REPORT: COMMITTEE ON CURRICULA AND COURSES

(For consideration by the Faculty Senate at its March 1, 2000 meeting)

The Committee requests that any department which has a proposal being recommended by the Committee on Curricula and Courses provide a spokesperson to attend the Faculty Senate meeting in which said proposal is to be recommended. Please contact William Jacoby in advance if errors are noted.

Telephone: 777-6683 or E-mail: william-jacoby@sc. Dept. of Government and International Studies 

I. COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

A. Civil Engineering

Change in title and description

FROM: ECIV 300 CIVIL ENGINEERING PRACTICE (3) (Prereq: MATH 241)

Theory and application of plane surveying techniques. Professional and engineering ethics. Fundamentals of engineering economy with emphasis on annual cost, present worth, and retirement and replacement.

TO: ECIV 300 CIVIL ENGINEERING MEASUREMENTS. (3)

(Prereq: MATH 241) Theory and application of plane surveying and mapping techniques. Lecture plus laboratory.

Change in credit hours and prerequisites

FROM: ECIV 301 PROGRAMMING AND GRAPHICS FOR CIVIL  ENGINEERING. (2) (Prereq: ENGR 102 and UNIV 101E)

TO: ECIV 301 PROGRAMMING AND GRAPHICS FOR CIVIL ENGINEERING. (2) (Prereq: ENGR 102) 

Change in title

FROM: ECIV 330 SOIL MECHANICS. (3)

TO: ECIV 330 INTRODUCTION TO GEOTECHNICAL ENGINEERING. (3)

FROM: ECIV 330L SOIL MECHANICS LABORATORY. (1)

TO: ECIV 330L GEOTECHNICAL LABORATORY. (1)

Change in prerequisites

FROM: ECIV 350 INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING. (3) (Prereq: CHEM 112, MATH 141)

TO: ECIV 350 INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING. (3) (Prereq: CHEM 111, MATH 141)

Change in title and description

FROM: ECIV 360 HYDRAULICS. (3) (Prereq: ENGR 360) Extension and application of fluid mechanics principles to hydraulic engineering problems; pipe systems, pumps, open channel flow, culverts, flow measurements.

TO: ECIV 360 INTRODUCTION TO WATER RESOURCES ENGINEERING. (3) (Prereq: ENGR 360) Application of fluid mechanics principles to water resources engineering problems; pipe systems, pumps, open channel flow, peak runoff, seepage, hydraulic structures.

FROM: ECIV 360L HYDRAULICS LABORATORY. (1) (Coreq: ECIV 360) Experiments, exercises and demonstrations on hydrostatics, flow in pipes and open channels, pumps, culverts, and flow measurement techniques Three hours per week.

TO: ECIV 360L INTRODUCTION TO WATER RESOURCES ENGINEERING LABORATORY. (1) Experiments, exercises and demonstrations on flow in pipes and open channels, pumps, flow measurement, seepage, and infiltration.

Change in prerequisites and description

FROM: ECIV 405 SYSTEMS APPLICATIONS IN CIVIL ENGINEERING. (3) (Prereq: ECIV 320 AND 350) Systems approach to analysis and design: description, modeling, and mathematical simulation; application of the decision-making process and optimization techniques in engineering planning and design.

TO: ECIV 405 SYSTEMS APPLICATIONS IN CIVIL ENGINEERING. (3) (Prereq: Upper division) Systems approach to analysis and design; application of engineering economic principles to the evaluation of design alternatives; deterministic  modeling and optimization emphasizing civil engineering applications.

Change in title

FROM: ECIV 530 SUBSTRUCTURE ANALYSIS AND DESIGN (3) 

TO: ECIV 530 FOUNDATION ANALYSIS AND DESIGN. (3)

New course

ECIV 555 PRINCIPLES OF SOLID WASTE ENGINEEERING. (3) (Prereq: ECIV 350, graduate standing or approval of the instructor) Fundamentals and engineering principles of solid waste generation, characterization, collection and transport, source reduction and recycling, physical chemical and biological treatment strategies. Includes a component on hazardous waste. 

COMPUTER SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

Implementation: The Registrar is hereby authorized to change all CSCI designated courses in the Bulletin to the corresponding CSCE designated course and to change all EECE designated courses to the corresponding CSCE or ELCT course. The Registrar will notify the affected program and the chair of the Curricula and Courses Committee of all such changes. 

Discussion: This authorization will allow the Registrar to correct any references to CSCI or EECE designated courses that have been inadvertently overlooked without requiring a formal "Change in Curriculum: approval. It is anticipated that it will affect primarily CSCI 101, 102, 145, and 146 and EECE 221 and 222 which may be required in other program’s curricula. Please note that only the designator and not the number have changed on these courses.

 

 

B. COMPUTER SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

 

 

1. Computer Science and Engineering Course Listings

CSCE Course Designator

 

Following is a list of courses to be offered by the CSE department under the CSCE course designator. The column headed "Comments" indicates the original CS or CpE course(s) from which the new CSE course is derived.

A few courses in the listing overlap substantially with others in content and description. These include CSCE 211/212/213 and CSCE 355/551. We have discussed these courses extensively and think that they must be maintained as separate courses during a transition period in order to provide minimal disruption to the students currently in the programs. At the end of this transition period, we will revisit these courses.

 

CSCE Number and Description

Comments

10l—Introduction to Computer Concepts. (3) (Prereq: two years of college preparatory mathematics) History, application, and social impact of computers; problem-solving, algorithm development, applications software, and programming in a procedural language. Open to all majors.

CSCI 101.

102—General Applications Programming. (3) (Prereq: two years of college preparatory mathematics) Introduction to systematic computer problem-solving and programming for a variety of applications. Open to all majors.

CSCI 102.

145—Algorithmic Design I. (4) (Prereq: placement in MATH 141 or grade of C or better in MATH 115) Problem-solving, algorithmic design, and programming. Three lecture hours and two laboratory hours per week. Open to all majors.

CSCI 145.

146—Algorithmic Design II. (4) (Prereq: grade of C or better in CSCE 145 and grade of C or better in MATH 141 or 174; coreq: MATH 174) Continuation of CSCE 145. Rigorous development of algorithms and computer programs; elementary data structures. Three lecture hours and two laboratory hours per week. Open to all majors.

CSCI 146.

205—Business Applications Programming. (3) (Prereq: MGSC 190 or CSCE 101 or above) Introduction to computer applications in business; programming exercises in COBOL. Open to all majors.

CSCI 205.

2O6—Scientific Applications Programming. (3) (Prereq: MATH 111 or MATH 115) Introduction to computer applications in the natural and social sciences; programming exercises in FORTRAN. Open to all majors

CSCI 206.

207—Programming in the Unix Environment. (3) (Prereq: CSCE 145 or 206) The Unix programming environment: I/O programming, Unix processes, fork, exec, pipes and signals, and tools. Open to all majors.

CSCI 207.

209—Special Topics in Computer Programming. (1-4) Programming and application development using selected programming languages. Course content varies and will be announced in the schedule of classes by suffix and title.

CSCI 209.

211—Digital Logic Design. (3) (Prereq: MATH 141 or MATH 174) Number systems; Boolean algebra; logic design; sequential machines. Credit may not be received for both CSCE 211 and CSCE 213.

EECE 211.

212—Introduction to Computer Architecture. (3) (Prereq: CSCE 145, 211) Computer architecture, components, and organization; memory addressing; Input/Output; instruction sets; interrupts; assembly-language programming. Credit may not be received for both CSCE 212 and CSCE 213.

EECE 212.

213—Computer Organization. (3) (Prereq: CSCE 145, MATH 174) Boolean and sequential circuits; computer components; instruction sets; assembly language programming; data representations; interrupts and memory hierarchies. Credit may not be received for both CSCE 213 and either CSCE 211 or 212.

CSCI 213.

240—Introduction to Software Engineering. (3) (Prereq: CSCE 146) Fundamentals of software design and development; software implementation strategies; object-oriented design techniques; ethics in software development.

CSCI 240. Also replaces EECE 351.

245—Object-Oriented Programming Techniques. (3) (Prereq: CSCE 146) Advanced object-oriented concepts and techniques; multiple inheritance; memory management; operator overloading; polymorphism; performance issues.

NEW COURSE. See attached justification

311—Operating Systems. (3) (Prereq: CSCE 212 or 213, CSCE 245) Operating system structure and function; process implementation, scheduling, and synchronization; memory management; security; naming protection; resource allocation; network file systems.

CSCE 411 and EECE 502. Moves Operating Systems from the Senior to the Junior year. CSCE 711 provides a graduate-level operating systems course.

313—Embedded Systems Laboratory. (3) (Prereq: CSCE 212 or 213) Design and implementation of microprocessor based systems; assembly language programming.

EECE 301.

330—Programming Language Structures. (3) (Prereq: CSCE 245) Formal specification of syntax and semantics; structure of algorithms; list processing and string manipulation languages; statement types, control structures, and interfacing procedures.

CSCI 330.

350—Data Structures and Algorithms. (3) (Prereq: CSCE 245, MATH 174) Techniques for representing and processing information, including the use of lists, trees, and graphs; analysis of algorithms; sorting, searching, and hashing techniques.

CSCI 220. CSCE 350 and CSCE 355 provide a 2-course sequence that coordinates topics covered in CSCI 220 and EECE 311.

355—Foundations of Computation. (3) (Prereq: CSCE 212 or 213, CSCE 350) Basic theoretical principles of computing as modeled by formal languages, grammars, and machines; computability and computational complexity. Credit may not be received for both CSCE 355 and CSCE 551.

EECE 311. Change in title. CSCE 350 and CSCE 355 provide a 2-course sequence that coordinates topics covered in CSCI 220 and EECE 311.

491—Computer Engineering System Project. (3) (Prereq: CSCE 240, 311) Selected design projects.

EECE 403. Change in title.

492—Computer Engineering Software Project. (3) (Prereq: CSCE 245, 311) Capstone design project.

EECE 404. Change in title.

495—Computer Science Capstone Project. (3) (Prereq: CSCE 240, 311, ENGL 462) Advanced software engineering techniques; software architectures; team project to implement software application; computer ethics.

CSCI 640. Change in title.

498—Independent Study. (1-3) (Prereq: approval of project proposal by instructor and department advisor) Individual investigation or study of special topics. At most three (3) credits may be applied toward a degree.

Replaces EECE 499 and CSCI 399, 498, and 499.

500—Computer Programming and Applications. (3) Concepts and properties of algorithms; programming exercises with emphasis on good programming habits. Credit may not be received for both CSCE 500 and CSCE 145. Open to all majors. May not be used for major credit by Computer Science and Engineering majors.

CSCI 500. Change in title.

510—System Programming. (3) (Prereq: CSCE 245) System software such as command language interpreters, client-server applications, debuggers, mail servers, browsers, macro-processors, and revision control systems; file systems, processes, threads, and interprocess communication.

CSCI 510.

512—System Performance Evaluation. (3) (Prereq: CSCE 311, STAT 509) Measuring, modeling, analyzing, and predicting performance of computer systems and networks; bottleneck analysis; Markovian queuing systems and networks; use of operational and probabilistic models.

CSCI 713.

513—Computer Architecture. (3) (Prereq: CSCE 212 or 213) Design methodology; processor design; computer arithmetic; algorithms for addition, multiplication, floating point arithmetic; microprogrammed control; memory organization; introduction to parallel architectures.

CSCI 513.

515—Computer Network Programming. (3) (Prereq: CSCE 311) Computer networks and communication protocols; socket programming; interprocess communication; development of network software; case studies.

CSCI 515.

516—Computer Networks. (3) (Prereq: STAT 509) Structure, design, and analysis of computer networks; ISO/OSI network architecture.

EECE 534. Also replaces CSCI 722.

520—Database System Design. (3) (Prereq: CSCE 245 or GEOG 563) Database management systems; database design and implementation; security, integrity, and privacy.

CSCI 520 = EECE 503.

531—Compiler Construction. (3) (Prereq: CSCE 330 or 355, CSCE 245) Techniques for design and implementation of compilers, including lexical analysis, parsing, syntax-directed translation, and symbol table management.

CSCI 531 = EECE 501.

547—Windows Programming. (3), (Prereq: CSCE 245) Object-oriented methods and tools for application programming with graphically interactive operating systems.

EECE 517

551—Theory of Computation. [=MATH 562] (3) (Prereq: CSCE 350 or MATH 526 or 544 or 574) Basic theoretical principles of computing as modeled by formal languages and automata; computability and computational complexity. Credit may not be received for both CSCE 355 and CSCE 551.

CSCI 551.

561—Numerical Analysis. [= MATH 527] (3) (Prereq: MATH 242 or 520) Interpolation and approximation of functions; solution of algebraic equations; numerical differentiation and integration; numerical solutions of ordinary differential equations and boundary value problems; computer implementation of algorithms.

CSCI 561.

563—System Simulation. (3) (Prereq: CSCE 245, STAT 509) Computer simulation of real systems; principles of system organization; random number generation; programming exercises in a simulation language.

CSCI 501.

564—Computational Science. (3) (Prereq: MATH 526, CSCE 146 or 207 or 500) Parallel algorithms; scientific visualization; techniques for solving scientific problems.

CSCI 564.

565—Computer Graphics. (3) (Prereq: CSCE 245, MATH 526) Graphics hardware; graphics primitives; two-dimensional and three-dimensional viewing; basic modeling.

CSCI 575.

567—Visualization Tools. (3) (Prereq: CSCE 145 or 206 or 207) Scientific visualization tools as applied to sampled and generated data; methods for data manipulation and representation; investigation of visualization techniques.

CSCI 577.

574—Robotics. (3) (Prereq: CSCE 212 or 213; and CSE 245) Design and application of robotic systems; emphasis on mobile robots and intelligent machines.

EECE 541.

578—Text Processing. (3) (Prereq: CSCE 330 or 355) Text and natural language processing; formal models and data structures appropriate for text processing; selected topics in computational linguistics, stylistics, and content analysis.

CSCI 587.

580—Artificial Intelligence. (3) (Prereq: CSCE 350) Heuristic problem solving, theorem proving, and knowledge representation, including the use of appropriate languages and tools.

CSCI 580 = EECE 521. Also replaces CSCI 785.

590—Topics in Information Technology. (3) Reading and research on selected topics in information technology. Course content varies and will be announced in the schedule of courses by suffix and title. May be repeated for credit as topics vary.

CSCI 509.

611—Conceptual Modeling Tools for CAD. (3) (Prereq: CSCE 211 or 213, CSCE 245) Design techniques for logic systems; emphasis on higher-level CAD tools such as hardware description languages and conceptual modeling.

EECE 511.

612—VLSI System Design. (3) (Prereq: CSCE 211 or 213, CSCE 245) VLSI design process models, introduction to EDA tools, HDL modeling and simulation, logic synthesis and simulation, benchmark design projects.

EECE 512.

613—Fundamentals of VLSI Chip Design. (3) (Prereq: ELEC 371) Design of VLSI circuits, including standard processes, circuit design, layout, and CAD tools. Lecture and guided design projects.

EECE 573.

 

 

2. Computer Science Course Descriptions

CSCI Designator

Ref: pages 223-224 1999-2000 Undergraduate Studies Bulletin

 

10l—Introduction to Computer Concepts. (3) (Prereq: two years of college preparatory mathematics or equivalent) History, application, and social impact of computers; problem-solving, algorithm development, applications software, and programming in a procedural language.

102—General Applications Programming. (3) (Prereq: two years of college preparatory mathematics or equivalent) Introduction to systematic computer problem-solving using a procedural language and programming using an interactive structure approach for a variety of applications. May not be taken by computer science majors.

145—Introduction to Algorithmic Design I. (4) (Prereq: MATH 115 or enrollment in MATH 174) Problem-solving, algorithmic design, and programming in a procedural language. Three lectures and two laboratory sessions per week.

146—Introduction to Algorithmic Design II. (4) (Prereq: CSCI 145 and MATH 174) A continuation of CSCI 145. Rigorous development of algorithms and computer programs; elementary data structures.

205—Business Applications Programming. (3) (Prereq: MGSC 190 or CSCI 145) Introduction to computer applications in business. Programming exercises in COBOL.

2O6—Scientific Applications Programming. (3) (Prereq: MATH 111 or MATH 115) Introduction to computer applications in the natural and social sciences. Programming exercises in FORTRAN.

207—C Programming and the Unix Environment. (3) (Prereq: CSCI 145 or 206) Programming in C under the Unix programming environment, I/O programming, Unix processes, fork, exec, pipes and signals, the Unix environment tools.

209—Special Topics in Computer Programming. (1-3) Programming and application development using selected programming languages. Course content varies and will be announced in the schedule of classes by suffix and title.

213—Computer Organization. (3) (Prereq: CSCI 145, MATH 174) Boolean and sequential circuits; computer components; instruction sets; assembly language programming; data representations; interrupts and memory hierarchies.

220—Data Structures and Algorithms. (3) (Prereq: CSCI 146) Theory of and advanced techniques for representation of information: lists, trees, graphs; analysis of algorithms; sorting, searching, and hashing techniques.

240—Software Design and Development. (3) (Prereq: CSCI 146) Fundamentals of software development. Software design and implementation strategies. Object-oriented design techniques. Software development in the UNIX environment. Ethics in software development.

321—File Management. (3) (Prereq: CSCI 220) Input/output devices, input/output management; file organization; sorting, searching and merging; file structures in database systems; time and storage space considerations.

330—Programming Language Structures. (3) (Prereq: CSCI 220 and 240) Formal specification syntax and semantics; structure of algorithms; list processing and string manipulation languages; statement types, control structures and interfacing procedures.

399—Independent Study. (1-3) Contract approved by instructor, advisor and department head is required for undergraduate students.

411—Operating Systems. (3) (Prereq: CSCI 213 and 240) Core concepts and terminology of operating systems. Process implementation, synchronization, memory management, scheduling, security issues, naming protection, resource allocation issues, network file systems.

489, 499—Undergraduate Research Project in Computer Science I, II. (3 each) (Prereq: consent of instructor)

500—Fundamentals of Computer Science. (3) Concepts and properties of algorithms; intensive programming exercises in a high-level, structured programming language with strong emphasis on developing good programming habits. Credit may not be received for both CSCI 500 and CSCI 145.

501—Systems Simulation. (3) (Prereq: CSCI 330) Computer simulation of real systems. Principles of system organization; random number generation. Programming exercises in a simulation language.

508—Computer Methods for Humanistic Problems. [ = ENGL 6201 (3) Introduction to data processing concepts suitable for research interests in non-numerical areas such as the humanities. (Not for computer science major credit, and not recommended for students in mathematics and the sciences.)

508L—Laboratory for Computer Methods for Humanistic Problems. [= ENGL 620P] (1) (Coreq: CSCI 508) Broad but intensive introduction to computer systems and programming for students in the humanities. No mathematical or scientific background is presumed. Laboratory experience with data processing equipment; introduction to elementary digital computer programming in an appropriate language. (Not for computer science majors and not recommended for students in mathematics and the sciences.)

509—Topics in Computer Science. (3)

510—Systems Programming. (3) (Prereq: CSCI 330 or graduate standing) Review of machine structure, machine language, and assembly language programming. Loaders, assemblers, macro-instructions, input/output, timesharing, batch processing, and interrupts.

513—Advanced Computer Architecture. (3) (Prereq: CSCI 213 and CSCI

330) Design methodology; processor design; computer arithmetic; algorithms for addition, multiplication, floating point arithmetic; microprogrammed control; memory organization; introduction to parallel architectures.

515—Computer Network Programming. (3) (Prereq: CSCI 411) Introduction to computer networks; communication protocols; ISO/OSI network architecture; interprocess communication; development of network software; case studies.

520—Database System Design. (3) (Prereq: CSCI 330) Database organization; design and use of database management systems; database models:

network, hierarchical, and relational; data description languages, data independence, and representation.

531—Compiler Construction. (3) (Prereq: CSCI 330) Techniques of design and implementation of compilers, including lexical analysis, parsing (both LL and LR), syntax-directed translation, and symbol table management.

540—Advanced Program Design. (3) Review of structured and top-down design, modular programming, and data types. Time/space tradeoffs, input/ output, and files, flow of control, preprocessors, error handling, and interrupts. Documentation. Credit may not be received for both CSCI 540 and

CSCI 146.

551—Theory of Computation. [= MATH 562] (3) (Prereq: CSCI 213 and CSCI 330, or MATH 526, or MATH 544, or MATH 574) Basic theoretical principles of computer science as modeled by formal languages and automata; computability and computational complexity.

561—Numerical Analysis. [= MATH 527] (3) (Prereq: MATH 526; MATH 242 or 520; or consent of department) Interpolation and approximation of functions, solution of algebraic equations, numerical differentiation and integration; solution of ordinary differential equations and boundary value problems. Computer implementation of algorithms.

564—Computational Science. (3) (Prereq: MATH 526, and CSCI 207 or 500) Introduction to computational science. Vector, parallel, distributed and massively parallel architectures. Parallel algorithms, scientific visualization, and techniques for solving scientific problems.

575—Introduction to Computer Graphics. (3) (Prereq: CSCI 330, MATH 526) Graphics hardware, graphics primitives, two-dimensional and three-dimensional viewing, basic modeling.

577—Visualization Tools (3) (Prereq: CSCI 145 or 206 or 207 or equivalent) Scientific visualization tools as applied to sampled and generated data, methods for data manipulation, investigation of visualization techniques.

580—Artificial Intelligence. [= EECE 521] (3) (Prereq: CSCI 330 or EECE 352) Introduction to heuristic problem solving, theorem proving techniques, and knowledge representation schemes, including the use of appropriate programming language and tools.

587—Text Processing. (3) (Prereq: CSCI 330 or CSCI 508) Introduction to text and natural language processing. Formal models and data structures appropriate for text processing. Selected topics in computational linguistics, stylistics, and content analysis.

640—Senior Project. (3) (Prereq: CSCI 411 and ENGL 462) Advanced software development techniques; software architectures; team project to implement software application; computer ethics.

 

3. Computer Engineering Course Descriptions

EECE Designator

 

Following are the current course descriptions for the Computer Engineering courses in the ECE department. These courses are being replaced with equivalent CSCE designated courses. They will be deleted from the University Bulletin. (See Section 5).

Ref: pages 119-120 of the 1999-2000 Undergraduate Studies Bulletin

211—Digital Logic Design. (3) (Prereq: MATH 141) Number systems, Boolean algebra, logic design, sequential machines.

212—Introduction to Computer Architecture. (3) (Prereq: EECE 211, Prereq or Coreq: EECE 201) Computer architecture, assembler-level programming, and systems organization.

301—ECE Laboratory II. (3) (Prereq: EECE 201, EECE 212) Design, implementation of programmable electronics systems.

311—Fundamentals of Computer Engineering. (3) (Prereq: EECE 212; Prereq or Coreq: EECE 351) Algorithm analysis; iteration and recursion; the tree, list, set, and graph data models; state machines and automata; grammars and languages.

351—Software Engineering. (3) (Prereq: EECE 212) Program design; basic characteristics of computer languages.

352—Algorithms and Data Structures. (3) (Prereq: EECE 351) Analysis design, and implementation of algorithms and data structures.

403—Computer Engineering Project Design I. (3) (Prereq: EECE 302, EECE 352) Selected design projects.

404—Computer Engineering Project Design II. (3) (Prereq: EECE 403) Capstone design project.

499—Special Problems. (1—3) (Prereq: advanced approval of project proposal by instructor and department advisor) Individual investigation or studies of special topics. A maximum of three (3) credits total may be applied toward a degree.

501-Compiler Construction. [= CSCI 531] (3) (Prereq: CSCI 330; or EECE 311 and 352) Techniques of design and implementation of compilers. Development of a small compiler.

502—Operating Systems. (3) (Prereq: EECE 351) Operating system structure and function; relationships between the operating system and the architecture of the computer; design and modeling techniques.

503—Database Design. [= CSCI 520] (3) (Prereq: CSCI 220 or EECE 352 or GEOG 563) Database management systems. Database design. Data models. Database languages. Data protection.

511—Conceptual Modeling Tools for CAD. (3) (Prereq: EECE 301, EECE 351) Design techniques for logic systems, emphasis on higher-level CAD tools, such as hardware description languages and conceptual modeling.

512—VLSI System Design. (3) (Prereq: EECE 301, 351) VLSI design process models, introduction to EDA tools, HDL modeling and simulation, logic synthesis and simulation, benchmark design projects.

517—Windows Programming. (3), (Prereq: EECE 352) Use of object-oriented methods and tools for application programming with graphically interactive operating systems.

521—Artificial Intelligence. [= CSCI 580] (3) (Prereq: CSCI 330 or EECE 352) Introduction to heuristic problem solving, theorem-proving techniques, and knowledge representation schemes, including the use of appropriate programming languages and tools.

534—Computer Networks. (3) (Prereq: MATH511 or STAT 509 or STAT 510 or STAT 511) Structure, design, and analysis of computer networks.

541—Introduction to Robotics. (3) (Prereq: senior standing in engineering or consent of instructor) Study of robotic concepts in design and applications. Emphasis on mobile robots and intelligent machines.

573—Fundamentals of VLSI Chip Design. (3) (Prereq: EECE 372) An introductory-level approach to the design of VLSI circuits, including standard processes, circuit design, layout, and CAD tools. Instruction will be by lecture and guided design projects.

 

4. Courses to be Deleted

EECE Designator

 

The following computer engineering courses under the EECE course designator should be deleted. These courses are being replaced with equivalent CSCE designated courses.

Ref: pages 119-120 of the 1999-2000 Undergraduate Studies Bulletin

 

211—Digital Logic Design.

212—Introduction to Computer Architecture.

301—ECE Laboratory II.

311—Fundamentals of Computer Engineering.

351—Software Engineering.

352—Algorithms and Data Structures.

403—Computer Engineering Project Design I.

404—Computer Engineering Project Design II.

501-Compiler Construction.

502—Operating Systems.

503—Database Design.

511—Conceptual Modeling Tools for CAD.

512—VLSI System Design.

517—Windows Programming.

521—Artificial Intelligence.

534—Computer Networks.

541—Introduction to Robotics. 

 

CSCI Designator

 

The following CSCI designated courses are not being replaced with equivalent CSE courses. These courses have not been offered in some time and are no longer needed to support our programs.

 

Ref: pages 223-224 of 1999-2000 Undergraduate Studies Bulletin

 

CSCI 321—File Management

CSCI 540—Advanced Program Design

CSCI 508—Computer Methods for Humanistic Problems. [=ENGL 620]

CSCI 508L—Laboratory for Computer Methods for Humanistic Problems. [=ENGL 620P]

 

5. New Course Proposal for CSCE 245 

CSCI 245: Object Oriented Programming Techniques

 

Catalog Description:

245—Object Oriented Programming Techniques. (3) (Prereq: CSCE 146) Advanced object-oriented concepts and techniques. Multiple Inheritance. Memory Management. Operator overloading. Polymorphism. Performance Issues.

 

 

6. Bachelor of Science in Engineering―Major in Computer Engineering

Change in curriculum

The curriculum for the Bachelor of Science in Computer Engineering degree is to be listed under the new Department of Computer Science and Engineering as shown below. The current curriculum, under the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and given on page 119 of the 1999-2000 Undergraduate Studies Bulletin, is shown for reference.

Old Wording (Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, page 119 of the 1999-2000 Undergraduate Studies Bulletin)

Degree Requirements

Curriculum in Computer Engineering (125 hours)

ENGL 101, 102 (6 hours)
Liberal Arts (18 hours)
MATH 141, 142, 241, 242 (14 hours)
Mathematics requirement (3 hours)
STAT 509 (3 hours)
CHEM 111, 112 (8 hours)
PHYS 211, 211L, 212, 212L (8 hours)
UNIV 101 for engineers (3 hours)
ENGR 102, 200 (5 hours)
Core Engineering elective (3 hours)
EECE 201, 211, 212, 221, 222, 301, 302, 311, 331, 351, 352, 371, 403, 404 (42 hours)
Major electives (12 hours)

 

New Wording (Department of Computer Science and Engineering)

Degree Requirements

In addition to the general education and progression requirements of the College of Engineering and Information Technology, a grade of C or better is required in MATH 174 and all CSCE courses applied to the degree.

Bachelor of Science in Engineering—Major in Computer Engineering (121 hours)

ENGL 101, 102 (6 hours)
Liberal Arts (9 hours)
PHIL 317 (3 hours)
MATH 141, 142, 174, 241, 242 (17 hours)
Mathematics elective (3 hours)
STAT 509 (3 hours)
CHEM 111 (4 hours)
PHYS 211, 211L, 212, 212L (8 hours)
CSCE 145, 146, 211, 212, 240, 245, 311, 313, 350, 355, 491, 492, 531 (41 hours)
ELCT 102, 221, 222, 321, 371, (15 hours)
Major electives (12 hours)

The liberal arts courses must include at least one history course, one fine arts course, and one social science course. The department maintains a list of approved humanities and social science electives.                                                                                                  The Math Elective is satisfied with MATH 526 or 527 or 544 or CSCE 561. Other courses in linear algebra or numerical analysis may be substituted with permission of the department.                                                                                                                          The department maintains a list of approved major electives for the Computer Engineering degree. Currently, CSCE 330, ELCT 331, and most CSCE courses numbered 510 and higher are approved. CSCE 561 satisfies the requirement as either a major elective or as a mathematics Elective.

 

7. Bachelor of Science—Major in Computer Information Systems

 

Change in curriculum

 

The curriculum for the Bachelor of Science – Major in Computer Information Systems degree is to be listed under the new Department of Computer Science and Engineering as shown below. The current curriculum, under the Department of Computer Science and given on page 223 of the 1999-2000 Undergraduate Studies Bulletin, is shown for reference.

Old Wording (Department of Computer Science, page 223 of the 1999-2000 Undergraduate Studies Bulletin)

Degree Requirements

Bachelor of Science Degree—Computer Information Systems Major

(128 hours)

1. General Education Requirements (62—73 hours)

The following courses may fulfill some general education requirements and must be completed for the B.S. degree: CSCI 145, 146,205; MATH 141,142,174; STAT 509; ACCT 222; ECON 224; ENGL 462. A grade of C or higher is required in CSCI 145,146, 205, and MATH 174. For an outline of other general education requirements, see "College of Science and Mathematics."

2. Major Requirements (24 hours)

CSCI 213,220,240,330,411,520,640 and three additional hours of approved CSCI courses numbered above 500.

3. Business Information Systems Requirements (15 hours)

(fulfills college cognate requirement)

MGSC 390,490,590 and two courses from the following: 494,591, 594.

4. Electives (16—27 hours)

 

 

New Wording (Department of Computer Science and Engineering)

Degree Requirements

In addition to the general education and progression requirements of the College of Engineering and Information Technology, a grade of C or better is required in MATH 174 and all CSCE courses applied to the degree.
Bachelor of Science—Major in Computer Information Systems (120 hours)
ENGL 101, 102, 462 (9 hours)
THSP 140 (3 hours)
Liberal Arts (18 hours)
MATH 174, 141, 142 (11 hours)
STAT 509 (3 hours)
Laboratory sciences (8 hours including two labs)
MGSC 390, 490, 590, and two of 494, 591, 594 (15 hours)
ACCT 222 (3 hours)
ECON 224 (3 hours)
CSCE 145, 146, 205, 213, 240, 245, 311, 330, 350, 495, 520 (35 hours)
Major elective (CSCE course numbered above 500) (3 hours)
Free electives (9 hours)

The liberal arts courses must include at least one history course, one fine arts course, and one social science course. In addition, demonstration of proficiency in one foreign language equivalent to the minimum passing grade on the exit examination in the 122 course is required. Up to six hours of foreign language courses may be counted towards the liberal arts requirement. The department maintains a list of approved humanities and social science electives.

CSCE 211 and 212 may be taken instead of CSCE 213.

 

8. Bachelor of Science in Computer Science

 

Change in curriculum

 

The curriculum for the Bachelor of Science in Computer Science degree is to be listed under the new Department of Computer Science and Engineering as shown below. The current curriculum of this program under the Department of Computer Science, given on page 223 of the 1999-2000 Undergraduate Studies Bulletin, is shown for reference.

Old Wording (Department of Computer Science page 223 of the 1999-2000 Undergraduate Studies Bulletin)

Degree Requirements

Bachelor of Science in Computer Science Degree

(130 hours)

1. General Education Requirements (71—82 hours)

The following courses may fulfill some general education and application area requirements and must be completed for the B.S. degree: CSCI 145,146; MATH 141, 142,174,241,526; STAT .509; ENGL 462. A grade of C or higher is required in CSCI 145 and 146 and MATH 174. Approved Group V courses are: BIOL 111, 112, 113; CHEM 111, 112; GEOL 101, 301, 311, 321, 331; MSCI 101, 102; or the Honors College equivalents.

2. Major Requirements (33 hours)

CSCI.21 3,220,240,330,411,551,640, and 12 additional hours of approved CSCI courses numbered above 500.

3. Application Area* (9 hours)

4. Other Program Requirements (8 hours)

PHYS 211, PHYS 212L, PHYS 212, PHYS 2l2L must be completed in addition to the eight hours of science in Group V of the general education requirements.

5. Electives (0—9 hours)

*The application area replaces the cognate requirement for this degree.

 

New Wording (Department of Computer Science and Engineering)

Degree Requirements

In addition to the general education and progression requirements of the College of Engineering and Information Technology, a grade of C or better is required in MATH 174 and all CSCE courses applied to the degree.

Bachelor of Science in Computer Science (122 hours)

ENGL 101, 102, 462 (9 hours)
THSP 140 (3 hours)
Liberal Arts (18 hours)
MATH 174, 141, 142, 241, 526 (18 hours)
STAT 509 (3 hours)
PHYS 211, 211L, 212, 212L (8 hours)
Laboratory science (4 hours)
CSCE 145, 146, 213, 240, 245, 311, 330, 350, 355, 495 (32 hours)
Major electives (CSCE courses numbered above 500) (12 hours)
Application area (9 hours)
Free electives (6 hours)

The liberal arts courses must include at least one history course, one fine arts course, and one social science course. In addition, demonstration of proficiency in one foreign language equivalent to the minimum passing grade on the exit examination in the 122 course is required. Up to six hours of foreign language courses may be counted towards the liberal arts requirement. The department maintains a list of approved humanities and social science electives.

The laboratory science course must be selected from the following list: BIOL 101, CHEM 111, GEOL 101, 301, 331, MSCI 111.

CSCE 211 and 212 may be taken instead of CSCE 213

 

Courses to be Changed

All EECE Designators Changed to ELCT Designators

A. EECE Designator to ELCT Designator Only

Undergraduate Courses

Ref: pages 119-120 of the 1999-2000 Undergraduate Studies Bulletin

Current Form                                                                                                                 Proposed Form

EECE 499 – Special Problems.                                                                                                                               ELCT 499 – Special Problems.

B. Designator and Prerequisite Changes Only

Undergraduate Courses

Ref: pages 119-120 of the 1999-2000 Undergraduate Studies Bulletin

Current Form

Proposed Form

EECE 221 – Circuits I. (3) (Prereq: MATH 142)

EECE 331 – Control Systems. (3) (Prereq: EECE 222)

EECE 332 – Fundamentals of Communications Systems. (3) (Prereq or Coreq: EECE 371)

EECE 353 – Modeling of Electrical Systems. (3) (Prereq: EECE 222, EECE 351)

EECE 361 – Electromagnetics I. (3)  (Prereq: PHYS 212, MATH 241, EECE 222)

EECE 362 – Electromagnetics II. (3) (Prereq: EECE 361)

ECE 371 – Electronics. (3) (Prereq: EECE 211, EECE 222)

EECE 551 – Power Systems Design and Analysis. (3) (Prereq: EECE 302, EECE 361)

EECE 553 – Electromechanical Energy Conversion. (3) (Prereq: EECE 302, EECE 361)

EECE 566 – Introduction to Optoelectronics. (3)    (Prereq: EECE 361)

EECE 572 – Power Electronics. (3) (Prereq: EECE 371)

EECE 575 – Advanced Electronics. (3) (Prereq: EECE 371)

EECE 580 – Audio Engineering. (3) (Prereq: EECE 222, EECE 371)

ELCT 221 – Circuits I. (3) (Prereq: MATH 142, ELCT 102)

ELCT 331 – Control Systems. (3) (Prereq: ELCT 321)

ELCT 332 – Fundamentals of Communications Systems.
 (3) (Prereq: ELCT 321, ELCT 371)

ELCT 353 – Modeling of Electrical Systems. (3)
 (Prereq: ELCT 350, ELCT 371)

ELCT 361 – Electromagnetics I. (3)
 (Prereq: PHYS 212, MATH 241, ELCT 222)

ELCT 362 – Electromagnetics II. (3)  (Prereq: ELCT 361)

ELCT 371 – Electronics. (3) (Prereq: CSCE 211, ELCT 222)

ELCT 551 – Power Systems Design and Analysis. (3)
 (Prereq: ELCT 332, ELCT 362)

ELCT 553 – Electromechanical Energy Conversion. (3)
(Prereq: ELCT 331, ELCT 362, ELCT 301)

ELCT 566 – Introduction to Optoelectronics. (3)
 (Prereq: ELCT 362, ELCT 363)

ELCT 572 – Power Electronics. (3)  (Prereq: ELCT 371, ELCT 331)

ELCT 575 – Advanced Electronics. (3) (Prereq: ELCT 371)

ELCT 580 – Audio Engineering. (3)  (Prereq: ELCT 371, ELCT 321)

 

 

 

 

C. Designator, Prerequisite, and Title Changes Only

Undergraduate Courses

Ref: pages 119-120 of the 1999-2000 Undergraduate Studies Bulletin

Current Form Proposed Form
EECE 201 – ECE Laboratory I. (3) (Prereq: EECE 211, Prereq or Coreq: EECE 222)

EECE 402 – Electrical Engineering Project Design II. (3) (Prereq: EECE 401)

ELCT 201 – EE Laboratory I. (3)  (Prereq: CSCE 211, ELCT 102, Prereq or Coreq: ELCT 222)

ELCT 402 – Electrical Engineering Project Design. (3)
 (Prereq: ELCT 401)

 

 

 

D. Designator, Prerequisite, Title, and Description Changes

Undergraduate Courses

Ref: pages 119-120 of the 1999-2000 Undergraduate Studies Bulletin

 

 

Current Form 

Proposed Form

EECE 222 – Circuits II. (3) (Prereq: MATH 242 and a Grade of C or better in EECE 221) Continuation of linear circuit design and analysis. 

EECE 301 – ECE Laboratory II. (3) (Prereq: EECE 201, EECE 212) Design, implementation of programmable electronics systems

EECE 401 – Electrical Engineering Project Design I. (3) (Prereq: EECE 302) Selected design projects.

ECE 561 – Microwave Engineering. (3) (Prereq: EECE 361) Introductory concepts in microwave…. 

EECE 563 – Semiconductor Materials. (3) Crystal structures, band structures, carrier statistics, pn junctions, bipolar transistors.

EECE 573 – Fundamentals of VLSI Chip Design. (3) (Prereq: EECE 372) An introductory level approach to the design of VLSI circuits, including standard processed, circuit design…. 

EECE 574 – Microelectronic Devices and Fabrication. (3) (Prereq: EECE 361, EECE 371) Semiconductor devices used in integrated circuits, including their design and fabrication.

ELCT 222 - Signals & Systems. (3) (Prereq: Grade of C
or better in ELCT 221, MATH 242) Introduction to signal processing and linear systems.

ELCT 301 - EE Laboratory II. (3) (Prereq: ELCT 201, ELCT 371, CSCE 212)  Design and implementation of programmable electronics systems and other electronic circuits.

ELCT 401 – Control Systems Laboratory. (3) (Prereq: ELCT 301,  ELCT 321, ELCT 331) Control systems design.

ELCT 561 – Advanced Electromagnetics. (3) (Prereq: ELCT 362) Applications of electromagnetic concepts in high-frequency systems.

ELCT 563 – Advanced Semiconductor Materials. (3)
 (Prereq: ELCT 363) Crystal structures, energy-band theory, and charge-carrier physics

ELCT 573 – High Speed Digital Systems. (3)
(Prereq: ELCT 371, ECT 361) Introduction to digital system analysis and design.

ELCT 574 - Semiconductor Electronic Devices. (3)
(Prereq: ELCT 363, ELCT 371) Semiconductor device behavior and  design for use in integrated circuits, discrete components and modules.

 

 

E. EECE Courses to be Dropped

The following EECE designated courses are not being replaced with equivalent ELCT courses. These courses are no longer needed to support our program and should be dropped.

Undergraduate Courses

Ref: pages 119-120 of the 1999-2000 Undergraduate Studies Bulletin

EECE 302 – ECE Laboratory III.

EECE 552 – Power Systems Planning and Operations Design.

EECE 565 – Optics, Theory and Applications. [=PHYS 514]

 

 

F. New ELCT Courses to be Added

(New Course Proposal Forms Attached)

Undergraduate Courses

Ref: pages 119-120 of the 1999-2000 Undergraduate Studies Bulletin

ELCT 101 – Electrical and Electronics Engineering

ELCT 102 – Instrument Control

ELCT 321 – Digital Signal Processing

ELCT 350 – Computer Modeling of Electrical Systems.

ELCT 363 – Introduction to Semiconductor Materials.

ELCT 531 – Digital Control Systems.

ELCT 576 – Semiconductor Laboratory.

 

 

C. College of Engineering and Information Technology

Changes in curriculum, University Bulletin, p. 115 and pages 114 and 115.

Chemical, Civil, Electrical, Mechanical, Computer and Computer Science

NOTE: The curriculum change listed above is not available through the Web at this time. But a printed copy has been sent to your deans, department chairs, and senators.

 

II. COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS

A. Film Studies Program

NOTE: The new program for Film Studies is not available through the Web at this time. But a printed copy has been sent to

your deans, department chairs, and senators. 

B. Department of French and Classics

Change in credit hours

FROM: FREN 350 FRENCH LANGUAGE STUDY IN FRANCE. (6)

TO: FREN 350 FRENCH LANGUAGE STUDY IN FRANCE. (1-6)

C. Department of Germanic, Slavic and East Asian Languages

New course

GERM 280 GERMAN CULTURE AND CIVILIZATON. (3) Survey of German literature, culture and heritage from the middle ages to the present. Taught in English.

D. Linguistics Program

New course

LING 514 CONTRASTIVE ENGLISH-SPANISH PHONETICS AND AND PHONOLOGY. [=SPAN 517] (3) Introduction to the study of phonetics and phonology and their application to the sounds and sound systems of English and Spanish. Includes transcription practice and discussion of relevance to teaching.

E. Department of Spanish, Italian and Portuguese

New course

SPAN 517 CONTRASTIVE ENGLISH-SPANISH PHONETICS AND PHONOLOGY. [=LING 514] (3) Introduction to the study of phonetics and phonology and their application to the sounds and sound systems of English and Spanish. Includes transcription practice and discussion of relevance to teaching.

 

III. SCHOOL OF MUSIC

Change in credit hours

FROM: MUSC 269 BEGINNING PIANO ACCOMPANYING. (3)

TO: MUSC 269 BEGINNING PIANO ACCOMPANYING. (3) (1 hour; repeatable for credit)

IV. COLLEGE OF NURSING 

Change in prerequisites and description

FROM: NURS 316 BIOPHYSICAL PATHOLOGY. (3) Prereq: NURS 220, 309) Pathology associated with biophysical alterations.

TO: NURS 316 BIOPHYSICAL PATHOLOGY. (3) (Prereq: CHEM 102, NURS 220; Prereq or coreq: NURS 309) Pathology associated with biophysical alterations.

V. COLLEGE OF SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS

A. Department of Geological Sciences

Change in prerequisites

FROM: GEOL 503 REGIONAL STRATIGRAPHY AND BIOSTRATIGRAPHY OF NORTH AMERICA. (3) (Prereq: GEOL 351; senior standing)

TO: GEOL 503 REGIONAL STRATIGRAPHY AND BIOSTRATIGRAPHY OF NORTH AMERICAN. (3) (Prereq: senior standing)

FROM: GEOL 511 ADVANCED PALEONTOLOGY. [=MSCI 511] (3) (Prereq: GEOL 311)

TO: GEOL 511 ADVANCED PALEONTOLOGY. [=511] (3) (Prereq: GEOL 305)

FROM: GEOL 516 SEDIMENTOLOGY. (4) (Prereq: GEOL 301, 522 or the consent of instructor).

TO: GEOL 516 SEDIMENTOLOGY. (4) (Prereq: GEOL 301. 522 or the consent of the instructor)

FROM: GEOL 522 OPTICAL MINERALOGY. (3) (Prereq: GEOL 321 or consent of instructor)

TO: GEOL 522 OPTICAL MINERALOGY. (3) (Prereq: GEOL 202 or consent of instructor)

FROM : GEOL 526 IGNEOUS PETROLOGY. (4) (Prereq: GEOL 522)

TO: GEOL 526 IGNEOUS PETROLOGY. (4) (Prereq: GEOL 202)

FROM: GEOL 527 METAMORPHIC PETROLOGY. (4) (Prereq: GEOL 522)

TO: GEOL 527 METAMORPHIC PETROLOGY. (4) (Prereq: GEOL 202

FROM: GEOL 543 NON-METALLIC ECONOMIC GEOLOGY. (3) (Prereq: GEOL 321 or consent of the instructor)

TO: GEOL 543 NON-METALLIC ECONOMIC GEOLOGY. (3) (Prereq: GEOL 202 and GEOL 325 or consent of instructor)

FROM: GEOL 544 METALLIC ECONOMIC GEOLOGY. (3) (Prereq: GEOL 101, 321)

TO: GEOL 544 METALLIC ECONOMIC GEOLOGY. (3) (Prereq: GEOL 202 and GEOL 345 or consent of the instructor)

FROM: GEOL 550 SEDIMENTARY SIMULATIONS AND SEQUENCE STRATIGRAPHY. [=MSCI 550] (4) (Prereq: GEOL 301 or consent of instructor)

TO: GEOL 550 SEDIMENTARY SIMULATIONS AND SEQUENCE STRATIGRAPHY. [=MSCI 550] (4) (Prereq: GEOL 325 or consent of instructor)

Deletion

GEOL 590 ROCK MECHANICS. (3)

 

B. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CARDIOVASCULAR TECHNOLOGY.

New Major

NOTE: The new Bachelor of Science in Cardiovascular Technology is not available through the Web at this time. But a printed copy has been sent to your deans, department chairs, and senators.

VI. MAY SESSION COURSES. (For the Senate’s information)

Department of Germanic, Slavic and East Asian Languages

RUSS 105M AN INTENSIVE INTRODUCTION TO THE RUSSIAN LANGUAGE. (3) Course focuses on the fundamental structures of Russian and develops basic listening, reading, writing and speaking skills. It does not fulfill foreign language requirements.