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Questions

If you have any questions about the content or organization of this event, contact Nina L. Glisson at (803) 777-8158 or ninal@mailbox.sc.edu

For registration questions please contact Jennie Duval at (803)777-3799 or jlduval@mailbox.sc.edu.

Information about this Conference and other events sponsored by the Center can be found at www.sc.edu/fye.

 

Preconference Workshops

(Continental breakfast and lunch provided for all workshop participants)

These workshops offer extended presentation, discussion, and interaction on a particular topic or area of interest.

Continuing education units (CEUs) can be earned for preconference workshops: .55 CEUs for full-day workshops and .35 CEUs for half-day workshops.


W-1
These Things We Know for Sure: Key Components and Strategies for a Successful First-Year Experience Initiative
February 7, 2015
8:00 am - 12:00 noon
$135

Daniel O'Neill, Associate Professor, Department of Counseling and Human Development; L. Lynn Marquez, Professor of Geology; Linda L. McDowell, Coordinator of the First-Year Experience; Carol Y. Phillips, Associate Provost Emerita - Millersville University of Pennsylvania

After 10 years of first-year experience programming and extensive qualitative and quantitative assessment these things we know for sure: (a) first-year relationships have a powerful influence on student success, (b) required first-year service-learning positively impacts student attitudes and behavior throughout their college careers, (c) a seminar structure enhances first-year students' ability to meet demanding academic expectations, (d) a flexible design of first-year seminars is crucial in meeting the diverse needs of students and academic programs, and (e) leadership is vital for the long-term success and sustainability of the program. Every educational institution has a diverse set of first-year learners with specific transition and curricular needs. This workshop provides guidance for faculty and administrators attempting to create a broadly based FYE program. In breakout sessions and discussions, participants will examine ways of implementing these successful approaches at their home institutions.


W-2
Developing and Assessing Integrative Summer Experiences to Support the Transition and Success of First-Year Students
February 7, 2015
8:00 am - 12:00 noon
$135

Frank E. Ross, Vice President for Student Affairs, Professor, Educational Leadership and Development - Northeastern Illinois University; Scott E. Evenbeck, President - Stella and Charles Guttman Community College; Jermaine F. Williams, Assistant Vice President for Student Affairs - Northeastern Illinois University

Intentionally structured summer programs for first-year students lead to gains in learning, success, and retention. This workshop details the essential components necessary to develop, implement, assess, and sustain integrative summer experiences for entering students in the college and university setting. Presenters will share demonstrated best practices and a strategic approach to providing educationally meaningful and integrative learning opportunities that support students' academic and social integration. Workshop participants will gain hands-on experience employing these practices in the design (or re-design) of a comprehensive summer experience, including a thorough assessment plan. Participants will develop an action plan for program implementation on their campus.


W-3
Do you Mind? Using Mindset Theory to Create Self-Regulated Learners
February 7, 2015
8:00 am - 12:00 noon
$135


Rebecca Campbell, Director of Academic Transition Programs, University College - Northern Arizona University; Kaitlin Hublitz, Lecturer and Course Coordinator, Academic Transition Programs - Northern Arizona University

Motivating students to adopt habits and strategies that facilitate academic and college success remains challenging. Weiner's attribution theory addresses individual's judgment of events, abilities, outcomes, and learned helplessness, positing that one only puts forward effort when success is guaranteed. Dweck's Mindset Theory expands on this, describing the cognitive framework related to individual's beliefs about future success. This session will deepen participants' awareness of research and theory on motivation and Self-Regulated Learning to develop competencies that will facilitate application of theory in first-year programs. Participants will engage in dialogue regarding student mindset profiles, strategies for facilitating growth mindset, and programmatic implementation.



W-4
Learning to Leap: Using Experiential Education and Collaborative Learning to Transform the First-Year Seminar Classroom
February 7, 2015
8:00 am - 12:00 noon
$135


Stephanie M. Foote, Director, Master of Science in First-Year Studies and Associate Professor of Education, Department of First-Year and Transition Studies - Kennesaw State University;
Deborah Mixson-Brookshire, Interim Assistant Dean, Associate Professor of Management, and Director of Distance Learning, University College - Kennesaw State University

Although active learning has become a hallmark of first-year seminar instruction (Hunter & Linder, 2005), the emphasis is often on short exercises that either help students get to know each other or activities that introduce a concept. While these forms of active teaching and learning can contribute to the first-year seminar classroom, experiential and collaborative learning can result in deeper, more meaningful learning and engagement (Donahue, 2004; Gross Davis, 2009; Mixson-Brookshire, 2012). The purpose of this interactive workshop is to help instructors take the leap to incorporate experiential and collaborative teaching and learning techniques in their first-year seminar classes.


W-5
Critical Thinking Pedagogy in the First-Year Experience and University Transition
February 7, 2015
8:00 am - 12:00 noon
$135

Robert A. Kenedy, Associate Professor, Department of Sociology - York University

Many students entering college and university are faced with the challenge of mastering critical thinking skills. Current literature suggests that students who acquire various critical thinking and related academic skills are more likely to successfully complete their degrees. Teaching first-year students to become critical thinkers requires a comprehensive educational approach. In this way, the evaluation process plays a vital role in critical thinking pedagogy. This workshop focuses on teaching and assessing critical thinking components in first-year seminars and introductory courses. We will examine the relevant pedagogical theory, research, and some best practices for teaching critical thinking.



W-6
Making Sense of First-Year Assessment
February 7, 2015
9:00 am - 4:00 pm
$235


Dan Friedman, Director, University 101 Programs - University of South Carolina; Jennifer Latino, Director, First-Year Experience - Campbell University

This workshop will provide an overview of assessment structures and methods; offer strategies for implementing effective evaluation, including the development of learning outcomes; and explore instruments used to assess student learning, experiences, satisfaction, and change. Participants will be introduced to resources on the topic of assessment, sample assessment instruments, and materials to guide the development and implementation of effective first-year assessment on their home campuses. The workshop will include a discussion of qualitative and quantitative assessment practices as well as direct and indirect methods for measuring outcomes. Participants will develop the knowledge needed to make sense of first-year assessment issues and create a plan for implementing or improving assessment at their respective institutions.


W-7
Best Practice in the First College Year: Defining What Works and Why
February 7, 2015
9:00 am - 4:00 pm
$235

John N. Gardner, President - John N. Gardner Institute for Excellence in Undergraduate Education; Senior Fellow, National Resource Center for The First-Year Experience and Students in Transition - University of South Carolina; Betsy O. Barefoot, Senior Scholar - John N. Gardner Institute for Excellence in Undergraduate Education; Fellow, National Resource Center for The First-Year Experience and Students in Transition - University of South Carolina

For more than three decades, a significant investment has been made by many colleges and universities to improve the first year. But funds spent have often not yielded expected returns in student learning and retention. In this workshop, the presenters will explore the questions, "What works in first-year programs and why... or why not?" They will draw from recent research findings and provide a variety of examples of best practice. Participants will be challenged to reflect on the first year at their own campuses-what initiatives have made a positive difference in the first year and what challenges remain?


W-8
Fostering Student Learning with Engaging and Meaningful Assignments
February 7, 2015
9:00 am - 4:00 pm
$235


Mary Stuart Hunter, Associate Vice President and Executive Director for University 101 Programs and The National Resource Center for The First-Year Experience and Students in Transition - University of South Carolina; Kevin C. Clarke, Assistant Director for Faculty Development and Assessment, University 101 Programs - University of South Carolina; Catherine Sale Greene, Assistant Director for Campus Partnerships, University 101 Programs - University of South Carolina.

Assessing student learning can often be a challenging task, but one that can be significantly improved with high-quality, well-developed, meaningful assignments. Incorporating meaningful assignments and feedback into first-year courses will enhance student learning and engagement and improve student satisfaction with the course. In this interactive workshop, the facilitators will provide frameworks and strategies for creating meaningful and engaging assignments; highlight examples of assignments that have proven successful; explain how effective grading and feedback can enhance student learning; and help participants develop a plan to improve the quality of assignments in their courses.


W-9
Learning Communities: Why and How
February 7, 2015
1:00 pm - 5:00 pm
$135


Jean M. Henscheid, Clinical Faculty, Adult, Organizational Learning and Leadership, College of Education - University of Idaho

The simple act of enrolling a small group of first-year students in two or more courses and engaging them in other academically purposeful activities can have a powerful impact on their learning and success. This workshop helps educators in the curriculum and cocurriculum explore the overwhelming cognitive, social, and organizational evidence that learning communities work. Participants also leave the workshop having designed at least one learning community to propose for their own campuses.


W-10
Using the Science of Motivation to Engage All Learners
February 7, 2015
1:00 pm - 5:00 pm
$135

Christine Harrington, Professor of Psychology and Student Success, Director, Center for the Enrichment of Learning and Teaching - Middlesex County College; Melissa Thomas, Director of the Center for Student Learning - College of Charleston

Perhaps one of the most important student success factors is motivation, yet faculty members often struggle with how to best motivate students and ultimately influence student learning. Theory and research on student motivation will come alive in this interactive workshop. The focus will be on how motivational theory and interesting research findings can be put into immediate practice in the college classroom and larger institution to positively influence student learning. Proven, practical strategies will be shared.


W-11
Shaping the First-Year Experience for African American and Hispanic Males
February 7, 2015
1:00 pm - 5:00 pm
$135


Wayne Jackson, Director of the Multicultural Academic and Support Services Department - University of Central Florida; Maurice A. Davis, Counselor - Montgomery County Community College

This workshop will address the first-year experience of African American and Hispanic Males at institutions of higher education. Participants will engage in a hands-on examination of their campus culture and its impact on African American and Hispanic males. This workshop will also offer the opportunity to begin the work of designing new programs and initiatives to address the retention of African American and Hispanic males during the first college year.


W-12
Recruiting, Developing, and Retaining First-Year Seminar Instructors
February 7, 2015
1:00 pm - 5:00 pm
$135

Michele Campagna, Executive Director of the Centre for Advising and Student Transitions - Montclair State University; Julie McLaughlin, Professor and Department Chair for the First-Year Experience, Co-chair of the First-Year Experience Advisory Committee - Cincinnati State Technical and Community College; Nicole Weir, Assistant Director of the Center for Advising and Student Transitions - Montclair State University

Instructor development programs are most effective when purposefully based on established curricula and maintained through ongoing support and assessment. Often, however, development programs are challenging to establish and maintain since they require administrative support and faculty buy-in. This workshop will describe steps taken to build and sustain instructor development programs on two campuses, one a technical and community college and the other a comprehensive state university. Through these examples, participants will learn how to apply similar philosophical approaches to teaching and learning to their first-year seminars and how to establish self-sustaining first-year seminar instructor programs at their respective institutions.


W-13
Enhance Your First-Year Advising Program by Teaching Students Emotional Intelligence
February 7, 2015
1:00 pm - 5:00 pm
$135


Catherine Andersen, Associate Provost for Academic Affairs - University of Baltimore; Korrel Kanoy, retired - William Peace University

A growing body of research shows that the most successful college students possess higher emotional intelligence (EI) than their less successful peers. Faculty and staff advisors can accomplish two key goals by infusing emotional-intelligence instruction into advising programs: (a) enhance retention and graduation and (b) assist student development in a key non-cognitive area that predicts academic and social success. Participants will leave the workshop with a comprehensive plan for infusing EI into the advising program, including gaining buy-in, training advisors, educating students about EI, assessing student EI, and helping students create developmental plans to improve their EI.


W-14
Creating Digital Citizens and Engaged Learners: The Preemptive Role of the First-Year Seminar
February 7, 2015
1:00 pm - 5:00 pm
$135

Brad Garner, Director of Faculty Enrichment, Center for Learning and Innovation - Indiana Wesleyan University

We are living in an age where digital technology is ubiquitous apps, mobile devices, eBooks, MOOCS, Open Source, and the Cloud. For students in higher education, the rapidly changing digital landscape will be a way of life throughout their college careers and into the workplace. In their lives, being digitally savvy and maintaining openness to lifelong digital learning will increasingly become a prerequisite for success. Yet, the creation of these opportunities depends upon faculty who are willing and able to adapt their courses to include digital learning requirements and experiences. This session will focus on the ways in which the first-year seminar, through intentionally designed teaching and assessment strategies, can help first-year students acquire the competencies necessary to engage with digital technology and become more effective and active digital learners. Participants should bring along a computer or mobile device and be prepared for a digital experience!


W-15
From Surviving to Thriving: First-Generation College Students and Academic Citizenship
February 7, 2015
1:00 pm - 5:00 pm
$135



La'Tonya Rease Miles, Director, Academic Resource Center - Loyola Marymount University; Danelle Dyckhoff Stelzriede, Associate Director for the First To Go Program - Loyola Marymount University

This workshop will explore the relationship between first-generation college students and
academic citizenship in an effort to discover and promote best practices for engaging first-gen students with the academic life of the university. Topics to be addressed include high-impact educational practices (Kuh 2008), such as learning communities, undergraduate research opportunities, service, and study abroad and sites for creative and critical scholarship. Participants will be encouraged to design and implement programs that promote academic engagement behaviors within this population that will aid in a productive transition to the university.