Power Lunch

Facilitators

  • Henry Chappell
  • Professor
    Moore School of Business

  • Whitney Maxwell
  • Clinical Assistant Professor
    SC College of Pharmacy

  • Norman “Tad” Pedigo
  • Professor
    School of Medicine

  • Details

  • SEPT 26
  • Wed 1:30pm - 3:00pm
  • Center for Teaching Excellence
  • Thomas Cooper Library, Room L511

  • This event is co-sponsored by the Office of Information Technology and the Center for Teaching Excellence

Description

How can the recording of classroom activities and making that recording available electronically enhance learning? Lecture capture can take many forms, from a simple audio recording to a multi-windowed presentation. A faculty member may “flip the classroom” by recording a lecture for students to view prior to class, leaving the entire class period for discussion of the topic. Complex medical or scientific procedures can be recorded during a classroom presentation for students to review later. Multiple inputs – slides, videos, white boards, for example – along with images of the instructor, can be included for viewing on-demand. Regardless of the format, the goal of lecture capture is to meet the needs of students, and to offer tools to enhance learning. In this session, experienced faculty members will lead a discussion about using lecture capture in USC classrooms.


About the Facilitators:

Henry Chappell joined the Department of Economics in 1980 and was named Dewey H. Johnson Professor of Economics in 2010. In 1999 he was an inaugural recipient of the Master Teacher Award for the Moore School of Business. He currently teaches a large online section of Principles of Economics.

Whitney Maxwell has been a Clinical Assistant Professor at the South Carolina College of Pharmacy’s USC campus since January of 2011. Her research interests center around medication therapy for disease-states commonly encountered in primary care. She uses lecture capture technology to extend courses to students outside of her Columbia classroom.

Norman “Tad” Pedigo is a Professor and Assistant Dean in the Department of Pharmacology, Physiology and Neuroscience in the School of Medicine. As Director of the University of Kentucky Teaching and Academic Support Center, he conducted a year-long evaluation of lecture capture, soliciting advice from faculty, students and IT staff.  His efforts resulted in a campus-wide adoption of a lecture capture product. He has brought this expertise with him to the USC SOM which plans to implement lecture capture in several large classrooms.