Resources
 
ABOUT THE CENTER | LISTSERVS | VISITORS | UNIVERSITY 101

HOME

EVENTS

PUBLICATIONS

RESEARCH

RESOURCES

AWARDS AND RECOGNITION

CONTACT INFORMATION

FIRST-YEAR RESOURCES

SOPHOMORE-YEAR RESOURCES

TRANSFER-YEAR RESOURCES

SENIOR-YEAR RESOURCES

ASSESSMENT RESOURCES

OTHER ONLINE RESOURCES

VIDEO RESOURCES

NRC LIBRARY

NRC BLOG


USC  THIS SITE

Collaboration between the Community College and the University:

de la Torre, D., Jr. (2007). Where there's a web, there's a way: Statewide approaches to promoting community college student transfer. Journal of College Admission, 194, 6-11.

Ehrenberg, R. G. & Smith, C. L. (2004). Analyzing the success of student transitions from 2- to 4-year institutions within a state. Economics of Education Review, 23(1), 11-28.

Hagedorn, L., Cypers, S., & Lester, J. (2008). Looking in the review mirror: Factors affecting transfer for urban community college students. Community College Journal of Research & Practice, 32(9), 643-664. doi:10.1080/10668920802026113

The authors of this research are looking at why students who express a desire to transfer do or do not complete the process. They look at the community college transcripts of students who successful transferred to see what made them succeed in the process. They determined that academic success and enrollment in a "transfer-focused" curriculum was the largest factor in aiding in their success. This information is interesting because it also looks at "success" of transferring. They look at those who complete the transfer to a four-year institution.

Handel, S.J. (2007) Second chance, not second class: A blueprint for community-college transfer. Change 39(5), 38-45.

This article looks at how to increase transfer students from community colleges to four-year institutions by examining the model in the California system. An agreement between the UC schools and community college system strengthen their work on getting more transfer students in to the top tier schools. In addition, the author lays out seven keys to creating a successful transfer process including communicating expectations effectively, making student-focused articulation policies, admitting community-college transfers first, and establishing a "transfer-going" culture at the community college level. These systematic changes are meant to promote transfer success and focus on giving the community college transfer a second chance at achieving a four-year degree.

Kisker, C. B. (2007). Creating and sustaining community colleges—University transfer partnerships. Community College Review, 34(4), 282-301.

Rhine, T.J., Milligan, D.M., & Nelson, L.R. (2000). Alleviating transfer shock: Creating an environment for more successful transfer students. Community College Journal of Research and Practice, 24, 443-453

The authors looked at a comparison of community college and university environments to determine more about what students needed to avoid transfer shock. Large areas of difference between the two environments were individualized attention, range of resources, availability and access of financial aid, and the transferability of credit. They continued to make three recommendations to community colleges to ease transfer shock: information and skills workshops, information and support networks, and mentor-mentee programs. Although it's a little bit older, I found it to be a very practical article.

Roska, J. & Keith, B. (2008). Credits, time, and attainment: Articulation policies and success after transfer. Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis, 30(3), 236-254.

Shoenberg, R. (2004). Articulation agreements ease transfer, contribute to incoherence of general education. Esource for College Transitions, 2(2), 3-4.

Steele, G. E., & McDonald, M. L. (2000). Advising students in transition. In V. N. Gordon, W. R. Habley & Associates (Eds.), Academic advising: A comprehensive handbook (144-161). San Francisco: Jossey- Bass.

The overall book is a guide for academic advisors, but the particular chapter that I am interested focuses on students in transition. It gives a brief definition of transfer shock to help advisors understand their students better. It also addresses how advising can help with all three stages of transfer: pre-, during-, and post- transfer. It also gives some advice to these administrators, including connecting students to both academic and social resources on campus. It also recommends designing comprehensive help for this special student population.

 

Updated May 2011

RETURN TO TOP
CENTER DIRECTORY MAP TO CENTER
SITE INFORMATION