REPORT: COMMITTEE ON CURRICULA AND COURSES

 

(For consideration by the Faculty Senate at itís June 27, 2000 meeting)

The Committee requests that any department which has a proposal being recommended by the Committee on Curricula and Courses provide a spokesperson to attend the Faculty Senate meeting in which said proposal is to be recommended. Please contact in Dave Berube in advance if errors are noted.

Telephone: 777-6663 or E-mail: berube@sc.edu

 

Table Of Contents
I. College of Engineering
II. College of Education
III. College of Hospitality, Retail and Sport Management
IV. College of Journalism and Mass Communications
V. College of Liberal Arts
VI. School of Music
VII. College of Nursing
VIII. School of Public Health
IX. College of Science and Mathematics
X. Experiment Courses

 

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I. COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

Civil and Environmental Engineering

 

Old Wording (page 117 of the 1999-2000 Undergraduate Studies Bulletin)

New Wording

Degree Requirements
Curriculum in Civil and Environmental Engineering (132 hours)

Degree Requirements
Curriculum in Civil and Environmental Engineering (127 hours)

ENGL 101, 102 (6 hours)
Liberal Arts (18 hours)
MATH 141, 142, 241, 242 (14 hours)
CHEM 111, 112 (8 hours)
PHYS 211, 211L, 212, 212L (8 hours)
UNIV 101 for engineers (3 hours)
ENGR 102, 200 (5 hours)
ENGR 210, 260, 290, 360, EECE 221 (15 hours)
ECIV 301, 303, 303L, 320, 327, 330, 330L, 350, 350L, 360, 360L, 405, 530, 562 or 563, 325 or 520, 470, ECON 421, STAT 509(43 hours)
Engineering Electives (12 hours)

ENGL 101, 102 (6 hours) Liberal Arts (12 hours)
MATH 141, 142, 241, 242 (14 hours)
STAT 509 (3 hours)
CHEM 111 (4 hours)
PHYS 211, 211L (4 hours)
Laboratory Science Electives (8 hours)
ENGR 102, 200, 210, 260, 360 (14 hours)
ENGR 290 or ELCT 221 (3 hours)
ECIV 301, 303, 303L, 320, 330, 330L, 350, 350L, 360, 360L, 470 (29 hours)
ECIV Electives (21 hours)
Engineering, Science, or Mathematics Electives (6 hours)
Free Elective (3 hours)

The liberal arts courses must include at least one history course and one fine arts course.

The laboratory science courses are to be with laboratory and may be chosen from biology, chemistry, geological sciences, marine science, and physics.

ECIV electives must include one course from each of the four career areas of Environmental, Geotechnical, Structures, and Water Resources. The Department maintains a list of courses for each area.

The Department maintains a list of acceptable engineering, science, or mathematics electives.

Electrical Engineering

 

Old Wording (Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, page 119 of the 1999-2000 Undergraduate Studies Bulletin)

New Wording

Degree Requirements

Curriculum in Electrical Engineering (125 hours)

Degree Requirements
Curriculum in Electrical Engineering (121 hours)

ENGL 101, 102 (6 hours)

Liberal Arts (18 hours)
MATH 141, 142, 241, 242 (14 hours)
STAT 509 (3 hours)
CHEM 111, 112 (8 hours)
PHYS 211, 211L, 212, 212L (8 hours)
UNIV 101 for engineers (3 hours)
ENGR 102, 200 (5 hours)
Core Engineering Elective (3 hours)
EECE 201, 211, 212, 221, 222, 301, 302, 331, 332, 351, 353, 361, 371, 401, 402 (45 hours)
Major Electives (12 hours)

ENGL 101, 102 (6 hours)
Liberal Arts (9 hours)
ECON 421 (3 hours)
MATH 141, 142, 241, 242 (14 hours)
STAT 509 (3 hours)
CHEM 111 (4 hours)
PHYS 211, 211L, 212, 212L (8 hours)
CSCE 145, 146, 211, 212 (14 hours)
ELCT 101, 102, 201, 221, 222, 301, 321, 331, 350, 361, 363, 371, 401, 402 (42 hours)
Career Track Electives (15 hours)
Free Elective (3 hours)

The liberal arts courses must include at least one history course, one fine arts course, and one course in technical literature or ethics. See department for approved list of Humanities and Social Science Electives.

See department for list of approved career tracks and courses for each track. 5 of 6 courses listed must be completed in at least one career track.

Any course at the University may be taken as a free elective, subject to approval by the studentís advisor.

 

Mechanical Engineering

 

Old Wording (page 121 of the 1999-2000 Undergraduate Studies Bulletin)

New Wording

Degree Requirements
Mechanical Engineering Curriculum (131 hours)

ENGL 101, 102 (6 hours)
Liberal Arts (18 hours)
MATH 141, 142, 241, 242 (14 hours)
CHEM 111, 112 (8 hours)
PHYS 211, 211L, 212, 212L (8 hours)
UNIV 101 for engineers (3 hours)
ENGR 102, 200 (5 hours)
ENGR 210, 260, 290, 330, 360, EECE 221 (18 hours)
EMCH 301, 327, 332, 354, 361, 367, 371, 394, 427, 428, 467 (33 hours)
Engineering electives (18 hours)

Degree Requirements
Mechanical Engineering Curriculum (125 hours)

ENGL 101, 102 (6 hours)
Freshman Elective (3 hours)
Liberal Arts Electives (12 hours)
MATH 141, 142, 241, 242 (14 hours)
CHEM 111, 112 (8 hours)
PHYS 211, 211L, 212, 212L (8 hours)
ENGR 102, 200, 210, 260, 290, 330, 360, ELCT 221 (23 hours)
EMCH 301, 327, 332, 354, 361, 367, 371, 394, 427, 428, 467 (33 hours)
Engineering Electives (18 hours)

The liberal arts courses must include at least one history course and one fine arts course.

A listing of acceptable elective courses is maintained in the Department Office.

 

New courses

ECIV 555 PRINCIPLES OF SOLID WASTE ENGINEERING. (3) (Prereq: ECIV 350, graduate standing or approval of the instructor) Fundamentals and engineering principles of solid waste generation, characterization, collection and transport, source reduction and recycling, physical, chemical and biological treatment strategies. Includes a component on hazardous waste.

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II. COLLEGE OF EDUCATION

New course

EDTE 626 SERVICE LEARNING FOR SCHOOL, COMMUNITY AND WORKPLACE RESPONSIBILITY. (3) Assist school personnel in designing academic, personal, civic and workplace responsibility.

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III. COLLEGE OF HOSPITALITY, RETAIL, AND SPORT MANAGEMENT

Administrative Information Management

New courses

AIME 345 INTRODUCTION TO OFFICE NETWORKING. (3) (Prereq: AIME 164 and AIME 343) Design, architecture, standards, implementation, and administration of a client-server office networking environment.

AIME 346 CONCEPTS AND APPLICATIONS IN THE OFFICE ENVIRONMENT II. (3) (Prereq: AIME 164 and AIME 343) The interaction and analysis of electronic spreadsheets.

AIME 348 CONCEPTS AND APPLICATIONS IN THE OFFICE ENVIRONMENT III. (3) (Prereq: AIME 164 and AIME 343) Application of office records and information management using current database software.

AIME 545 TELECOMMUNICATIONS. (3) (Prereq: AIME 445 or consent of instructor) Telecommunications systems, applications, and equipment allowing for the global dissemination of information.

Change in prerequisites

FROM: AIME 342 BUSINESS COMMUNICATIONS. (3)

TO: AIME 342 BUSINESS COMMUNICATIONS. (3) (Prereq: AIME 264 or AIME 343)

FROM: AIME 370 RECORDS MANAGEMENT. (3)

TO: AIME 370 RECORDS MANAGEMENT. (3) (Prereq: AIME 352)

FROM: AIME 448 PROFESSIONAL INTERNSHIP. (3)

TO: AIME 448 PROFESSIONAL INTERNSHIP. (3) (Prereq: AIME 447 and AIME 564)

FROM: AIME 560 ANALYSIS AND APPLICATIONS OF INTEGRATED SOFTWARE. (3)

TO: AIME 560 ANALYSIS AND APPLICATIONS OF INTEGRATED SOFTWARE. (3) (Prereq: AIME 352 and AIME 370)

FROM: AIME 564 OFFICE INFORMATION SYSTEMS. (3)

TO:AIME 564 OFFICE INFORMATION SYSTEMS. (3) (Prereq: AIME 560)

Change in title, prerequisites, and description

FROM: AIME 343 WORD PROCESSING APPLICATIONS IN THE BUSINESS OFFICE. (3) Word processing concepts and applications.

TO: AIME 343 CONCEPTS AND APPLICATIONS IN THE OFFICE ENVIRONMENT I. (3) (Prereq: AIME 164) Critical electronic office applications, centering upon advanced electronic word processing, operating systems, and presentation graphics.

FROM: AIME 445 OFFICE TELECOMMUNICATIONS APPLICATIONS. (3) Office-oriented telecommunications systems applications, and equipment; interconnecting technology with other information processing equipment in the automated office.

TO: AIME 445 ADVANCED NETWORKING FOR THE OFFICE. (3) (Prereq: AIME 345) Advanced administration of office client/server networks with major emphasis on network operating system software.

FROM: AIME 447 OFFICE ADMINISTRATION AND SUPERVISION. (3) Office management, staff development, compensation plans, and new technological developments.

TO: AIME 447 END-USER SUPPORT IN THE OFFICE. (3) (Prereq: AIME 370 and AIME 342) Overview of end-user technical support in the office with a focus on troubleshooting skills, tools, and techniques.

FROM: AIME 352 HUMAN FACTORS AND AUTOMATED Issues. (3) Ergonomics related to office systems, organizational goals and policiies, employee motivation, productivity and job satisfaction.

TO: AIME 352 END-USER INTERFACE DESIGN FOR THE OFFICE. (3)

(Prereq: AIME 346 and AIME 348) Development of graphical user interfaces for office applications.

FROM: AIME 590 SPECIAL TOPICS IN OFFICE INFORMATION. (3) Advanced concepts, issues, and trends in office iinformation systems. Course content varies and will be announced in the schedule of classes by suffix and title. May be repeated once for credit.

TO: AIME 590 SPECIAL TOPICS IN OFFICE INFORMATION MANAGEMENT. (3) (Prereq: upper level and/or consent of instructor) Advanced concepts, issues, and trends in office information management. Course content varies and will be announced in the schedule of classes by suffix and title. May be repeated once for credit.

 

Change in curriculum, University Bulletin, page UG 88

Current

Administrative Information Management
This major in the Department of Retailing offers a degree program which prepares graduates for careers in the management of information systems. The program prepares graduates to analyze and design administrative office systems, select and implement appropriate technologies, and evaluate and manage personnel. The program includes a core of liberal arts courses, specialized computer technology and management courses related to the field, and an internship in the industry.

Progression Requirements for Administrative Information Management

In addition to the College progression requirements, in order to enroll in the Professional Division of Administrative Information Management, a student must complete the 45 hours in the courses indicated below with a minimum grade point average of 2.0. Students who do not meet the specific course, semester hour, and grade point average requirements for progression must continue in the Pre-Professional Division or change to another major. Graduation requires a 2.0 GPA.

All students must demonstrate keyboarding proficiency. This keyboarding proficiency may be satisfied by satisfactory completion of a keyboarding course or by an examination as administered by the College of Applied Professional Sciences. All students must meet keyboarding proficiency during their first year in the AIME major.

1. Curriculum for the Pre-Professional Division (45 credits)

General Education (12 credits)
ENGL 101 and 102....................................6
Mathematics.........................................6
To be satisfied using one of the following options:

  1. MATH 122 or higher and a second higher MATH course, except MATH 221, 222;
  2. MATH 122 or 141 and an additional course in computer science, statistics, or PHIL 110 or 111;
  3. two courses in one of the following areas: computer science, statistics, or PHIL 110 and 111.

Office Administrative Information Management Core Courses: AIME 164, 240, 243, 264...................................12

Other Courses...........................21

It is recommended that students complete the courses required in the University core.

2. Restricted Courses
The following courses are restricted to students enrolled in the Professional Division of Administrative Information Management or those students who receive special permission of the department chair: AIME 444, 445, 447, 448, 560, 564.

3. Additional Course Grade Requirements
All courses used to meet major or professional specialization requirements must be completed with a grade of C or better.

Degree Requirements for Administrative Information Management

1. General Education Requirements

Humanities and Social Sciences (36-37)

ENGL 101, 102..............................................6
ENGL 287 and one course from ENGL 282 or above................6
Eight courses from the College of Humanities and Social Sciences 24-25

  1. at least one course in history;
  2. ARTE 360;
  3. THSP 140;
  4. PSYC 101;
  5. ECON 224;
  6. foreign languages--students shall demonstrate in one foreign language the ability to comprehend the topic and main ideas in written and, with the exception of Latin and Ancient Greek, spoken texts on familiar subjects. This ability can be demonstrated by achieving a score of two (2) or better on a USC foreign language proficiency test. Those failing to do so must satisfactorily complete equivalent study of foreign language at USC.
  7. fine arts elective (art, music, theater).

Mathematics and Sciences (13-15)

Six to seven hours in numerical and/or analytical reasoning are required 6-7
This requirement may be fulfilled in one of the following ways:

  1. MATH 122 or 141, plus an additional course from PHIL 110, 111, mathematics (at the next highest level), computer science, or statistics; or
  2. two courses from one of the following fields-philosophy (110 and 111 only) or computer science or statistics.
  3. Two courses (one of which must have a laboratory) from the following sciences: astronomy, biology, chemistry, geological sciences, marine science, or physics.................................7-8

2. Major Requirements
Related Courses (21)

RETL 161 Functional Accounting I or BADM 225
RETL 162 Functional Accounting II or BADM 226
AIME 240 Business Law or BADM 324
RETL 344 Personnel Organization and Supervision
BADM 371 Principles of Management
Approved Elective
Approved Elective

Administrative Information Management Major Courses (39)
AIME 164 Introduction to Office Automation
AIME 243 Word Processing Concepts and Technology
AIME 264 Computer Applications in Business
AIME 342 Business Communications
AIME 352 Human Factors and Automated Issues
AIME 362 Administrative Communication
AIME 370 Records Management
AIME 444 Corporate Training and Development
AIME 445 Office Telecommunications Applications
AIME 447 Office Administration and Supervision
AIME 448 Professional Internship
AIME 560 Analysis and Applications of Integrated Software
AIME 564 Office Information Systems

3. General Electives.............12

Total hours required.................121-124

Proposed

Administrative Information Management
This major in the Department of Retailing offers a degree program that prepares graduates for careers in the management of information systems. The program prepares graduates to analyze and design administrative office systems, select and implement appropriate technologies, and evaluate and manage personnel. The program includes a core of liberal arts courses, specialized computer technology and management courses related to the field, and an internship in the industry.

Progression Requirements for Administrative Information Management

In addition to the College progression requirements, in order to enroll in the Professional Division of Administrative Information Management, a student must complete the 45 hours in the courses indicated below with a minimum grade point average of 2.0. Students who do not meet the specific course, semester hour, and grade point average requirements for progression must continue in the Pre-Professional Division or change to another major. Graduation requires a 2.0 GPA.

All students must demonstrate keyboarding proficiency. This keyboarding proficiency may be met by satisfactory completion of a keyboarding course or by an examination as administered by the College of Hospitality, Retail, and Sport Management. All students must meet keyboarding proficiency during their first year in the AIME major.

1. Curriculum for the Pre-Professional Division (45 credits)

General Education (12 credits)
ENGL 101 and 102....................................6
Mathematics.........................................6
To be satisfied using one of the following options:
  1. MATH 122 or higher and a second higher MATH course, except MATH 221, 222;
  2. MATH 122 or 141 and an additional course in computer science (above CSCI 101), statistics, or PHIL 110 or 111;
  3. two courses in one of the following areas: computer science (above CSCI 101), statistics, or PHIL 110 and 111.

Administrative Information Management Core Courses: AIME 164, 343, 346, 348, 342, 345, programming class...............21

Other Courses....................................12

It is recommended that students complete the courses required in the University core.

2. Restricted Courses The following courses are restricted to students enrolled in the Professional Division of Administrative Information Management or those students who receive special permission from the department chair: AIME 445, 447, 448, 545, 560, 564.

3. Additional Course Grade Requirements All courses used to meet major requirements must be completed with a grade of C or better.

Degree Requirements for Administrative Information Management

1. General Education Requirements

Humanities and Social Sciences (33-34)

ENGL 101, 102....................................6 One course from ENGL 282-286........................3 Eight courses from the College of Humanities and Social Sciences...24-25

  1. one course in history;
  2. one fine arts class (art, music, theater);
  3. THSP 140;
  4. one course from PSYC or SOCY;
  5. ECON 224;
  6. one course in GINT;
  7. foreign languages--students shall demonstrate in one foreign language the ability to comprehend the topic and main ideas in written and, with the exception of Latin and Ancient Greek, spoken texts on familiar subjects. This ability can be demonstrated by achieving a score of two (2) or better on a USC foreign language proficiency test. Those failing to do so must satisfactorily complete equivalent study of foreign language at USC.

Mathematics and Sciences (13-15)

Six to seven hours in numerical and/or analytical reasoning are required................6-7
This requirement may be fulfilled in one of the following ways:

  1. MATH 122 or 141, plus an additional course from PHIL 110, 111, mathematics (at the next highest level), computer science, or statistics; or
  2. two courses from one of the following fields-philosophy (110 and 111 only) or computer science (above CSCE 101) or statistics.

Two courses (one of which must have a laboratory) from the following sciences: astronomy, biology, chemistry, geological sciences, marine science, or physics 7-8

2. Major Requirements
Related Courses (21)

RETL 261 Functional Accounting I
RETL 262 Functional Accounting II
AIME 240 Business Law or ACCT 324
STAT 110 or STAT 201 or MGSC 291

RETL 344 Personnel Org and Super or MGMT 371 Principles of Management
Approved Elective: Suggested Courses: AIME 444, RETL 310, HRTA 364 or SPTA 435
Programming Course Suggested courses include CSCE 145, 205, 206, 207, and 209

Administrative Information Management Major Courses (42)
AIME 164 Introduction to Office Automation
AIME 342 Business Communications
AIME 343 Concepts and Applications in the Office Environment I
AIME 345 Introduction to Office Networking
AIME 346 Concepts and Applications in the Office Environment II
AIME 348 Concepts and Applications in the Office Environment III
AIME 352 End-user Interface Design for the Office
AIME 370 Records Management
AIME 445 Advanced Networking for the Office
AIME 447 End User Support in the Office
AIME 448 Professional Internship
AIME 545 Telecommunications
AIME 560 Analysis and Applications of Integrated Software
AIME 564 Office Information Systems

3. Minor or General Electives................12-18

Total hours required.............................121-130

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IV. COLLEGE OF JOURNALISM AND MASS COMMUNICATIONS

Change in prerequisites and description

FROM: JOUR 502 ADVANCED RADIO PROGRAMMING. (3) (Prereq: JOUR 325 and either 434 or 452, or equivalent) Practical application to radio programming of the various skills and principles acquired in prerequisite courses.

TO: JOUR 502 ADVANCED RADIO PROGRAMMING. (3) (Prereq: JOUR 325, 333/L and either 434 or 452, or equivalent) Practical application to radio programming of the various skills and principles acquired in prerequisite courses. Must be taken concurrently with JOUR 503, 526 and 534.

FROM: JOUR 503 ADVANCED TELEVISION PROGRAMMING. (3) (Prereq: JOUR 326 and either 434 or 452, or equivalent) Practical application to television programming of the various skills and principles acquired in prerequisite courses.

TO: JOUR 503 ADVANCED TELEVISION PROGRAMMING. (3) (Prereq: JOUR 326, 333/L and either 434 or 452, or equivalent) Practical application to television programming of the various skills and principles acquired in prerequisite courses. Must be taken concurrently with JOUR 502, 526 and 534.

FROM: JOUR 526 ADVANCED TV PRODUCTION AND DIRECTION. (3) (Prereq: JOUR 523 or consent of instructor) Technical and creative use of television video and audio equipment in public affairs, entertainment programs, commercials, public service, and promotional spot announcements.

TO: JOUR 526 ADVANCED TV PRODUCTION AND DIRECTION. (3) (Prereq: JOUR 523, 333L or consent of instructor) Technical and creative use of television video and audio equipment in public affairs, entertainment programs, commercials, public service, and promotional spot announcements. Must be taken concurrently with JOUR 502, 503 and 534.

Change in title, credit hours and description

FROM: JOUR 546 ADVANCED COPYEDITING. (3-6) (Prereq: JOUR 326 and 434) Production of public affairs programs.

TO: JOUR 546 ADVANCED COPY EDITING. (3) (Prereq: JOUR 333/333L and 434) Production of public affairs programs. Must be taken concurrently with JOUR 502, 503 and 526.

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V. COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS

A. Department of Geography

New courses

GEOG 348 BIOGEOGRAPHY. (3) Spatial distributions of plants and animals as they relate to historical biogeographic patterns and human impact on the biosphere.

GEOG 371 AIR POLLUTION CLIMATOLOGY. (3) Fundamentals, processes and issues associated with air pollution. Emphasis is on the role of the atmosphere, how air pollution affects surface climate, and how climate and meteorology influence air quality.

GEOG 430 THE GEOGRAPHY OF DISASTERS. (3) The study of disasters, their triggering mechanisms (natural, human, technological), their spatial distributions from local to global scales, and associated human responses.

GEOG 571 MICROCLIMATOLOGY. (4) (Prereq: GEOG 202 or consent of instructor) Field techniques and processes in the atmospheric boundary layer including radiation, soil heat fluxes, turbulence, momentum, latent and sensible heat fluxes, moisture, and evaporation.

GEOG 573 CLIMATIC CHANGE AND VARIABILITY. (3) (Prereq: GEOG 202 or equivalent) Observations and theories of climatic change and variability as they occur at different space and time-scales. Projections of future climates. Techniques used in climatic change research and impact analysis.

Change in title, prerequisites and description

FROM: GEOG 545 METEOROLOGY. (4) Study of weather and climate, their causes and controls. Three lectures and two laboratory hours per week.

TO: GEOG 545 SYNOPTIC METEOROLOGY. (4) (Prereq: GEOG 202 or equivalent) Analysis of snynoptic-scale circulation using weather maps, soundings, cross sections, thermodynamic diagrams, numerical models, and imagery.

Change in curriculum, University Bulletin, pages 157-158

NOTE: The curriculum change for the Department of Geography is not available through the Web. But a printed copy has been sent to your deans, department chairs, and senators.

 

B. Department of Germanic, Slavic and East Asian Languages and Literatures

New course

JAPA 350 JAPANESE CULTURE AND SOCIETY THROUGH FILM. (3) Examination of Japanese culture and contemporary society using selected films. Taught in English.

C. Department of History

Delete

HIST 538 GERMANY TO 1914. (3)

HIST 539 GERMANY SINCE 1914. (3)

HIST 548 EASTERN EUROPE IN THE TWENTIETH CENTURY. (3)

HIST 596 EVOLUTION OF WARFARE. (3)

New courses

HIST 300 THE HISTORIANíS CRAFT. (3) Explores the nature of historical evidence, the formulation of historical questions, and the construction of historical arguments using primary and secondary materials.

HIST 344 EASTERN EUROPE SINCE WWI. (3) Survey of states in the East-central and Southeastern Europe. Problems of national identity, modernization, and small state politics. Impact of WWII, the Cold War, fall of communism, and return to pluralism.

HIST 378 URBAN EXPERIENCE IN MODERN EUROPE. (3) Social and cultural impact of urbanization in Europe since 1789 through a comparison of major cities such as London, Paris, Vienna, and Berlin.

HIST 596 EVOLUTION OF WARFARE I. (3) A history of tactics, strategy, weapons, and logistics from 500 B.C. to A.D. 1400.

HIST 597 EVOLUTION OF WARFARE II. (3) [=ARMY 597] A history of tactics, strategy, weapons, and logistics from A.D. 1400 to present.

HIST 462 SOUTHERN INTELLECTUAL AND CULTURAL HISTORY. (Prereq: junior level) Intellectual and cultural developments characteristic of the Southern region from colonial times to the recent past.

Change in title and description

FROM: HIST 338 THE GERMANS SINCE HITLER. (3) The defeat of the Third Reich; occupation and division of Germany; political, social, economic, and cultural development of East and West Germany.

TO: HIST 338 MODERN GERMANY. (3) A survey of German history including political, cultural, social and economic developments unification in 1871 to the present.

D. Department of Psychology

New course

PSYC 565 PSYCHOLOGY OF PHYSICAL ACTIVITY. (3) [EXSC 410] (Prereq: PSYC 101, PSYC 228, or consent of instructor) Introduction to psychosocial factors in physical activity. Topics include mental health effects of exercise, behavior change theories applied to physical activity, and physical activity determinants and interventions.

E. Department of Theatre, Speech and Dance

New courses

THSP 219 INTRODUCTION TO THEATRE LABORATORY. (1) Study of health, safety, and other laboratory procedures in preparation for participation in scenic, lighting, costume, promotions, and performance labs. May not be repeated for credit.

THSP 221 STAGE MANAGEMENT LABORATORY. (2) (Prereq: THSP 219) Supervised participation in theatre stage management. May be repeated once for credit.

THSP 511 ARGUMENTS IN CULTURAL STUDIES. (3) The study of arguments from popular culture.

THSP 512 ARGUMENTS IN SCIENCE AND TECHOLOGY. (3) The study of arguments drawn from science and technology emphasizing how scientific methodologies are modified and corrupted to make persuasive appeals.

THSP 544 18TH AND 19TH CENTURY AMERICAN PUBLIC ADDRESS. (3) The discourse of selected American speakers whose speakers have played a significant role in shaping and reflecting the nationís development in the 18th and 19th centuries.

THSP 563 GREAT DEBATES. (3) A study of debates at the Constitutional Convention, Lincoln-Douglas debates (1858), vice-presidential and presidential debates, and other national debates.

THSP 564 SPEECHWRITING. (3) An exploration of the process of advanced policy advocacy emphasizing speechwriting strategies, issues management, and systematic advocacy campaigns.

Change in number

FROM: THSP 290 SMALL GROUP COMMUNICATION. (3)

TO: THSP 389 SMALL GROUP COMMUNICATION. (3)

Change in title

FROM: THSP 253 STAGECRAFT. (3)

TO: THSP 253 SCENIC TECHNOLOGY. (3)

FROM: THSP 554 THEATRE SAFETY. (3)

TO: THSP 554 PERFORMING ARTS SAFETY. (3)

Change in prerequisites

FROM: THSP 220 THEATRE LABORATORY. (1)

TO: THSP 220 THEATRE LABORATORY. (1) (Prereq: THSP 219)

FROM: THSP 570 ADVANCED ACTING I. (3)

TO: THSP 570 ADVANCED ACTING I. (3) (Prereq: THSP 240 or THSP 372, and THSP 370 (with a grade of B or above)

Change in number and title

FROM: THSP 469 COMMUNICATION IN THE LEGAL PROCESS. (3)

TO: THSP 543 LEGAL COMMUNICATION. (3)

Change in number and description

FROM: THSP 460 ADVANCED ARGUMENTATION AND DEBATE. (3) (Prereq: THSP 260 or consent of instructor) Theories and principles of debating across many settings. Emphasis on advanced intercollegiate debating.

TO: THSP 560 ADVANCED ARGUMENTATION AND DEBATE. (3) (Prereq: THSP 260 or consent of instructor) Theories and principles of debating across many settings. Emphasis on advanced intercollegiate debating.

Change in title and description

FROM: THSP 545 AMERICAN PUBLIC ADDRESS. (3) The oral discourse of selected American speakers whose speeches have played a significant role in shaping and reflecting the nationís development.

TO: THSP 545 20TH AND 21ST CENTURY AMERICAN PUBLIC ADDRESS. (3) Examines discourse of selected American speakers whose speeches have played a significant role in shaping and reflecting the nationís development in the 20th and 21st centuries.

FROM: THSP 549 SURVEY OF RHETORICAL THEORY. (3) Analysis, evaluation, and application of principal rhetorical theories. Includes analysis of performance texts.

TO: THSP 549 RHETORIC OF PERFORMANCE TEXTS. (3) Analysis, evaluation, and application of selected rhetorical theories. Course will focus on performance texts.

FROM: THSP 587 DRAMATIC PERFORMANCE FOR COMMUNICATION MEDIA. (3) (Prereq: THSP 170 or consent of instructor. The study and application of performance techniques suitable for specialized fields of communication media.

TO: THSP 587 FILM AND TELEVISION ACTING. (3) (Prereq: THSP 170) Theory and practice of film and television acting.

Change in curriculum, University Bulletin, page UG 186

NOTE:The curriculum change for the Department of Theatre, Speech and Dance is not available through the Web. But a printed copy has been sent to your deans, department chairs, and senators.

 

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VI. SCHOOL OF MUSIC

Change in designator, number, title, prerequisites and description

FROM: MUED 586 THE ARTICULATE BODY. [= THSP 586] (3) Theoretical and experimental exploration of the major body systems and developmental movements to bring more articulation to the body and more awareness and physical ease in performance.

TO: MUSC 581 THE ALEXANDER TECHNIQUE. (3) Theoretical/experimental exploration of major body systems and developmental movements to bring more articulation to the body and more awareness and physical ease in performance. For music and education students.

Change in University Bulletin, page 192

Present

Proposed

Minor in Music. The minor in music has prerequisites of six credits plus 18 credits of prescribed courses. Specific requirements are available from the music studies office. Consultation with an advisor in the School of Music is required.

Minor in Music.The minor in music requires a three (3) credit prerequisite (MUSC 115), ten (10) credits of core requirements, and eight (8) credits chosen from music electives. Consultation with the undergraduate director in the School of Music is required.

Cognate. All MUSC and MUED courses numbered 200 and above are appropriate for cognate courses in other departments or colleges.

The following courses may be used to satisfy the cognate requirements of undergraduate degrees offered by other schools and colleges on the USC campus:

MUSC 115, 116, 145, and all MUSC and MUED courses numbered 200 and above.

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VII. COLLEGE OF NURSING

Change in credit

FROM: NURS 503 CONGREGATIONAL NURSE ROLE. (1)

TO: NURS 503 CONGREGATIONAL NURSE ROLE. (2)

FROM: NURS 503A CONGREGATIONAL NURSE ROLE PRACTICUM. (2)

TO: NURS 503A CONGREGATIONAL NURSE ROLE PRACTICUM. (1)

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VIII. SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH

A. Department of Exercise Science

New course

EXSC 410 PSYCHOLOGY OF PHYSICAL ACTIVITY (3) [=PSYC 565] (Prereq: EXSC 224 or consent of instructor) Introduction to psychosocial factors in physical activity. Topics include mental health effects of exercise, behavior change theories applied to physical activity, and physical activity determinants and interventions.

B. Department of Environmental Health Sciences

New course

ENHS 680 ENVIRONMENTAL DECISION-MAKING: THE INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY APPROACH. (3)(Prereq: ENHS 660 or consent of instructor) Emphasizes the roles of information technologies in applied environmental and marine resource management. Provides practical experience in environmental assessment, modeling and decision-making.

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IX. COLLEGE OF SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS

A. Department of Computer Science

Change in designator, prerequisites and description

FROM: CSCI 561 NUMERICAL ANALYSIS. [=MATH 527] (3)(Prereq: MATH 242 or 520) Interpolation and approximation of functions, solution of algebraic equations, numerical differentiation and integration, solution of ordinary differential equations and boundary value problems. Computer implementation of algorithms.

TO: CSCE 561 NUMERICAL ANALYSIS. [=MATH 527] (3)(Prereq: MATH 242 or 520) Interpolation and approximation of functions; solution of algebraic equations; numerical differentiation and integration; numerical solutions of ordinary differential equations and boundary value problems; computer implementation of algorithms.

FROM: CSCI 551 THEORY OF COMPUTATION. [=MATH 562] (3)(Prereq: CSCI 213 and CSCI 330, or MATH 526, or MATH 544, or MATH 574) Basic theoretical principles of computer science as modeled by formal languages and automata; computability and computation complexity.

TO: CSCE 551 THEORY OF COMPUTATION. [=MATH 562] (3) (Prereq: CSCE 350 or MATH 526 or 544 or 574) Basic theoretical principles of computing as modeled by formal languages and automata; computability and computational complexity. Major credit may not be received for both CSCE 355 and CSCE 551.

B. Department of Mathematics

Deletions

MATH 341 ENGINEERING MATHEMATICS I. (3)

MATH 360 NUMERICAL CALCULUS. (3)

MATH 398 TOPICS IN COMPUTER APPLICATIONS. (3)

Change in prerequisites

FROM: MATH 111 BASIC COLLEGE MATHEMATICS. (3) (Prereq: qualification through placement or a grade of C or better in MATH 100)

TO: MATH 111 BASIC COLLEGE MATHEMATICS. (3) (Prereq: qualification through placement)

Change in description

FROM: MATH 242 ELEMENTARY DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS. (3) (Prereq: qualification through placement or a grade of C or better in MATH 142) Ordinary differential equations of first order, higher order linear equations, Laplace transform methods, series methods; numerical solution of differential equations. Applications to physical sciences and engineering. Introduction to programming desirable.

TO: MATH 242 ELEMENTARY DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS. (3) (Prereq: qualification through placement or a grade of C or better in MATH 142) Ordinary differential equations of first order, higher order linear equation, Laplace transform methods, series methods; numerical solutions of differential equations. Applications to physical sciences and engineering.

Change in designator, prerequisites and description

FROM: MATH 527 NUMERICAL ANALYSIS. [=CSCI 561] (3) (Prereq: MATH 242 or 520; or consent of department) Interpolation and approximation of functions, solution of algebraic equations, numerical differentiation and integration; solution of ordinary differential equations and boundary value problems. Computer implementation of algorithms.

TO: MATH 527 NUMERICAL ANALYSIS.[=CSCE 56] (3) (Prereq: MATH 242 or 520) Interpolation and approximation of functions; solution of algebraic equations; numerical differentiation and integration; numerical solutions of ordinary differential equations boundary value problems; computer implementation of algorithms.

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X. Experiment Courses: (For the Senateís information only)

COLLEGE OF SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS

Department of Mathematics

MATH 172X MATHEMATICAL MODELING FOR THE LIFE SCIENCES. (3) Prereq: C or better in MATH 122 or MATH 141) Developing models; difference equations; vectors, trigonometry, polar coordinates; matrices, eigenvalues, eivenvectors, sum and product rules combinatorics, permutations, combinations, elementary probability theory; basic techniques of integration; symmetry.