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The Community College and Transfer Students:

Abou-Sayf, F. K. (2006). Effect of tuition increases on the transfer between two-and four-year institutions. Journal of Applied Research in the Community College, 13(2), 159-165.

Bahr, P. R. (2008). Cooling out in the community college: What is the effect of academic advising on students' changes of success?. Research in Higher Education. 49, doi: 10.1007/s11162-008-9100-0

This article focuses on the pre-transfer academic advising and how it eventually affects transfer students. Cooling out is a theory about how individuals, generally advisors, much help students to lower the expectations of students who have 'unreasonable' goals. The results of the research showed that advisors specifically did not 'cool out' students, but aided them as they made their decisions.

Brill, M. (2009, April 7). Making the grade: Be smart when switching to a four-year school from community college. Market Watch. Retrieved April 9, 2009, from http://www.marketwatch.com/news/story/Transferring-a-four-year-college/story.aspx?guid=%7BA17E6050%2DE185%2D499A%2DBB6B%2D8AA58F822BC0%7D

Deil-Amen, R. (2006). "Warming up" the aspirations of community college students. In J. E. Rosenbaum, R. Deil-Amen, & A. E. Person (Eds.), After admissions: From college access to college success (pp. 40-65). New York, NY: Russell Sage Foundation.

In this chapter, Deil-Amen reviews literature on the "cooling down" of community college student's aspirations to complete a bachelor's degree. She also researches the idea of "warming up" those aspirations. The author's research is a qualitative study of 22 students who decided to pursue a bachelor's after attending community college. The study reveals that although students initially did not have a strong commitment to pursue a four-year degree, faculty support in particular enabled them to raise their aspirations. The faculty did this by demonstrating caring and patience, giving students personal attention, and developing mentor relationships. Flaga, C. T. (2006). The process of transition for community college transfer students. Community College Journal of Research & Practice, 30(1), 3-19.

Handel, S. J. (2007). Transfer students apply to college, too. How come we don't help them? Chronicle of Higher Education, 54(9), B20.

Melguizo, T. & Dowd, A.C. (2009). Baccalaureate success of transfers and rising 4- year college juniors. Teachers College Record, 111(1), 55-89.

Melguizo, T., Hagedorn, L. S., & Cypers, S. (2008). Remedial/developmental education and the cost of community college transfer: A Los Angeles County sample. Review of Higher Education, 31(4), 401-431.

Owens, K.R. (2010). Community college transfer students' adjustment to a four-year institution: A qualitative analysis. Journal of the First-Year Experience and Students in Transition 22 (1), 87-128.

This research examines transfer students' perceptions, particular regarding the process. The data collection began while the students were still at the community college and concluded after the first semester of transfer. The results explore the expectations of transfer students, and particularly concerns of navigating the academic environment, fitting in to the university, and feeling marginalized in the first weeks. Additionally, the research found that transfer support needs to include have interaction with other university students and understand the university technology programs. The author also found some recommendations from transfer students, including transfer advisors, transfer checklists, and better transfer orientations.

Sanoff, A. P. (2003, July). Restricted access: The doors to higher education remain closed to many deserving students. Lumina Foundation Focus 6, 1-23.

This is a report in a Lumina Foundation publication. One of the areas that the report discusses is the community college option. In the discussion, they refer to the disparity of students that start at community colleges but do not complete their degree. However, it is only one piece to a larger report.

Tatum, C. B., Hayward, P, & Monzon, R. (2006). Faculty background, involvement, and knowledge of student transfer at an urban community college. Community College Journal of Research & Practice, 30(3), 195-212.

Urso, D. & Sygielski, J.J. (2007). Why community college students make successful transfer students. Journal of College Admission, 194, 12-17

 

Updated May 2011

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