL 301 or MSCI 311 or consent of instructor) Phylogeny, morphology, behavior, and ecology of fishes. Three lecture and 3 laboratory hours plus three field trips to be arranged.
  • 537 -- Aquaculture. {=BIOL 537} (3) (Prereq: BIOL 301 or MSCI 311) Introduction to the practical and scientific aspects of the commercial culture of freshwater and marine organisms. Three lecture hours per week. One all-day field trip required.
  • 538 -- Behavior of Marine Organisms. (4) (Prereq: consent of instructor) The identification of behavioral adaptations of estuarine and marine organisms: their ecology, physiology, development, and evolutionary history; field observations.
  • 545 -- Geological Oceanography. {=GEOL 545} (3) (Prereq: consent of instructor required for undergraduates only) A comprehensive study of the origin and development of the major structural features of the ocean basins and the continental margins. Discussion of the techniques used in obtaining geologic data and the interpretation of sedimentary processes, vulcanism, and the stratigraphy of the ocean basins.
  • 550 -- Sedimentary Simulations and Sequence Stratigraphy. {=GEOL 550} (4) (Prereq: GEOL 301 or consent of instructor) Problems of sequence stratigraphy resolved with graphic computer simulations. Sedimentary fill of basins by carbonates and/or clastics tracked as a function of rate of sediment accumulation, tectonic behavior and sea level. Includes laboratory.
  • 552 -- Population Genetics. {=BIOL 552} (3) (Prereq: BIOL 301, MSCI 311, and BIOL 303) An introduction to the principles of population genetics, with emphasis on the origin, maintenance, and significance of genetic variation in natural populations.
  • 553 -- Marine Sediments. {=GEOL 553} (3) (Prereq: GEOL 516 or consent of instructor) Marine sedimentary environments; physical/biological factors which control the formation and distribution of modern marine sediments.
  • 557 -- Coastal Processes. {=GEOL 557} (3) (Prereq: consent of instructor) Physical and geological processes controlling the formation and evolution of beach, barrier, and nearshore environments, including discussion of coastal management issues. Field trip(s) to coastal environments.
  • 566 -- Ecosystem Analysis. (3) (Prereq: consent of instructor) The formulation and simulation of compartment models of marine and terrestrial ecosystems with complex nutrient cycling, food chains, and energy flow. Analog and digital simulation techniques. Ecosystem stability and sensitivity. Organization, structure, and diversity of an ecosystem.
  • 568 -- Introduction to Micrometeorology. {=GEOL 568} (3) (Prereq: PHYS 201 and MATH 141, or consent of instructor) Small-scale processes in the atmospheric boundary layers, including energy budget, radiation, soil heat transfer, humidity, viscous flows, turbulence, momentum and heat exchanges, evaporation, and marine atmospheric boundary layer.
  • 575 -- Marine Ecology. {=BIOL 575} (3) (Prereq: CHEM 111 and BIOL 301 or MSCI 311) Structure, dynamics, and interactions between populations and communities in marine ecosystems. Three lecture hours per week. Attendance at designated departmental seminars is required.
  • 575L -- Marine Ecology Laboratory. {=BIOL 575L} (1) (Prereq or coreq: MSCI 575) Laboratory and field exercises in coastal environments. Three hours per week plus field trips.
  • 577 -- Ecology of Coral Reefs. {=BIOL 577} (4) (Prereq: BIOL 301 or MSCI 311 or consent of instructor) Structure, productivity, and biodiversity of coral reefs, emphasizing their sensitivity, stability, and sustainability. Taught as an extended field experience with daily lectures and guided research activities.
  • 578 -- Physiological and Pollution Ecology of Marine Organisms. (3) (Prereq: MSCI 311 or equivalent) Functional adaptation of marine plants and animals to ecological stresses including pollution. Three lecture hours per week.
  • 579 -- Air-Sea Interaction. {=GEOL 579} (3) (Prereq: consent of instructor) This course provides knowledge of the physical mechanism responsible for interaction between the ocean and the atmosphere and of the influence of air-sea interaction on atmospheric and oceanic dynamics and thermodynamics on a wide variety of spatial/temporal scales.
  • 580 -- Satellite Oceanography. {=GEOL 580} (3) This course provides knowledge of various techniques used in satellite remote sensing of the oceans. Key skills will be developed in satellite data processing, image analysis, and hands-on research.
  • 581 -- Estuarine Oceanography. {=GEOL 581} (3) (Prereq: MSCI 312 or consent of instructor) Estuarine kinematics and dynamics; classification of estuaries; estuarine circulation and mixing.
  • 582 -- Marine Hydrodynamics. {=GEOL 582} (3) (Prereq: differential equations, PHYS 201 or 211, or consent of instructor) Basic principles of fluid statics and dynamics. Conservation of mass, momentum, and energy; viscosity, vorticity, and boundary layers with examples from the marine environment. Applications to and analysis of ocean currents and waves.
  • 583 -- Geology and Geochemistry of Salt Marshes. {=GEOL 583} (3) (Prereq: consent of instructor) Geological and geochemical processes in salt marshes. Methods of geological research in marshes including instrumental techniques, sampling design, and data analysis. Two lectures per week plus four weekends of project oriented fieldwork and/or equivalent lab work.
  • 585 -- Coastal Tropical Oceanography. (4) (Prereq: MSCI 312 or consent of instructor) Descriptive oceanography of mangrove and coral reef coasts with emphasis on physical processes. Taught as an extended field experience with daily lectures and guided research activities.
  • 599 -- Topics in Marine Science. (1-3) Current developments in marine science selected to meet faculty and student interests. Course content varies and will be announced by suffix and title in schedule of courses.
  • 624 -- Aquatic Chemistry. {=CHEM 624} (3) (Prereq/coreq: CHEM 321, MATH 142, or consent of instructor) Study of the chemical reactions and processes affecting the distribution of chemical species in natural systems. Three lecture hours per week.
  • 627 -- Marine Phytoplankton. {=BIOL 627} (3) Examines the physiology and ecology of phytoplankton, including environmental controls on community composition, primary productivity, and detection and characterization of water quality (eutrophication) and harmful algal blooms.

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