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McKissick Museum to present ‘Worth Keeping! Traditions in the Permanent Collection’

An exhibition of Southern folk-art materials and culture from the University of South Carolina’s McKissick Museum holdings is underway through Aug. 1, in the museum’s north gallery.

The exhibition, “Worth Keeping! Traditions in the Permanent Collection,” is free and open to the public.

“Like other regions of the United States, a number of our traditions are intrinsic to Southern culture,” said Lynn Robertson, director of McKissick Museum. “They are both enduring and evolving. Some are like sedimentary rock, with each generation adding something to the one before, while others are fluid like a river. But they are all ‘worth keeping.’”

More than 40 objects from McKissick’s holdings in Southern folk-life materials and culture will be on display. They range from quilts and baskets to pottery, and displays and text panels will bring other traditions, such as music, cooking and storytelling, to life for visitors.

Poet T.S. Eliot wrote, “A tradition without intelligence is not worth having.” McKissick curators are known for their knowledge of Southern folk life and for creating traveling exhibits that share South Carolina’s history and culture with communities around the country.

Drawing from that curatorial knowledge, McKissick curators will bring objects in the “Worth Keeping” exhibit to life by exploring the history of folk traditions, how they have passed down through the generations and how they have shaped Southern culture.

McKissick Museum exhibits are free and open to the public. The museum is located on the University of South Carolina’s historic Horseshoe and is open from 8:30 a.m. – 5 p.m. Monday through Friday and 11 a.m. – 3 p.m. Saturday. The museum is closed on Sundays and holidays.

For more information, contact Ja-Nae Epps at 803-777-2876.

By Office of Media Relations

Posted: 00/00/00 @ 12:00 AM | Updated: 02/27/09 @ 3:35 PM | Permalink

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