Conferences and Continuing Education
 
ABOUT THE CENTER | LISTSERVS | VISITORS | UNIVERSITY 101

HOME

EVENTS

PUBLICATIONS

RESEARCH

RESOURCES

AWARDS AND RECOGNITION

CONTACT INFORMATION





USC  THIS SITE

 

 

 

 

Our Invitation to You

* Registration Now Open

The National Resource Center is pleased to now offer online courses on current topics related to the first-year experience and students in transition. Online courses are designed to come as close as possible to providing students with the same course content and opportunities for interaction with classmates and with the instructor as traditional or classroom-based courses as well as take advantage of pedagogy and teaching techniques that are not possible or uncommon in a traditional format. Our online courses will take place during a four-week or five-week period with the majority of instruction occurring in an asynchronous environment. Asynchronous instruction is neither timebound nor place-bound and does not require the simultaneous participation of all students and instructors. It utilizes toolssuch as email, threaded discussions/forums, listservs, and blog.


Participants will earn 1.5 continuing education units.

 

Who Are Our Veteran Students and Are We Veteran-Friendly?

Instructor
David DiRamio
Associate Professor
Auburn University

David DiRamio is an associate professor of higher education administration at Auburn University. Since his first article, "From Combat to Campus," was published in 2008, Dr. DiRamio has emerged as a nationally known researcher and speaker reporting on the emerging population of student veterans in college. His scholarly works include the book "Veterans in Higher Education (2011)," which applies well-known theories and models of college student development to the contemporary phenomenon of the student veteran, and "Creating a Veteran-Friendly Campus (2009)," detailing best practices and how campus leaders can help student veterans succeed. More recent co-authored research about female college student veterans has been published in College Student Journal (2015) and forthcoming in the NASPA Journal About Women in Higher Education (in press, 2015). Dr. DiRamio received both B.S. and M.B.A. degrees from the State University of New York at Buffalo and a Ph.D. in Educational Leadership from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. David is a U.S. Navy veteran.

 


Course
Date
Registration Deadline
Course Capacity
Fee
 
May 30 - June 24, 2016 Tuesday May 17, 2016 25 Registrants $425.00

COURSE DESCRIPTION

In this online course we will examine the phenomenon of the veteran student in college by integrating best practices, findings from the research literature, and empirically established theories. The course is designed to inform and engage those who provide campus programs and services for veteran students, as well as others in the higher education / student affairs community (campus staff, administrators, faculty, and graduate students conducting thesis or dissertation research). Using a blend of video lectures, required readings, discussion forums, and self-assessments, the course is divided into four parts:

Course Objectives

This course is designed to support students' development of the knowledge, attitudes, and skills needed to:

  • understand the critical issues facing veteran students;

  • recognize of the psychosocial, cognitive, and identity-related concerns of veteran students who a transitioning to college and civilian life;

  • be a critical consumer of the research literature about veteran students;

  • use research to inform decisions about how to best serve the needs of veteran students;

  • be mindful and intentional when working with this unique student population;

  • understand privacy concerns and ethical considerations when working with veteran students;

  • critically examine best practices and organizational policies related to veteran students; and

  • effectively plan and resource programs and service for veteran students.





    Applying Student Development Theory to College Transition Programs



    Tracy L. Skipper, Ph.D.
    Assistant Director for Publications
    National Resource Center for The First-Year Experience and Students in Transition


    Dr. Tracy L. Skipper is assistant director for publications for the National Resource Center for The First-Year Experience and Students in Transition at the University of South Carolina. An accomplished editor and writer, Skipper edited (with Roxanne Argo) Involvement in Campus Activities and the Retention of First-Year College Students (2003), wrote Student Development in the First College Year: A Primer for College Educators (2005), and served as managing editor of the five-volume series, The First-Year Seminar: Designing, Implementing, and Assessing Courses to Support Student Learning and Success (2011-2012). Most recently, she co-authored the volume Writing in the Senior Capstone: Theory and Practice with Lea Masiello. She holds degrees in psychology, higher education, American literature, and rhetoric and composition. In addition to her writing and editorial work, she has served as a student affairs administrator, taught writing at the college level, and presented writing workshops for higher education professionals. She has presented on the application of student development theory to curricular and cocurricular contexts and what national datasets suggest about the organization and administration of high-impact educational practices. Her research interests include the application of cognitive-structural development to composition pedagogy and the use of writing in first-year seminars and senior capstone courses.

     


    Course
    Date
    Registration Deadline
    Course Capacity
    Fee
     
    August 29 - September 23, 2016 August 16, 2016 25 Registrants $425.00

    COURSE DESCRIPTION

    Since the 1970s, theories of student development have provided a useful framework for identifying student needs, designing educational practice, and assessing learning and developmental outcomes. With the ever-increasing diversity of college students in the United States, researchers and educators have questioned the relevance of many of these theories. Despite these challenges, student development theory remains an important body of knowledge informing the work of educators throughout the academy as they design classroom experiences, programs, and interventions for college students in transition. This online course will introduce key student development theories and explore current research and practice related to them. Participants will evaluate the usefulness of these theories for creating developmentally appropriate educational practices on their own campuses and consider strategies for assessing developmental outcomes.

    Course Objectives

    As a result of completing this course, participants will be able to use selected theories to
    • support their understanding and identify potential needs of students with whom they work,

    • set goals and identify developmentally appropriate outcomes for students in transition,

    • design programs or pedagogies to help students meet identified outcomes, and

    • create an assessment plan for measuring specific developmental outcomes.

    Course Materials:

    Skipper, T. L. (2005). Student development in the first college year: A primer for college educators. Columbia, SC: University of South Carolina, National Resource Center for The First-Year Experience and Students in Transition.



    Proving and Improving: Foundations of First-Year Assessment



    Dallin George Young, Ph.D.
    Assistant Director for Research, Grants, and Assessment
    National Resource Center for The First-Year Experience and Students in Transition



    Dallin George Young, PhD is the Assistant Director for Research, Grants, and Assessment at The National Resource Center for The First-Year Experience and Students in Transition. He coordinates all the research and assessment endeavors of the National Resource Center and facilitates and disseminates three national surveys: National Survey of First-Year Seminars, National Survey on Sophomore-Year Initiatives, and the National Survey of Senior Seminars/Capstone Courses. He oversees a number of research collaborations and grant opportunities between the Center and the national and international higher education community as well as across the University of South Carolina (USC) campus. He coordinates the distribution of the Paul P. Fidler Research Grant, a competitive national grant that recognizes the development of research investigating the experiences of college students in transition. He is also an active member on the Planning, Assessment, and Innovation Council at USC.

    Before joining the National Resource Center, Dallin worked in doctoral internships in the Office of the Associate Vice President of Student Affairs at Georgia Gwinnett College and in the Department of Student Affairs Assessment at the University of Georgia. Prior to this, he held professional positions in student housing at Dixie State College of Utah, University of South Carolina, and California College of the Arts. Dallin’s research interests focus on learning outcomes of postsecondary professional preparation, peer leadership, the impact of professional standards in higher education, and assessment. Dallin’s research agenda has afforded him the opportunity to produce scholarly publications and presentations at national conferences.


    Course
    Date
    Registration Deadline
    Course Capacity
    Fee
     

    September 12 - October 14, 2016

    August 30, 2016 25 Registrants $425.00


    COURSE DESCRIPTION

    This course is a comprehensive introduction to first-year assessment and provides participants with the knowledge and tools needed to make sense of first-year assessment issues at their respective institutions. More specifically, this course provides an overview of assessment models and methods; offers strategies for implementing effective assessment plans, including the development of learning outcomes; and explores instruments used to assess student learning, experiences, satisfaction, and change in their transition to college. Both qualitative and quantitative assessment practices will be discussed.

    Course Objectives

    • Identify key learning outcomes for the first year of college

    • Explore common tools for data collection

    • Apply techniques for selecting appropriate assessment instruments

    • Develop the knowledge needed to make sense of first-year assessment issues

    • Understand data collection methods and models for first-year assessment

    Course Materials:

    Friedman, D. B. (2012). The first-year seminar: Designing, implementing, and assessing courses to support student learning and success: Vol. V. Assessing the first-year seminar. Columbia, SC: University of South Carolina, National Resource Center for The First-Year Experience and Students in Transition.

    (A note about the required text: The subject for the text is the first-year seminar, one of many programs developed to support first-year student success. The course is designed to focus on assessment foundations relevant to the entire first-year experience. The text was selected because of its concise treatment of foundational concepts that apply to the assessment of the seminar and other first-year programs as well as many other functional units across institutions of higher education.)

     



    Fostering First-Year Student Success



    Stephanie M. Foote, Ph.D. is the Director of the Master of Science in First-Year Studies and Associate Professor of Education in the Department of First-Year and Transition Studies at Kennesaw State University. Prior to this, she was the administrator for academic success and first-year programs at the University of South Carolina Aiken. Foote earned her Ph.D. from the University of South Carolina in Educational Administration-Higher Education. She is a past recipient of the NODA Outstanding Research Award for her dissertation study of semester of college and she was recently selected as the recipient of the McGraw-Hill Excellence in teaching First-Year Seminars award. Her current scholarly interests include self-authorship development in transfer students, the role of first-year seminars and experiential pedagogy on student engagement in the early college experience, and engagement in online learning environments. Foote is a co-principal investigator on the Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education (FIPSE)-First in the World Program (FITW) grant ($3.2 million award), Strengthening bridges for student success: Increasing transfer and completion rates for underrepresented, underprepared, and low-income community and technical college students seeking four-year degrees. Additionally, Foote is the leading author of College Students in Transition: An Annotated Bibliography, and she developed and taught the online course, Fostering First-Year Student Success for the National Resource Center for the First-Year Experience and Students in Transition annually since 2010. Foote is currently a guest co-editor of a special "Fostering Success for Students in Transition" issue of the Journal of College and Student university Housing, she currently serves on the editorial board for the Journal of Student Affairs Research and Practice (JSARP), and is the editor for the Journal of College Orientation and Transition (JCOT).


    Stephanie M. Foote, Ph.D.
    Director, Master of Science in First-Year Studies
    Associate Professor of Education
    Department of First-Year and Transition Studies
    Kennesaw State University

     


    Course
    Date
    Registration Deadline
    Course Capacity
    Fee
     

    October 3-28, 2016

    September 20, 2016 40 Registrants $425.00


    COURSE DESCRIPTION

    This course is designed to engage participants in an exploration of the fundamental aspects of first-year student success. Drawing from multiple perspectives, participants in the course will be challenged to: a) move beyond generational characteristics to fully understand who first year students are and what issues potentially impact their success; b) apply the information generated through readings, reflective assignments, and discussion to innovate practices aimed at fostering first-year student success; and c) develop a variety of qualitative and quantitative methods that can be used to measure first-year student success.

    Course Objectives

    • Participants will identify issues that impact the success of first-year students on their campus.

    • Participants will develop strategies and transform existing practices to encourage first-year student success.

    • Participants will understand how to use qualitative and quantitative methods to measure first-year student success.

    Course Materials:

    Upcraft, M. L., Gardner, J. N., & Barefoot, B. O. (2005). Challenging & supporting the
    first-year student: A handbook for improving the first year of college. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

    RETURN TO TOP
    CENTER DIRECTORY MAP TO CENTER
    SITE INFORMATION